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KZN JUNE 2019

INVEST CONNECT COMMUNICATE COLLABORATE

ISSUE 05

Dynamo

Property

Kasinomics

Big Guns

Meet Dinesh Naidoo, the man who built a tourism empire

After all the doom and gloom, Durban’s finally getting to the Point

The small people who are South Africa’s big economy

Massive business investments underway in KZN

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City story

Meet the tourism gugu

Steeped in the tourist product

Thembi’s crowning glory

In the bag

Bringing the world to KZN

Pastor Robert Ntuli tackles our inner city challenge

Dinesh Naidoo: A man who has seized every opportunity

Taking the hospitality industry by storm

A B&B that makes its guests feel special

Enterprising creatives bagging the tourism market

Thulisele Galelekile: A woman who’s passionate about KZN

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Time to invest

On Point

Investment in KZN is rocking – with big businesses leading the way

The future of the Point starts to take shape


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KZN

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INVEST

EDITOR Greg ArdŽ PRODUCTION EDITOR Lorna King DESIGNER Kyle Griffin ADVERTISING Gaylene Diedericks 081 707 6313 GENERAL MANAGER Doody Adams CONTRIBUTORS Shirley le Guern Debbie Reynolds Matthew Hattingh Shelley Seid Val Adamson Sophie ArdŽ

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Copyright: All material in this issue is subject to copyright and belongs to Famous Publishing unless otherwise indicated. No part of the material may be quoted, photocopied, reproduced or stored by an electronic system without prior written permission from Famous Publishing. Disclaimer: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this publication, neither the authors nor the publisher will bear any responsibility for the consequences of any actions based on information contained herein. Neither do they endorse any products/ services advertised herein. Material which appears under ‘Advertorial’ is paid for.

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COVER CREDIT: POP-UP PORTRAITURE PROJECT: FOTOBOOTH

Published by Famous Publishing, 52 Mahogany Road, Mahogany Ridge, Westmead, Durban, 3610. 031 714 4700 www.famouspublishing.co.za Printed by Paarl Media, KZN

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IT: The way forward

Own the space

Unlocking informal economy

A living gem

Ballito is booming

Through the lens

Sibaya Coastal Precinct

R76-billion property masterplan hatched

Creativity lives here

Framing the picture

The Fourth Revolution

Vega talks: Public spaces

It’s time for Kasinomic revolution

What’s this thing called Fotobooth?

Neville Matjie shares the best of KZN

KZN in the movie spotlght


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ED’S LETTER

More than just a SILVER LINING

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t seemed droll really: I strolled into the voting station and dispensed with the deed in minutes. The exercise of my fundamental right in our hard-won democracy seemed perfunctory. I felt ashamed when my daughter, voting for the first time, beamed radiant and hopeful. That took me back to the joyful day I witnessed Nelson Mandela casting his first vote. Twenty-five years later South Africa is liberated from the yoke of apartheid yet burdened by hideous poverty and gross maladministration. Ours is a country with the world’s highest Gini coefficient, (measuring the gap between the haves and the have nots). The international cover of Time magazine vividly portrays the horrid inequality, check it out. So, in the marvellous May weather of Durban, most middle-class folk probably did a spot of shopping or had a braai after they voted. For the poor, there were no more food hampers

– politicians probably tired of them soon after they dispensed with the free T-shirts in the weeks preceding the elections. That’s the cynical take on things. Our country seems a mishmash of hope and helplessness. The brilliant travel Indaba which showcases our tourism gems was almost overshadowed by a filthy strike that saw litter strewn liberally across highways and the streets around Durban’s City Hall. Although striking municipal workers invoked the ire of fellow citizens, the reaction to their shenanigans was actually muted because they were protesting, among other issues, the fact that members of the ANC’s Umkhonto we Sizwe Military Veterans had secured cushy jobs in council at double the pay of ordinary workers. Who wouldn’t be outraged at that? It is vile and iniquitous, like the thugs operating under the banner of Delangokubona and other business fora that are simply hijacking businesses in the

name of transformation. Of course, the gap for this and other ruinous politics exists because members of the elite are so busy at the feeding trough they have forgotten their mandate to serve. The economy is far from vibrant, infrastructure is wanting, and large parts of government have been rendered immobile by dumb ruling party deployments. State capture means we’ll struggle to undo the legacy of apartheid and bring dignity to impoverished

South Africans. But, it is not all bad news. A critical area of vibrancy in the country is the media, which is vociferously outspoken. The media roasted political parties ahead of the elections because their offering was piss-poor. The fact that perplexed voters faced a confusing plethora of start-up parties on the ballot paper is a testament to this. The growth of sinister, militaristic and racist parties talks to the failures of our new society.


ED’S LETTER

And parties with an anticorruption tirade are often as guilty of malfeasance as the opponents they deride. We might bemoan the many challenges, but I quoted respected Durban based Advocate Griffiths Madonsela, SC, in a recent story. He toasted the fact that South Africa’s constitutional democracy was bolstered by institutions like the Public Protector and the courts. The adjudicative role of the courts – in the exercise of their review powers – have flourished since 1994. The courts, almost singularly, have held the line when South Africa was potentially at its breaking point – and that must be celebrated, he said. Fellow jurist, former Judge Thumba Pillay, in a radio interview, applauded the courts for asserting rights determined by the Constitution. But, he said injustices of the past couldn’t be blamed for the fact that poor people still used pit latrines. That was down to bad governance and graft, and the poor are the biggest victims of this injustice. The poor were uppermost in my mind when I spent a night in a rondavel in rural Msinga as part of a feature for this edition on the informal economy. The moths were the size of bats and I lay awake in the pitch dark on a bed on a cow dung floor, musing about the people immersed in a myriad of “lowly” activities in South Africa. They are the country’s unsung heroes. As author GG Alcock says in the story, these aren’t celebrated entrepreneurs in the mould of Richard Branson. But we need to redefine our heroes. We need to stop worshipping tenderpreneurs with big cars, huge houses,

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enormous egos and tiny personal success. Our solutions needn’t be grand. They are common sense. When we regain the lost years we can harness our enormous potential. Consider Shirley le Guern’s story in this edition about the monster investments being rolled out in KZN. Take note of Matthew Hattingh’s story on Durban’s Point. It wrestles with the issue but concludes that for all the naysayers and legitimate criticisms, the Point is still a success. We extend this topic into the inner city with our Vega talks partnership. The outlook is sunny if you look at the success of Sibaya and booming Ballito. Another tonic is Shelley Seid’s story on the wonderful Fotobooth initiative, a lovely rendition of KZN’s evolving culture. We’re also proud to feature a spread of pictures from Neville Matjie, a high powered chap whose hobby, like Thuli Galelekile’s job, encapsulate KZN’s gems. Indeed, there’s more reason to be heartened than downbeat. Happy reading.

gregarde@gmail.com


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U R B A N R E G E N E R AT I O N


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“It’s about building relationships with everyone who lives was among the chorus of passionate Durbanites in our city and uplifting its citizens to be responsible and to who rallied against the Carte Blanche story which take ownership of their space. We can’t just keep folding our aired on November 18 last year under the banner arms and hoping the politicians are going to do it for us.” “Goodbye Durban?” The teaser read: “Holidays are approaching with The Durban CBD/beachfront cleanup is one of their first an estimated two-million holidaymakers descending on hands-on projects and, thanks to the December appeal Durban’s beaches. But the once beautiful sandy beaches are asking for committed volunteers, around 2 000 people now littered with heroin needles and shards of broken glass raised their hands. from bottles smashed to make crack pipes. “People have promised everything from their skills and “In the midst of this, the city is planning an R39-billion resources to time and funding,” says Ntuli. “We have a facelift along the coastal promenade. Carte Blanche steering committee which is driving the process using our investigates how Durban’s beachfront precinct could put the website, city-story.org, and online platforms.” health and safety of visitors at risk.” Using the official 11 municipal zones, the team is currently My argument was that I used the Durban beach and conducting physical audits to identify key assets and promenade extensively and personally hadn’t seen any challenges, what works, what doesn’t, what’s messy and “heroin needles and crack pipes”. In fact, except for a few unsafe and what needs fixing. days of the year, I hardly see any litter at all. With the assistance of all stakeholders and with improved Put in context, however, community involvement, they the issue was more about hope to identify and jointly what went on just behind the action projects which will Golden Mile – the problems of uplift the city, contributing to prostitution, human trafficking, an enjoyable and memorable crime and drugs that had experience for all its citizens. plagued the CBD for years. Ntuli can’t talk enough about Quickly weighing in on the his passion for uniting and debate was an organisation uplifting people and sharing called City Story, which posted his faith. a video on social media on “Faith is personal, but it December 4 urging concerned shouldn’t be private,” he says. citizens to stop “turning a blind “Our Jerusalem is Durban and eye”, and promising that in four our faith needs to find public Many saw the Carte Blanche expose years it would invite media TV expression here by connecting about the crime and grime on crews back to the city to report people and expanding our Durban’s beachfront as a hatchet “not on urban decay, but on relationships. In a very practical job. Others, like Pastor Robert Ntuli, urban regeneration”. sense, that is what City Story saw the current affairs TV show’s represents.” Robert Ntuli is on the investigation as a worthy challenge, Ntuli grew up near Empangeni steering committee of City on the KZN North Coast and did Story, described as a “collective writes Debbie Reynolds his Bachelor of Administration at of passionate Durbanites who the University of Zululand before see the city’s destiny as being a coming to work in Durban in 1997. great city to grow up in and grow old in”. “My father was a pastor, so I was raised in a Christian “What Carte Blanche did was upsetting, but it made us see family, but I never really had a calling until early 2000,” the problem afresh and it was the disruption we needed to he says. “By then I was working for Unilever in the team provoke us into action,” says Ntuli. “It was good in that it fell responsible for Royco brands and loving every minute of it. into a structure that already existed to replace urban rot with But then my heart changed and I realised my passion was the urban renewal.” business of people.” Ntuli says City Story was established about four years ago After a period of reflection back home, Ntuli returned to by a network of Christian business people and friends who Durban with his wife Zamo, whom he had met doing ministry shared a vision to transform and regenerate the city they work, and started the Living Stones Agency church. love. He was recruited in 2016 to broaden the group’s skills “We meet at Howard College on Sundays at 9.30am, but our set and to head up the “spiritual sphere”. community goes far beyond the Sunday morning service,” “City Story consists of five spheres, being business and he says. “For me it’s a tragedy when that is all it is about. It economy, government, education, family and church,” says should be about connecting with other human beings and Ntuli. “We see it is a faith-based community of courage that is working together for our collective well-being. taking the idea of redemption and renewal from our personal “My passion has always been about the humanity aspect lives into a wider city space. which is why working with City Story makes so much sense. We’re not just about ticking off a to-do list, but rather about LEFT: PASTOR ROBERT NTULI IS WORKING WITH CITY STORY TO TURN URBAN ROT INTO URBAN RENEWAL. PICTURE: DEBBIE REYNOLDS transforming the human space.”

