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Contents

August 2018

VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 1

[24-25]

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High School Football Schedules

24-25 On the Cover:

The Factory Church

32-34

Inside a Local Law Enforcement’s Citizens’ Academy

[19]

[32-34] Follow Us >>>

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Family Life Publications

Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

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.......................... Perspective

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.............................. Calendar

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................ Woodstock Minute

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................... Sheriff Reynolds

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.................... Community Life

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................... Senator Speaks

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....... Summer Concert Photos

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............... Community Partner

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............................ Quotables

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........................ Book Review

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......................... Artist Profile

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................... Friday Night Live

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.................... Ribbon Cuttings

familylifepublications

@FamilyLifeMags

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Publisher’s Perspective

PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHER Jack Tuszynski Jack@FamilyLifePublications.com EDITORIAL Julie Senger Julie@FamilyLifePublications.com ART Candice Williams Candice@FamilyLifePublications.com Laurie Litke Laurie@FamilyLifePublications.com SALES Janet Ponichtera Janet@FamilyLifePublications.com

We’ve had incredible support from so many people and partners who have stayed with us from the beginning, joined us in the process, and praised us from the sidelines. Honestly, I always anticipated that we would. Growing up here, it was just common knowledge and practice to actively participate in efforts that create positive change for everyone. We are all fortunate to call these communities ours and bring these magazines to you. Thank you, and God bless.

Family Life Publishing Group, Inc. 630 East Main Street Canton, GA 30114

770-213-7095

FamilyLifePublications.com Family Life publications have the largest monthly circulation of direct-mailed community magazines in our area. Woodstock Family Life is a monthly community magazine with a total print count of over 30,000, direct mailing over 28,000 copies to Towne Lake, downtown Woodstock up to Hickory Flat and toward the Roswell border. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists, and submissions are not necessarily those of the editor/publisher, and the publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. Woodstock Family Life magazine is not responsible for errors and omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher. Subscriptions are available for $25 per year. Please contact us for payment options.

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© 2018 All rights reserved.

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The second part of our plan was to use sustainably sourced papers that have been manufactured and printed reflecting my personal unwavering concern for our environment. Our magazines use well designed and informative content to engage, inform, and entertain, using trees grown exclusively for our papers that are created without harsh and toxic chemicals, which are detrimental to fragile streams and waterways. We’re so very proud of that.

In fact, some of you may be receiving this magazine for the very first time, and there’s a mighty good reason for that. Starting with this issue, our magazines are now reaching more homes and businesses than ever — 30,000 each issue, every month. We are so pleased to be able to place this in your home. Our community calendar, articles from neighborhood professionals, insight from local leaders, and opportunities for you to volunteer and get involved with charities are here for you. Please indulge yourself, and enjoy the read.

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t has been a very satisfying first five years publishing our community magazines for you to enjoy each month. Before we opened our doors in July 2013, the plan was to deliver a publication that put your family and our community first while promoting local businesses and providing a resource to help readers plan exciting evenings and weekends close to home. Andrew Carnegie once said, “If you want to be happy, set a goal that commands your thoughts, liberates your energy, and inspires your hopes.” That is what we did.

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Gavin Adams, Steven Anderson, Jessica Asbell, Cyndi Braun, Cobb EMC, Jyl Craven, Jennifer A. Dattolo, James B. Depew, Joshua Fuder, Corey Harkins, Lisa-Marie Haygood, Milan Johnson Wade, Tim Morris, Tina Morris, Vishant Nath, Brittany Page, Michael Petrosky, Frank Reynolds, Sen. Bruce Thompson, Susan Zereini

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Built From the Community for the Community

Jack Tuszynski, Publisher

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Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


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Calendar Ongoing Water Quality Month — August is the time of year when many people are enjoying the last bits of summer recreational activities involving water. But these bodies of water are threatened by increasing water pollution. The Clean Water Act was passed in 1972, but most people are unaware of the little ways they can pollute their water. Water sustains all life, and entire ecosystems depend on it for their survival. Water Quality Month reminds us to take a long, hard look at what your household and community are doing to protect sources of fresh water. 7th Annual Stand Up for Stand Down Toiletry Drive for Georgia’s Homeless Veterans — Through September 7, this drive collects much-needed toiletry and personal care items to fill “comfort bags” for veterans who attend Stand Down events throughout North and Central Georgia. “Stand Down” is a military term that refers to the time when troops are brought back from the battlefield for rest and recuperation. Travel/samplesize items are needed. Donations can be dropped off at 26 Georgia Cancer Specialists locations in Georgia. For more information, call 770-864-5347. For a list of locations, visit Facebook.com/SU4SD YPOW A.M. Coffee — Each Thursday morning, join Young Professionals of Woodstock for coffee and networking. 7:00am, Copper Coin Coffee, 400

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Jerry G. White’s Immutable Evidence Art Exhibit — The images contained in this exhibit attempt to capture the beauty and uniqueness of commonplace things that are rendered uncommon via the constantly changing

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Chambers Street, Woodstock. 770-5926056. MainStreetWoodstock.org/connect/ GROW Monthly Meeting — On the third Thursday of each month, join the volunteers in this group to help plan Woodstock’s seasonal plantings, annual Scarecrow Invasion, and downtown holiday decor. 6:00pm, Chattahoochee Tech Woodstock Conference Room, 8371 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-5926056. Design@mainstreetwoodstock. org. MainStreetWoodstock.org/ community/#beauty Woodstock’s Farm Fresh Market — Each Saturday through December, the Woodstock Farm Fresh Market’s rules guarantee that it is the best market in the region to get locally grown, fresh produce because produce vendors are required to grow at least 85 percent of the product they bring to the market, and they are subject to inspection to confirm this. 8:30am-12:00pm, Market Street, downtown Woodstock. 770-9240406. VisitWoodstockGa.com Holly Springs Young Professional Experience (HYPE) — On the first Tuesday of each month, young in age, young in your profession, or young at heart — doesn’t matter. Meet at Holly Springs’ newest coffee shop for a cup of coffee and some laid-back networking with local professionals. 7:00-8:00am, The Coffee Vineyard, 2800 Holly Springs Parkway, Suite 100, Holly Springs. 770-345-5536. Facebook.com/ events/556923864658166/

effect of light, shadow, color, and composition. Tuesday-Friday 11:00am5:00pm and Saturday 12:00-5:00pm, Cherokee Arts Center, 94 North Street, Canton. 770-704-6244, CherokeeArts.org

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Police Department National Night Out — National Night Out is designed to heighten crime and drug prevention awareness, generate support for local anticrime efforts, strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships, and send a message to criminals that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back. 6:00-9:00pm, The Park at City Center, 101 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. 678-614-9104.

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Author Susanna Kearsley, Bellewether — Bestselling author Susanna Kearsley does solid research and has a butterfly’s delicate touch with characters; a great combination of skills to possess for great historical fiction. 6:30pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Suite 138, Woodstock. 770516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

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21st Annual Woodstock Summer Concert Series Presents Everclear — This is a FREE concert! FREE shuttle service is also provided from the Outlet Shoppes on Ridgewalk Parkway. 7:30pm, Northside Hospital Cherokee Amphitheater, 101 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. WoodstockConcertSeries. com

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Author Kristan Higgins’ Good Luck With That — This New York Times bestselling author is beloved for her heartfelt novels filled with humor and wisdom. In this new novel, she tackles an issue every woman deals with: body image and self-acceptance. 2:00pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Suite 138, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

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Main Street Mastermind “Interviewing and Selecting Top Performers” — In this FREE workshop, Jim Bulger, president of WorkThrive Consulting, will discuss common mistakes made in hiring and will share steps and techniques that employers can use to better identify, interview, and select motivated and engaged employees.

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


25 8:00-9:30am, Chambers at City Center, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-5926056. MainStreetWoodstock.org

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A Novel Idea — This month, a stellar lineup of talented authors will discuss and read from their science fiction and fantasy novels. The cafe has sandwiches, salads, and desserts. BYOB. Door prizes will be given away! This event is FREE and open to the public. 7:009:00pm, East Main Cafe (inside Audio Intersection), 210 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-670-9333. Marsha.Cornelius@ hotmail.com

Jonathan Peyton

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Woodstock Roots — The series has been centered around bluegrass since its inception in 2016. This year, the series will transition from regional bluegrass artists to feature local Americana artists. Jonathan Peyton will be performing on this date. 7:00-9:00pm, Elm Street Arts Village Event Green, 111 Elm Street, Woodstock. 770-592-6056. VisitWoodstockGa.com

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Volunteer Aging Council (VAC) Fundraising Luncheon — Support VAC programs, and get a wonderful lunch for only $5.00! Bring a friend, coworker, family member, or yourself, and enjoy a tasty lunch while supporting the seniors and veterans of Cherokee County. Stay and eat, or pick up and go. RSVP the location, so the amazing chefs can be prepared for all who come to support. 11:30am-1:00pm, Autumn Leaves of Towne Lake, 1962 Eagle

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

Drive, Woodstock. 678-230-4067. VACCherokeeGa.org

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Parent’s Night Out — Drop the kids off at the pool, so you can enjoy adult time! Kids will play in the pool, enjoy a pizza dinner, do crafts, play games, and end the night with a movie! 5:30-10:00pm, Cherokee Aquatic Center, 1200 Wellstar Parkway, Canton. 678-880-4760. CRPA.net

