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Winter Issue 2012

ISSN 1176 791X

W E L L I N GT O N

Doing the best you can Should kids be pushed to be the best or to have fun? ..................................................

Getting the best out of boys Handy hints for parenting sons ..................................................

 2012 Olympic Games! NZ Olympians talk about what it takes to get to the top ..................................................

Win Win Win • Competitions • Giveaways • Vouchers

A news magazine and online resource for families

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inside this issue

Contents

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Winter 2012

Comment 12 Kids’ View

We ask children if they do things to be the best or for fun.

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17

Features

4 How to say “no”

10 Kids taking more responsibility

You don’t always have to say “yes”

Doing chores teaches lifelong habits.

5 Getting the best out of boys

11 Baby & Toddler

Handy hints for parenting sons from education consultant Joseph Driessen.

6 Doing the best you can

Winter home heating tips to keep baby safe and warm.

Should kids be pushed to be the best or to have fun?

17 Game on

Online billing and kids – how to prevent costly downloads.

Resource information

We speak with Sophie Pascoe, Tim Carswell and Barbara Kendall about how to get to the top.

10 Parenting Classes 14 Calendar of events 15 Entertainment 15 Winter activities 21 Marketplace 21 School Term Dates

8 The importance of breakfast

Create healthy habits with a delicious – and healthy – start to the day.

9 Keeping kids’ energy levels constant

Simple food combinations can prolong energy and keep kids’ brains eager to learn.

About Us Publisher Robyn Willis Design & Production Moody Shokry Advert Production Target Press Production Office Editor Vanessa O’Brien Assistant Editor Rachel Taniwha Website editor

Fiona Smith

Contributing Writers

Alan Jones, Eva Maria, Maureen Chrisp Tracey - Ann Abery, Crissi Blair,Leigh Elder,Wayne Webb, Joseph Driessen, Advertising Sales

Caren Constable, Shona Robb,Nicky Barnett, Jane Hunter, Tina Barriball, Katrina Wright Office Manager

Raelyn hay

Office Assistant

Jackie Pithie

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18 2012 OIympic Games 20 The vege patch

New Zealand Gardener of the Year Alan Jones discusses the benefits of having a worm farm, and how to make one.

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Reach us at: Family Publishers (NZ) P.O. Box 36-004, Christchurch NZ Free phone 0800 28 55 10 Fax: 03 3559 183 Mobile. 0274-359-414

Email: admin@familytimes.co.nz www.familytimes.co.nz

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Printed and distributed quarterly approximately two weeks before each major school holiday. 37,374 distributed through early childhood centres, primary and intermediate schools, public libraries and selected medical and midwifery premises. The opinions expressed in this publication are not those of the publisher unless indicated otherwise. No part of this publication may be reprinted without the expressed written permission of the publisher. Family Times is not responsible for unsolicited material. Family Times is funded and published solely through the support of its advertisers. They support us, so please support them.

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From the editor Nobody dreams of growing up and being average. At least not anybody I know.

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ut in a society that applauds achievement rather than effort, I have to wonder if our measure of success has become just a little tainted. Is every little ripper rugby player only a hero if he grows up to be an All Black? Is every book-weary student only as good as her last class-topping test? I hear you all gasping a resounding and shocked “no”! Yet, that’s the message we get so many times from society. We heap accolades on people who reach their goals of fame or fortune, but forget – or even ridicule - those who may have tried equally as hard and failed. So, in the quest to ensure their children keep mediocrity at bay, some parents push their kids to extremes. Busy time tables, high pressure, rewards for achievement. Some may try to live vicariously through their children, and others may subscribe to Amy Chua’s Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother philosophy of not accepting anything less than the best from their children. On the other hand, do overly libertarian parents disadvantage their children by not instilling a need to succeed? A focus on fun is great to a point, but how effective is it when kids grow up and embark on their corporate ladder climb? I recently read this in a newsletter printed out for teenage school kids: “Your school may be “outcome-based,” but life isn’t. In some schools, you’re given as many tries as you want to get the answer right. Standards are set low enough so everyone can meet them. This, of course, bears no

resemblance to anything in real life - as you will soon find out.” I agree completely. So, is there a happy equilibrium? This edition Family Times’ assistant editor Rachel Taniwha talks with the experts about the effects that both these parenting strategies have on children, and how to best put your kids on the path to success in life. Check out our main feature on “doing the best you can” for some great insight into raising healthy and thriving kids. Also in this issue, John Cowan from The Parenting Place looks at how to encourage responsibility in kids and what discipline is really about. Of course we also have all our regular features, competitions and giveaways, so start turning the pages and most of all: Enjoy!

How to say “No” without guilt or explanation Stop, pause and think before responding, giving you time and space to consider your response. If you’d like more time before answering, say you’ll need to get back to them at an agreed time. Remember less is more – respond with a succinct statement, then stop talking. We’re often uncomfortable with silence and it’s common to feel the need to fill silence with explanations justifying our decisions. Offer an explanation only if necessary. If you are worried about hurting someone’s feelings or letting them down, say “no” with empathy and understanding, acknowledging your regret at being unable to say “yes” this time. Let them down gently, but remain firm in your decision. If someone won’t take “no” for an answer or pressures you to change your decision, use the broken record technique. This simply involves repeating your statement or response until the other person accepts your decision. If they persist, try distracting them by changing the topic of conversation. Ask open questions, turning the focus back on them or perhaps end the conversation by saying you have to go. If speaking on the telephone, try holding your hand up when saying “no”. This action is a powerful visual aid. It helps you feel strong and assertive, even though you may feel nervous or anxious on the inside. Practise saying “no” at home or in front of a mirror. Use visual reminders and positive affirmations, such as “I say “no” without guilt

or explanation” or “I have strong boundaries between work and family life”. Write these down and display in your diary, personal organiser, calendar or fridge. Remember it’s okay to say “no”. If helpful, write down and acknowledge any feelings of guilt, then take action, let them go and move on. When making a decision, trust your intuition and common sense. By Karyn Riley Karyn Riley is a Christchurch-based women’s wellbeing specialist and author of “How to Keep the YOU in Mum”, inspirational speaker, writer and mother of two. For more information visit www.rileylife.co.nz.

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Getting the best out of boys All of us as parents do our very best to be the best parent we can be, and most of us do a pretty good job.

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t is worthwhile however to reflect about what research has to tell us about effective parenting for boys.

Being authoritative

An authoritative parent is one who provides clear positive leadership and who commands respect from their son. Authoritative parenting involves setting clear goals for your family; involving your children and listening to their point of view, providing help and guidance so that the children can meet their obligations, and loving them not as a friend but as a parent. Boys thrive when they feel their parents are positive leaders who help them and guide them but expect them to be accountable. Authoritative parental leadership promotes loyalty and cooperation in boys.

Providing structure

Many boys thrive when they live in a structured household. This means the household is well organised and predictable, with clear routines and rules that all members abide by. Basically it’s running a tight ship while still allowing the children freedom within structure. Boys thrive when they know what to expect and where they stand. It gives a strong sense of security, which makes them cooperative.

Staying calm and using fewer words

Boys have just as many emotions as girls, but they process them in a different way.

They are more inclined to want to take action rather than to speak and they prefer to go away and think about something rather than engage in a big verbal battle about it. When parents use emotions and words to try and prevail upon their sons often their boys shut down or their aggression is activated. Instead, parents should stay very calm and use brief language and allow their sons time and space to process the message.

Using consequences for accountability

Boys need to learn to become accountable for their actions and they need to be taught to keep their word and agreements and to follow the rules of the household. When they try and test the boundaries and prevail against the parent they should be held to account with consequences rather than words and emotions. Boys respect fairness but despise adults who do not follow through.

Channelling physical energy and risk taking

Many boys have very physical energy levels as well as the need to take risks, and the traditional way to channel this energy is through sport, outdoor adventures and the martial arts. Some parents have lost sight of this, and allow their son to become addicted to computer games instead. These parents need to realise that for many boys activities like play-wrestling, games and sport are essential ingredients for growing up into fine young men.

Providing male role models

Many boys live in a very unbalanced and unnatural world without the guidance and example of adult men. Men do things differently and have a different take on life, and boys desperately need their guidance, love and support. When this is lacking, many boys become highly insecure, oppositional and frantically macho. These boys need male mentors, and the best parents go out of their way to provide for this. They enlist the help of the boys’ father, grandfathers and uncles. They enrol boys into sports with male coaches. They tell stories about male heroes and make boys feel good about being a man. Boys with male role models become centred and secure.

Linking school with the world of work

Part of the unnatural environment of many boys is that they don’t see adult men working. Boys are surrounded by working women both at home and at school, but deep down they are

searching for their own place in society. Many boys rebel against school because they do not see the link between school and the work they will do is adult men. Wise parents go out of their way to explain to their sons how school might lead into possible areas of work, and take their son to building sites, universities, workshops and polytechnics to show them the pathways that are available to them. Once boys see the learning pathway, they feel school is relevant and their resistance to school disappears. We all want to be the best parents we can be. For many of us, however it pays to think more deeply about what kind of parents our children actually need us to be. This applies very much to boys who live in a modern society that does not cater for many of their deepest needs and who need parents who will provide a more balanced environment for them. By Joseph Driessen, education consultant Driessen speaks to parent and teacher groups about boys’ education. Email j.o.d@xtra.co.nz.