City STORY

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PICTURE VAL ADAMSON

inesh Naidoo is a high octane entrepreneur who started out studying IT but struggled with the fees and ended up getting a “B-Cafeteria”, “majoring in cards and pool”. Today he is a major shareholder in a group of 18 firms, including Serendipity Travel, one of the country’s biggest outbound tour companies which did a turnover of R100-million in 2010 and is on track for R1-billion next year. Naidoo is youthful, energetic and adventurous, throwing himself at a host of enterprises all spun out of travel, which he got into by chance ... or serendipity: defined as a pleasant discovery by chance. As a teen, Naidoo had the opportunity to travel to the US for three months in 1993, part of the Hindu Youth Council attending the Parliament of World Religions. It was a brilliant eye-opener, which ultimately led to an 18-month trip to Denmark where he and other South African youngsters learnt conflict resolution. Back home in his early 20s, Naidoo “wasn’t qualified to do anything”, but was well placed to do just about everything, so he started working for

a friend who owned a business with interests in travel, insurance and real estate. Based in St George’s Street in Albert Park, it was a commission-only gig for Naidoo who sold furiously and flirted with the travel agents at lunchtime. When someone resigned, he filled in and soon seized the opportunity to take a R650 four-stop flight to Chennai in India. He was blown away by the prospects of South Africans travelling to India, and pitched the idea to his boss – who didn’t like it. Naidoo boldly resigned, bought a fax machine and set up shop in his garage. While he could negotiate the tour packages, he did not have the capacity to issue air tickets and asked his Sri Lankan friend and travel agent, Lal Jayamaha, for help. As it turned out, Jayamaha and his colleague Carol du Preez were leaving their company to go solo, so the trio joined forces and set up Serendipity Tours in the CBD. That was 1996. Naidoo did a quick course in travel, but for the rest just leapt in, learning, living on debt and punting Asian holidays. “We didn’t pay ourselves salaries, we just survived. We splashed out on a toaster for the office so we could have something to

Meet the TOURISM GURU A livewire who draws his strength from silence, Dinesh Naidoo has seized every opportunity to understand the travel business which to date has sent 100 000 people overseas. He is on a mission to improve tourism to KZN


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SPIRITED & SPIRITUAL Dinesh Naidoo, 48-yearsold and from working-class stock from Merebank, south of Durban, is married with two children. He’s a livewire, but says he draws his strength from silence. In 1996 he took a landmark journey to India. At his hotel, a young man told Naidoo his life was at a crossroads, and that he was destined for either politics or business. “He asked me to write down my favourite colour, flower and number on a piece of paper. Before he had seen what I had written, he gave me the answers. He said I would either become a politician and enjoy great influence but no money, or go into business and make money. “It was bizarre. The guy was a total stranger, but I took it as a good omen. It has made me spiritual. People define that differently. For me it is about being at one with yourself, having focus. Every morning I meditate for about 15 minutes. I try and shut everything out, which allows me to focus on priorities. In life, I look for guidance and I try to give it.” Naidoo consults with a mentor in India, Mahatria Ra, and tries to plant positive pictures in his mind so they might become self-fulfilling.

eat. No one knew who we were, so we talked ourselves up, giving the impression we had many departments. There wasn’t a market to India at the time, but the country had just opened up to South Africans so we killed it.” At the time Naidoo was invited to a meeting of tour operators in Victoria Falls where he was approached by a woman in the

Association of Travel Agents of South Africa, to stand as ASATA vice president. Naidoo felt out of his depth but gulped and agreed, hoping his organisational experience in Hindu youth would help him hack it. It did – and the influential position broadened his exposure and deepened his travel industry learning. In the first year of business, Serendipity took about

400 people overseas. Last year it issued over 100 000 tickets, and the company has branched into corporate markets, conferences, insurance and IT. Naidoo realised the need for quick, cost-effective and reliable IT, so set up a company in Hyderabad in India that now employs 40 developers who run the back end of a travel programme for one of South Africa’s biggest banks. The Indian company allowed Naidoo to set up SVS Visa Services, a onestop portal to check visa requirements for any country and to arrange the necessary paperwork. Naidoo says Serendipity’s achievements came from understanding the business and building relationships, reputation and revenue. “Our culture is fun. We don’t want unhappy people working here. We apply

the fledgling Indian Premier League cricket tournament. He jumped in and the Deccan Chargers won that year. Naidoo was approached by Jayan Moodley when she was struggling to make her first movie White Gold. He helped leverage tons of support, and since then his investment and energy have helped make Moodley’s Keeping Up With The Kandasamys and the sequel, box office hits. The movies – with key scenes shot on Durban’s beachfront – have probably done more to showcase Durban as a tourist destination than anything else on film or television. “People travel to places where movie stars have been filmed. It’s simple. Indians flocked to Sun City because Aishwarya Rai was crowned Miss World there.” Naidoo’s experience

“We must market Durban so everyone knows where it is. It is the gateway to KZN” the SUMO principle: Stop, Understand and Move On, or Shut Up and Move On. If good people are empowered they will do well. They will make mistakes, but everyone grows. I don’t micromanage.” Naidoo describes his role without any ego. “I am mostly concerned with helping people to leverage opportunities. I hate wasted opportunities. I use the selfish-selfless principle. The more you give, the more you receive. People don’t have a JOB here. They don’t earn enough to make them Just Over Broke. They are incentivised. That creates great service.” Naidoo’s diverse interests have fuelled his journey. In 2009 he was asked to help sponsor the worst team in

in travel meant he and bankers Howard Arrand and Andrew Hudson pulled together industry role players into a twoyear dialogue to improve tourism in KZN. Naidoo has a few golden rules to increase international tourists to KZN. “Everyone must accept the word ‘Durban’ is critical. We must market Durban so everyone knows where it is. It is the gateway to KZN. You fly to Durban to get into the province and move around. Target foreigners because of the exchange rate and make sure the poster boy for Durban, which is beachfront, is clean and safe. If you do that then you can bring in influencers from around the world.”

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BELOW: CLINTON ARMOUR SAYS HAPPY GUESTS ARE GETTING GOOD VALUE.

Steeped in the TOURIST product New kid on the block, ANEW Hotels & Resorts are taking the tourism market seriously

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he tourism business relies on key ingredients but chief among them must be energy and imagination. Clinton Armour, 35, is a tad too old to be the next Sol Kerzner, but the farmer’s son from the Midlands is fired up and on the acquisition trail. The Armour family have been in timber and dairy since the 1950s, but got into hotels by chance when they secured an old roadhouse motel near Harding in the 1980s as part of a farm purchase, and was managed independently by them for generations. The business ticked over and seven years ago Armour hived it off and Ingeli Forest Resort was born – a comfortable 44-room, mid-level hotel one hour’s drive from Port Shepstone, ideal for travellers breaking their journey between KwaZuluNatal and the Eastern Cape. Armour saw the opportunity to work on the local leisure market, which saw the business boom and the property transformed. On the acquisition trail, just over three years ago, Armour and a partner bought the Protea Hotel in Hluhluwe on auction. Armour learnt how the biggest hotel group in the world, Marriott, operated, and decided it was time to form a new brand. The Hluhluwe and Ingeli properties were rebranded under the ANEW Hotels & Resorts banner. Hluhluwe was extensively refurbished, and a fivestar lodge was added to complement the existing four-star offering. Over R25-million later it now boasts 81 en suite rooms, including two self-catering chalets. The Hluhluwe

investment gave Armour a prize offering for tourists on the doorstep of game reserves and iSimangaliso, a region at the nexus of South Africa, Mozambique and Swaziland. Creating the ANEW brand got Armour into the tourism business seriously. “It’s definitely not easy. A lot of people are struggling and the entry barriers are high. I wouldn’t have been able to do this without the balance sheet of the farming business and a true calling to what we are doing. The competition is stiff, there are big brands out there, but delivery is everything in hospitality.” Armour recently increased his stake in a 100-bed hotel in the Midlands, and in total the group now employs around 500 people. “We make sure our

“The competition is stiff, there are big brands out there, but delivery is everything in hospitality” employees are happy and aware of their impact on the guest experience. If they are happy they make sure their guests are happy. Happy guests feel like they are getting value for money.” Armour is looking to purchase another strategically placed hotel in the near future. He believes KZN’s tourism prospects are hot and with resilience, good systems and service, ANEW has the momentum to grow. “Big groups can’t be nimble. We can fill the gap by creating experiences born out of being steeped in our local tourism products.”

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Thembi’s crowning GLORY Hospitality is all about excellence and making guests feel special, writes Matthew Hattingh

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commitment to treating guests like royalty and a passion for people and self-improvement. These are the ingredients in teacher-turned-businesswoman Thembi Maseko’s winning recipe, helping her to build a successful four-star B&B, conference venue, and catering company. Maseko took early retirement in 2006 and used her pension to establish Umqhele Bed & Breakfast in a tranquil setting surrounded by natural beauty in Richards Bay in 2007. Hard work and faith helped her through the tough, early years, and today her awardwinning establishment counts many corporates and local government departments among its regular clientele. Maseko had no background in the hospitality industry, but on a hope and prayer she quit her job of 15 years to open her B&B. The plan was for a nine-room establishment, but initially finances only stretched to three rooms. “It wasn’t easy,” recalls Maseko, “We had pension money to start the business, but it wasn’t enough. We even took out an additional loan.” Fortunately Maseko is a dab hand in the kitchen and had established a parallel catering business, which for a spell ran a canteen for Transnet. With food generating income – and giving her B&B guests an alternative in a city a little short on fine dining options – Maseko was able to add another three rooms in 2010. By 2012 the nine rooms originally planned were in place, and a conference venue with space for up to 40 people soon followed, allowing Umqhele to offer clients a more complete package. She tells of one of their guests in the early years who really spurred things along. An unassuming police

LEFT: THEMBI MASEKO: EXCELLENCE AND WORD OF MOUTH – A WINNING COMBINATION.

official staying over for business, he was smitten by her establishment, especially the food. Maskeko says she had been doing research at the time, spending a few nights in five-star hotels to see how they did breakfast and other things, and had been applying the lessons learnt on her policeman guest. Before long, he phoned his colleagues, and the next week they were all staying at Umqhele. Soon he spread the word to other government departments. An important factor in Maseko’s success, she says, has been her willingness to learn more about the hospitality business. She has studied at the International Hotel School in Westville, Durban, with funding from the Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs. Maseko says she wanted a name that reflected her faith. Umqhele means

crown in Zulu and has a biblical origin, referring to a verse in Isaiah: You will be a crown of splendour in the Lord’s hand, a royal diadem in the hand of your God. “Our guests have to feel that kingship treatment … to make us different from other B&Bs. We want to make our clients feel very special, hence our motto ‘be a king for a day’,” she says. The mother-of-four grown-up children (the youngest, a rugby player in the Sharks Academy) says her staff make a point of taking new arrivals to their rooms and carrying their luggage. Room service is available, supper is served on request, and a host of amenities like free WiFi, satellite TV and en suite bathrooms are part of the package. “We want to exceed their expectations,” says Maseko. Her efforts have paid off with the business expanding to include a selfcatering establishment in another house on the same street. In 2015, Maseko won second place in her category and R50 000 in the uMhlathuze Responsible Tourism Challenge; and in November last year she beat 567 other entries to take first prize and R50 000 in cash, plus mentorship and coaching, in the Imbokodo Iyazenzela Women in Business Awards, sponsored by Ithala, the KZN development finance corporation. Maseko is no slouch at marketing. Her B&B is listed on the main booking websites, and she networks with travel agents to help pick up business. But her main tool, she says, is word of mouth. “Our motto is excellence. People are inspired and go out and tell other people. I really believe in the excellency part. Excellence honours God and inspires people.”