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Movies in the Park — Sherlock Gnomes will be shown outdoors in downtown historic Woodstock. Before the movie, take a stroll down Main Street where you can enjoy over eighteen great restaurants, thirty charming stores, and watch the train pass through town. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs! FREE! Movie starts around 8:30pm, Northside Hospital Cherokee Amphitheater, 101 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. 770-5926000 x1952. GeorgiaMoviesInThePark. com

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Story Time With Author Shelli Johannes’ Cece Loves Science and Authors M.J. Pullen & Ricki Schultz — Join Shelli Johannes for a special story time where she will be reading and signing her new children’s picture book, followed by two bestselling contemporary women’s fiction authors reading from their latest novels, Sugar Street (Pullen) and Switch and Bait (Schultz). Story time 11:00am & Pullen/Schultz 2:00pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Suite 138, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

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Business Startup Seminar — Learn the Dos, Hows, and Don’ts in this FREE seminar presented by Tim Grady, business advisor, entrepreneur, author, and public speaker with more than 30 years’ experience working with entrepreneurs and business owners. 8:30am (8/18) & 7:00pm (8/23), Comfort Suites, 340 Parkway 575, Woodstock. EventBrite.com

2nd Annual Strut Your Mutt — Contests for best dressed (small and large dogs), best trick, and dogowner look-alike categories. Dogs must be up-to-date on all shots. No female dogs in heat. Unruly dogs will be asked to leave. Half of all proceeds will be donated to the Cherokee County Animal Shelter. There will be county agencies, dog-related vendors, and a free Frosty Paws for every registered dog. $10 per dog. 8:30am, Patriots Park, 1485 Kellogg Creek Road, Acworth. 770-924-7768. CRPA.net

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SchmoozaPalooza — This event is designed to bring businesses together in a fun and casual networking environment. Exhibitors will have a tabletop display that will allow them to promote their business and make new contacts. Attendees will enjoy door prizes, food, and fun while previewing the latest products and services featured. 4:007:00pm, Woodstock City Church, 150 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock. 770-3450400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Author Lisa Patton, Rush — This author reads from her newest novel, which takes a sharp, nuanced look at a centuries-old tradition while exploring the complex, intimate relationships between mothers and daughters and female friends. 2:00pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Suite 138, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

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Cherokee Chamber of Commerce Leadership Symposium 2018 — This one-day conference will feature four speakers who will share thoughtprovoking information to be used both on the job and in life. $50/members, $75/ future members. Cost includes continental breakfast, lunch, and two networking breaks. 8:30am-4:00pm, Falany [continued on page 8] WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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LIBRARY EVENTS SequoyahRegionalLibrary.org HICKORY FLAT 2740 East Cherokee Drive, Canton, 770-345-7565 ROSE CREEK 4476 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock, 770-591-1491 WOODSTOCK 7735 Main Street, Woodstock, 770-926-5859 SLIME WARS! August 10, 4:30pm, Woodstock Make two different kinds of slime, and see which one you like better. You’ll get to keep what you make! Children must be accompanied by an adult. Registration is required. INKLINGS WRITERS CRITIQUE GROUP August 11 & 25, 11:00am, Woodstock Love to write, but need some feedback? All writers interested in joining a group to share writings, ideas, and feedback are invited to attend! MAKER MONDAY August 13, 4:30pm, Rose Creek We’re all makers! Get creative in the pop-up maker space with self-directed making, tinkering, and STEAM activities. This is for ages 7-12; children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. TODDLER STEAM — ROBOTS! August 13, 10:30am, Woodstock Explore with Bee Bots! Try to take them through a maze, or just learn about programming. There are so many things they can do! Children must be accompanied by a participating adult. TEEN COFFEE HOUSE & OPEN MIC NIGHT August 17, 6:30pm, Woodstock Tweens and teens grades 6-12 are invited to join the Teen Advisory Board and showcase their talents! Coffee and refreshments will be provided. Registration is required. ART WALK August 17, 6:30pm, Woodstock All ages are invited to display their art during the Teen Coffee House & Open Mic Night. Registration is required. PROJECT PINTEREST August 19, 3:00pm, Woodstock Explore Pinterest-inspired creative projects! Registration is required. BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP August 21, 12:00pm, Woodstock Enjoy coffee, conversation, and a book discussion with

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Calendar continued from page 7

Performing Arts Center, 7300 Reinhardt College Parkway, Waleska. 770-345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

new friends. This month’s selection is South of Broad by Pat Conroy. All ages are welcome; new members are encouraged. MANGA CLUB August 21, 5:00pm, Hickory Flat Teens are encouraged to read and discuss different manga series and related topics. This program will encourage reading and group discussion in a fun and innovative way. Refreshments are provided. MUSIC AND MOVES August 22, 10:30am, Hickory Flat Get moving and grooving with friends from Go Noodle! It’ll be a dance party to remember! Children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. FALL GARDENING August 23, 11:00am, Rose Creek Learn about the new Rose Creek Seed Library, how to extend the life of your garden, and the best vegetables to grow in the fall. Presented by the Cherokee County UGA Extension and the Cherokee County Master Gardeners. HOMESCHOOLER’S BOOK CLUB August 23, 1:30pm, Rose Creek Join a community of readers who meet once a month to enjoy some lively conversation about literature. This month’s theme is “Reader’s Choice.” Children should read a book independently or with a caregiver and share a brief book talk about their book with the group. Refreshments will be provided. HOMESCHOOL FAMILIES MEET & GREET August 24, 10:30am, Hickory Flat Homeschool families are welcome to meet with other local homeschool families, enjoy refreshments, and learn about all the services offered at the library! Children must be accompanied by an adult. FAMILY GAME NIGHT August 27, 6:00pm, Hickory Flat Take a timeout from the back-to-school rush, and enjoy an evening as a family! Compete as a team in popular “Hollywood Game Night” games, enjoy free refreshments, and win prizes! This is for all ages; children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

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Discover Woodstock Scavenger Hunt — This scavenger hunt provides a unique experience, as participants team up to gather photographic evidence of their journey through 100 different venues in Woodstock. Participants will have two weeks to complete as many of the tasks or challenges as they can out of a list of 100. Teams will be competing to win a $100 Downtown Dollars gift certificate. downtown Woodstock, 770-924-0406. VisitWoodstockGa.com

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Author Ilona Andrews, Magic Triumphs — Mercenary Kate Daniels must risk all to protect everything she holds dear in this epic, can’t-miss entry in this thrilling, #1 New York Times bestselling urban fantasy series. 7:00pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Suite 138, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

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Downtown Buzz — This event is open to Main Street members and invited guests. There will be networking and a brief topical program. FREE! 8:00am, the Chambers at City Center, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-5926056. MainStreetWoodstock.org

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


SEPTEMBER

6, 13, 20, & 27 Brown Bag Concert Series — Each Thursday in September, enjoy a FREE lunchtime concert! 12:00-1:00pm, The Park at City Center, 101 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. 770-517-6788. VisitWoodstockGa.com

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Good Morning Cherokee Breakfast — Held the first Thursday of each month, the Chamber’s monthly breakfast meetings offer both current and future Chamber members the opportunity to conduct business and network with more than 200 fellow business leaders. Please register online by 3:00pm on the Tuesday before the event. 7:00am, Northside Hospital Cherokee Conference Center, 1130 Bluffs Parkway, Canton. 770-3450400. CherokeeChamber.com

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Night Hike — Please bring your own flashlight or headlamp for a cool evening hike with fellow Cherokee County neighbors. $10 per person, preregistration is required. All ages welcome. 8:00pm, Lewis Park, 200 East Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock. 770-924-7768. CRPA.net

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Friday Night Live Art Night — Enjoy the artistic side of downtown Woodstock on this fun night! Thanks to the extended hours during this popular event, everyone has a chance to explore the variety of shops downtown. 6:009:00pm, downtown Woodstock. 770-5926056. VisitWoodstockGa.com

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Listen to Your Ceiling Fan By Cobb EMC staff

[HomeLife] If you could have a conversation with your ceiling fan about energy efficiency, it might say the following:

“I can help lower summer cooling costs by making the air around me seem cooler than it actually is.” “I’ll run fast or slow, but first raise the thermostat setting three to five degrees to save energy.” “Spin me counter clockwise in the summer, and I’ll push the cool air downward.” “Don’t leave me running for too long, or my motor might heat up an empty room.” “Turn me off when you leave the room. I’ll enjoy the beauty rest!”

If you desire energy savings, it would be wise to listen to what your ceiling fan is “saying.”

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These tips were provided by Cobb EMC, a not-for-profit electric cooperative. 770-429-2100. CobbEMC.com

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Early Orthodontic Intervention By Vishant Nath, D.M.D.