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feature story

Doing the best you can We’ve all come across it at some stage – the proud parent with the academically gifted child or the sporting protégé.

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t’s often the result of many hours of hard work, dedication and encouragement from their parents.

He says that children’s sport needs to be structured around these needs rather than to stress winning as the most critical factor.

But what about the children who do not win or get the top marks in school? Perhaps they tried just as hard, and their parents are just as proud.

“Parents need to realise that sports are good for kids even if they do not win. This is not to say that children should not be encouraged to win or be the best that they can be in any particular game. After all, a sporting contest is always about winning and losing – even those played in the back-yard. But the emphasis of coaches and parents should be about giving the kids the things they both need and desire from sport: fun, social contact, skills. In this way they will be encouraged to stay in sport and for some, develop an aspiration and determination to become very good. The key is that this aspiration is the child’s not his or her parents’ aspiration for them.”

The question is, should results be measured in terms of a grade, a win or loss, or by whether children are having fun? Should parents applaud their children’s efforts no matter how well they perform or push their children hard to excel and to be the best at what they do? We’re well aware of the pressure to excel in sport as New Zealanders. Take the All Blacks for example: they won the Rugby World Cup, but the public pressure to succeed was so intense that there was even a Facebook page dedicated to a riot on the streets if they lost. What message does this give children? Is it that losing is to be avoided at all costs, or else they face losing the love of their parents - or on a larger scale - the wrath of a nation? On the other hand though, if children aren’t encouraged to try to be the best, does it result in an underachiever, someone who never really gets ahead in life? Sport NZ community sport and recreation general manager John Reid says research shows that for young children in particular, winning ranks below many other aspects of the sport experience. “Aspects like having fun, being with and making friends and getting better (skills) rank ahead of winning in terms of outcomes desired by children.”

Reid says that parents’ greatest gift to children who aspire to be good is to encourage and support them playing informally with other kids and by themselves. Many worldwide examples exist of elite athletes being produced almost entirely through informal play without formal coaching or competition structures – they tend to be highly skilled, highly motivated, and highly spontaneous and creative in their sport and with appropriate formal tuition and support later in their youth years, they become some of the best performing elite athletes in the world. “In an overall sense we are encouraging parents to just let the kids play – play at home, play at school, play at practice and play in competition.” The Parenting Place creative producer John Cowan says he remembers parents on the

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Families are well catered for on every Interislander voyage.Nurseries provide cot and baby-changing facilities. Playgrounds of varying sizes, for a range of ages ensure that our youngest passengers can play and meet new friends. If they can be convinced to leave the playground, magicians and clowns perform on many school holiday sailings. And, of course Interislander looks after families with a range of great value fare options.

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feature story “If children catch our passion for a sport, a career or a cause, then we don’t have to push them so hard – their own passion will do all the pushing.” John Cowan, creative producer, The Parenting Place.” sideline as he watched his son play sport. Most just loved the idea that their boys were out there having some fun, but some parents withdrew their kids from the team to find another club that would give their son a better chance of winning trophies. “Maybe without parents like that, we probably wouldn’t have the All Blacks, or many top level athletes at all. But I also know that some of those parents had kids who resented the pressure and dropped out of the sport as soon as they could.” He says he winces when he sees parents push children too hard, “But in saying that, I grieve when I see kids wasting their potential because parents failed to give them selfdiscipline and motivation.” He says finding a reasonable middle ground is a bit harder than it seems, and in any group of parents you will find a range of practices. Cowan refers to Amy Chua, an American woman raised by Philippine-born Chinese parents. Chua’s bestselling book, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, created a huge stir when it was published in 2011. She treated her girls as her own parents had treated her: “They demanded total respect and were very tough with my three younger sisters and me. We got in trouble for A minuses, had to drill math and piano every day, no sleepovers, no boyfriends.” She threatened to destroy her daughters’ toys if they underperformed, she did not accept her four-year-old daughter’s handmade birthday card because it wasn’t good enough and she

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“I don’t believe you need to drive children super hard to get top results,” says Cowan. Each week he interviews top achievers in sports, politics, business or entertainment on the radio (Newstalk ZB, 8-9pm Sundays) about their lives. “Invariably, they credit their parents with having a powerful influence on the course of their lives but, as far as I can recall, only one of the 350-odd guests I’ve interviewed had what you could call a “tiger mother”. These leaders weren’t driven to success, but inspired by their parents’ example and heart. “I think this model is a far more natural way of boosting our children to success. If children catch our passion for a sport, a career or a cause, then we don’t have to push them so hard – their own passion will do all the pushing.” New Zealand Association of Gifted Children president and educational psychologist Rose Blackett says parents should celebrate and reward effort and task commitment over achievement. “Effort is what is likely to set us up to positively face later challenges in life -academic and personal.” She says we need to strive to achieve, however individuals have variable levels of achievement. A task that requires great effort for one child may be simplistic for another.  “An issue I have faced when working with children is that within our school system we chronologically group children. However within a class of six-year-olds you are likely to have a heterogeneous group.  One child may be reading Lord of the Rings for example, and another struggling to sound out and recognise

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While Cowan is appalled by her harsh, supertough methods, he cannot deny that she gets results. Chua herself is a law professor at Yale, and her daughters’ are turning out as spectacular achievers. But at what cost?

NZ’s No.1 parenting publication

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letters. The effort a child puts into a task, at their individual level, needs to be considered not the achievement.”

“Parents’ greatest gift to children who aspire to be good is to encourage and support them playing informally with other kids and by themselves.” John Reid, Sport NZ sport and recreation general manager.”

She says parents need to celebrate the journey (effort) not the destination (achievement).  “Some children measure themselves on their achievements and if they get it wrong, view themselves as a failure.” She refers to a child who got the top mark in New Zealand on a music exam when they were quite young.  As a teen they viewed themselves a failure as they were never able to obtain the top mark in New Zealand again. “These children can set unrealistically high expectations for themselves.” “A six-year-old who gets frustrated because their writing is not as neat as the teacher’s for example... often does not consider the years of writing practice the teacher has had, or that their fine motor skills are still developing.

Frustration can then show itself in many forms such as outward negative behaviours or inward withdrawal.”   Blackett says children are individuals; there is no one right formula. Children will react and interact with the environment they are in and the people within that environment.  “We cannot change the child, merely the environment we set up for our children.” By Rachel Taniwha

Tips for parents – gaining the best from your child •

• •

Realise that if a child undertakes an activity and is having fun and makes friends, they are more likely to stick to it and want to try harder. Pressure and focus on winning or being the best can lead to the child giving up, or developing negative behaviours, low selfesteem or inward withdrawal.

Remember that many elite athletes have been produced almost entirely through informal play without formal coaching or competition in their younger years.

Many top achievers say they weren’t “driven” to succeed, but were inspired by their parents’ example – be a positive influence. Allow children to catch your passion.

Celebrate and reward effort over achievement. Ensure children have a realistic view of their achievements. Adjust their perceptions of success if their goals are set so high that they could be unobtainable.

Realise you cannot change the child, only the environment we as parents set.

BJ Bear

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Energise kids with a healthy breakfast Children who eat breakfast each day may have an advantage when it comes to learning. So why not go beyond sharpening their pencils to sharpening their minds by making a balanced breakfast a habit in your home? Studies show that children can concentrate much better after they have had a good breakfast, thus maximising their chances of achieving well at school. Childhood and teenage years are years of growth and development, in which they need the best of nutrients in order that maximum bone strength is achieved, teeth are formed, and growth is realised. Breakfast should lay the cornerstone of the daily food intake during this time. You can teach your children how to build a balanced breakfast, and set them up with a good habit for life.

Breakfast should consist of:

Something filling e.g.

breakfast cereal – porridge, grain-based products, muesli or wholegrain, high fibre breads

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Something lasting e.g. milk,

yoghurt, eggs, baked beans

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Some colour e.g. fruit, chopped

Some common reasons for skipping breakfast in children and teens are:

raw apple or canned peaches, banana, soaked prunes, dried sultanas, raisins, avocado, tomatoes

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Poached eggs on toast are a cheap and tasty breakfast cooked in less than five minutes. Try making the morning breakfast meal a family affair with everyone eating together, and be sure to set a good example by starting your day with a balanced breakfast too. Your children will be much more likely to make breakfast a healthy habit if you sit down to enjoy breakfast with them as often as possible. By Janne Pasco, Community & Public Health community nutrition advisor, Christchurch.