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ave you ever visited a spectacular African city like Durban and wanted a lovely memento of your trip, but instead were bombarded with mounds of cheap crap from China as you strolled along the promenade? If you ever questioned the knock-on value of tourism, look no further than Nicky Stark and Debbie Russell, Durban friends who have seized on a lucrative business to help tourists to South Africa remember their stay. They are the proprietors of Blue Flamingo Bags, a bespoke textile firm started only 18 months ago, but already the glam bag ladies have sold over 4 000 items, have an online store and supply as far afield as London. They have also secured prized space at some of the key 60-odd Tourvest retail stores across the country. Russell, 49, spent 16 years in retail management, mostly at Edgars, while Stark, 46, is a freehand artist who studied textiles and did colour and trend forecasting for Ninian & Lester before becoming a designer for Mr Price. Stark’s work took her into handbags and accessories and in time she and Russell teamed up to create a classy range of tourism products.

TO U R I S M

In the BAG

This is a story of what servicing the tourism industry means, beyond owning a beach hotel, berg resort or an airline

“We couldn’t get over how cheezy tourism products were,” said Russell. “Everything was bad drawings of the Big 5 on ugly materials, made in China. We realised we could do something better, something more appropriate and more memorable.”

ABOVE: CAPTURING THE TOURIST MARKET WITH THEIR LOCAL BAGS ARE DEBBIE RUSSELL AND NICKY STARK.

So Stark got drawing, everything from wild dogs to strelitzias to proteas. The result is a range of about a dozen items – including vanity bags, clutch whistles, key rings, tea towels, tablet sleeves and double zipped pencil cases – that are sought after as travel wallets. They run a cut, make and trim outfit from a garage in Sunningdale. Originally sewing projects were outsourced to women from Bhambayi, but they have since employed two women from this community. They are also collaborating with the Hillcrest AIDS Centre on another design. Russell says focusing on tourism has had a two-fold benefit: they have honed in on an underserviced and well-heeled market with a global aspect. The memorabilia visitors take back home after visiting South Africa should be cherished, says Stark. “They will have value if they are distinct and if they have an authentic association with South Africa. So we look at the places they visit and the things they do and make the designs accordingly. We aim to provide tourists with an original, locally made, quality keepsake,” said Stark.

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Bringing the world to KZN With a passion for KwaZulu-Natal pumping through her veins, Thulisele Galelekile, general manager of marketing for Tourism KZN, is set to bring the world to our beautiful province

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mlazi born Thulisele Galelekile is the general manager of marketing for Tourism KZN (TKZN), and the chair of the province’s powerful Routes Committee that works to bring more foreign tourists to Durban. She is the fifth of six siblings, has a Bachelor of Commerce Honours from UKZN, and has spent 20 years in marketing. She thrives on developing people and describes herself as a determined innovator. KZN INVEST caught up with her: Q: What are KZN’s key tourism markets and what are they after? A: The UK, Germany, Netherlands, France, although a growing number of tourists are coming from the US, Australia, India, China and southern Africa. These customers are after cultural experiences, scenic beauty and

KZN OFFERS AN UNPARALLELED PLAYGROUND FOR VISITORS AND LOCALS. FROM THE COAST TO THE DRAKENSBERG MOUNTAINS, THERE IS AN ENTHRALLING LANDSCAPE THAT TELLS OF CULTURES PRESENT AND PAST. HERE ARE THULI GALELEKILE’S EIGHT REASONS TO VISIT KZN.

safaris. They are interested in simple and authentic African experiences, and we sell KZN based on this. Q: The diversity of KZN’s offering is striking and the province’s road network is relatively good. How many hospitality firms leverage this? A: TKZN’s Asset Database includes: 246 hotels; 203 lodges; 690 bed and breakfast establishments; 87 campsites; 717 self-catering establishments; 41 youth hostels; 314 conference venues; and 1 305 tourist guides. Q: Is there any objective measure of how KZN’s offering is improving? A: KZN’s global connectivity programme is bearing fruit, especially with the direct Durban to Heathrow BA flight. BA is one of five international airlines flying to and from Durban, and another, Emirates, recently announced

 Safaris: Spotting the Big 5 (elephant, rhino, lion, leopard and buffalo) has been a long-time rite of passage for many safari-goers. KZN does not disappoint in that regard, with Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, Tembe Elephant Park and uMkhuze Game Reserve. Uniquely, the province also offers the opportunity to observe two more mammothsized species – the southern right whale and great white shark.

additional flights. KZN has been on an aggressive campaign to increase its air connectivity to the world to help unlock the province’s economic growth potential, to attract investment, human capital and tourism. The recently held Indaba solidified KZN as a globally connected gateway for airlines. It is anticipated

 Wildlife: Rewarding wildlife viewing isn’t always about the big animals. uMkhuze proves the point with some 400 species of birds often taking centre stage for visitors. Another showstopper is iSimangaliso Wetland Park – a Unesco World Heritage site – featuring five ecosystems that contain everything from loggerhead and leatherback turtles, to dolphins, hippos and zebras.  The Drakensberg Mountains: The Mountain

of the Dragons is the tallest range in southern Africa, and one of the continent’s most superlative places to hike and see tumbling waterfalls, bubbling rivers, flat-topped ridges, dramatic peaks, wide valleys and steep escarpments. Trails range from simple walks and halfday hikes to testing treks upwards of 12 hours. Much of the range is protected within the Unesco World Heritage-listed uKhahlamba-


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that by 2022 the province’s tourism stock will be worth R60-billion. Q: What are the biggest challenges in route development? A: The biggest one is the sustainability of the routes we develop. We are working closely with airlines to drive marketing of those routes to improve load factors. Another

Drakensberg Park, which is made up of various national parks and reserves.  Durban: Beaches on the Golden Mile, along with the promenade, revamped waterfront and adrenaline activities in the stadium are all worth your time. With the largest concentration of Indian people outside of India, the city has a uniquely Asian atmosphere.  Coastline: The Golden Mile, a 5km-long group of beaches

challenge is the profitability of the destination, which is mostly driven by the number of people who travel that route. We actively drive destination awareness in markets we target, to stimulate demand and drive numbers up. At Indaba we welcomed the announcement that 14 private sector companies will provide

that flank Durban, offers surfing, a sheltered, safe shore, a place for sport enthusiasts to play ball, swim, jet-ski and lounge in the sun. A visit to the beach at Cape Vidal in iSimangaliso Wetland Park is a must, and en route you may catch a glimpse of buffaloes, crocodiles and hippos.  Zulu culture: KwaZulu-Natal – the Zulu homeland – offers traditional villages which allow you to learn the history of the legendary King Shaka

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financial muscle to place KZN on an international platform. They are not only chipping in for the cost of the massive repositioning campaign – which will involve an internationallyacclaimed marketing agency – but their representatives also sit in on strategy meetings and share their business expertise.

and observe the challenges faced by contemporary South Africans. Festival highlights include the Reed Dance, where thousands of Zulu “maidens” gather before their king at Enyokeni’s Palace.  Battlefields: Boers, British and Zulus have all been at war at one time or another in KZN, and their battles have shaped the history of South Africa. The battlefields are a must for history buffs.  Ancient art: The

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Drakensberg was home to the San people for thousands of years and elements of their life here are still visible in the form of fascinating rock-art sites. At Kamberg Nature Reserve, a three-hour guided walk will take you to one of the most important galleries where archaeologists were able to initially interpret the symbolism used in San art, and thus give understanding to hundreds of other sites across southern Africa.


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I N V E ST M E N T

Time to INVEST President Cyril Ramaphosa’s quest to nail down $100-billion investment in five years might seem a tad ambitious, writes Shirley le Guern, but the money is steadily flowing into KZN

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romises versus bricks and mortar, developments versus grand schemes, a mothballed National Development Plan, Ramaphosa’s trumpeted investment plan. It’s all rather confusing. But, despite the ongoing cynicism mirrored in lower business confidence indices and the fall in manufacturing output, some companies are shelling out some big cash. Two investors who nailed their colours to the mast at Ramaphosa’s Investment Summit last year were pulp and paper giants Mondi and Sappi. While no details of Mondi’s R8-billion pledge have yet emerged, Sappi is forging ahead with its R7,7-billion spend at its Saiccor mill. The largest single site dedicated to manufacturing dissolving wood pulp for the textile, pharmaceutical, beauty and household products industries, the Saiccor mill is a major exporter. The investment will buy a new evaporator, recovery boiler and screening and washing plant, upgrade the bleach plant and pulp machines, improve recovery circuits and digesters, and upgrade the wood yard. Most importantly, the spend is not an end in itself, but will pave the way for additional investment of about the same amount over the next five years.

White goods manufacturer, Defy, is taking a similar approach. While launching its new R121-million facility to manufacture top loader washing machines at its Jacobs plant, chief technical officer of Turkish holding company, Arcelik Global,

Oguzhan Ozturk, said the company had not only invested R1,2-billion in Defy’s three production plants in Durban, East London and Ezakheni to bring them up to world standards, but was looking to injecting a further R1-billion in seven years.

BELOW: PRESIDENT CYRIL RAMAPHOSA. UNDERNEATH: THE SAICCOR MILL AT UMKOMAAS.

As the second largest white goods producer globally, Arcelik sees South Africa as the headquarters for its operations in subSaharan Africa. Already, Defy will invest a further R200-million in 2019, of which part will go towards a large distribution centre in Ladysmith. Brick manufacturer, Corobrik, is another big spender – although its current R801-million investment is located in Rietfontein, Gauteng. Due for completion next year, it will be Africa’s largest and most environmentally friendly brick-making facility. Initially there were hints that further mega brick factories could be built in KwaZulu-Natal and other provinces, however, the implosion of South Africa’s construction sector makes


I N V E ST M E N T

this unlikely at present. Nevertheless, Corobrik CEO Dirk Meyer remains upbeat. “It is just a matter of time before the construction sector improves. The industry is cyclical. Corobrik has always tried to invest strategically at the bottom of the cycle to be prepared to reap the rewards of an upturn.” Minister of Trade and Industry, Rob Davies, who visited both Defy and Corobrik in April, said the creation of an African free trade zone was gathering momentum with investors who were growing capacity. Like Corobrik and Defy, another well-known KZN brand, Van Dyck Floors is also upscaling operations for local and African markets. CEO of Van Dyck, Mehran

TOP: AN AERIAL VIEW OF THE DEFY FACTORY IN DURBAN. ABOVE: KZN PREMIER SIHLE ZIKALALA. BELOW: CEO OF VAN DYCK, MEHRAN ZARREBINI.