[HealthyLife] Parents often ask, “At what age does my child need to see an orthodontist?” The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children should have an orthodontic evaluation no later than age seven. This may seem young, but early orthodontic intervention can prevent the need for more extensive orthodontic work once your child gets older. Over the years, the perception of orthodontics has evolved. One or more parents of many of today’s children have had braces themselves. So, there is already a built-in understanding of the importance and benefit of orthodontic treatment. Orthodontists can spot subtle issues with

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

jaw growth and emerging teeth, even while baby teeth are still present. The evaluation may show that your child’s development is on track, or that your child could benefit from early orthodontic intervention, or even that a future visit will require orthodontic treatment (in other words, a “wait and see” approach is appropriate). In any case, the only way to find out is to schedule a visit as recommended. Early orthodontic intervention can allow an orthodontist to achieve results that might not be possible once the face and jaws have finished growing. In other words, delaying the initial orthodontic evaluation can mean that it is too late to fix certain issues that might be present in your child, or that fixing the issues will require much longer and more extensive orthodontic treatment. Even if your child’s teeth look straight to you, an orthodontic evaluation can reveal

bad habits your child may have such as mouth breathing, thumb-sucking, teeth grinding or clenching, or even biting the cheek. These habits can lead to issues in the future, so the sooner the habits are identified and corrected, the better. Orthodontists can also monitor for uneven facial appearance. For example, they can identify if the lower jaw is abnormally smaller or larger than the upper jaw. Orthodontic treatment can improve the way the lips meet. These may seem like insignificant issues, but when they are identified before the jaws and face are finished growing, corrections can be made using early orthodontic intervention.

Dr. Vishant Nath is the owner of Canton/Alpharetta/Roswell Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics. 678-352-1090. KidsHappyTeeth.com

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Woodstock Minute

City of Woodstock Police and Fire Departments Announce

Citizens’ Public Safety Academy By Brittany Page

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he Woodstock Police and Fire Departments are now accepting applications for the fall Citizens’ Public Safety Academy, which is scheduled to begin on Thursday, August 30, 2018. Citizens’ Public Safety Academy is a series of educational classes designed to enhance the understanding of various aspects within the police and fire profession. The program is intended to strengthen the relationship between citizens and the Woodstock Police and Fire Departments as well as spotlight the responsibilities of public safety personnel and the inherent risks associated with these professions. Some of the classes offered during this series include: CRASE (Civilian Response to Active Shooter) seminar, criminal investigation procedures, crime prevention, extrication demonstration, thermal imaging camera presentation, fire safety, and fire prevention. The class will also tour the Woodstock Fire Department and Cherokee County Fire Training Center as well as participate in a judgmental shooting demonstration at the Georgia Public Safety Training Center at the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office.

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The Citizens’ Public Safety Academy will be held every Thursday evening, from 6:30-8:30pm, August 30 - November 8. Anyone who lives, works, or has an expressed interest in Woodstock may apply for the Citizens’ Public Safety Academy. Applicants are required to be at least nineteen years of age and submit to a background investigation prior to acceptance in the program. Once accepted, positions are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. Citizens’ Public Safety Academy applications are available at the Woodstock Police Department, located at 12453 Highway 92 in Woodstock, or by visiting WoodstockGa.gov/police/cpsa. The deadline for accepting applications is Monday, August 27, 2018.

Brittany Page is the information officer for the City of Woodstock. 770592-6000. WoodstockGa.gov

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Reading —

An Essential Tool for Young Children

[HealthyLife] Reading is an essential tool for young children to connect and learn valuable language skills. Who doesn’t remember reading or listening to Where the Wild Things Are, Amelia Bedelia, Frog and Toad are Friends, or The Little House? In an age where digital technology seems to overshadow the world, characters in Pippi Longstocking, Ferdinand the Bull, and Dr. Seuss’ books still have something to “say.” Woodstock Pediatric Medicine has recently partnered with Reach Out and Read, a national nonprofit organization that promotes the importance of early reading and literacy in children. This program

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

By Milan Johnson Wade, C.P.N.P. will be the first program implemented in Cherokee County, alongside 142 other clinical sites throughout Georgia, and over 5000 sites nationwide. This program provides developmentally appropriate books at each well child exam beginning at six months to five years old. This will help parents introduce reading early to their child to help them gain a love for learning by reading. Parents, older siblings, and grandparents who read to these children will become their first teachers prior to enrolling in a school setting. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children who are read to at an early age show valuable language

development and strong parent-child relationships. Research shows that children who participate in the Reach Out and Read program score up to six months ahead of their peers on testing. This focus on early learning helps children develop strong vocabulary skills, so they enter school at a level above their peers. The children in Cherokee County and surrounding counties are going to greatly benefit from these free books. If you would like to learn how you can help, please contact Woodstock Pediatric Medicine.

Tips to Keep Reading Fun • • • •

Turn off electronic devices. Teach by example. Read together as a family. Introduce children to the library.

Milan Johnson Wade is a certified pediatric nurse practitioner for Woodstock Pediatric Medicine, 2000 Professional Way, #200, Woodstock. 770-517-0250. WoodstockPeds.com

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The 26th Georgia International

LAW ENFORCEMENT EXCHANGE By Sheriff Frank Reynolds

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he flight attendant walked down the aisle collecting our morning breakfast, as we made our final descent into Israeli airspace. It had been ten years since I flew to the Middle East, and I couldn’t help but think of my first flight into Baghdad, which was a spiraling corkscrew descent from twenty thousand feet, and the mission was completely different. I never knew if I’d have the opportunity to return to this part of the world, but as our plane touched down in Israel, a content and peaceful smile spread across my face. I knew this experience was going to be extraordinary. I was one of 21 law enforcement executives selected to attend the 26th Georgia International Law Enforcement Exchange (GILEE) delegation to Israel. “GILEE is a research unit within Georgia State’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies and was founded in 1992 by Dr. Robbie Friedmann. The program works continuously to improve public safety by enhancing inter-agency cooperation, partnerships, and professional educational training among the world’s top law enforcement communities, most recently Israel and Hungary. To date, it has offered more than 200 special briefings to more than 32,000 law enforcement officers, corporate security personnel, and community leaders. GILEE has carried out

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more than 450 programs and produced more than 1,500 students,” (GILEE.GSU.edu). Our delegation spent the next two weeks traveling throughout Israel to learn how our counterparts provide law enforcement services to their communities. Israel is internationally known for its innovative technology and its contemporary approach to law enforcement services. Throughout our travels across Israel, I was particularly impressed with how Israeli law enforcement emphasized community policing. Dr. Friedmann accurately describes community policing as, “Policy and strategy aimed at achieving more effective and efficient crime control, reduced fear of crime, improved quality of life, improved police services and police legitimacy through a proactive reliance on community resources that seek to change crime-causing conditions. It assumes a need for greater accountability of police, greater public share in decision making, and greater concern for civil rights and liberties.” During our stay, we were blessed with an opportunity to visit with a group of police academy students. We exchanged questions and answers about how our two nations view each other and current trends. It didn’t take long to realize that we shared many of the same issues concerning our respective countries. Despite our cultural

difference, we shared a common bond, our love for community, national pride, and our willingness to serve. Similarly, our delegation had ample time to learn from one another. Our group was comprised of professional law enforcement and corporate executives from Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee. We often found ourselves discussing current trends in public safety (e.g., hiring, agency policy, and public opinion). In addition to our law enforcement activities, we visited a few of Israel’s historic sites. This gave us important insight into the historical connection between the past, present, and future policing doctrines. The entire experience gave us confidence in our own nation’s future, as we continue to deal with similar issues. On our last evening in Israel, I looked across the sunset-filled room of our delegation. Lost in the reflection of our own experiences, we all shared the same content and fulfilled disposition of a brighter future.

Frank Reynolds is the sheriff for Cherokee County. 678-493-4100. CherokeeGa-Sheriff.org

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Cherokee County School Board Earns State Recognition for Governance & Leadership The Georgia School Boards Association has awarded the Cherokee County School Board its 2018 Quality School Board designation. The statewide recognition program celebrates school boards that consistently model best practices and meet specific high standards of excellence.

Community The Discover Woodstock Scavenger Hunt Returns Woodstock residents and visitors will have the opportunity to learn about and explore Woodstock during the 6th annual Discover Woodstock Scavenger Hunt! The scavenger hunt starts August 30 and runs through September 15.

Cherokee County School Board front row (L-R) Kelly Poole, Chair Kyla Cromer, and Patsy Jordan. Back row (L-R) Superintendent Dr. Brian V. Hightower, Robert Rechsteiner, Vice Chair Mike Chapman, John Harmon, and Clark Menard.

Who can take part? Whether you live in Woodstock, work in Woodstock, or are visiting Woodstock, you are welcome to take part in this fun community activity. The event is free, and no advanced registration is required. On August 30 at 10am, the clues will be released for the scavenger hunt teams to start the event. The clues will be available at VisitWoodstockGA.com, the downtown Woodstock Facebook page, and hard copies will be available at the Woodstock Visitors Center. For more information, log on to VisitWoodstockGA.com, or call the Woodstock Visitors Center at 770-924-0406.