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Not having enough time. A drink water or milk Being too tired to bother. Wanting to spend the extra time dozing in bed. • Not having readily available breakfast foods milk and fruit are available in the house. in the kitchen every morning. At a household level, being well-organised can knock most of these excuses on the head. • Breakfast can be semi-prepared the night A little planning the night before can go a long before (bowls laid out for children, etc). way when you’re in a rush to get out the door • Quick-oats can be used to make porridge in the morning. in as little time as possible. • Smoothies can be prepared the evening Parents can try to ensure before and kept in the fridge overnight. that breakfast cereals, fresh Of course, some kids simply don’t have an

appetite first thing in the morning. In cases like this, focus on a mid-morning snack providing the nutrition they’ve missed out on at breakfast time. A sandwich, fruit bread, bun, fruit or yoghurt at break time in school can help make up for a missed breakfast. Preparing colourful, interesting breakfasts can help inspire little tummies. Try Weetbix with sliced peaches, yoghurt and milk - it looks good and tastes yummy. How about a bowl of warm porridge with raisins and nuts sprinkled on top with a little brown sugar or honey?

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Keeping kids’ energy levels constant All parents and their kids need a certain amount of glucose each day to provide energy. Not enough and you will be tired and listless. Too much will mean the excess is stored as fat.

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lucose overloading is one of the key factors driving the obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemics. Food and drink provide the fuel that gives us energy and keeps all our bodies’ processes functioning. All food and drink is largely made up of protein, fat and carbohydrate. The balance is water, small amounts of vitamins and minerals and artificial additives in processed food. Protein performs essential functions like building and sustaining muscle and improving immunity. Fats contain essential fatty acids that promote growth, a healthy skin, absorption of vitamins and help to regulate body temperature. Carbohydrates provide us with glucose for energy.    Ask any nutritionist or dietician around the world what this fuel mix should be, and on average, they will come up with a mix of 30 per cent protein, 30% fat and 40% carbohydrate. Now, if you tinker with this mix you are asking for trouble. In our experience, we find there is a general reluctance to eat fat, and we are well catered for here by the incredible range of low-fat foods on offer. In fact, most people do not eat anywhere near the right amount of fat. In our experience, this percentage is often as low as 5-10% of total energy intake. Protein foods like meat, fish and eggs are the most sustaining, and it would be difficult to eat more than the recommended 30%. So, by default, we generally eat too much carbohydrate type food. Now, here’s the important bit - carbohydrate makes the glucose that provides us with energy, and too much glucose means the excess is stored as fat. At

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the same time, adults and growing kids need a regular consumption of glucose providing energy to keep us going.  Fortunately, the solution to getting this critical formula right is very simple. The trick to having constant energy levels is to include a good mix of protein, fat and carbohydrate in every meal and snack.  Remember that this is not an exact science and the suggested 30/30/40 mix is only a guide and will vary according to your energy requirements at any one time. For example, the Silver Fern netballers gulp down fast-digesting glucose producers like jelly babies after a game to boost their flagging energy levels.    By Leigh Elder, Eat For Keeps Eat For Keeps have helped thousands of people maintain a healthy weight and life by using these simple concepts. Visit www.eatforkeeps.com for lots of free tips and ideas.

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Breakfast • Most cereals contain high levels

seeds, yoghurt, rip-off-lids of canned fish or baked beans, of glucose-producing processed boiled eggs, raw carrots, celery. carbohydrate - mix with Wholegrain snack biscuits, combinations of rolled oats, nuts, e.g. Arnotts’ Lunch Slices with seeds and yoghurt toppings like cheese slices, • Porridge                 hummus, cottage cheese, pickle • Change to a dense multigrain and tomato.        bread Apart from after intensive exercise, to prevent energy lows avoid eating • Eggs or baked beans      processed, simple carbohydrate food Lunch • Grain bread sandwiches with good and drink on its own, e.g. energy drinks, fruit juice, cakes, scones, white protein content, e.g. canned fish, bread products and milk chocolate (go ham, chicken, cheese and egg • Insulated lunch bags are great for for dark). Kids must have their treats like some of these listed above, and the including food like yoghurt and odd sweet or biscuit are fine as long as cottage cheese they are all combined with sustaining • Add fruit and nuts food. • Soup  Eating sustaining • Chopped up raw vegetables like carrots and celery meals and snacks • Left-overs from dinner, e.g. provi de these great chicken and vegetables 

benefits: Dinner • Keeps you fuller for longer • Good chunk of protein (meat, fish, • Having seafood), small portions of rice, pasta, potato, parsnip or kumara. Lots of other vegetables

Snacks • Nut bars, fruit with a few nuts/

higher energy levels

• Normal blood-sugar levels • Sustaining food helps regulate

portion sizes

• It’s not an exact science and easy to

maintain

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Do you want the best for your child? From Years 1 – 6 Chilton students have class teachers who teach the core curriculum and specialist teachers who deliver French, Spanish, Dance, Physical Education, Music and Instrumental programmes. Our specialists have a real passion for, and expertise in, their subject areas. Visit our co-educational Preschool and girls-only Junior School and see for yourself the Chilton difference.

Contact our Registrar to find out more www.chilton.school.nz Independent Anglican School Years 1 - 13 Girls' Only Co-educational Preschool

Phone: 566 4089 124 Waterloo Road, Lower Hutt info@chilton.school.nz www.familytimes.co.nz

9


Kids taking more responsibility Responsibility means being a self-starter when it comes to looking after yourself and others.

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esponsibility is also the idea that you have yourself under control, reliably doing what you should do (e.g. chores and study) and not doing what you shouldn’t. It is a skill and an attitude, and it needs to be taught to children. It is something that also takes maturity, so we should expect our children to take a while to master it. Chores are a key area where kids learn responsibility. I am sure we all wonder if it is worth the effort to get children to do jobs that we could do ourselves twice as well in half the time. Getting children to do chores certainly is neither cheap labour nor punishment for being young: the main goal is teaching responsibility. The other key way to teach responsibility is through discipline. “Discipline” is one of those weasel-words that can leave my mouth meaning one thing but can arrive in someone else’s ear meaning something different. My definition of discipline is the training we give our children to help them think and make better decisions in the future. One of the best outcomes of good discipline is children taking ownership of their own problems and responsibilities. Here is an example of how this type of discipline might work: imagine a little girl, she goes to the fridge, pulls out the plastic juice jug and drops it on the floor and the mess goes everywhere. Now, a grumpier version of me

“Getting children to do chores certainly is neither cheap labour nor punishment for being young: the main goal is teaching responsibility.”

juice jugs. But with a responsible attitude, coupled with a belief in their ability to solve problems, they won’t wilt or run away – they will roll up their sleeves and get stuck in. Responsibility like that is a wonderful legacy to give our children. By John Cowan, creative producer at The Parenting Place

would go in there and go ballistic. “Get out of here while I clean up this mess!” But a more useful response would be to go in there and say something like, “Oh dear, you’ve got a mess, but you’re a clever kid, here’s a sponge, here’s a mop, you have a go at cleaning it up. I’ll come back and see how you’re getting along.”

No-one gives you a guide to raising children when you leave the maternity ward, but enlisting the help of some quality parenting classes is a great way for all parents to take a step back and try some new ideas.

Playcentre

Note: “You’ve got a mess”. It’s amazing how many kids think that the mess is your problem, but you give them ownership of it. And you are also giving her the tools to solve her problem. Now, she probably won’t enjoy cleaning up, and you know that you could do the job in a tenth of the time yourself, and even when she is finished you’ll have to do the whole job over again properly anyway, but that child will be learning some important things about life. They’ve learnt to take ownership of a problem, and they’re learning that problems are not for running away from; problems are for solving. “Hmmm… I’ve got a problem. It’s my problem, but I can solve it. There are no problems so big that they can’t be solved.” That is responsibility. Some people might not call that discipline because it did not involve yelling or penalties, but that is exactly what I think discipline is. Sadly, all of our kids will have adult-sized problems later in life much bigger than spilt

Parenting classes

Extend your child’s learning through play. There is free training in parenting skills, child development and more through your local Playcentre including workshops on creativity, sand and blocks etc. Visit www. playcentre.org.nz or phone 0800 PLAYNZ.

Parent Help Parent Help offers individual parenting education tailored to your own needs with highly trained counsellors/parent educators in Wellington and Porirua. Phone 04-4999994 to find out more or book a time.

Toolbox parenting groups

Vision: “To encourage and inspire parents and equip them with the skills and resources needed to grow great kids.”

Toolbox groups are relaxed, informal parenting sessions run over six weeks in a home or community venue. Each session leaves participants with a range of activities and strategies to try at home, and are filled with expert advice, humour and empowering strategies. The focus is on making your parenting experience a really positive one. Toolbox groups are available throughout the country and are delivered in three age

groups – early years (0-6), middle years (6-12) and teenage years (12+). The cost of the course is $67.50 per person or $90 per couple (including GST). The course is facilitated by trained local volunteers who are friendly and supportive. Whatever stage you are at, a Toolbox group will give you the confidence to be the best parent that you can be and have fun on the way. To find out more information about our courses and to find a group in your area visit www.theparentingplace.com or call 0800-53-56-59.

Last bastion of cigarette advertising to go The Cancer Society welcomes moves to introduce plain packaged tobacco products and commends Associate Health Minister Tariana Turia on her staunch support for New Zealand to be smoke-free by 2025. Cabinet has agreed in principle to introduce plain packaging for all tobacco products in New Zealand, following a similar move in Australia. As part of the goal of making New Zealand smoke-free, the packaging will display only health warnings and the contact details for Quitline.