Zarrebini, announced in April that Van Dyck and Harrismith-based Nouwens Carpets would consolidate their operations to take on a difficult market. Parent company PFE International has invested more than R100-million over the past 15 years with big state-of-the-art capital projects and modernisation, and the company has also bought a 49% share in the Mathe Group and invested in a new factory to recycle truck tyres in Hammarsdale. A second multi-million-rand investment will see a second production line being commissioned within the next few months. Zarrebini believes the South African economy has been buffeted by global trade headwinds, and local

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political and economic uncertainties. But, he says, investors need to take a long-term view. “You can’t be myopic. There are still a lot of opportunities to generate growth throughout Africa. We’re taking a 10- to 20-year approach rather than a shorter term five-year view on things. We’re looking at how to mitigate current economic conditions. If you focus on being more resilient rather than on short-term performance, then I think you will build your internal capacity to ride out the economic headwinds and find yourself in a far stronger position ultimately.” Dube TradePort also continues to net investors with a similar long-term approach. The first phase of the Special Economic Zone (SEZ) attracted investments worth an estimated R3,2-billion from the likes of Samsung, HBM-SA Health (condoms), Chinese optic cable manufacturer Yangtze Optics Africa Cables, Indian automaker Mahindra’s new semi-knockdown assembly plant, gearbox manufacturer Rossi SA, laundry line manufacturer Retractaline, polypropylene bag maker Tufbag SA, and bearing manufacturer Amsted Reelin. CEO Hamish Erksine recently announced that work on a new 45-hectare TradeZone 2 had commenced. “We are targeting electronics and pharmaceutical investors for this site, which is part of our overall plan to lure R18-billion worth of investment over the next five years into Dube TradePort.” One of the first investors is expected to be Samsung which opened its television manufacturing plant at Dube in 2014. Back then,


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ABOVE: CEO OF DTP, HAMISH ERKSINE, ANNOUNCED THAT WORK ON A NEW 45-HECTARE TRADEZONE 2 HAD COMMENCED. RIGHT: COROBRIK CEO DIRK MEYER. BELOW: A R6,5-BILLION INVESTMENT IN RICHARDS BAY MINERALS BY RIO TINTO IN ON THE CARDS.

the company promised total investment of $20-million over four years and is currently building a R35-million distribution centre. Another announcement at Ramaphosa’s Investment Summit came from Pan-African investment conglomerate Mara Group.

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The proposed R1,5-billion plant at Dube, backed by the African Development Bank, will produce smartphones. Transnet has shelved plans to deepen berths and invest in infrastructure in the Durban harbour while it gets its governance issues in order, but it, too, has hinted at upcoming private sector investment. Nozipho Sithole, chief executive of Transnet Port Terminals, said the parastatal was venturing into new areas of business via public-private sector partnerships. An agreement for an edible oil terminal

at Maydon Warf was on the table together with a possible second terminal in the Richards Bay Industrial Development Zone for the import of palm oil from central Africa. Also on the cards is a R6,5-billion investment in Richards Bay Minerals by Rio Tinto. The construction of the Zulti South project will replace the declining capacity at RBM’s Zulti North lease area. Construction is scheduled to start this year, subject to the granting of all necessary permits, with first commercial production expected in late 2021. Rio Tinto chief executive Jean-Sébastien Jacques said in a statement: “The longterm fundamentals of the market remain strong, and production from Zulti South will commence in time to fill a widening supply gap ensuring RBM’s position as a leader in the sector.” Much has been written about the need for policy certainty, investment incentives and reliable and affordable electricity, but there’s no reason to hold back on investment believes Asheen Magjee, the provincial head of First

National Bank’s business in KZN. Currently, the province contributes 16% to national GDP. “Industries such as hospitality and tourism, manufacturing, warehousing, agriprocessing as well as energy are ideally suited to accelerate and enhance our province’s full capability. The combination of foreign investment, local corporate investment as well as government infrastructure spend will set us up to achieve global levels of excellence,” he said. In recent speeches, KZN Premier Sihle Zikalala said the modest upturn in global growth would benefit the province. Improving business and consumer confidence meant expected growth upwards of 4%. At President Ramaphosa’s investment summit Zikalala arrived armed with 25 bankable projects aimed at attracting private investors. Sectors identified include agro-processing, film and media, manufacturing, logistics, medical, property development and tourism with a total value R250billion. Projects include major tourism and property boosts like Tinley Town, Nonoti Beach Resort and Blythdale.

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DUBE AIROAD INNOVATIVELY DRIVES

VALUE FOR KWAZULU-NATAL BUSINESSES

THE ULTRA-EFFICIENT ROAD TRANSPORT OF CARGO IS BECOMING AN EVER-MORE STRATEGIC COMPONENT OF TODAY’S FAST-PACED BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT AND IS CENTRAL TO ORGANISATIONS SEEKING A COMPETITIVE EDGE IN THE DELIVERY OF VALUE TO CLIENTS. Ms Anathi Qabaka, Dube TradePort Corporation’s Transport and Logistics Manager, believes the Dube AiRoad trucking fleet offers business owners the edge they crave, providing exceptional transport services, refrigeration capacity and facilitation of customs and South African Police Service (SAPS) inspections. Commenting on the benefits of the service, Ms Qabaka said “Our strategic location between the seaports of Durban and Richards Bay and adjacent to King Shaka International Airport makes us a major player in KwaZulu-Natal’s multi-modal system, especially within the air-freight and break-bulk cargo environments.” Dube TradePort Corporation, is responsible for driving the development of Dube TradePort Special Economic Zone - Africa’s global manufacturing and air logistics platform – which not only operates one of the most technologically-advanced cargo terminals in Africa, but also controls a truck fleet, ensuring the facility’s ability to ‘close the loop,’ offering its time-critical customers a total air-to-road and road-to-air cargo solution. Ms Qabaka said Dube AiRoad’s expanding fleet comprised Euro 5 emission-compliant trucks - enabling the ‘greening’ of customer supply chains - including two

sizes of refrigerated trucks for cold chain integrity. “In today’s business environment, where speed, agility and time-critical capabilities are crucial, Dube AiRoad ensures customer competitiveness in the national and global economy. We give customers flexibility - including refrigerated, palletised and ULD containerised capacity within an uninterrupted supply chain.” “Our refrigerated trucks are critical to our fleet, given that KwaZulu-Natal - and Dube TradePort Special Economic Zone specifically - has been identified as a pharmaceuticals hub. Ours is a specialised handling entity, audited to ensure our support, handling and packing competence for such sensitive products. Our refrigeration ability affords us exceptional opportunities to grow,” she added. Dube AiRoad’s cargo volumes have positively increased since 2014, when the trucking operation came into its own, which is a good indicator of the growth within KwaZulu-Natal’s cargo market. In the 2017/18 financial year alone, the service transported 2 million kilo’s of cargo and is intent on further growing its import-export customer base.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: ANATHI QABAKA l TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS MANAGER E. AIROAD@DUBETRADEPORT.CO.ZA

T. +27 32 81 40300 / 52200

WWW.DUBETRADEPORT.CO.ZA

“In a move to extend our growth trajectory and increase the value businesses offered to customers, Dube AiRoad has taken an unprecedented step in customer service delivery. We now facilitate the inspection and processing of cargo with Customs and the SAPS on behalf of customers. Through our expediting of the process, customers can minimise delays,” said Ms Qabaka. Customs and SAPS inspections are official measures to ensure the safe import and export of cargo into and out of South Africa. Through Dube AiRoad’s inspection assistance intercession, it provides a meticulous and quick service, ensuring the safe and efficient handling of goods on behalf of customers, saving time and money. Ms Qabaka concluded by saying “As an efficient, professional and world-class road freight distribution provider, our intent is to innovatively transform the logistics environment, delivering exceptional transport solutions in an ever-changing and always demanding business environment. Our goal is the effective implementation of absolutely seamless logistics, key to keeping abreast of customer demands. ‘Today’s business leaders know that top-class logistics is a critical tool in creating value for customers. In this knowledge, we strive to continuously improve our professional logistics activities to deliver that value.”


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The city of Durban (eThekwini Municipality) is South Africa’s second most important economic region

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Extensive first-world road, rail, sea and air

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CITY THAT’S

GEARED FOR GROWTH A truly smart city, Durban, KZN, South Africa seamlessly combines an innovative business environment with an exciting, contemporary lifestyle. Connecting continents, here you will find Africa’s busiest port, the top ranking conferencing city and the home to the continent’s very first Aerotropolis. Boasting world-class infrastructure, manufacturing and industrial concentration that is constantly evolving, isn’t it time to join this progressive society rich in investment opportunities? …We can help you make it happen, now.

web: Invest.durban

Dube TradePort and King Shaka International Airport - 60year Master Plan - driving growth of aerotropolis, or airport city 0 01 00 1

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Rated in top 5 ‘Quality of Living’ cities in Africa and Middle East by Mercer Consulting in 2015

Named one of the New 7 Wonders Cities by the Swiss-based New 7 Wonders Foundation in 2014 1 01 00 1


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P O I N T D E V E LO P M E N T

On POINT

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After nearly a decade of delays, development in Durban’s Point Precinct is picking up pace, writes Matthew Hattingh

urf ski champion Herman Chalupsky in his heyday told an interviewer he preferred shorter races to the longerdistance slogs. But when it comes to his day job, as a commercial property broker, the veteran waterman seems bent on marathon rather than a sprint. Certainly this is the case in the Point area where Chalupsky has been active for over a decade. Amid legal wrangles over the future of the watersport clubs at Vetch’s Beach; scrapping of plans for a small-craft harbour; the Point’s major investor changing hands; and long consultations with the municipality over its investment model, progress has been heavy going. But finally for Chalupsky and others who have much riding on the future of the 55ha Point Precinct, the headwinds have abated. Sticking points and disputes have been resolved and the Malaysian government-owned investor, UEM Sunrise, some years back changed tactics – switching from selling serviced sites to secondary investors to putting up buildings itself.

Afika Ndima, eThekwini Municipality project executive and point man on the Point, explained the city had at the same time restructured its holding in a development trust, letting it deal more directly within the Durban Point Development Company. A development framework agreement was concluded in 2016, and the town planning scheme amended to allow for increased bulk within the Point Waterfront Precinct – from 575 000m² of development bulk to 750 000m². This makes the multi-phase project more economically viable and able to support a number of activities, including offices, retail and residential. It also compensates the Malaysians for the loss of buildings that had been part of the small-craft harbour plan, said Ndima. An artist’s impression prepared by Durban Point Development Company shows glass-shelled skyscrapers on podiums behind the new promenade, with the tallest – a 55-storey tower – near the harbour entrance. The towers are angled to give the buildings behind at least a glimpse of the sea, although little can be done about the long shadows cast in the winter months.