Melanie Tugman! Congratulations to our October “7 Differences� winner, Joyce McMichael! Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Community Brownie Scouts Achieve Top Honor Twelve Brownie Girl Scouts from Troop 14662 earned the highest recognition available to scouts in second and third grades. The girls earned the Brownie Journey Summit Award for completing all three National Leadership Journeys at their grade level. The Brownies were mentored by Cadette Scouts in Troop 11410 and Troop 11428. All participating scouts live in Cherokee County. The Brownies include Sophie Abbott, MaryJo Brown, Catherine Hof, Joan Hof, Amilia Huggins, Cheyanne Landers, Lucy Paire, Livi Rogers, Sophie SabajGriffeth, Carah Samples, Celia Williams, and Emily Worosz. The Cadettes who provided invaluable leadership to the younger girls include Evie Clark, Bela Hernandez, Grace Kicak, Lydia Klements, Julia Sick, and Allie Zimmerman.

Georgia CASA Welcomes Deidre Hollands Beginning August 1, Deidre Hollands will serve as the new program operations director for Georgia CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates). As the program operations director, Deidre will lead comprehensive affiliate support and services for the CASA network to improve quality advocacy and effectiveness as well as foster meaningful relationships and collaboration with affiliate leadership and state partners to further the mission and integrity of the CASA network. Deidre is no stranger to CASA, having served in Cherokee County as a CASA volunteer in 2000, a volunteer coordinator for two years, a CASA director for ten years, and as the founding executive director of The Children’s Haven for the last four years, which is a center for family visitation, the local CASA program, and a convening and collection space for the larger community interested in supporting children and families in child welfare. Deidre is widely known across the CASA network for sharing her expertise through trainings, ongoing support, and all-around general advice. She has led fundraising and community engagement trainings, new director orientations and mentorship, provided grant support, represented CASA at state-level meetings, and served as a COPs representative on the Georgia CASA board.

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Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

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Community GROW Committee Releases 2018 Scarecrow Invasion Details Planning for the 2018 Scarecrow Invasion is underway. The proceeds from the Scarecrow Invasion are donated to GROW. This organization, which stands for Green Reaps Opportunity for Woodstock, is the design committee for Main Street Woodstock. They create and implement great design initiatives for the downtown Woodstock community. You might know them from their beautiful landscaping and holiday decor along Main Street. Proceeds from past years of the Scarecrow Invasion have been used to purchase the beautiful art benches around downtown.

Woodstock July 4th Spectacular Parade Float Winners This year’s July 4th Spectacular was celebrated in style with great weather and lots of smiling faces! Downtown Woodstock was the site of the annual parade including over ninety float entries and a very large, patriotic, and energized crowd to cheer them on! Congratulations to the 2018 Float Winners: Most Original Float Trail Life USA Troop 0184

Registration begins September 4 at 10:00am at the Woodstock Visitors Center (8588 Main Street, Woodstock). Last year, the event sold out in less than two days, so enter early! To vote for your favorite scarecrow, go to the Visitors Center during the month of October. Votes are $1 each, and businesses with scarecrows may have voting set up in their establishment for their scarecrow. The winner will receive bragging rights and an awesome trophy. Changes to this year’s event include locations available, display guidelines, and price structure. Due to streetscape improvements, there will no longer be scarecrow displays along Arnold Mill Road. There will be spaces added to the area around Market & Elm Streets to continue to allow as many businesses and individuals the opportunity to participate. Spaces added on Chambers Street last year will be available again this year. Structures, such as buildings, photo booths, etc. are no longer permitted. Additionally, hay bales and natural pumpkins will be prohibited to avoid rot and decay. Pricing will be adjusted based on location this year. Spaces with the most visibility, specifically those on Main Street, will cost $100 for businesses. All other locations will be $60 for businesses. Registration for nonprofits and individuals will be $40 regardless of location.

Best Holiday Float Let’s Pretend Publishing People’s Choice Award The Home Depot, Woodstock History and Heritage Award Jim Cook

> > > > > >

Woodstock Announces Streetscapes Transportation Enhancements Project

City officials recently announced plans to begin the South Main Streetscapes Transportation Enhancement (TE) project, a federally funded project designed to extend the streetscapes from Oak Street to Fowler Street in downtown Woodstock. As an extension of the streetscape project completed in 2010, Oak Street to Fowler Street will soon have the same look and feel as the rest of downtown. The project includes twelve parking spaces, 8’-wide sidewalk on the west side of Main Street, 6’-wide sidewalk on the east side (along the RR R/W), decorative brick pavers and planters, street furniture including trash cans and benches, decorative street lights, street trees (east side) and landscaping, joined by curbs and gutters, resurfacing, and new striping. Construction is slated to be completed by April 2019. Patrons will continue to have ease of access to all businesses along this portion of Main Street. For more information, please call 770-592-6000.

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Community Woodstock ES Former Principal Recognized by City of Woodstock The Woodstock City Council recently recognized Kim (Montalbano) Cerasoli with an award that reads, “Presented to Principal Kim Montalbano, Woodstock Elementary School, in recognition of her incredible contributions to Woodstock youth.” Principal Cerasoli, who championed many Woodstock ES projects in partnership with the City and its police and fire departments over the last five years, has been appointed as the new principal for Indian Knoll Elementary School for the 2018-2019 school year.

Knights of Columbus Makes Generous Donation to Cherokee Day Training Center The Knights of Columbus Woodstock Council 11768 delivered a check for $10,500 to Heather Dailey, executive director of Cherokee Day Training Center. The money was raised through the Knights’ Tootsie Roll Drive. The Knights of Columbus is a Catholic, family, fraternal, service organization founded in 1882, which raises awareness for needy causes, generates much-needed funds, and contributes countless volunteer hours to support a variety of charitable activities to benefit humanity. Cherokee Day Training Center meets the needs of individuals with developmental disabilities in Cherokee County and surrounding areas through two campuses, providing a combination of employment and community access services as well as specialized medical supplies. It is the mission of Cherokee Day Training Center to enhance the quality of life available to each individual receiving support by providing those employment and training supports necessary for achieving increased independence, personal development, social connections, and optimal health and safety.

Holly Springs Accepting Vendor Applications for Autumn Fest The City of Holly Springs is now accepting applications from vendors wishing to participate in the 15th Annual Autumn Fest on October 6, 2018. Autumn Fest will be held from 10:00am until 5:00pm at Barrett Park in Holly Springs. Vendor space starts at only $25 and is available to handmade artists and crafters as well as children’s area exhibitors. Autumn Fest is also looking for food vendors. Local businesses can reserve space on Sponsor’s Row. Applications are due September 7. For more information and to download your application, please visit HollySpringsGa.us/autumnfest, or contact Erin Honea at EHonea@hollyspringsga.us or 770-345-5536.

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Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

Woodstock Announces Improvements to City Center Parking Lot The City of Woodstock recently announced the completion of significant improvements to the City Center parking lot, which is the largest public lot in downtown. Using funds from recent real estate transactions by the Downtown Development Authority, the lot has been resurfaced and restriped, and it includes a new layout, which has increased capacity to around 190 spaces including three additional handicapped spaces. The project also includes a new sidewalk providing a safe and defined pedestrian connection to the shops and restaurants in downtown along Towne Lake Parkway. Additional improvements including lighting and landscaping will be completed in the coming months. People utilizing the improved lot at City Center or at Chattahoochee Tech can catch a ride on the complimentary Woodstock trolley during service hours to get them to their destination. There are currently over 1,100 publicly available parking spots in the downtown area with an additional 500 private spaces available for visitors to businesses that own their own parking facilities. Additional parking facilities are being planned using funds from the recent voter-approved SPLOST last November. For more information on downtown parking and the trolley, please visit WoodstockGa.gov/905/DowntownParking.

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Cherokee Woodstock

8/17 at North Cobb 8/24 Creekview 8/31 at Cambridge 9/14 North Paulding 9/21 North Forsyth 10/05 Etowah 10/12 at Cherokee 10/19 at Lassiter 10/26 at Roswell 11/02 Walton

River Ridge

8/17 at Etowah 8/25 at Hapeville (Godfrey Stadium, Day Game) 8/31 Harrison 9/07 at Allatoona 9/14 at Osborne 9/28 Dalton 10/05 at Sequoyah 10/12 Creekview 10/26 at South Cobb 11/02 Sprayberry Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

Sequoyah

8/24 at Cherokee 8/31 at Osborne 9/07 Dalton 9/14 Campbell 9/28 at Creekview 10/05 River Ridge 10/12 South Cobb 10/19 at Sprayberry 10/26 Harrison 11/02 at Allatoona

Etowah

8/17 River Ridge 8/24 North Cobb 8/31 at South Forsyth 9/07 at Pebblebrook 9/14 Hillgrove 9/28 Cherokee 10/05 at Woodstock 10/12 at Walton 10/26 at Lassiter 11/02 Roswell WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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Senator Speaks

Oh Say, Can You See? By Senator Bruce Thompson

R

ecently, NFL owners convened in Atlanta for their annual spring meetings. All 32 NFL teams were present to consider several very important matters including billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper’s purchase of the Carolina Panthers, new rules to limit the risk of head injuries during kickoffs, sporting event gambling, and of course — players kneeling during the “Star Spangled Banner.”