“Plain packaging will remove the last bastion of cigarette advertising and discourage people from taking up the habit,” said the society’s health promotion manager, Dr Jan Pearson. “From July, a ban will come into force on the open display of cigarette and tobacco packs in all shops, meaning they can’t be displayed next to the sweets, but have to be out of sight – something we campaigned for long and hard. Plain packaging is the next step.”

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baby & toddler

Keeping young children safe this winter Most of us find that we tend to spend more time indoors in winter. Fires are being lit and the heaters cranked up to keep everyone warm.

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flickering flame or the glow from a heater can be fascinating to children, who are too young to understand how dangerous they can be. Babies about four - nine months are particularly active and can cover more floor than you might expect. Keep a close eye on them as they may get themselves too close to the heater and be unable to get away again. Here are some things you can do to help keep your family safe and warm this winter:

Bassinets or cots should be kept away from windows, where rooms are coldest.

Keep your baby’s room well ventilated with doors open - especially if you use a heater.

To check if your baby is too hot or cold, touch the back of their neck underneath clothing. If they feel warm, they are fine, even if their hands and feet are cold. If they feel cold, pop another layer on them.

Making your baby’s bedroom safe and the right temperature A warm, dry home is really important for your child’s health and safety. Insulation is a proven way to achieve this. Overheated rooms though are not safe for babies so it’s important to strike a balance: • The best temperature for babies is one in which adults could comfortably wear light clothing, such as a single cotton layer. • Rooms should usually be between 16-20°C for babies to be comfortable and safe, and 15-17°C is a good overnight temperature.

Gas heaters can give off dangerous fumes and fan heaters can overheat the room. Using an electric heater (convection or oil filled) with a thermostat is best.

Babies usually need one more layer of clothing or bedding than adults. Natural fabrics that breathe – such as such as wool and cotton – are best.

Keeping safe with fires and heaters The NZ Fire Service has a very simple rule; “Keep a metre from the heater”. This means people and furniture should be at least a metre from a heater or fire to reduce the risk of being burned, or causing a fire. Having a safety guard around all heaters and fires will help prevent children getting burned. Look for a guard that:

• •

can be securely attached to the wall

is high enough that a child can’t climb over the top

has bars or mesh to stop children put ting their arms or other objects through

What to look for when choosing safe nightwear •

Close fitting clothing reduces the risk of catching fire. Buy pyjamas that fit your child rather than buying a size too big to make them last. Check the label on nightwear for a “low fire danger” label. This means the design of the garment is close-fitting to reduce the risk of it catching fire. It does not mean that the fabric is fire proof – it can still burn if exposed to a heat source.

For more information, support or advice, PlunketLine (0800-933-922) is available 24/7.

La Leche League New Zealand Sally had trouble latching her baby and phoned her nearest La Leche League leader for help. Now Sally says that “Breastfeeding is pain free and my baby is content and settled.” Mothers who want to breastfeed need accurate information and support. If you need help with breastfeeding, contact La Leche League. Your leader will listen and offer practical suggestions. La Leche League leaders are breastfeeding mothers who are trained to give up-to-date breastfeeding information. Wellington La Leche League 04-471-0690.

What is free play and does it help learning?

SIDS

Sudden Infant Death Support

HELP LINE 0800 164 455 24 Hour

Information & Support

Best practice in early childhood education emphasises choice in children’s play: can they choose what, how and for how long they play? This is child-led, or child-initiated play, sometimes called free play. It’s important; not just because it makes children happy, but because research has shown that children’s brains develop better connections with the child in charge of play. Child-led play has two vital ingredients; flexible resources that fire the imagination (sand, water, containers, boxes, paint) - and

you! This learning needs an engaged adult to pay attention, ask questions or offer help, sometimes to join in, and sometimes to sit back. A growing brain benefits from as few restrictions as possible. Playcentre has advocated child-led play for more than 60 years, and its education programme teaches adults how to support this play effectively. To learn more about Playcentre, visit www.playcentre.org.nz or phone 0800-PLAYNZ to find a Playcentre near you.

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www.familytimes.co.nz

11


Maureen Crisp from Family Times visited Avalon Primary School in Lower Hutt to talk with kids about whether they like doing activities for fun or to be the best they can be. ISSN

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Joshua Uelese Mikaele Tutagalevao, age 10 I want to do rugby. I just love rugby. I don’t really know if I’m good at it. I’d like to try badminton and squash because they look interesting. I don’t have to be good at it. I just want to try it. I could give up rugby if it was for church or family. I want to please my parents but I like to play rugby too. We have to be the role models for others.

www.familytimes.com.nz

Karori Pool �� 25 metre pool �� Toddler pool �� Spa �� Hydroslide �� ������������������� �� Birthday parties 22 Donald Street, Karori Phone 476 5400 Wellington.govt.nz

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Mose Faamausili Muta, age 10 I love rugby too. I’m good at it. I like to play other sports like soccer. My parents signed me up for a club last year. I was happy to play rugby for a club. I’d like to try table tennis. I like running and sprinting. Any physical challenge I just want to try it. I just like to try things; it doesn’t matter if I’m hopeless at it. I want to please other people like my role models.

Aaliyah Cox, age 10 I want to try tennis for a sport. I think it looks interesting. It doesn’t matter if I’m good at it because I will learn to get better. I do dancing out of school for my mother. I like to dance but I don’t want to do it all the time. I’d like to try other things. Even if it’s hard I know that I will get better.

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Jayla Tarcela Muscara, age 10 My parents force me to do ballet. They were trying to put me into a sport that I could do forever and I didn’t want to and so they said ballet. I didn’t want to do it but I wanted to do a good thing for them so I do it for them. I have to make myself do it, I don’t know if I’m good at it. If I could give up ballet I would do tennis. Ballet keeps me flexible so that’s good.

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BRAVE Since ancient times, stories of epic battles and mystical legends have been passed through the generations across the rugged and mysterious Highlands of Scotland. In BRAVE, a new tale joins the lore when the courageous Merida (voice of Kelly Macdonald) confronts tradition, destiny and the fiercest of beasts. The film takes aim at cinemas on June 21, 2012, and will be presented in Disney Digital 3D™ in select theatres. We have five prize packs, each consisting of a double in-season pass to the movie, a watch, stationary set and t-shirt to give away. Entries close 27 June 2012.

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The Family Times Design Competition The London 2012 Olympics start on 27 July and will involve more than 200 countries in 302 events across 26 different sports. To celebrate, we would love our readers to design a commemorative t-shirt. Draw it for us, and be in to win a $30 prize pack from Crayola! Three entry age groups: preschool (age 1-4), 5-8, 9-12. Create your design on an A5 sheet or download the template and entry form from www.familytimes. co.nz. Post in to PO Box 36 004, Christchurch 8146. Entries close on 13 July 2012.

Museum of Wellington City & Sea

Tell our advertiser you saw it in...

free entry open every day 10am to 5pm Queens Wharf www.museumswellington.org.nz

messing about in boats

__________________________________ Congratulations to our autumn design poster competition winners from our last issue and thanks to the Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetu for their help with judging. Winners are:

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Winter 2012    

BRITA water Filter jugs BRAVE Ice Age 4: Continental Drift Jet Park Hotel – it’s a family affair

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It’s easy to win fantastic prizes with Family Times. Just fill in the entry form and post it to us by the due date, or enter online at www.familytimes.co.nz. This month we have a fantastic line up of prizes with more great giveaways online‌ Good luck!. Check out last issue’s lucky winners online.

Scrat’s nutty pursuit of the cursed acorn, which he’s been after since the dawn of time, has world-changing consequences – a continental cataclysm that triggers the greatest adventure of all for Manny, Diego and Sid. In cinemas 28 June 2012, we have five family passes and merchandise to Ice Age 4: Continental Drift to give away. Entries close 27 June 2012.

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To be in the draw to win, enter online at www.familytimes.co.nz, write your name and address on the back of an envelope or postcard and send to: Wellington Competition, P O Box 36 004, Christchurch to reach us by 13th July 2012, unless stated otherwise. Only one entry per household.

Ice Age 4: Continental Drift

   

    

Jet Park Hotel – it’s a family affair Avoid the rush for the airport with Jet Park Hotel’s new family suites that cater for mum, dad and up to four kids in a tworoom interconnecting suite. Situated by Auckland Airport, everyone can be ready on time – and entertained at the hotel. The suites feature kids’ TV, music, and bed linen, baby bath, toys and cots. There’s a lounge and kitchenette in the parents’ room, and a separate TV in the kids’ room. Factor in Jet Park’s two weeks free car storage, and it’s an excellent-value option. We have a night’s accommodation in a family suite to give away plus a $100 voucher to be used on any goods or services at Jet Park Hotel.