Start dates for this mini-Dubai have yet to be announced, but a number of other major projects are under way in the Point or should begin soon. These include: A cruise liner terminal; Water and sewerage mains upgrades; A 68 000m² office development on the site of the uShaka car park; A 29-storey residential building on the foreshore; and The new promenade. Work on the promenade – a raised walkway linking the pier at uShaka Marine World to North Pier at the harbour mouth – is at an advanced stage. KZN Invest joined Chalupsky and


P O I N T D E V E LO P M E N T

Sheldon Randall, projects manager with the builders, Stefanutti Stocks, for a tour. We went below to see how the watersports clubhouse was shaping up, and climbed an old lookout tower for a bird’s eye view of the 30m-wide, 750m-long structure. Randall says the project is on schedule, with the superstructure complete. He expects some delays with the finishing work, but says it should be open to the public towards the end of the year. Once done, the main Durban promenade will begin to infuse the Point with a little of its magic – and vice versa. Chalupsky points wistfully to a

sixth floor, double-volume penthouse flat above the canals where he lived happily for many years. “You can jump on a bicycle and cycle along the beach to gym at the Moses Mabhida Stadium,” he says of the charms of living and working on the Point. Ndima notes that almost every hotel on the Golden Mile has been revamped following the R560-million World Cup remodelling of the promenade. “We have seen what the promenade has done in instilling confidence in visitors and businesses,” says Ndima, who predicts a similar lift for the Point when it gets its share of beachfront foot traffic. The city is footing the R345-million bill for the project. “Probably the best decision the city has taken,” says Ndima, explaining that it will open public access to a relatively inaccessible beach while making the Point less of a cul-de-sac. Ndima says design work for the residential building – at the northern end of the line of towers, close to where Vetch’s Pier meets the beach – had been done and the building plans approved, while the site between this residential building and the Moyo uShaka restaurant had been earmarked

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for a 39-storey hotel, but Durban Point Development Company has put out the development rights to the market for South African developers to participate, he says. “There are a number of development proposals under consideration at the moment. At this stage three active proposals are being considered, including two well-known brands, one of which is international and quite keen,” says Ndima. A shopping centre is planned for behind the hotel site and would be linked to uShaka Marine World by a sky walkway over Camperdown Road. Again, Durban Point Development Company has opted to make this retail investment opportunity available to South African developers. Construction work on the office development behind uShaka was expected to begin in October and would be developed by a local developer, says Ndima. There is less certainty around the start date for the ocean liner terminal which had previously been slated for completion by October this year, but at the time of going to press, construction work had yet to begin. The R215-million terminal and other major infrastructure projects at the


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port have been on ice while Transnet reviews governance issues in the wake of state capture claims and the suspensions or resignations of senior officials at the parastatal. Approached for comment, Nokuzola Nkowane, Transnet National Port Authority’s acting port manager for Durban, repeated a vague assurance made to media earlier this year. “The anticipated commissioning of the project is still October 2020 as previously communicated,” she said. The KwaZulu Cruise Terminal company – a joint venture by the Mediterranean Shipping Company and their black empowerment

P O I N T D E V E LO P M E N T

partners Africa Armada Consortium – was awarded a 25-year concession to finance, build and operate the terminal. Nkowane said the terminal company “is presently finalising the detailed design” of the building. Chalupsky believes the terminal – when it does finally arrive – will bring a “critical mass” of visitors to the area which will trigger a chain reaction of development. “It’s huge,” he says. As things stand tourists must travel to and from liners via the gritty Esplanade and through the docks to the makeshift terminal at N-Shed. Nic Steyn, the beachfront amusement park owner, property investor and

Point resident since 2003, tells of how he came across a couple of foreign tourists at the Yacht Mole. It seemed their taxi had dropped them off in the wrong place and they were preparing to walk to N Shed with a bright pink suitcase in tow. “You won’t get 100m said,” Steyn told the tourists before driving them to their ship. The new terminal, at the harbour’s A and B berths, will be right on Mahatma Gandhi Road, opposite the row of historic buildings that extend from Cape to Cairo nightclub to the new Lion Match offices. Tourists will be free to stroll out of the terminal straight into the Point. And because a management association runs things, and there are more gardeners, cleaners and security guards than you can shake a stick at, our tourist (with or without pink suitcase) will immediately find a little slice of safe and salubrious urban chic: the gabled facades and raw brickwork of Point’s old warehouses – now recycled as offices, shops and restaurants. Then it’s past the gondolas and on to uShaka Marine World, the new promenade and beyond. “The existing promenade is a jewel. The Point section is just going to add to it. Things are going to happen,” says Steyn.

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I N F O R M AT I O N T E C H N O LO G Y

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ZN INVEST and EvershedsSutherland partnered recently to host a discussion about the prospects of a mini Silicon Valley in Durban. The event offered insights into key information and technology companies in KZN and considered what it would take to grow these successes as the economy morphs with increasing reliance on tech firms. Hamish Erskine, the CEO of Dube TradePort (DTP), said massive investments in infrastructure and existing industry in KZN – like forestry and mining – offered an opportunity to develop IT. Economy growth will be accompanied by a surge in IT which was well

Derivco – probably the biggest IT employer in KZN with 1 500 staff in uMhlanga – pays top dollar for top software programmers and is a major incubator of talent. “These IT specialists play in global markets and are attracted to

often left the province for greener pastures. Stuart Davidson and Simon Wyer from point of sale giant, Barrows, said while theirs wasn’t an IT company “yet”, moves in technology meant it relied increasingly on software engineers who were hard to

IT- the way FORWARD It’s heady stuff: all this talk of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. But what does it really mean in KZN?

poised to fit into the global advances in electronics and pharmaceuticals. IT professionals around the world were increasingly attracted to an ecosystem, he said, one that had a good lifestyle, reasonably priced property, vibrant culture and easy travel connectivity. Will Heygate, the GM of Zapper, the electronic payment company, said KZN was being outstripped by Johannesburg, and more importantly Cape Town, in the IT stakes, especially now that Amazon had chosen to open up shop in Cape Town creating 2 000 jobs.

competitive and rewarding environments which will attract this talent,” Heygate said. Oliver Lamusse, the KZN MD of First Technology Group, said KZN lacked human capital. “The biggest challenge is retaining skills.” MTN KZN head Ernest Galelekile agreed, saying KZN companies were not doing enough to foster IT talent and then to create opportunities to sustain companies locally. MTN is presently running a national App competition which is showcasing great KZN talent, but these people

find in KZN. “Durban is renowned for its lifestyle offering. It would signal an advance if we could meet the challenge of attracting talent here for more than lifestyle reasons,” Wyer said. But, he said, the tech environment was fluid and that meant good prospects for those with an eye for disruption. Kuben Nagana, IT manager of City Logistics, said in some instances Cape Town and Johannesburg firms paid 30% higher salaries for IT specialists than Durban did. “Our

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lifestyle proposition is good, but once they are here these people want to progress and to continually upgrade their skills.” Galelekile said building skills didn’t always mean producing university graduates. Start-ups, he added, might benefit from subsidised connectivity. Erskine added that DTP was attracting top companies like Samsung, a fibre optic manufacturer and the Mara Group that is investing R1,5-billion into a smartphone manufacturing plant – and the challenge was to grow this. Andrew Turner of Eversheds-Sutherland said, “Attorneys in commercial practice are expected to beat a path to new opportunities for their clients. The Dube TradePort, as a Special Economic Zone right on our doorstep, fits the bill. For example, to offer qualifying businesses an income tax discount of some 13% is a very big deal.” In April Cisco launched a R10-million incubation hub at DTP, aimed at supporting small enterprises and speeding up their entry into the digital marketplace. The facility is a smart building with Cisco technology and business facilities, workspaces and high-speed connectivity. Collaboration platforms include the opportunity for locals to connect to Cisco experts around the world and to join the Cisco Networking Academy (NetAcad) programme, described as one of the world’s biggest classrooms giving students hands-on digital skills training for in-demand careers. Participants at the discussion agreed there was a need to more vigorously showcase KZN’s IT, an inventory of its companies and its rising stars.

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V E G A TA L K S

Own the SPACE A good city is like a good party – people linger if they enjoy themselves. That’s a bastardisation of a quote by Danish architect Jan Gehl and it was the upshot of talks hosted by KZN INVEST and Vega School recently

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PICTURES SOPHIE ARDÉ

ise up and claim the space! That was the advice of self-declared bleeding heart architect Derek van Heerden who, along with Sivan Govender and Clive Greenstone, were conversation catalysts in the talks to consider Durban’s Point and the inner city. The discussion was moderated by Naretha Pretorius, KZN Vega School Principal. Govender is the regional manager of inner city property company TUHF, and Greenstone is a green roof expert and academic. Greenstone churned up a range of issues that swirled

around in a lively discussion about public space, who owned it and why. Have ordinary people surrendered public spaces to private sector developments? If so, how do they regain it? And are entrepreneurs driving inner city growth and is gentrification chasing the poor away? Greenstone’s view is that spaces developed a rhythm of their own and evolved with multiple uses. A city square might be a bustle by day, but by night homeless people sought refuge in its recesses. “People stamp an identity on places by naming and claiming them, which impacts on how accessible they are and to whom.”


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V E G A TA L K S

ABOVE FROM LEFT: SIVAN GOVENDER, DEREK VAN HEERDEN, CLIVE GREENSTONE AND NARETHA PRETORIUS, HOSTS AT THE RECENT VEGA TALKS.

Whether you can throw a picnic blanket down, toss a frisbee to a mate, or settle on a bench and smoke a joint, says much about a place. Spaces can be accessible, robust, have multiple uses, and their character is determined by that: the sights, sounds and feeling they evoke. Uses are as diverse as skateboarders cruising through Stellawood Cemetery or the homeless stashing their belongings in stormwater drains during the dry season. Greenstone sneered at exclusive gated estates and neighbourhoods taken over by “hipsters drinking craft beer and cappuccinos”. Govender said TUHF was formed in 2003 to fill the void created when big money fled the inner cities. His

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organisation has a R3-billion loan book through its funding to 598 buildings providing 34 000 residential units across South Africa. Sixty of those are in Durban. TUHF doesn’t fund social housing and only 10% of its lending is available for student accommodation. It funds the space upwards of that, but below where big banks lend. Most of its money goes to entrepreneurs who redevelop city buildings, and Govender said TUHF hadn’t even “scratched the surface” of SA inner city potential. “We don’t fund slumlords. We look for like-minded entrepreneurs who realise development does not happen in isolation.” It was a holistic offering that catered for lifestyle, security and transport. Entrepreneurs who look after their tenants are rewarded with higher, regular rentals. Govender said some cities in SA were well run but lacked comprehensive plans that paid attention to lively, functional public spaces. Urban Development Zones – created to give tax breaks to entrepreneurs investing in the city – were implemented inconsistently; and some cities were administering them too bureaucratically to harness potential. Van Heerden said communities existed around issues, for example they rallied around security threats. Planners were often aloof of the people they served, he said, echoing what Greenstone said about humans not necessarily abiding by Western, grid planning, because they “like to cut corners”. Van Heerden added that arrogant planners ought to consult more: follow where residents walked and pave over their tracks, rather than creating paths and expecting people to use them; and that people would protect their public spaces from vandals and abuse if intensive consultation went into planning the areas. “There’s so much contestation and conflation because we pay lip service to public consultation. We think we know what’s good for people. But we’re scared of what this might open up.”

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CONTRIBUTION KWAZULU-NATAL, WITH 11,4 MILLION RESIDENTS, ACCOUNTED FOR 20% OF SOUTH AFRICA’S POPULATION IN 2018

SECTORS: AGRICULTURE/ BUSINESS SERVICES/ MANUFACTURING/ ENERGY AND WATER/ MINING AND BENEFICIATION/ TOURISM AND PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT

INVEST WITH CONFIDENCE

16% GDP

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Trade & Investment KwaZuluNatal is a South African trade and inward investment promotion agency (IPA) established to promote the province as a premier investment destination and to facilitate trade by assisting local companies to access international markets.