The sale of the Panthers to Mr. Tepper has strong support and should easily garner the votes necessary. The movie Concussion brought to light the devastating effects high impact blows can have to the brain. If you have not seen the movie, it is worth renting. After seeing this movie, it became obvious to me that something must be done to protect these players from these types of injuries. This past month, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA), the 1992 federal law prohibiting states from legalizing sports betting, unconstitutional. The result of this action sent the U.S. Congress into a tizzy, as members considered how this ruling would affect them back in their home states. The owners realize that betting is already occurring, but they find themselves in a similar posture as U.S. congressional members in that they must be cautious about endorsing or opposing this deeply divided and controversial issue. Welcome to politics! Although the first three topics are important, the issue of players kneeling during the national anthem must be resolved. NFL ratings have dropped nearly ten percent since the controversy started, and many, including the commissioner, acknowledge it is time to move on. Of course, it is only my opinion, but my sentiment is shared by many others that we should not move on without addressing the elephant in the room. There is something fundamentally wrong when this type of action is allowed, yet making gestures at a referee, spiking a ball, mocking the crowd or another player are strictly prohibited. Goodness, we even have teams changing their names because it is considered offensive to a tribe, yet disrespecting the U.S. flag and offending military men and women and patriotic families is somehow okay? I would prefer to see these privileged players channel their energy, influence, and resources into filling the gap for the nearly seventy percent of children growing up in fatherless households. The stats are compelling — with teenage girls nearly four times more likely to get pregnant, and teen boys are twenty times more likely to end up in prison than those in a dual-parent household. Both sexes are nearly five times more likely to commit suicide than teens raised in a home where the father is present.

Bruce Thompson is a state senator for District 14, which includes Canton. 404-656-0065. BruceThompsonGa.com

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Woodstock Summer Concert Series

Departure Photos courtesy of PhotoJack.net

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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A

himsa House is dedicated to addressing the link between domestic violence and animal cruelty. They offer services and assistance to victims of domestic violence with pets in Georgia, and work to raise awareness of this connection in communities throughout the state. In families affected by domestic violence, pets are also at risk. Abusers threaten, injure, and kill family pets to terrorize others in the home; yet most domestic violence shelters are unable to allow pets to accompany their owners to safety. Nearly fifty percent of individuals delay escaping the abuse because of concern about their pets. Ahimsa House, meaning “nonviolence,� is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to addressing the links between domestic violence and animal abuse. Anywhere in Georgia and at no charge, Ahimsa House provides emergency pet safe housing, veterinary care, pet-related safety planning, legal advocacy, a 24-hour crisis line, outreach programs, and other services to help the human and animal victims of domestic violence reach safety together.

Originally, Ahimsa House maintained a central shelter for animals at a secret location in metro Atlanta. In fall 2006, they recognized the need to change their program model to operate more costeffectively and to better serve victims statewide. In March 2007, Ahimsa House launched its redesigned direct services program, which houses animals via a network of foster homes and boarding facilities across the state. Ahimsa House works closely with a network of volunteer foster homes and partnering boarding facilities across Georgia, which allows them to serve the entire state. Animals can stay for up to sixty days, which roughly corresponds to the length of stay permitted by most domestic violence shelters, but they are flexible about extending this time period in situations of ongoing need. Thanks to their foster homes, they can accommodate not only dogs and cats but also a variety of other animals such as birds, small animals,

reptiles, and horses. The animals receive veterinary care as needed during their stay, ranging from basic vaccinations to treatment of injuries or illnesses caused by abuse or neglect. As of December 2017, Ahimsa House had provided over 63,300 nights of safe, confidential shelter for pets in need. In 2016, they took in 27 percent more animals than in 2015, and requests for their services went up by 34 percent. In 2016, they received over sixteen times the number of calls to their 24-hour crisis line than they did in 2007, the year their program decentralized.

For more information, or to get involved with Ahimsa House, please visit AhimsaHouse.org, or call 404-496-4038.

Community Partners

Photo by Josh Meister

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COVER STORY By Cyndi Braun

Established in 2014, The Factory Church is passionate about making disciples and being the church “the other six days.” While Sunday services offer authentic worship and biblical teaching, The Factory desires to make disciples and equip them to share their faith with a world desperate for truth and the saving power of Christ Jesus. Don’t be satisfied with just going to church. BE the church “the other six days.”

Planting a New Church

After spending many years as a youth minister and worship pastor, Keith Norman began to feel a calling to pastor a church. One night while studying the Bible, he thought about how the first Christians fed the poor, cared for orphans and widows, loved their fellow man, and were passionate 24

Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

about sharing the gospel of Christ, every day of the week. It was never about “just” Sunday. He wondered why modern churches couldn’t be more like that early church. Pastor Keith began to meet with a small group of people in his home, including his wife Lucille, daughter Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Pastor Keith, laughing. “Jesus loved people that other people wouldn’t love. He had compassion for everyone.”

Sunday + the Other Six Days

Jala, and son Blake. He shared his vision of a nondenominational, racially diverse church that makes disciples for Christ and serves others. From that small group, the church has grown steadily, and it moved to its current location in January 2015. The Factory now offers three services every Sunday while helping the needy in the Woodstock area and beyond.

What Makes The Factory Unique? In factories, raw materials are transformed into new products with specific purposes in mind. The same is true at The Factory Church where God transforms people, helping them grow in their relationship with Christ. At factories, each employee has a specific job to do. Similarly, Christians are expected to continue Christ’s work on earth. Pastor Keith preaches that Christians should love all people, spread the hope and joy that Jesus offers, and serve the poor. The Factory believes in sharing a genuine love of Christ by worshipping with people who don’t look the same or vote the same and by serving others. All ethnic groups, all faiths, even nonChristians, are welcome at The Factory. “At the end of the day, if you have a pulse, we really want you here,” said

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

While the worship team offers an amazing Sunday service, the Church emphasizes living out the faith the other six days of the week. “I’ve done a series called ‘On.’ That means getting up in the morning, reading, praying, treating the kids a certain way, treating your spouse a certain way. Not just turning your Christianity on from 9-11 Sunday morning,” said Pastor Keith. “If you’re part of the Bible Belt, you probably learned religion. You put on your nice clothes on Sunday, and you go to a church where everybody looks like you. When you finish, you go out to eat, then you go home and watch football. You don’t think about refugees or care about poor people,

In addition to the wells, The Factory Church provides support to feed about 200 orphans at a Tanzania orphanage each Saturday and has recently partnered with an organization in Uganda to build a church for worship services and community use. Locally, the Church offers lunch the first Saturday of the month for people who are homeless or nearly homeless. They also conduct regular food drives to provide additional help to those in need.

Join The Factory

After attending services at The Factory, many people feel touched by the Holy Spirit. The message, the music, and the fellowship bring people together in a way that leads them to follow Jesus. If you’re interested in “the other six days,” join The Factory this Sunday. or even your rich neighbor.” Pastor Keith encourages church members to practice their faith throughout the week and guides them in specific areas in which they can help the poor. One of the Church’s primary focuses is providing clean water to poor villages in Africa. During a mission trip to Tanzania in 2009, Pastor Keith was shocked to see the villagers drinking filthy water. He decided to raise money to build a well to provide clean water to that village, specifically to benefit children in an orphanage. Since then, The Factory has constructed eight wells in Tanzania, Kenya, and Uganda. The wells are dug in coordination with village churches.

Service Times 8:00am, 10:00am, and Noon

9872 Main Street Woodstock, GA 770-517-7265 TheFactoryMinistries.org Facebook.com/theothersixdays Twitter.com/FactoryMinATL Vimeo.com/thefactorychurch

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Hair Tales

What Your Hair Says About You By Jyl Craven

[Lifestyle] Stylists sometimes say that they can tell a lot about a person by looking at their hair. Did you know scientists can actually tell you a biography’s worth of information about yourself simply by examining a strand of hair from your head? It’s true! By studying the isotopes that make up the proteins and amino acids in your hair, scientists can tell you the following information: Your Eating Habits

Where You’re From

Most of us think eating habits show up in our waistline and skin, but did you know your eating habits also manifest in your hair? By studying the proteins and amino acids in your hair, scientists can determine what kind of food you are eating — if you prefer meat to fish, or stick to a vegetarian or vegan diet. This science has been especially useful in studying ancient peoples in an attempt to determine ancient diets.

University of Utah Geologist Thure Cerlin has created a database of hair isotopes from cities around the United States, and other scientists are working to develop a hair database of the entire world. Scientists can actually tell where you have lived just by examining a strand of your hair. If this reminds you of CSI, it should. Detectives use this technology to identify unknown crime victims found far from home. Different parts of the length of the hair will show a whole timeline of a person’s movements around the country — the longer your hair, the more of your story it will tell. This technology can be a huge breakthrough in missing persons’ investigations — and it all comes down to a single strand of hair.

Your Health

Your hair might be trying to tell you that you’re about to have a heart attack! Your hair shows the amount of the stress hormone cortisol that your body produces. By testing the levels of cortisol in your hair, scientists may be able to predict your risk for a heart attack. In fact, they’ve already shown that people who have had a heart attack within the past three months showed the highest levels of cortisol in their hair.

In the hands of a scientist, what would your hair say about you?

L

Jyl Craven is owner of Jyl Craven Hair Design of Canton. 770-345-9411. JylCraven.com

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Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

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Quotables

“Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.” -Calvin Coolidge

“I may win, and I may lose, but I will never be defeated.” -Emmitt Smith “I always wonder why birds stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on the earth. Then I ask myself the same question.”