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www.familytimes.co.nz PAGE 13 www.familytimes.co.nz


cool activities

Calendar of Events The winter school holidays are almost here. It’s time to wrap up warmly and find some fun things to do. Wellington has lots of activities on offer for families to enjoy. We’ve got some ideas to get you started. Happy holidays! 23 June

Saturday Morning Market in Porirua. Large, busy and popular market with strong Polynesian and Asian flavour – ethnic food, bric-a-brac, clothing, fresh produce, Pacific Island crafts. From 12am – 10am, Cobham Court, Porirua. Phone 04-236-0077 for more information.

24 June Toy and Die Cast Fair. Take your little

enthusiast along to see Matchbox, kitset models, railway, trucks and much more. From 11am-3pm. Admission is $2. St Mary’s College Gym, Hawkestone Street.

2 July Expressive Characters. Join painter Rob Mcleod as he makes larger-than-life expressive, cartoon-like paintings that escape off the wall. Make up your own imaginary character that you will paint to take home and inhabit your room. City Gallery Wellington, Civic Square.

Capital E National Theatre for Children presents: Ivy - saviour of the dinosaur!

Meet Ivy, a slightly odd cleaning lady who begins her story from her museum basement hideaway. Here she has gathered a vast collection of treasures over the years, all stored inside her time travelling cleaner’s trolley. Join her on a whirlwind adventure of historical discovery where saving the dinosaurs from certain extinction doesn’t seem impossible! Saturday 30 June 2pm, Monday 2 – Saturday 14 July 10am and 11.30am, www.capitale.org.nz.

Sounds Amazing

Discover the science of sound in Te Manawa Museum’s vibrant hands-on interactive exhibition showing at Capital E in the July holidays. Engage hands, eyes and ears in more

than 20 fun exhibits that explore all things sound – from a large scale piano, to a human sound machine, you’ll be answering indepth science questions in no time. Monday 2 – Saturday 14 July, 10am – 4pm www. capitale.org.nz.

The Dominion Post season of Magnolia Street

Jake hates the new inner-city street his mum has dragged him to — it’s full of oddballs! The biggest oddball of all is Mrs Booth, an elderly resident who shows Jake an unexpected side to Magnolia Street. It’s a quirky world where 1944 might be just around the corner and magnolia trees have hearts. Packed full of surprising digital animation. Saturday 21, Wednesday 25 and Saturday 28 July at 6pm, Downstage Theatre www.capitale.org.nz.

Discovery Centres July 2012

WED 4

Inspiration Station – Discover Disco Get your groove on these school holidays. 10am – 1pm. Level 4. Free entry.

THU 5

Rediscover Thursdays – Ukulele Jam at PlaNet Pasifika Come to a Rediscover Thursdays session at one of our Discovery Centres and try something new. If you have your own ukulele, bring it along! 7pm–8pm. Level 4. Free entry.

WED 11 & THUR 12

Discovery Centres Arts Festival Connect with your creative side these school holidays with a two-day arts festival in and around Te Papa’s family-friendly Discovery Centres. All ages welcome! 11am–4pm. Discovery Centres. Free entry.

THU 19

Rediscover Thursdays – Science Night at NatureSpace Bored with your usual Thursday night? Come to this Rediscover Thursdays session and have fun with some science experiments. Spaces are limited. 7pm–8pm. Level 2. Free entry. Make It @ Te Papa! Get crafty with fun, hands-on activities these school holidays. Monday, Tuesday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 11am–12 noon. Cost $3.

www.tepapa.govt.nz/kids 14 www.familytimes.co.nz

Phone (04) 381 7000 www.tepapa.govt.nz

On 10am – 1pm. Visit www.artsight.co.nz for more information.

2-3 July

School holiday craft classes for kids at St George’s Church Hall in Seatoun. On 2 July easy printmaking for cards and gift paper. On 3 July - make a button bracelet or cuff. On 4 July - learn to knit. On 5 July - make the perfect picture frame. On 6 July - sewing projectmake a cool container. Bookings essential. Phone Gillie on 027-485-8485 or visit www. bycrikeythatscrafty.co.nz.

3 July Around the World and Buck again. Meet Buck, the champion dog trialist returning home from a successful world tour who is stuck in quarantine with British bulldog Horatio, French poodle Fifi and the mysterious Dolores Del Mar from Mexico. Tickets are $10.50. Phone 04-527-2168 or visit www.expressions.org.nz for more information.

3 July (and 10 July)

Hands-on cooking classes for children. Chef Gabriele Cagnetta will show you how to make pasta and then you will get to do it yourself under his guidance. You don’t need to bring anything, just your enthusiasm for some fun cooking. From 9.30-11.30am. La Bella Italia, 10 Nevis Street, Petone. Visit www. labellaitalia.co.nz for more information.

3-12 July

Frankie’s Web - a school holiday show by Dan & Dani. These school holidays join Dan and Dani in their “webby” wonderland. Frankiesaurus has left clues to help us get a poor lost mummy spider back home and find all her spider babies. Aimed at two to eight-year-olds. Tickets are $5. Under 2s are free. June Oakley Guide Hall, Te Kupe

Diving suit in the Jack’s Boathouse activity area at Museum of Wellington City & Sea. Road, Paraparaumu. Visit www.dananddani. co.nz for more information.

7 July Waikanae Lions Monster Garage Sale. The Waikanae Lions are holding the monster garage sale of the year. The Waikanae Memorial Hall will be full of a wide range of household goods, building goods, whiteware, furniture, children’s toys and recreational items. From 8am, at 7 Pehi Kupa Street, Waikanae.

9 July My Favourite Things. Make a simple accordion book using collage, drawing and


cool activities

Entertainment painting processes with colours and pictures of your choice. Bring some photos of you and your family to include. From 9am-12pm, Toi Poneke Arts Centre, 61 Abel Smith Street. Phone 021-786-629 for tickets.

11-15 July Nutcracker on Ice. The Imperial Ice Stars return to Wellington with their dazzling new production. An amazing experience for the whole family. Visit www.ticketek.co.nz for tickets.

11 July

Creative writing workshops for intermediate students. Katherine Mansfield Birthplace is running creative writing workshops for intermediate age students - Years 7-8 - in the July school holidays. Tutor: Eirlys Hunter. Phone Katherine Mansfield Birthplace on 04-473-7268 or email educationkmb@xtra.co.nz to reserve a place.

18 August

Hutt Steps Up - fundraiser for Ronald McDonald House. Hutt Steps Up is a variety entertainment concert featuring superb local talent who are donating their time. Family passes available for $30. Horticultural Hall, 32

The winter school holidays are COOL at our place! Celebrate your arty side in the Te Papa Discovery Centres these school holidays. In July, they’re rolling out the Discovery Centre Arts Festival, with two jam-packed days of performances, workshops, and art activities. Highlights of the festival include the Fatcat & Fishface sing-along in NatureSpace, the Hip Hop Hula workshop in PlaNet Pasifika, Art Ninja in Inspiration Station, and Native Styles in Te Huka ä Tai. Don’t forget that the Discovery Centres rock right through the school term too – especially when there’s a $3 activity hour on the go. Find out more about the handson happenings every day. Visit tepapa. govt.nz/kids, phone 04-381-7000, or check out facebook.com/familiesattepapa.

Laings Road, Lower Hutt. Tickets are available from www.dashtickets.co.nz.

25 August Petone Carnival 2012. Entertainment, activities, and more from 12pm and finishing with a spectacular fireworks display at 7:30pm. You’ll find fire sculptures, carnival rides, a massive food fair, market stalls, three stages jampacked with bands and much more. Visit www. petonecarnival.co.nz for more information.

8 September Upper Hutt Spring Festival. Craft stalls, food and entertainment. Main Street, Upper Hutt. Compiled by Tracey-Ann Abery

...

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Camp at El Rancho these holidays Give your kids a week away somewhere they can be challenged, have fun, be safe and learn about God. El Rancho runs holiday camps for kids aged 7 to 12-yearsold. These residential camps (four nights, four days) are packed with a wide range of outdoor activities and fun games, as well as creative, energetic speakers who share the Gospel. The camps have an average of one leader to every five campers. This provides close supervision of activities and lots of personal attention to the needs of individual campers. Check out www. elrancho.co.nz for more information.

Winter is now upon us. It’s a good time to start looking for some entertainment ideas to keep your kids occupied during the cooler months and upcoming school holidays. We’ve put together some fun options to get you started. Te Papa Discovery Centres Go and hang out at Te Papa’s Discovery Centres. You can discover microscopic bugs, strum a ukulele, play shop in the Kiwi Corner Store and try traditional Maori activities. www. tepapa.govt.nz.

PATAKA Art and Museum Money talks to 1 July. The Art of Money to 1 July. Wayne Barrar: Bio Borders - animals and plants in a globalised landscape photography, 19 May – 19 August. Twenty Years of Winners - The Wallace Art Awards Paramount Winners, 1992 -2011, 19 May – 5 August. Plimmerton - a colourful history, 7 July – 11 November. Phil Dadson: Bodytok Quintet - A Sonicsfromscratch production, 26 May – 29 July. You can find Pataka on the corner of Norrie and Parumoana Sts, Porirua. www.pataka.org.nz.