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TIKZN

Trade & Investment House, 1 Arundel Close Kingsmead Office Park, Durban, 4001, South Africa +27 (0) 31 368 9600 info@tikzn.co.za

Y O U R K N O W L E D G E PA R T N E R I N B U S I N E S S MANDATE SERVICES Trade & Investment KwaZulu-Natal is a South African trade and inward investment promotion agency established to:

Promote, brand and market the province of KwaZulu-Natal as an investment destination

Facilitate trade by assisting local companies to access international markets

Identify, develop and package investment opportunities in KwaZulu-Natal

Provide a professional service to all clientele

Retain and expand trade and export activities

Link opportunities to the developmental needs of the KwaZulu-Natal community

REASONS TO INVEST IN KWAZULU-NATAL •

• • • • • • •

In close proximity and within easy access to South Africa’s two largest ports, Durban and Richards Bay, and King Shaka International Airport for air cargo Access to the large labour pool Diverse cultures Gateway to other African countries World-class transport and telecommunications infrastructure Investment and export incentive schemes Mature manufacturing base Idyllic climate

GROWING THE PROVINCE THROUGH FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT AND EXPORT TRADE The agency is equipped with the professional expertise and experience, as well as national and international networks geared to maintaining and growing KwaZulu-Natal’s competitive advantage as a premier investment destination and leader in export trade.

SERVICES OFFERED

INVESTMENT PROMOTION SERVICES • Sector economic data provisioning • Backward and forward linkages • Joint venture facilitation • Capital raising through finance institutions • General business advice AFTERCARE SERVICES • Incentive programme advice • Inward and outward investment promotion missions • Project packaging and profiling • Export training • Business market intelligence

EXPORT ADVISORY SERVICES • Access to international trade exhibitions • KwaZulu-Natal export portal profiling • Decision support model with market intelligence INVESTSA ONE STOP SHOP SERVICES • Specialist investment advisory and facilitation services • Permits • Registration • Licensing • Market intelligence • Advice on business processes and locating in KwaZulu-Natal • Company matchmaking services

www.tikzn.co.za


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G Alcock is a revelation. Close your eyes and the big white guy with a kaaskop and a wide smile sounds just like a Zulu homie from Msinga. Actually, that’s exactly what he and his brother Rauri are. The white dudes went to school in Greytown, but their formative years were spent herding goats and stick fighting in the

I N F O R M A L E CO N O M Y

out hustling for a living in the informal sector. Thirty years later he has become a specialist on the subject and has written three books that bear testament. Third World Child: Born White, Zulu Bred; KasiNomics: African Informal Economies and the People who Inhabit them; and, KasiNomic Revolution: The Rise of African Informal Economies. Kasi is the African word for township and as much

Unlocking INFORMAL ECONOMY

heart of KZN where their parents Neil and Creina ran agricultural projects for the poor. Rauri continued with the work of his parents – but more about him later. GG moved to Johannesburg and started

as GG and his brother are a revelation, GG’s book KasiNomics proposes a revolution. He writes about great informal marketplaces ranging from muti offering herbal and plant medicines and charms, to community-

based savings stokvels, to cluttered table tops of sweets, cellphones and vegetables. It’s a world of spaza shops, “hole-in-the-wall corrugated iron supermarkets of Africa” and traditional kasi-kos

South Africa’s informal economy is ripe for the pickings, but it should be unlocked to help the country’s poor like the rural women of Msinga takeaway outlets that serve everything from cow’s head, to kotas and delicious oily vetkoek. GG says he saw a new world in the informal market, “the world my dad saw, a world of small


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FAR LEFT: GG ALCOCK, BUSINESSMAN AND AUTHOR OF KASINOMIC REVOLUTION: THE RISE OF AFRICAN INFORMAL ECONOMIES. LEFT: RAURI ALCOCK AND GUGU MBATHA.

GOATS THAT ROAM Agriculture buffs just don’t get it, Rauri Alcock says, finding shelter from 30-degree heat beneath a thorn tree in Tugela Ferry. He is attending a training session of the rural upliftment project, Mdukatshani, and is cussing boffins who service commercial farming – the people who should have insight into small-scale black farmers. “They lick their pencils and shake their heads. They only think about big farms, supplying big quantities of feed or veterinary medicine. They are 20 years behind the reality facing thousands of small black farmers.” In the deprived region of Msinga, Mdukatshani’s goat project is a great example of what GG says about informal small-scale actually being big-scale, with even bigger potential. Rauri has secured R70-million in funding for a pilot that involves 3 400 small goat farmers. If successful it could double KwaZulu-Natal’s annual R4-billion goat industry and uplift millions of subsistence farmers. Rauri’s colleague, Gugu Mbatha, says Zulu men make most livestock decisions. Most Msinga men are migrant workers and managing a cattle herd long distance is tricky, but women have free reign in managing a goat herd. Goats are cheaper than cows: R1 000 versus R15 000; a goat matures in a year versus a cow in six; and goats are hardy, more drought resistant and breed faster than cows. In addition, goats are used for every Zulu ritual ceremony and are slaughtered to celebrate anything from nuptials to paying respects to the dead. MaMchunu Ngitheni Yengwa is an 85-year-old grandmother who has sustained her family in Ncunjane, Msinga for 20 years since her husband died, on a herd of goats. Every month, Yengwa brings in about R4 000 selling goats and spends less than R100 on medicines and feed. Self-herding goats feed mostly by browsing the leaves of acacia trees. With the help of Mdukatshani, farmers like Yengwa have helped grow herds and kept more kids alive in winter. The project has also trained 280 youth as community animal health workers who visit goat farmers, sell medicines and share advice on treatment. Mvezelwa Mchunu, also from Msinga, lost his job in Johannesburg and returned home to farm goats with his mother and brothers. They now have a herd of 200. The Mdukatshani pilot is being extended to four more districts in KZN in the hope it will increase goat herds and create more jobs. Rauri says small-scale black farmers own 5,8-million of South Africa’s 7,8-million goat population, and every year South Africa imports a million goats from Namibia. “The opportunity in goats is crazy. It is such low hanging fruit. It doesn’t need a municipal councillor or a tenderpreneur. It relies on what is in the back yard. And commercial goat farming doesn’t really work. Goats thrive in herds with a maximum of about 100 adults.”

people doing big things, transforming Africa a little bit at a time”. He describes the informal business sector as the next frontier of Africa “as unknown and unexploited by regulators or corporates as deep outer space”. An unjustly short summary of KasiNomics is that it argues for a more inclusive economy. It is packed with witty anecdotes that vividly illustrate GG’s convictions, all thanks to his mother Creina Alcock who encouraged her son to write about real people. Best of all, his stories are engrossing. He says corporate inertia and myopia mean most big South African businesses are blind to the opportunities in the formal sector. Perhaps more importantly, GG says society has idolised

entrepreneurship as the preserve of Elon Musk and the like. Tenderpreneurs with flash cars and designer gear are toasted when many of their grandmothers sustained generations through a lifetime of unglamorously – though profitably – selling vetkoek. “These are women who have been in business for years, making good money, but they aren’t celebrated or recognised as business people. People say we need more entrepreneurs in the township. Are they mad? We have thousands, but they aren’t sexy like Richard Branson.” KasiNomics seems perfectly timed – May’s international cover of Time magazine ran a stark aerial photo showing the glaring disparity of South Africa’s worlds and a story on the world’s most

ABOVE: MAMCHUNU NGITHENI YENGWA FROM MSINGA EARNS R4 000 A MONTH FROM SELLING GOATS.


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I N F O R M A L E CO N O M Y

GG says he saw a new world in the informal market, “the world my dad saw, a world of small people doing big things, transforming Africa a little bit at a time” unequal country. GG says R150-billion paid out to 17 million social grant recipients isn’t sufficiently circulated in informal markets because it is paid out via big retailers, doing nothing for “inclusivity and economic redress”. Government is at pains to regulate the informal economy, rather

than stimulate it. And “experts” assume the poor are helpless. “Poverty is a condition, not a characteristic of people. Those who live in poverty are as hardworking and enterprising as those who are better off. What they lack principally are opportunities ... policies that expand access to

routes out of poverty.” GG advocates things like free wireless to an affordable mobile money service geared for the informal economy, dominated by a large number of smaller traders doing huge volumes in small amounts. It also needs a banking system that appreciates that successful

entrepreneurs in the informal economy don’t have a credit record. “I have a friend who sells 2 400 meals a day. His business uses 80 bags of potatoes a day, but he has no cash slips to prove that. When he bought a Jeep he paid R600 000 in cash because he didn’t qualify for a loan.”

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is being driven by demand for the burbs: lower prices in a flat market mean sellers with sizeable savings can afford to sell big properties for less as they opt for more secure, modern, maintenance-free living. OceanDune and Pebble Beach have vast swathes of communal, familyoriented swimming pools, clubhouses and interleading rooftop gardens, all of which appear has muted the traffic noise. Thompson says Sibaya resales have been phenomenal: a 37m² studio apartment was bought off plan in December 2016 for R950 000 and resold last

A living GEM

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Sibaya Coastal Precinct – a place where people can rediscover a quality lifestyle

verything is coming up roses for Yunus Paruk and Charles Thompson, the pioneer developers at the Sibaya Coastal Precinct. The paean to the power of positive thinking is as apt to the 1950s Broadway musical from whence the song comes as it is the property gem on the coast just north of uMhlanga. In November 2016 the development on the hills of sugarcane opposite the Sibaya Casino was announced with a few appreciative clucks about the Indian Ocean views and the chirping of birds from the coastal forest. But you could hear the traffic. Few could have foreseen how dramatically popular

the development has been. With the backing of Paruk and a Botswana investor, Thompson, the youngest partner of Durban headquartered ID Construction, has built three spectacular sea-facing developments that house 420 apartments. All but four of these are sold. OceanDune, Pebble Beach and commercial components represent about half of the current build at Sibaya which about 1 000 residents already call home. They represent over R1-billion in sales, of which R700million was transferred last year, representing what Thompson says might be the 2018 SA record for a single development. Val de Vie, the Cape Town estate marketed by Ryk Neethling did sales

of R350-million last year. At Sibaya Coastal Precinct six developers rushed in after Thompson and his partners. Now a host of stylish estates are blossoming forth from the green hills. Thompson said bulk infrastructure on the third component of their development, Gold Coast Estate, furthest from the casino, would be complete by September, and will add 160, mostly free-standing residential units to the precinct. Thompson says Sibaya is booming because of the demand for modern, high spec living where all the infrastructure is new – from fibre connectivity to roads to water, sewage and electricity. The move out of the burbs

year for R1,7-million. A two-bedroom apartment was bought for R2,5-million and resold before transfer for R3,7-million, while a 500m² penthouse sold for R18-million. During construction, Thompson said, about 5 000 jobs were created, and about 500 people are now permanently employed at Sibaya. ADvTECH, the private education group, is building a 2 000 student primary and secondary school at Sibaya and is eyeing a 60ha chunk of land below the casino for a university for 10 000 students. The 1 000ha Sibaya Precinct includes a wetland, 350ha of coastal forest, and 75km of walking tracks. It is 4km from uMhlanga and equidistant to the airport.