“Home is a place you grow up wanting to leave, and grow old wanting to get back to.” -John Ed Pearce

“Two things to remember in life — take care of your thoughts when you are alone, and take care of your words when you are with people.” -Zig Zigler

-Harun Yahya

“Change is the end result of all true learning.” -Leo Buscaglia “If you love a flower, let it be. Love is not about possession. Love is about appreciation.” -Linus (i.e. Charles M. Schultz)

“To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting.”

“Life without love is like a year without summer.”

-Edmund Burke

-Swedish Proverb

“No one ever drowned in sweat.” -Lou Holtz

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[HomeLife] Last month, Georgia joined fifteen other states by adopting the Hands-Free Law. A driver can no longer have a phone in their hand or use any part of their body to support their phone. Drivers can only use their phones to make or receive phone calls by using speakerphone, earpiece, wireless headphone, or a phone that is connected to their vehicle or an electronic watch. GPS navigation devices are allowed. Headsets and earpieces can only be worn for communication purposes and not for listening to music or other entertainment. A driver may not send or read any textbased communication unless using voicebased communication that automatically converts spoken words to a written text or is being used for navigation or GPS.

Other Things Stated in the Law • A driver may not write, send, or read any text messages, e-mails, social media, or internet data content. • A driver may not watch a video unless

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

it is for navigation. A driver may not record a video (continuously running dash cams are exempt). • Music streaming apps can be used provided the driver activates and programs them when they are parked. Drivers cannot touch their phones to do anything to their music apps when they are on the road. Music streaming apps that include video are not allowed since drivers cannot watch videos when on the road. Drivers can listen to and program music streaming apps that are connected to and controlled through their vehicle’s radio.

Georgia’s New

Hands-Free Law By Susan Zereini, Esq.

Penalties and Fines for Offenses First conviction - $50 and one point on a license Second conviction - $100 and two points on a license Third and subsequent convictions $150 and three points on a license For more details, visit GaHighwaySafety. org.

Susan Zereini, Esq. is a senior criminal attorney at the Burns Law Group. 181 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-956-1400. BASLG.com

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Stop Comparing Your Average to Everyone Else’s Awesome By Gavin Adams [InGoodFaith] I had the opportunity to preach a few Sundays ago — I love when those weeks roll around. After our third and final service, my production director asked me the same question we ask every communicator at the end of each Sunday: “Which message would you like to be the ‘master?’” The master message is the one that is uploaded to all our online portals, and that got me to thinking. Every day, all across the country, what we usually see on social media is everyone’s “master message.” We’re only seeing their highlight reels. More than ever, we have the ability to only post what’s best. And with that, we are positioned like never before to be intimidated by others and convinced that we aren’t good enough. When we only remember others’ highlights and our lowlights, we find ourselves in a dark place. So, what do we do when we find ourselves in the downward spiral of comparison? Instead of looking to others, begin looking inward to compare yourself to yourself. Work to improve yourself every day because you are the benchmark for your own growth and improvement. Your last leadership decision is your newest leadership benchmark. Your last parenting moment is your newest parenting benchmark. Be your own benchmark, and become better by that comparison. There are two good questions we should all ask ourselves: How are you improving? Who are you inviting into the process to help you improve? We can always get better, but our best benchmark should always be where we are today, not what we saw online from someone else’s social media posts.

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Gavin Adams is lead pastor at Woodstock City Church, 150 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock. 470-689-6000. WoodstockCity.org

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Book Review BY JESSICA ASBELL

N

ew neighbors! Those words can either bring happiness or despair, depending on who moves in. So, imagine Abby’s surprise when she goes next door to meet the new neighbors and finds herself face to face with the love of her life — when they are both married to someone else. After pushing Liam away following the death of her brother in an accident that was her fault, Abby slowly finds happiness again with Nate. They move away, build a life, and have a daughter, Sarah. But their picture-perfect marriage is put to the test when Liam, Nancy, and their son, Zac, move in. As Liam and Abby hide their past from their spouses and fight their feelings for each other, lies are told, spouses grow suspicious, and a rash act means the end of life as they know it. In The Neighbors, author Hannah Mary McKinnon explores what happens when an ex-boyfriend moves next door. Abby is broken after the death of her brother. A tragic character, Abby never forgives herself and believes that she is not worthy of happiness. So, she builds a life, away from the one she loves the most, in hopes that by denying herself true love and happiness, she can pay penance for her brother’s death. Told from the eyes of Abby, Nate (the husband who worships her), Sarah (their daughter), and Nancy, the not-so-naïve wife of Liam, we see firsthand how lies can invade someone’s death and infect everything they touch — and how there might be more going on in the neighborhood than meets the eye.

At times heartbreaking, and at other times witty, The Neighbors is a complex view of how well we know our neighbors, our families, our spouses, and ourselves. When nothing is as it seems, how can we know what the truth is? And when your world falls apart, where do you turn? If you are looking for drama and a dose of domestic suspense, pick up a copy of The Neighbors.

Jessica Asbell is an avid reader and a children’s minister. She holds a BBA from Mercer and a Master of Divinity in Christian education from McAfee School of Theology. She’s also a frequent customer at FoxTale Book Shoppe. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBooks.com

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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instructors who would be teaching us about their respective areas of law enforcement in the coming weeks. One thing was clear after the introductions were complete: every single one of these instructors sincerely loves their job. Week 2 Uniformed Patrol

By Julie Senger

At Family Life magazines, we are constantly looking for ways to get involved in the community because it’s our community, too, and we feel this better equips us to provide interesting, impactful information that allows us to continue to connect with you — our friends and neighbors. With this in mind, when I read about the inaugural Cherokee Sheriff ’s Citizens’ Academy, I seized the exciting educational opportunity to learn about the important and often dangerous nature of what these brave men and women do to protect us on a daily basis, so I could share my experience and help raise awareness. The inaugural Sheriff ’s Citizens’ Academy was a ten-week course, with class one night a week except for week ten, which had an extra class Saturday morning for gun range instruction and graduation. There was also an opportunity to schedule a ride along with a patrol officer outside of class time. My classmates came from all walks of life: doctors, attorneys, Boy Scouts, restaurant owners, retirees, and many other backgrounds. Week 1 Orientation

The first night of class began with Sheriff Frank Reynolds welcoming us. In his speech, he made it very clear that the notion of “We (the Sheriff ’s Office) got 32

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this!” is no longer a reality. He wanted to be sure that we understood his desire to partner with Cherokee citizens to help keep our community safe, stating that, “None of us is as smart as all of us.” Sheriff Reynolds was also very quick to point out the hierarchy/chain of command upon which the citizens of Cherokee County sit at the very top, above himself — he works for us. Sheriff Reynolds was followed by brief self-introductions of all the other

During this class, we learned that there were more than 115,000 calls in 2016, and that the Cherokee Sheriff ’s Office (CSO) uniform patrol officers drove more than 1.5 million miles within Cherokee County. Each patrol officer receives twelve weeks of training before hitting the road. After class, we were able to go outside to see the different

patrol vehicles and all the state-of-the-art technology they contain. We were also given the opportunity to sign up to ride along with a patrol officer. Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


I rode along with Cpl. Butler of the BridgeMill Precinct. While nothing more than a traffic stop occurred during our patrol, Cpl. Butler did explain the protocol for the more serious types of calls they must answer, and had one of those occurred, for my safety, he would have dropped me out at a public place to be picked up. I was also allowed to use the radar gun to track the speed of drivers who were driving down a very popular parkway in Cherokee. Week 3 Administration and Adult Detention Center (ADC) Operations and Tour

CSO’s ADC has 512 beds. During the time of the class tour, there were no open beds, and new inmates were issued a thick floor mat, a pillow, and linens until a bed became available. In the ADC, men, women, juveniles, and mental health patients are separated into different areas. The male inmates are divided and housed based upon severity of crime. As there are not nearly as many female inmates, they are all housed in the same area, regardless of crime severity. Week 4 Use of K-9s in Law Enforcement

The CSO had five K-9s at the time of this class. Each K-9 is trained for 1.5 years in Holland, with another 2-3 months of formal training with their handler after they are purchased by the CSO. The best dog breeds for K-9 work are Dutch Shepherds and Belgian Malinois. Each K-9 costs an average of $15,000. These intelligent, disciplined dogs are trained to detect bombs and narcotics as well as recover evidence/missing persons. CSO K-9s respond to all in-progress crimes in which a suspect can escape/flee. This class concluded with an impressive K-9 demonstration of narcotics recovery as well as a handler donning a bite suit Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

to show how these dogs help officers aggressively apprehend dangerous suspects. Week 5 Traffic Enforcement Unit

The statistics we learned in this class were quite staggering. Be careful out there, and please wear your seat belt! • The CSO has only eight officers to cover the over 400-square miles of Cherokee County. • There is an average of four traffic accident fatalities each month in Cherokee County. • Forty percent of these traffic accident fatalities could have been prevented if seatbelts were worn. • Seeing a traffic enforcement officer parked on the side of the road will deter a driver from speeding for an average of four miles.