Kapiti Tenpin Bowling Need a break? Go glow bowling and grab a snack at the Tucker Bowl Café. It’s the best place for family fun and entertainment on the Coast. www.kapiti10pin.co.nz.

Holiday specials

Reading Cinemas KidzStuff Theatre presents Reading Cinemas Courtenay has great Goldilocks and the Three Bears entertainment and prices these school holidays. Goldilocks wants to enter the talent quest, but she’s not allowed because she’s not a bear! On 30 June-14 July. Monday – Friday 11am and 1pm. Saturday 11am. Moncrieff Street, Mt. Victoria. Bookings: 04-385-0292.

Museum of Wellington City & Sea Jack’s Boathouse is the new kids’ activity area. Climb in the wooden dingy, flick through some maritime books and steer a sailing ship. From 10am to 5pm. Free entry. www. museumswellington.org.nz.

KIDSCO Kids love KIDSCO, enough to wake their parents early to get to the programme. KIDSCO plans activities for all ages and interests from five to 11 years. www.kidsco.co.nz.

Disney Pixar’s Brave starts on 21 June, and all your favourite Ice Age characters are back in Ice Age 4 on 24 June.

Sounds Amazing

Discover the science of sound with an interactive exhibition showing at Capital E. Engage hands, eyes and ears in more than 20 fun exhibits. From 2-14 July from 10am–4pm. Visit www.capitale.org.nz.

El Rancho Residential Holiday Kids Camps

A place for kids to be challenged, have fun, be safe and learn about God. Find out more at www.elrancho.co.nz.

Trade Aid

Trade Aid Children’s holiday programme. Use wooden printing blocks to make your own

Karori Recreation Centre Preschool programmes School-age programmes Adult classes Facility hire Sports league 251 Karori Road, Karori, Phone 476 8090 Wellington.govt.nz www.familytimes.co.nz

15


cool activities

Winter activities for kids Just because it may be cold, raining and miserable outside does not mean kids can’t have fun during winter. Here are some activities that are simple, will inspire their minds (and get them away from the TV, computer and video games), and will provide hours of entertainment during the colder season.

1. 2.

3. “A Zealandia membership is the way to go for families wanting to save our wildlife – just $101 for a year!” That’s 20 words. cards, bookmarks and wrapping paper. Ages eight-12 years, 10-12 July, 10am-3pm each day.

Phone 04-499-1839 or email wellington@ tradeaid.org.nz for bookings.

Nutrimetics’ Ultra Care+ Night & Day Hand Repair Kit Our hands do the hard yards so why not give them a reward they deserve and stop ageing in its tracks? Nutrimetics’ Ultra Care+ Night & Day Hand Repair Kit works to moisturise, smoothen and hydrate hands. A combination of powerful alpha-hydroxy acids  resurface the hands and reduce pigmentation, while soothing extracts,  rose fruit and myrrh gently nourish and strengthen nails. The day creme contains SPF15 to protect from further damaging UV rays. We have five Nutrimetics’ Ultra Care+ Night & Day Hand Repair Kits to give away worth $34.90 each. Enter online at www.familytimes. co.nz or write your name and address on the back of an envelope or postcard and send to: Fathers Who Dare Win giveaway, PO Box 36 004, Christchurch, to reach us by 13 July 2012. Check out our website for more fantastic competitions.

Let the kids go wild at Zealandia - July school holidays  Book on the exciting Junior Rangers programme for a full or half-day filled with fun and educational activities. Explore the exhibition, learn about being a ranger, build your own wētā hotel or flower press, go treasure hunting and feed eels in the sanctuary valley. There are games, lunch and relax time too. Best suited to five to 12-yearolds, $30-$65. After dark… is Kids’ Night Adventures - a truly memorable experience! Best for seven

WIN,WIN,

4.

5. 6.

WIN!

7.

Make a hut – all that’s required are chairs, tables, old blankets, sheets. Put on a show – have the children choose a book to act out, rehearse, and then perform. A magic show is also another fun idea. Play shop – make some play money and price tags and some items to “sell” and have a shopkeeper. Have an indoor picnic – why should picnics be for the outdoors? Lay down a blanket, and eat the same types of foods you would have in summer. Indoor treasure hunt – write up clues around the houses directing kids to hunt for a hidden prize. Dance – keep warm by staying active. Make a CD of your kids’ favourite songs and if you have access to a camera, film it and maybe even create a home fitness video! Board games – stick with the classics – Scrabble, Monopoly, or get creative and have the children make their own game with their rules and play them together. A sheet of cardboard, felts, glitter, paint, glue, dice – let their imaginations run wild. Also puzzles can provide hours of fun, and

kids can design their own too. Create an obstacle course – use the whole house or a few rooms. Make sure it is safe. 9. Baking – choose a few recipes, bake, decorate and eat. 10. Charades – a classic guessing game – choose a theme or a TV show, song etc and each person has to act it out while everyone else has to guess. Prize for the winner. 11. Play outside – it may be raining and miserable but there is still a lot of fun to be had jumping in puddles, walking with umbrella, breaking ice and freezing water in buckets.

8.

Tell our advertiser you saw it in...

to 12-year-olds, booking essential, $15 child, $30 adult. Free! Relax on Toddler Tuesdays at Rata Café, 10:30am, while Anna Burns captivates your littlies for a 45 minute storytelling session. Also, free with admission, kids’ clue trail sheets - find the letters through the valley to solve the clue. A must for families: gain year-round access to Zealandia for just $101 (two adults and up to three children). For full details visit www.visitzealandia.com, to book call 04-920-9200 ext 3.

KIDSCO

Your children may spend a good deal of their social development time from age five to 11 years in their after-school or holiday programme. KIDSCO aims to enable children to fully experience their interests in a range of interesting and educational activities, and to actively encourage friendships. As parents, we want our kids to be cared for by people who are trained or qualified. That’s why KIDSCO “is the next best place to home.”

SCHOOL HOLIDAY FUN ONLY AT ZEALANDIA …. when you can’t be there for primary school kids during the school holidays! • Themed programmes – fun, imaginative activities & games • Programme design includes each child’s stage of development • No fuss/no charge late pickup for emergencies • Qualified & Trained staff • OSCAR & WINZ • See web site for details

NEW!

BOOK NOW on one of our exciting full-day JUNIOR RANGER ADVENTURES and our creepy crawly KIDS’ NIGHT ADVENTURES and try our FREE CLUE TRAILS.

Photo: Jo Moore

PLUS A FREE KIDS MENU ITEM with each main menu item purchased at Rata Café.

For all conditions, times and details go to www.visitzealandia.com/events or phone 04 920 9200

www.kidsco.co.nz

Photo:Tom Lynch

16 www.familytimes.co.nz

Your Sanctuary... for nature, not for profit


Online payments and kids - an unexpected problem I recently had a startling wake-up call on the security of online devices.

L

et’s set the scene: I work in an online field, at a gaming company that has adults and children among its members. I am also responsible for approving refunds there. I have been online for over a decade-and-a-half and am very technology savvy. However, despite all these things, one day in my inbox I got a receipt for $65 I had spent online. Knowing I hadn’t spent that amount on my Google Wallet account recently I assumed that I had been scammed or phished (had my identity compromised and abused online) – both things I would have thought near to impossible for me. The truth was much worse. I had been very lax in the security of my Android Tablet and had not gotten around to setting the security for purchases properly. My six-year-old son had been playing a few games on it: games I had personally vetted and approved and had no chat or connection to other players. I was not paying too much attention when he asked if he could buy more coins in the game. I said no, but the alarm bells should have rung then. I was complacent and did not think to check the purchasing settings. Long story short, when I checked the account, $65 was just scratching the surface; he had racked up $261.16 in charges in two weeks, the bulk of which was in the last three days.

What can you do to prevent this? Always secure your payment options. Often devices and online accounts store credit card payment details for convenience, but convenience also carries risk. You can require

KidzStuff Theatre presents: Goldilocks and the Three Bears by Michele Amas. Goldilocks wants to enter the talent quest, but she’s not allowed because she’s not a bear! Then Baby Bear comes up with a plan! A show about bear bands, being left out, and discovering different can be cool! Venue: 4 Moncrieff St., (off Elizabeth St.) Mt. Victoria. From 30 June until 14 July, Monday – Friday 11am & 1pm. Saturday 11am. Tickets $10, groups of 10 plus $9 . For bookings phone: 04 385 0292

embarrassment or the trouble I got into with my wife for not preventing this.

a password for every purchase made. You can set this in your device regardless of whether it’s a tablet, IPhone or Android phone. Talk to your children about real money and game money; have them appreciate that even in a game they should check with their parents before buying anything. An ounce of prevention and education can set good habits early on. Disable in-game purchases. Some apps and programmes have this setting built in for this very reason, so if it’s available and you want to avoid unnecessary cost then choose and activate this option. You can elect to enter your credit card details for every purchase and not have them saved in between purchases. This is labour intensive but the safest way to secure payments short of never buying anything online.

By Wayne Webb Webb is a community services manager for SmallWorlds - an online gaming site.