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B

lossoming Ballito, was there ever a ’burb more blessed in South Africa? Probably not, which is great for the people who own property on this patch of paradise in KwaZulu-Natal. And a bummer if you don’t own there. Buying now will cost you dearly. Well, almost. Two quick riders to this generally upbeat story: there are apartments to be had for R1-million and, while the market is flying, infrastructure can barely keep pace with the build. Cobus Oelofse, who heads up the Ilembe Chamber of Commerce, says about 600 000 residents call his area home – an area that spans from King Shaka International Airport to Amatikulu in the north and inland as far as Kranskop. Its biggest concentration is Ballito where there are 16 housing estates – either completed or under construction – involving upwards of 12 000 residential units. This created the gold rush in Ballito and the explosion of businesses to service them: malls, hospitals, lawyers, plumbers, the works. “We are trying hard to maintain the growth trajectory, especially

Ballito is BOOMING

Ballito is no longer the quiet holiday town it once was. Property investors and business owners are taking advantage of the rapid move up the coast where a R76-billion masterplan has been hatched with the sugar industry in the doldrums,” Oelofse says. “We are pushing industrial growth to make our economy more diverse so employment is more permanent. The property boom has meant infrastructural challenges. We need a new substation, for example, and our business confidence index shows significant overtrading in the retail sector.” Oelofse says the rush on retail is an

indicator of the excitement around Ballito. It might be overtraded now, but in the long-term it means the pioneers who take a risk in the rush get in early and are more likely to reap rewards. The boom has meant a variety of shopkeepers appear to be flourishing. Retail mogul Allan Hirsch says his Ballito store was “very seasonal” when it opened. “Out of season we really struggled

with just locals popping in. However, over the last few years, it has changed completely. It is difficult to tell the difference between the holiday season and off-season now. The store has done incredibly well.” Craig Toweel owns The Wedge, opposite the entrance to Zimbali. The 4 700m² mall has 28 tenants and opened in December. “Trade has been good. We’re doing well. Our position has paid off. Restaurants in Ballito seem overtraded, but on the whole, people are attracted to convenience.” Anthony Diepenbroek is the KZN MD of Balwin Properties, a company listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange that is developing one of the last free sites in Ballito. The Ballito Hills development consists of 3 000 units behind Ballito Junction, with a 59m² unit starting at R1-million. So far 418 units of varying sizes have already been sold, and R180-million is being budgeted to spend on bulk infrastructure. Diepenbroek says: “We hit the price right. It’s the last piece of land offering development on scale on the seaside of the N2. We are selling to young professionals, many of whom


P R O P E RT Y

LEFT: THE SIGHT FOR ZIMBALI LAKES RESORT. BELOW: AN AERIAL VIEW OF BALLITO JUNCTION.

commute to uMhlanga, a 20-minute drive. The capital growth prospects for Ballito property are so good because there’s limited land left. What is left is expensive.” Balwin’s success is but one of a number of development triumphs. According to property marketing and research company, Rainmaker, annual

residential sales on the KZN North Coast are upwards of R2-billion, and the population on the eastern side of the N2 around Ballito has grown from 17 000 in 2011 to 32 000 in 2018. The largest private landowners in the area have hatched a R76-billion masterplan there. One of them is Murray Collins from Collins Residential, who says the area is “undoubtedly one of South Africa’s fastest growing residential nodes”. Collins says semigration to KZN, especially the North Coast, and growing tourism is fuelling investment demand. “That’s why a R76-billion masterplan through various stakeholders has been created to ensure the North Coast demand continues to ‘boom’ exponentially.” Collins says the plan includes his R2,5-billion Zululami Luxury Coastal Estate at Sheffield Beach. Launched in December 2016 with beach access, revitalised dams and wetlands, and spanning over 140-hectares, Zululami sold 80% of phase 1 before launching phase 2. That project alone employs 5 000 people and construction is at full tilt. Already bulk infrastructure and the gatehouse are built. The next component of this masterplan is the R10-billion development Seaton, that borders Zululami and covers 411-hectares and envisages an equine district, a lifestyle village, college node and retirement home.

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The Collins component of the masterplan incorporates seven development zones over 5 089-hectares including commercial, retail, residential and lifestyle. The goal is to create over 34 000 residential units and 320 000 jobs. To date, Seaton and Zululami, the first components of the plan, have involved infrastructural spend of R71-million. The Ballito investment machine has created a plethora of opportunities. One is the Zimbali property fund. Last year Kuwait’s IFA Hotels & Resorts – which broke ground in Zimbali in 1996 – partnered with a finance firm to create the fund to drive investment into its properties. The latest component is Zimbali Lakes Resort, launched in 2017, which has since achieved over R700-million in land sales. IFA’s Phil de Sylva says the fund is meant to help taxpayers take advantage of incentives to invest in sectors like hospitality, adding that he expects it to grow to R2-billion in a few years. De Sylva says Zimbali has contributed R10-billion to the economy of KZN. Another interesting development is that associated with the estate Lush, within Elaleni Coastal Forest. Developer Clifton Smithers has created an Airbnb type facility for his property investors to extend the investment potential beyond bricks and mortar. His short-term letting platform allows owners to exercise greater control over who rents there, mindful of preserving their estate. Smithers says the market demand for short-term letting in Ballito is high, and owners are looking for ways to maximise this opportunity. “We introduced a short-term rental scheme for Lush. We see two types of investors: those who let their properties on an ongoing basis, and others who invest to use it as their primary residence for most of the year and then let out during the high season.” Rainmaker says Airbnb reported 66% of KZN hosts shared their primary residence with guests for an average 13 nights a year, fetching R20 000 in income. Smithers said: “The demand for short-term letting opportunities is unquestionable, and this demand is ever-growing. KZN’s North Coast is a top performing area when it comes to shortterm letting for holidaymakers.”

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C R E AT I V I T Y

Creativity LIVES HERE Fotobooth – working together to see what they see by SHELLEY SEID


C R E AT I V I T Y

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n December 2017 a group of photographers came together to form a pop-up portraiture project. Their aim was to attend creative events, set up a street style studio, give people space to “be what they want to be”, and create collages to exhibit via social media. And so Fotobooth was born. Each event, distinguished by its own printed fabric backdrop, is carefully curated by the group, themed, connected and accompanied by a conceptual write-up for a mini-exhibition on Facebook and Instagram.

Fotobooth, say its members, is a collective voice made up of individual styles. “We are not trying to make everyone Fotobooth – rather Fotobooth is because of everyone,” they say. This is photography that is “made”; photos are not “shot”, or “taken”. The subjects have their own agency, are encouraged to be themselves and choose whether the image should be kept or deleted. They say the portrait process is organic and collective, with roles switching and interchanging. While one member styles the shoot and

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another controls the lighting, a third will be engaging with the public and another will be holding the camera, ready to press the button. The collective curates the albums. “We work together to see what we see,” they say. There is a long-term goal attached to this project: to building an archive of events and people, particularity creatives in Durban, the collective says. In five or 10 years, they will have a history. “We will be able to look at changing portraits of individuals and discern what they tell us about the times.”

This is photography that is “made”; photos are not “shot”, or “taken”. The subjects have their own agency, are encouraged to be themselves and choose whether the image should be kept or deleted


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C R E AT I V I T Y

 THEMBI MTEMBU: ART FOR ME IS SIMPLY FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION, OF CONFRONTATION, OF FEELINGS, EMOTIONS AND ANYTHING THAT COMES TOGETHER TO SHOW WHO YOU ARE. THEMBI FOTOGRAPHED BY JUICE  THANDOTHANDOKUHLE NGCOBO: TO ME, BEING A CREATIVE IN DURBAN MEANS FINDING YOUR PURPOSE IN THE ARTS BY EXPLORING AND COLLABORATING. THANDO FOTOGRAPHED BY BLACKCLOUD  JUICELUNGELO MAKHANYA AKA JUICE: FOTOBOOTH IS DOING THE WORK OF A TIME CAPSULE WHERE WE TRY AND DOCUMENT NOT ONLY THE PEOPLE OF A PLACE, BUT THE WAY THEY PRESENT THEMSELVES AT THAT TIME. JUICE FOTOGRAPHED BY THANDO  SIMANGA ZONDO AKA KONSTANTKONSTANT: BEING A CREATIVE IN DURBAN MEANS SCRAPING UNDERNEATH THE SURFACE FOR THE JEWELS. AND WORKING ON ONESELF AT THE SAME TIME. KONSTANT FOTOGRAPHED BY OSMOSISLIZA  BUSANIBUSANI GCABASHE: WE DON’T SHOOT PEOPLE BUT WE MAKE FOTOS THAT WILL KEEP MEMORIES THAT LAST FOR YEARS. BUSANI FOTOGRAPHED BY BLACKCLOUD  LIZA DU PLESSIS AKA OSMOSISLIZA: FOTOBOOTH IS ABOUT CREATING NEW CONTENT AND CHANGING THE “PH” IN FOTOGRAPHY, THE “JOYFUL” RATHER THAN “ACID” EFFECT OF MEETING CREATIVES (AND THEIR NETWORKS) FROM DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS. OSMOSISLIZA FOTOGRAPHED BY JUICE  BLACKCLOUDNJABULO MAGUBANE AKA BLACKCLOUD: ART IS FREEDOM OF SPEECH WITHOUT TALKING. BLACKCLOUD FOTOGRAPHED BY KONSTANT


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A D V E RTO R I A L

Covering MEDICAL risk

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Local teams launch revolutionary medical malpractice product

xperienced niche market insurance specialist, ShackletonRisk – an authorised financial services provider (FSP No 33621) – is one of a national network of brokerages offering South African medical practitioners a groundbreaking medical malpractice (Med Mal) insurance product that has been carefully engineered to cover local challenges in a rapidly changing sector. According to director Mark Lynn, South African medical practitioners have been negatively impacted by substantial increases in medical malpractice claims. This – together with the fact that most are insured by an offshore service provider – significantly increases their risk due to the volatility of the local currency. Not only is this pushing up costs, but it is also endangering the future of some medical practices. “An analysis of the market shows that medical claims are rising sharply and doctors are increasingly becoming targets of vexatious litigation. This has a direct correlation with the higher premiums which are charged every year. Our underwriters are committed to making a positive contribution to the long-term sustainability of the medical

sector in South Africa. With stable, sustainable premiums with low allocations to operating costs, we are able to focus on what is most important – offering full protection and support to our clients,” he says. The reasons for the sudden upswing in claims is complex and includes patients’ increased awareness of their right to seek recompense and greater pressure from some legal practitioners who are eager to capitalise on this. Amendments to legislation governing the Road Accident Fund (RAF) has meant that damages claims

from injuries sustained in motor vehicle accidents is less profitable to personal injury lawyers, some of whom have now turned their attention to medical malpractice claims. Since 2011, claims against healthcare professionals in South Africa rose by 35% and the value of the claims increased by 121%. (Medical Protection Casebook, August 2017). According to the Medical Protection Society SA, claims over R1-million increased nearly 550% in just 10 years, while claims above R5-million grew by 900% between 2008 and 2013.