Week 6 Criminal Investigation Division (CID)

There are thirty officers to investigate all crimes in Cherokee County. CID handles crimes against persons, property, and children as well as financial crimes. In 2016, there were 1,400 crimes reported against children in Cherokee. Property crime is also quite overwhelming. A lot of property crime consists of theft from vehicles with the doors left unlocked, so please lock your doors — even in your own driveway. At the conclusion of this class, we were given an opportunity to dust for fingerprints, collect crime scene evidence,

and analyze blood spatter patterns in mock crime scenes. We also visited the crime lab to learn about its evidence analyzation equipment. Week 7 Court Services

This class consisted of a tour of the old jail and old courthouse. There are quite a few interesting stories of items that inmates tried to deliver or receive to/ from people on the “outside” from the top floor windows of the old jail. In addition, we were able to tour areas that are normally closed off to the public in the new courthouse, and we learned about all the security measures that are in place to ensure safety in the courtroom. Week 8 Special Operations (HNT, SWAT, and STRIKE)

There are fourteen members on the CSO Hostage Negotiation Team (HNT). The members on this team must have above average negotiation and problemsolving skills. They have eighty hours of in-class training, and they are on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Their goal is to resolve hostage situations peacefully and safely. Some of the unique pieces of equipment that the HNT uses are a rolling office; a long-range acoustical device (LRAD), which allows them to speak with individuals through a brick wall; and if all else fails — SWAT (special weapons attack team). CSO’s SWAT consists of 37 individuals who endure very rigorous physical training before being admitted onto the team, some of which is very similar to Navy SEAL training techniques in that candidates must complete tasks while being deprived of sleep for at least 24 hours. SWAT members must also complete an eight-hour course on gun and shooting laws. Their objective is to take out a suspect in five minutes or less, and they have some pretty intimidating WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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• Never draw a weapon behind the firing line unless instructed to do so. • Don’t anticipate commands.

Inside the shoot house

artillery, including a Sig MPX, with which to accomplish this goal. The STRIKE team’s objective is to operate and deliver the communications support vehicle, emergency rescue vehicle, all terrain vehicles, SWAT transport vehicle, hostage negotiations vehicle, mobile command post, robot, and other assets to critical incidents. They provide multiple communications and technology capabilities, provide incident commanders with a mobile command post, provide for the establishment of a tactical operations command, document critical information during on-going operations, and staff critical technical and communications support positions. Week 9 Cherokee Warrants and CMANS

The CSO Warrant Unit serves subpoenas, warrants for misdemeanors and felonies, temporary protective orders, 10-13 orders, and FIFAs. Interesting statistic — eighty percent of violators are repeat offenders. As you can imagine, this can be a very dangerous/difficult job, as no one is ever happy to see a warrant officer at their door. The Cherokee Multi-Agency Narcotics Squad (CMANS) provided some startling information: • Eighty Percent of domestic violence issues are related to substance abuse. • One billion in cash comes through Atlanta to Mexico each year for methamphetamine sales. • 85 percent of the world’s recreational drug use occurs in the U.S. 34

Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

Week 10 Training and Gun Range

The training that CSO deputies are required to complete is extensive (60+ hours, and they must requalify each year). Many also choose to go through additional advanced training and/or take college courses. The CSO gun range consists of the following: • 25-yard qualifying range • Live-fire shoot house with multiple rooms, allowing for numerous forceon-force scenarios • 100-yard rifle range and fifty-yard multipurpose range • 25-yard open bay range used for static steel targets • Six reactive steel lanes (Bill Rogers lanes) Before my classmates and I could shoot and utilize the CSO gun range, we were taught these cardinal rules of firearms safety: • Always assume the gun is loaded. • Always point the muzzle in a safe direction. • Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire. • Be sure of your target (behind it and beside it).

We then had the option to use the high-tech, judgmental pistol shooting simulator, which is an interactive video training system that allows students to walk into an active shooter situation, carry on conversation with a potential active shooter and other video characters, and determine whether the use of deadly force is warranted. This is a very realistic system and valuable training tool. Finally, students met on a Saturday morning to use the gun range. Many of my classmates were very adept and comfortable handling guns. I was not very relaxed, as it would only be the second time in my life that I had ever shot a firearm. My hands were shaking vigorously as I attempted to load my magazine with bullets. My instructors were very helpful and quick to put me at ease. By the end of the day, not only had I shot the standard issue pistols that the CSO uses, I was also confident enough to shoot an AR-15. Overall, this course gave me the chance to better understand what our police officers go through from as close to their perspective as a civilian can get. The next class has been streamlined down from ten to eight weeks and will begin September 4. All the same topics will still be covered in the eight-week course. This free, unique opportunity is made available to the first twenty citizens who sign up and pass/fulfill all the necessary paperwork/background check requirements. For more information, email Joshua Watkins at JLWatkins@ CherokeeGa.com, or call 678-493-4097. Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


How to Look Like Your Best “Selfie” By Drs. Petrosky, Harkins, and Depew

[HealthyLife] Facial rejuvenation — is there an app for that? Not exactly, but some patients are using Instagram filters to remove blemishes and wrinkles, hide under-eye circles, and brighten their complexions, and then bringing those altered photos to cosmetic surgeons to serve as a roadmap for what they want to look like in real life. Living in an era when individuals post photos of themselves on social media platforms on a daily basis, the increased interest in looking your best is understandable. Using photo apps to improve your appearance is now very common. Taking those photos to a plastic surgeon and saying, “This is how I want to look all the time” seems to be the logical next step. Some of the most common facial concerns that people tend to polish

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

away with photo apps are also some of the things that can be treated with the following minimally invasive procedures: 1. Skin rejuvenation treatments, such as laser skin resurfacing, can be used for evening out skin tone and eliminating blemishes. Small spider veins, moles, and wrinkles can all be minimized with laser skin treatments. 2. Derma fillers can be used to plump thin lips, enhance shallow contours, soften facial creases and wrinkles, and improve the appearance of recessed scars. Dermal fillers help to diminish facial lines and restore volume and fullness in the face. These treatments require very minimal downtime, allowing patients to return to work and other normal activities directly following treatment.

Hopefully, the trend of using photo apps to help reveal your natural beauty will continue to catch on. Instead of bringing in photos of celebrities, who may have completely different facial features, a patient photo that’s been tweaked is much more likely to represent realistic objectives, which will lead to increased patient satisfaction. As with any procedure you are considering, make sure your consultation is with a specialtytrained, boardDrs. Petrosky and Harkins are board-certified plastic surgeons, certified and Dr. Depew is a board-eligible plastic plastic surgeon at Plastic Surgery surgeon. Center of the South. 770-421-1242. PlasticSurgeryCenterOf TheSouth.net

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ArtistProfile BY TINA MORRIS

The Glass Is Always Half Full

A

rguably the best at what he does, Thomas Arvid didn’t start in oil painting. Growing up in Michigan, Thomas always found an artistic way to complete his classwork, whether it was illustrating poetry for an English assignment or creating a mural for history class. He made airbrush T-shirts for friends and created stone sculptures for a landscape company. After graduating high school, Thomas went on to work in the printing and sign painting industry. It wasn’t until Thomas moved to Atlanta that he began to work with oil paints, a natural progression of his artistic pursuits. He slowly transitioned from his nineto-five job, eventually spending more and more time painting. Early in his career, Thomas could often be found at Café Tu Tu Tango in Atlanta, a restaurant that provided studio space for artists to work, where patrons could watch, make requests, and purchase artwork on demand. Thomas started his oil painting journey with a focus on the color red. This series included Converse shoes, a Radio Flyer wagon, and red wine. The first red wine painting was bought off the easel. It seemed every time he started another one, someone would buy it, and people began recognizing him as the artist who painted wine. Thomas’ style is cropped in such a way as to invite the viewer in. His paintings are void of people, so anyone can feel part of the vignette, reflecting a natural table scape, as if the viewer just joined the party. The craftmanship of his work is exquisite. His attention to detail makes his pieces intimate and well respected. When asked about some of his favorite pieces, Thomas named that first oil painting of the red Converse shoe along with other examples of where he brought his work to another level. Other personal favorites include Reflections, Unplugged, and Best

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Case Scenario. Reflections has a level of detail people may not notice at first glance. It is close-cropped wine bottles, and the light that shines on them reflects the room. The viewer can see the refrigerator in the kitchen, full of magnets and children’s artwork or photographs. It’s this level of verisimilitude that causes people to mistake his work for a photograph. It is clear that Thomas is living his best life by pursuing his passion and sharing it with those around him. His positivity and zest are evident in his work. He wants to share his optimism with his audience, and that is why all the titles of his paintings have positive connotations. The glass is always half full for Thomas. His advice for other artists? “Make a conscious decision to dedicate the time to your work.” All the paintings mentioned in this column (along with many others) can be found on ThomasArvid.com. Vinings Gallery hosts several pieces and a show a couple times a year if you desire to see his work in person.