Rangimarie Montessori preschool

Why Montessori preschool education? Visit Rangimarie Montessori Children’s House to see the Montessori philosophy in action. The children learn in a beautiful indoor and outdoor setting, immersing themselves in an environment that enables them to learn when they are ready. They experience activities holistically through specially designed Montessori materials. Language, reading, maths, science, art, music and physical development are offered to children who are ready to begin them. The staff aims to provide a peaceful and calm ERO voucher – Family Times Free Parenting Publicat space for children to develop their own May 2012  interests. Give your child this exceptional opportunity to achieve their potential. Visit www.rmch.co.nz for more information.

Too late, money has been spent unwittingly – now what do I do? The very first thing you should do is secure your device and payment details. Immediately, before you even think of trying to get the money back, accept your responsibility for securing your device first and foremost. If you have spent a small amount then it’s sometimes a valuable lesson to accept the loss and ensure it never happens again. For larger amounts you should write to the company that the payment has been made to. Explain the situation honestly and do not threaten them. Ninety nine times out of 100 it’s your fault and they do not have to fix your problems for you.

Childhood Concepts

Childhood Concepts welcomes parent input and respectfully involves their aspirations for their children into the centre. Teachers are carefully selected to ensure that the right philosophy, quality care and education are provided within all centres. They are passionate about delivering quality practice and show genuine care for the wellbeing of all children. Teachers have fun with the children while supporting and extending their learning, and create a happy and relaxed atmosphere. The daily programme covers languages and cultures, Te Reo, numeracy, literacy, science, technology, the arts, health and physical wellbeing.

Contact your credit card company as a last resort. You can generally explain the situation to your credit card company and they can reverse the charges and credit you the amount back eventually. However this often can cost both you and the vendor handling fees.

ERO guides for parents ™

Early Childhood Education: A Guide for Parents

™

Choosing a School for a Five Year Old

What happened to the $261.16?

™

Going to Secondary School

Needless to say I nearly had a heart attack but promptly set about securing my device and then contacted the companies to see if I could reverse these payments. One of the companies held the line and stated that, as there are plenty of warnings when paying, they were not responsible. The other companies involved were much more understanding and I got the bulk of my money back. In fact I was only out the $65 I had originally noted. The balance was returned to me with kindness and understanding, which did little to lessen my

™

Improving Education Outcomes for Pacific Learners

™

Science in The New Zealand Curriculum: Years 5 to 8

New National Reports

Download copies of these reports, other publications and individual school reports:

www.ero.govt.nz Ph: 04 499 2489  Email: info@ero.govt.nz 

www.familytimes.co.nz

17


london 2012

Olympic glory – NZ’s best talk about what it takes It’s the ultimate goal for any athlete – the prestige and honour to make it to the Olympic Games.

F

rom 27 July to 12 August, billions of people worldwide will watch as the world’s best athletes from more than 204 countries compete in the 2012 London Olympics. Hours and hours of hard work, both physical and mental will be put to the test. Rachel Taniwha from Family Times spoke with several of New Zealand’s best current and former Olympians, and a current coach, about what it takes to make it to the top and their advice for helping kids to be the best.

Barbara Kendall Boardsailing 1992 Olympic gold medallist, 1996 Olympic silver medallist, 2000 Olympic bronze medallist. Finished fifth at 2004 Olympics and sixth at 2008 Olympics. She is the only New Zealand woman to compete in five Olympic Games.

How did you get involved in your sport? I come from a sailing family. I was sailing at 10-days-old, and started competing when I was 12 in a small boat. At 16 I was windsurfing and the next 25 years were spent watering all the different disciplines. Because my older brother and sister were windsurfing it was a natural thing to do.

What role did you parents play? They were the reason: All their passion for sailing was transferred to us kids.

dreams and the feeling of passion for something. Teach them how to plan, how to set goals, how to motivate themselves, how to deal with setbacks, how to love and how to

When did you know you wanted to be the best?

persevere, how to laugh and how to cry, how to be loyal, how to care for the environment, how to be healthy. Sport is a great vehicle for learning all this, but as they play, acknowledge what they’ve learned, then they can apply it to all areas of their life. For kids it is the dare of the dream. Most are too afraid to pursue the loftiest of dreams; most are too scared to put their emotions and whole being on the line, but if you don’t you may never reach your potential and when you do the stars are reachable.

I was born that way. I was competitive, determined and very focused from day one.

Who are your role models/ what inspires you?

Tim Carswell Cycling

My brother set the bench mark - if my brother can win an Olympic medal, so can I. I got my competitive edge from my dad, my grounded state from my mum, and the belief I could win from my brother and sister. Later in my career I got the grounded-ness from my husband and my belief from Janice McLennan (my performance coach) then inspiration from all sorts of mediums.

Current New Zealand track cycling coach, 1998 Commonwealth Games bronze medallist, competed in 1996 and 2000 Olympics.

How much of the athlete’s success is due to physical attributes, to mental attitude or plain hard work?

What is the biggest hurdle you’ve had to overcome to make it this far?

All the riders that we work with are very naturally talented and are identified as they come through the junior under-19 age group. They are then brought into the national training groups that help them develop other areas such as strength and conditioning, mental skills training, nutrition etc to make them capable of being truly world-class athletes. All of the riders put in a lot of hard work to make it to that level.

Two different stages - when I was younger it was the expectation I put on myself. I was tough on my performances; if I didn’t win, I beat myself up. When I was older it was the politics and administrators who didn’t believe in me because I was over 35.

Advice for children wanting to be the best in sport/advice for parents? Teach your kids values: The importance of

NZ’s No.1 parenting publication

ISSN 1178

2011

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Maximise your child’s learning potential

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issue 2011

Check out our Competitions online and win! www.familytimes.com.nz

* Lazer Strike at Lower Hutt only

2 handy locations with FREE parking • 399 Hutt Road, Lower Hutt : Ph 568 3168 • 35 Kenepuru Dr, Porirua: Ph 237 4428

* Karts at Porirua only

www.strikenz.co.nz 18 www.familytimes.co.nz


london 2012 Sophie Frances Pascoe Swimming 2008 Beijing Paralympics – gold medal 100m breaststroke, silver medal 100m butterfly, gold medal 200m individual medley. Shared gold medal for 100m backstroke. She is the youngest ever New Zealand medallist (aged 15 at the time).

How did you get involved in your sport? I started swimming lessons at school, which then lead me to swim at the CCS Independence Games where I was spotted by two Paralympians, Graham Condon and Roly Crichton - the current coach who asked me to join QEII swim club.

What role did you parents play? They played a huge part in supporting me to achieve my goals. They took me to early morning trainings, motivated me on my down days and have just really become the backbone of what I do and I always want them to be proud parents.  

 How do you keep the

athletes focused? 

The hard training is complemented by racing/ competition both on the road and track throughout the year. Most of this racing is chosen for the way it will motivate the riders and make it a bit more fun than just training all the time. In the New Zealand winter we race and train in either Europe or the USA.

 What percentage of the

training is devoted to skill training, competition and psychology preparation? Certain events require more skill or tactics than others and so this varies from individual to individual. This also has the flow-on effect to the quantity of racing each rider does. Mental skill training has become a bigger part of our programme in recent years and we have a specific sports psych that our athletes work with to facilitate this.

 Tips for other coaches in

getting the best from their athletes? Try and make it fun. It can’t be fun all the time, but if there isn’t any fun in there at all the athletes will turn off pretty quickly.

The Sir Edmund Hillary Outdoor Pursuits Centre of New Zealand – School Holiday Programmes

When did you know you wanted to be the best? At the age of 10 I told my grandfather before he passed that I wanted to win a gold medal for him at the 2008 Beijing Paralympics so that’s when I guess I really wanted to be the best and on top of the world.

Who are your role models/ what inspires you? I would definitely have to say that my coach plays a huge role motivational-wise. Every day he is down there waiting for me to be the best I can be, he wants the same dream and goal as what I do. I believe our coach and athlete relationship inspires the both of us to put everything we have into every training session and race.

What is the biggest hurdle you’ve had to overcome to make it this far?

Every day is a hurdle. To be the best athlete in the world in your discipline of sport you have to go outside of your comfort zone. The biggest hurdle for me though was getting over failure, from being on top of the world and then becoming second hurts and it’s a challenge in yourself to push through those hard times. That’s where motivation has to take over.

Advice for children wanting to be the best in sport/advice for parents? Believe in yourself and always push yourself

to the limit to achieve your dreams and goals. They can always come true if you work for them. Supportive family and friends are the best people to have around you when working towards those dreams and goals.

What does bottom wiggling and healthy teeth have in common? Have a look at BarnaBee’s two minute Buzzing & Brushing music video at www. barnabee.co.nz and see for yourself. Better yet, visit BarnaBee with your children and you’ll soon observe them bottom wiggling their way through a two-minute brush with an enthusiasm that may be a little unexpected. (You might want to get this on video. It’s very cute). Brushing for two minutes twice a day with full fluoride toothpaste is such an effective way to prevent tooth decay. It’s a wonder we don’t all make it an automatic and essential part of our day. Then, of course, there’s real life. Often it seems like the energy we expend on encouraging our children to brush is disproportionate to the two-to-three minutes it actually takes. Trust us, we get it. And we think we can help. You’ll be hearing a lot about BarnaBee and the Bee Healthy Regional Dental Service in the coming months because Bee Healthy is committed to improving oral health outcomes for your children and the families in our community. A key part of achieving

this is ensuring your experiences with us are positive, meaningful and memorable. Visit www.beehealthy.org.nz to learn more and have fun buzzing and brushing.