After careful assessment of the current market, Pietermaritzburg based Safire Insurance Company Limited – an authorised financial services provider (FSP No 2092) – partnered with Genoa Underwriting Managers to create an innovative specialised medical malpractice policy that is reinsured by Munich Re, one of the world’s largest underwriters. CEO of Safire Insurance, Pierre Bekker, says that because the company focuses on the creation of symbiotic relationships in order to deliver quality services and niche


A D V E RTO R I A L

insurance products to legal, fiduciary, insolvency and business rescue practitioners, this was a natural extension of Safire’s business. However, barriers to entry are high and it took Safire and Genoa 14 months to create a product that met the multifaceted challenges faced by the private healthcare sector in South Africa. One of the most important aspects, says Lynn, is that doctors and specialists who are covered by this South African product will now have the protection of the Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services Act and the South African Ombudsman of Short Term Insurance (OSTI). This product is available to select medical practitioners registered with the HPCSA – Health Professions Council of South Africa – and

underwriters will have a more focused approach on assessing each practitioners risk profile, thereby charging the commensurate risk premium. “This avoids cross subsidisation of premiums for higher risk practitioners by lower risk practitioners. When coupled with low allocations to operating costs as well as cost effective litigation, this enables our underwriters to focus on what’s most important – offering full protection and support to our select clients at cost effective rates,” he explains. Support is important to Lynn who emphasises that the trauma and reputational damage associated with a potential medical malpractice claim should never be under estimated. He says that all interactions with clients in the medical field will be

LEFT: FROM LEFT, PIERRE BEKKER, CEO OF SAFIRE INSURANCE, WITH MARK LYNN AND STEVE MAIN, DIRECTORS OF SHACKLETONRISK.

face-to-face both before and during the full life of the policy. Both ShackletonRisk and Safire do not follow the highly impersonal call centre approach that is prevalent in the insurance sector nowadays. Bekker explains that the policy focuses on mediation and other alternative dispute resolution techniques to reduce claim costs so that practitioners are not faced with a situation where their Limit of Indemnity has been eroded by unnecessary litigation or defence costs. “The quick and efficient resolution of valid claims and the rigorous defence of vexatious claims is backed firstly by an in-house legal team and then by a team of medical and legal professionals from the top firms (MacRobert Attorneys, Clyde & Co, Weber Wentzel, Malatji Kanyane, and Garlicke and Bousfield) in this field across the country,” he says.

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Another value add comes with a partnership with Medical Practice Consulting (MPC) to offer CPD training to select practitioners. In addition, policy holders have access to relevant and innovative patient relationship management tips garnered from sound international research and supplemented with insights received from practitioners’ interactions through their daily dealings with their patients. In the event of a claim, a doctor will receive personal coaching by a highly qualified medico-legal team on how to best deal with it and manage the associated trauma. “From the get go, as soon as a practitioner is notified of a potential claim by the HPCSA, we will ensure that the process is handled correctly. We will assist with responses and even attend the HPCSA hearings with the practitioner,” he explains. The new policy offering also includes a number of extensions such as free fidelity cover of R25 000 for theft by employees, a good Samaritan extension and a premium holiday of up to three months to cover maternity leave or time taken for additional studies. The policy automatically includes an Extended Reporting Period (ERP) of up to 60 months and, subject to certain conditions, doctors also have the option to extend cover beyond the initial period stipulated.

FSP No 33621

www.shackletonrisk.co.za

SHACKLETONRISK MANAGEMENT, a member of The Shackleton Group of Companies, specialises in brokering niche market commercial insurance products to liquidators, attorneys, business rescue practitioners, professional estate administrators and medical specialists.


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J U ST LO V I N ’ K Z N

MOYO: ANY SUCCESSFUL ECONOMY IS DRIVEN BY GROWTH IN TRADE. I WAS INSPIRED BY THE SUNRISE OVER THE SHIP ENTERING OUR PORT AND THE REFLECTION OF MOYO IN THE INDIAN OCEAN.

WILSON’S WHARF: THE BOATBUILDING SECTOR IS INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT AS PART OF OUR “OCEANS ECONOMY”. WE HAVE INCREDIBLE BOATBUILDERS IN KZN AND CONTINUED SUPPORT FOR THEM WILL REALISE JOB CREATION AND GROWTH IN EXPORTS FROM KZN.

Through the LENS


J U ST LO V I N ’ K Z N

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KIRK FALLS AT THE FOOT OF SHONGWENI MARKET: I WAS TAKEN TO THIS SPOT BY A FRIEND, MARC DE CHALAIN WHO IS AN AVID PROPHOTOGRAPHER. IT EMPHASISES THE IMPORTANCE OF LOGISTICS TO OUR ECONOMY. I WOULD LOVE, IN MY LIFETIME, TO BE PART OF THE REALISATION OF A HIGH-SPEED RAIL LINK FROM KING SHAKA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, DURBAN, PIETERMARITZBURG AND THE PROVINCE OF GAUTENG.

Neville Matjie (left) is the CEO of Trade & Investment KwaZulu-Natal, who, every day as the man at the helm of one of KZN’s most important agencies, manages scores of staff and attends to politicians and foreign tycoons

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n a professional level, Matjie has a master’s degree from a Scottish university and a clutch of other business qualifications, and on a personal level is husband to Lenore and has one child. Matjie is also an ardent

photographer and his interest in visual storytelling has seen him snap hundreds, if not thousands, of amazing photographs. We asked Matjie to tell us briefly what motivated him to shoot these four images and why they deepen his love for KZN. * MOSES MABHIDA STADIUM: I TOOK THIS PICTURE WHEN MY FAMILY AND I WERE LEAVING A BAFANA BAFANA GAME AT THE STADIUM. I COULD NOT RESIST CAPTURING THE BEAUTY: IT IS ICONIC, A MUST-DO VISIT IN DURBAN.

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FILM

Framing the PICTURE Turn on the television and you’ll find proudly KZN soapies. Go to the movies and you’ll see our province in all its splendour. Debbie Reynolds turned the spotlight on the local film industry

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e’re at Gateway in January. It’s the premiere of the movie 3 Days To Go and I’m ridiculously proud of KZN for producing such a great showcase. It’s a universal story but told our way with our people in our space. It’s March and Deep End, a story about a Durban youngster who dares to follow her surfing dream, is on the circuit in 26 cinemas around the country. It’s April and Kandsamys: The Wedding is hitting silver screens nationwide, hot on the heels of its predecessor Keeping Up With The Kandsamys, which stormed the box office to become the highest grossing SA film worldwide. It’s Monday to Friday on SABC1 and Uzalo has audiences tuning in at 8.30pm. Just an hour later on etv, Imbewu: The Seed ignites the screen. Or you could hang in for the drama eHostela on Mzansi Magic on Sundays at 8pm. Consider these are all proudly-KZN productions filmed in Durban. You get the picture: the local film industry is flourishing. Reinforcing the city’s commitment to the industry and coming up in July is the Durban International Film Festival, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, and the Durban FilmMart which turns a healthy 10. Add to this the establishment of the Durban Film Office, the eThekwini Municipality’s film industry development unit 15 years ago, and there’s a reason KZN is contributing 9,5% to the SA film economy. “We’re only in third place behind Gauteng and the Western Province, but we have come a long way and shown

ABOVE: BABY CELE PLAYS GABISILE ON UZALO, AIRED ON SABC1, MONDAY TO FRIDAY.


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LEFT: ACTRESS JAILOSHINI NAIDOO IN KANDASAMYS: THE WEDDING. BELOW: THE DURBAN FILM OFFICE TEAM CELEBRATED ITS 15TH ANNIVERSARY IN MARCH. Picture: Debbie Reynolds

steady growth,” said Toni Monty, who heads up the Durban Film Office. “Our permit office works with an average of 150 productions a year. Since 2003 the film office has assisted over 3 000 productions to film in eThekwini locations, creating employment of over 30 000 crew days over the last 15 years. “These activities contribute R329million to the local economy annually.” eThekwini Economic Development and Planning Committee chair Sipho Kaunda said the film industry was not merely about the creative process and end product. “There is an entire value chain that benefits, including locations, infrastructure, logistics and services, hospitality and catering, post-

production and distribution. “Then as a by-product, films sell the city as a tourism and film production destination of choice.” Monty said a major turning point was the strategy to attract functioning production hubs into the city, which kicked off with the Stained Glass Productions studio in KwaMashu that produces Uzalo and eHostela. “They now have 90% local crew and employ around 70% of the interns, contributing around R190-million to the local economy in the last three years.” She said another valuable contributor was VideoVision. “They have invested in, produced and distributed countless SA films, including Mandela: Long Walk To

Freedom, More Than Just A Game, and the current TV drama Imbewu.” With development being a key driver, the city, in consultation with the industry, has created a Sector Strategy focusing on four pillars.  Growing the local business network to connect all players and the city to encourage the formalisation of opportunities.  Encouraging new market entrants by the creation of a transformation and localisation policy and further expanding existing development programmes.  Attracting more film and television hubs, including a framework to promote “Digital Durban” which aims to draw post-production and visual


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effects opportunities.  Promoting and encouraging a film service culture through a revised marketing strategy to uncover, showcase and promote services and Durban as film friendly. Through its Micro Budget Film Fund, one of the first of its kind in SA aimed at bridging the gap between emerging and intermediate film making, the film office has supported 25 micro-budget producers with 12 completed films. Its Development Fund has worked with eight intermediate and professional filmmakers and has established the Location Scout Service, partly to expose young filmmakers to the business of location scouting. Arts administrator and creative consultant Russel Hlongwane says KZN is finally establishing its own voice with the world acknowledging that Durban is a unique African city with a melting pot that is hard to find anywhere in the world.

FILM

ABOVE: ARTS ADMINISTRATOR AND CREATIVE CONSULTANT RUSSEL HLONGWANE SAYS KZN IS FINALLY ESTABLISHING ITS OWN. Picture: Debbie Reynolds BELOW: A SCENE FROM DURBAN’S FILMMART PROJECT, FIVE FINGERS FOR MARSEILLES.

“We haven’t exactly arrived, but we are posing a threat,” he says. “The investment from the public sector is paying off and there is more confidence. It is encouraging to see KZN gaining its voice through television, which is growing rapidly in the province. “There is, however, a need to increase capacity, skills and expertise, not only in front of the camera, but also behind the scenes in the support services.” Hlongwane curated the Festival’s Isiphethu – Emerging Filmmmakers Hub – an industry programme for emerging and micro-budget filmmakers to engage with experts through master classes, panel discussions and workshops. Monty says Durban’s FilmMart has worked with around 200 projects in development with countless success stories, including Five Fingers For Marseilles, Alison, Inxeba (The Wound) and Train Of Salt And Sugar. “The reality is that the film industry now knows Durban,” says Monty. “Variety and Hollywood Reporter are our media partners. We can’t do everything overnight, but we are on the cusp of greatness.” Thriving local actress Jailoshini Naidoo says Durban is the place to be. “People are suddenly taking notice of our beautiful locations and our fascinating stories.” With leading roles in the Kandsamays, 3 Days To Go and Imbewu, Naidoo says the Durban Film Office and KZN Film Commission’s work is definitely paying off. “People are discovering our little gem on the east coast, which is actually more film friendly and way cheaper than the Cape. This is just the start – we’re only going to get bigger and better.”

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