WIN,WIN,

WIN!

Family Times and OPC www.opc.org. nz have Two Holiday Action Challenge Programmes to give away, valued at $615 each! Choose between OPC Tongariro – five days of action packed fun and adventure with tramping, abseiling, high ropes, mountaineering, camping, canoeing, caving and rock climbing or OPC Great Barrier for sea kayaking, rock climbing, abseiling, sailing, surf kayaking, camping, steep creeking and coasteering. Ages 14 – 18 years. Transport to the centre not included. Enter online at www.familytimes.co.nz or write your name and address on the back of an envelope or postcard and send to: OPC giveaway, PO Box 36 004, Christchurch, to reach us by 13 July 2012. Check out our website for more fantastic competitions.

›› TONGARIRO MOUNTAIN BASE ›› GREAT BARRIER ISLAND MARINE BASE ›› FAMILY ADVENTURE CHALLENGE ›› DADS & LADS ›› MUMS & DAUGHTERS ›› LADIES WEEKENDS ›› TAILORED PROGRAMMES

The Sir Edmund Hillary Outdoor Pursuits Centre of New Zealand www.familytimes.co.nz

19


gardening corner

The vege patch with Jonesy Earthworms kept in a worm farm are the ultimate pets. They don’t bark at night and we don’t have to take them for walks. In fact we don’t have to buy them pet food as they help us make food. They eat our kitchen scraps and reward us with “vermicast,” the very best plant food and ideal ingredients for making your own potting mix.

T

he liquid vermicast that they produce is richly concentrated and micro bacterialaden. Earthworms and compost worms excrete this as they digest our garden and kitchen waste. It can be diluted 10:1 with water and sprayed on all your veges, fruit and flowers. Solid vermicast or “worm poo” that they also produce when digesting is used as a soil conditioner. Place a handful around your flower plants or side dress you veges; it’s also good for roses and fruit trees. The worm’s menu is vegetable and fruit scraps, dolomite and lime, paper, grass clippings and teabags. Their favourite foods are banana skins and apple cores. Worms do not like meat, bread and orange peel.

like to live above the ground)

• Each farm recycles a fair amount of waste. Operating instructions for your worm farm 1. Soak the newspapers in water and stuff all three of the tyres full of the damp newspaper (avoid coloured or glossy pages), one sheet at a time.

2.

Place the sheet of wood wrapped in plastic on top of the bricks or telephone books.

3.

Put the first stuffed tyre on top of the wood. Put an old sack or carpet inside to make a sort of nest for the new worms.

4. Make your own worm farm built entirely from reused and recycled materials You will require: • Old carpet or sack if available (optional) 5. • Phone books or old bricks • Wooden board 550mm x 550mm • Small piece of silage wrap or similar • Three car tyres of similar size • Something suitable to use as a lid (piece of 6. • • •

wood with a rock on it is okay) 35 Saturday newspapers (approximately) One container – suggest an old pot or bucket (to collect the liquid) Lots of tiger worms or red worms (they

Fill this bottom tyre with bedding material e.g. horse manure/rotting pea straw/ compost and then tip the worms in. Cover immediately with a thick layer of wet newspaper. Now put the other two stuffed tyres on top. Feed regularly with kitchen scraps by lifting up the newspaper. Make sure the farm is kept moist to the touch. Always replace the newspaper to keep it dark. Keep the worms and bedding covered with damp newspaper, plus an old sack or carpet (also damp). Place your lid on top of the tyre to prevent fly problems. Make sure the worms’ bedding is always moist – you may not need to add extra water if

An end to painful heels! Both adults and children can suffer with crippling heel pain. Expert help is available at Active Feet Podiatry. In adults, the most common cause for this pain is a strain to a structure known as the plantar fascia. In children aged 11 to 14 this is usually an irritation to a growth plate in the calcaneus or heel bone. This condition is

20 www.familytimes.co.nz

be found in animal manure or rotting pea straw. Or buy them from a local worm farmer – check your phone book. Now you have a worm farm you can start recycling all your kitchen scraps. Empty them into the farm and feed the worms daily or whenever is convenient. It’s a good idea to site your worm farm reasonably close to the back door, in a sunny spot. Healthy soil, healthy food, healthy people!

known as Sever’s disease. Dr. Halpine can prescribe exercises and fit orthotic devices to give relief to both these groups of sufferers. Call Active Feet Podiatry to get an appointment. Its offices are conveniently located in Harbour City Tower, 29 Brandon Street, Wellington, and at the Ngaio Medical Centre. Phone 04-4738696. wwwActiveFeetPodiatry.com.

you give them lots of moist food scraps.

7.

As the tyre stack fills up (normally takes several months), you can slide out the bottom tyre and empty it of worm castings/vermicast. You can use this in the garden or compost heap.

8.

The empty tyre is now ready for reuse – stuff with fresh, moist newspapers and place on top of the tyre stack.

9.

Regularly empty the pot of worm run – dilute 8 to 1 with water and spray or pour on to and around your special plants.

Alan Jones (Jonesy) is the 2010 New Zealand Gardener of the Year. He looks after Leeston Consolidated School’s veggie gardens and keeps school parents up-to-date with tips for home gardens.

Tell our advertiser you saw it in...

10. The nutrients from your kitchen scraps

are now available for you to use in your organic garden and your worm population will have increased remarkably.

11. Worms suitable for your worm farm can

Lots to see at Te Papa Kids’ Store Te Papa Kids’ Store on level two of the museum is full of wonderful gifts for children that are educational, fun, and distinctively New Zealand. There is an extensive range of books available for children of all ages plus a great range of beautiful, cuddly soft toys to delight any child’s heart. Whether it’s a birthday

gift or you just want something special for a child, Te Papa Kids’ Store is the place to find it. There’s also a great range of lower priced items that are perfect for spending pocket money during the holidays. Kahu the Kea is off on yet another adventure around New Zealand but he will return for live performances during the school holidays. In the meantime, check out his website on http://www.tepapa.govt.nz/WhatsOn/ Kahu-KidsAtTePapa to read about his latest adventures in Antarctica!


market place

Dining

Term 4, 2012

Parties

l o o h Sc Te r m es t a D

Tuesday 15 October to no later than Friday 14 December

Term 1, 2013 Between Monday 28 January and Thursday 7 February to 19 April

Term 2, 2013 Monday 6 May to Friday 12 July

2012 public holidays remaining

2012/2013 primary and intermediate Term 3, 2012

Labour Day - 22 October (Monday) Christmas Day - 25 December Boxing Day - 26 December

Monday 16 July to Friday 28 September

Term 4, 2012 Monday 15 October to no later than Thursday 20 December

Term 1, 2013 Between Monday 28 January and Thursday 7 February to 19 April

Term 2, 2013 Monday 6 May to Friday 12 July

2012/2013 secondary and composite Term 3, 2012 Monday 16 July to Friday 28 September

Entertainment

Kids Fun

Shopping

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market place

Day Trips -

Family Holidays Hawke’s Bay

           

Your ultimate holiday experience

                                                                                                                        

fun Children’s

entertainment galore!

eat Onsite Storkey’s

Restaurant & Bar

choice

A bed for every budget

space

Spread out & explore! Call 0800 457 275 or 06 843 9126 Visit 11 Storkey St Napier

N09-01211

Book online www.kennedypark.co.nz

Win a

Holiday Houses escape!* Enter our draw online and you could win

$500 worth of accommodation at one of our amazing holiday houses.

NZ’s No.1 parenting publication

ISSN 1178

2011

5268

ISSue Summer

AU

CK

L AN

D

CHR

ISTC

HUR

CH Winter

A news

maga

Childhood traum

the suc ces flic r on ys to ily con Ke fam ing Optimum ma nag sleep

Helping a kids bounce back

Wa

n rde g er gagro winJon es n su mm veg es Ala Th et you r fro m Ge h hel p ays wit Wi n giv eaw Wi n ion s, Wi nmp etit rs Co vou che and

Maximise your child’s learning potential

Kia Kaha Christc

Eight-page hurch on “the supplement new normal ”

zine

and

onlin

e resou

rce for

famil

ies

www

.fami

lytim

es.co

.nz

IN CIN EMA

S

issue 2011

ISSN 1176 7944

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Win Competitions, giveaways nt and fro vouche rs sfu lly t ho me

www.holidayhouses.co.nz/win

Check out our Competitions online and win! www.familytimes.com.nz

22 www.familytimes.co.nz

Thousands of amazing holiday houses are available right now, but they fill up fast so don’t delay in booking a winter getaway for your family. *Terms and conditions available online at www.holidayhouses.co.nz/win


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Family Times Wellington, Winter 2012  

Family TImes Wellington, Winter 2012

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