Tina Morris is a student in the MFA creative writing program at Reinhardt University, 7300 Reinhardt College Circle, Waleska. 770-720-5582. Reinhardt.edu/Graduate/ MFA-CW/

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T

he day someone handed Coach KK Simmons a basketball was life-changing. He knew this was his sport, and succeeding became his passion. “My family comes with height, and it’s just our favorite sport. So, I was kind of born into it,” said Coach Simmons, who grew up in Marietta. “When I was four, I was handed a basketball, and I never dropped it since.” But genetics is only part of Simmons’ story. His father Jonathan Wells encouraged him on his basketball journey. His support motivated Simmons to perform on a higher level, earning a full scholarship to Kent State University, and then playing professional basketball in Germany and Austria. “It only takes one person to impact a kid. For me, it was my dad,” said Simmons. “He took me to practice every day, didn’t miss a game, and I realized this man really believes in me. I’m trying to be that guy my dad was to these kids. That’s all I want to do, be a positive impact on these kids.” Simmons decided to return to Georgia and help young athletes achieve success through Game Time Results Academy, which he founded earlier this year. The mission of Game Time Results Academy is to offer young people the tools they need to be successful on and off the court. Camps help kids improve their physical, social, and mental skills in a stress-free, co-ed environment that teaches players the importance of unity and equality. “We aim to improve basic life and game

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

g me o e Ti r ferin . f m P o a r er, G y began Sports e m m m u For Offers Thiesssults Acal dceammps at Blitz d Rbasketbal each n a s ll p sT p m m a a C a The COTING b t e Bask aining •• S DHROIBBLINGDING/PASSIANLGL Tr OUN KETB B S E • RE S OF BA E E TIM L M U A R • LG ERAL CE V O • AN DUR N E SS ITNE F D ND AN WORK A IP H AM ANS • TE M S TY T OR GILI SP D AND A EE Y • SP NG B I N I A TS TR POR S Z T I BL

skills and put the ‘fun’ in fundamentals,” said Simmons. “I teach and encourage sportsmanship, commitment, and leadership on and off the court. We work on strengthening kids’ natural athletic abilities and helping them play at their highest potential.” As a multi-sport facility, Blitz Sports is the ideal location for Simmons’ basketball camps. Owned/founded by Rashid Gayle, Blitz Sports offers training programs for athletes and teams from a variety of sports including baseball, softball, basketball, volleyball, soccer, lacrosse, and football. The facility also hosts team practices, tournaments, and other events like birthday parties. In addition to formal camps, Coach Simmons now offers private basketball training for athletes seeking one-onone coaching. This mobile training can be held at home or another convenient location. Whatever the age of the athlete, a little extra coaching goes a long way to building a foundation for success. If your young athlete wants to take his skills to the next level, check out Game Time Results Academy at Blitz Sports.

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e es 29 Gam 05-8 imeR 78-5 ameT 6 G / ts .com Spor book Face Blitz Blitz.com 2 Time 852/ 9602 21 8 7 3 3 75 2043 04-925n orts4 p S anto z Blit ad, C / o m R o l il .c pe M book Face E. Ro 0 0 5

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Follow

Your Nose to a Better

Landscape By Joshua Fuder

[HomeLife] When I set about building the landscape at my house in 2015, I selected plants based on several criteria. Factors included edible fruits, aesthetics (blooms, foliage colors and textures), bloom season, adaptability, and price. A successful landscape will incorporate these factors with design into something that has multi-season interest. In my opinion, a home landscape should be an experience that goes beyond the visual; it should say, “someone lives here.� I realized last year that I was not

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Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

paying enough attention to all my senses when selecting plants. I was completely overlooking my nose and not judging plants on fragrance. Sure, I had a big Southern Magnolia that came with the property and some herbs that I planted, but other than that, the experience of my landscape was the same whether I was in my truck with the windows up or outside knee deep in weeds. Smell, or the chemoreception of olfaction, is crucial to many human functions like taste, memory, and emotion. Why certain plants developed fragrance is a matter of biology. Fragrant blooms attract insects, bats, and hummingbird pollinators to transfer pollen and create fertile seeds. Minty, oily, or sharp smells in foliage of certain plants play a defensive role. These smells come from chemicals that are often toxic to animals or insects. When placing fragrant plants in the landscape, try not to place them in windy or open locations to avoid the dissipation

of the aroma. Instead, plant them near the home or walkways and areas that will be sheltered by surrounding shrubs, trees, and fences. Here are some well-adapted plants for our area that will fill your landscape with a pleasant fragrance: Perennials - Dianthus, Hosta (certain varieties), Narcissus, peony, tuberose, and herbs Shrubs - Gardenia, Rose, anise/Illicium parviflorum, native azaleas, fragrant tea olive, edgeworthia chrysantha, clethra alnifolia, lindera benzoin, Viburnum (certain varieties) Vines - Carolina jessamine, Confederate Jasmine, Clematis Trees - cladrastis kentukea (American yellowwood), vitex agnus, Magnolia

Joshua Fuder is an agriculture and natural resources agent at the UGA Cooperative Extension Cherokee County. 770-721-7830. CAES.UGA. edu/extension/cherokee

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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August Is National Children’s Vision and Learning Month By Jennifer A. Dattolo, O.D., F.C.O.V.D.

[HealthyLife] Eighty percent of what we learn originates from vision. Difficulties with vision can have a profound effect on learning and development. The American Optometric Association states 35-40 percent of children diagnosed with learning disabilities have vision problems. Signs and symptoms of learning-related vision problems include skipping and rereading lines, decreased reading comprehension, and short attention span when performing near tasks. These symptoms are also present in children diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, and a misdiagnosis can be made if a comprehensive eye exam is not performed.

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Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

A child’s first eye exam should be between the ages of six to twelve months, and it is free through the InfantSee Program. This exam will detect any refractive errors that need to be corrected with glasses as well as any misalignment of the eyes and visual system that could cause problems for the child if not diagnosed until a later age. Children should be examined again at age two and then every year after. There are several visual skills which are vital to learning: binocular vision (how the eyes work together), eye tracking (how the eyes move when reading), eye focusing (looking near to far), and visual information processing (visual memory, discrimination, figure ground). Children

who struggle with undiagnosed visionrelated problems may have eye fatigue, double vision when reading, headaches, poor concentration and comprehension, letter and number reversals, and an inability to keep their place when reading and writing. Glasses and/or vision therapy can correct these deficits. Vision therapy is also used to treat eye turns, lazy eye, and for visual rehabilitation after head injuries (concussions, stroke). The College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD) can direct you to an optometrist in your area who specializes in vision therapy and rehabilitation. Let’s give all children the ability to perform at their fullest potential by having their eyes examined on a regular basis.

Jennifer A. Dattolo is a physician at Eyes On Towne Lake, 1075 Buckhead Crossing, #130, Woodstock. 770-7025996. EyesOnTowneLake.com

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Elder Abuse By Tim Morris

Elder Abuse is a rising concern. There are many cases being [Lifestyle] reported of physical, verbal, and financial exploitation of the elderly. In most cases, the abuser is usually a caregiver or family member. But facilities that house elderly individuals seeking medical or long-term care are also included in these reports. A nursing home in the Atlanta area was recently in the news for elderly abuse. A resident was calling for help because he couldn’t breathe, and there was no urgency on the part of the nursing staff to assist him in his time of need. The resident passed away in a matter of minutes due to the neglect of those staff members. Many of these cases are a black eye to those who really try to care for their elderly loved ones. Caregiving is a full-time commitment that is very strenuous on the caregiver. I cared for my aunt for eleven years, and looking back, it was physically and mentally the hardest thing I’ve ever done. I had to do everything for her while holding down a full-time job and supporting my family. The decisions I had to make were stressful, but they were made based on what was best for her quality of life. Her last eleven years were some of the best years of her later life. I stayed by her side the entire time; I felt no one should ever leave this world alone.

Of course, that’s not always the case in today’s time. I have witnessed and heard stories of extreme abuse throughout my 28 years of working with the senior community. Georgia is doing more today with resources to bring these cases to court and convict those who are abusing the elderly. If you suspect someone is in an abusive situation, please report it to Adult Protective Services by calling 404-657-5250. This call can be made anonymously. L

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

Tim Morris is the director of Cherokee County Senior Services. 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-479-7438. www.CherokeeGa.com/ Senior-Services

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By Steven Anderson, D.M.D.

Summertime usually means [HealthyLife] most people are outside enjoying all the activities warm weather brings. This time of year also seems to lend itself to the consumption of more sugar, whether in drinks and ice cream, lollipops and popsicles, or rich milk chocolate, which doesn’t last long in your hand when it’s hot outside. Unfortunately, sweets have their pitfalls. So, consider what you can do to reduce some of the risk factors of oral disease and tooth decay that may result in serious health problems and financial costs in your future. Tooth decay is the most common disease in the world. Left untreated, tooth decay often hurts, and the more it hurts, the more serious and involved the treatments and costs. It’s always best to see your dentist early, before it hurts. Bacteria in our mouths are the most common cause of tooth decay. Bacteria secrete strong acids, eroding the enamel

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and soft dentin of our teeth. So, why do these bacteria secrete acid? Acid is the byproduct of their digestive processes, and when bacteria “eat,” their waste product is acid. So, what do bacteria eat? You guessed it — SUGAR! The bacteria in our mouths love sugar. The real thing, not the artificial stuff. Here’s a helpful shopping tip: Remember “sugar free” for your family. There are many sugar-free products your children (and you) will enjoy that don’t have an unpleasant aftertaste. Every time we eat sugar, bacteria continue to excrete the harmful acids in our mouth beyond the time of an immediate toothbrushing ritual. The more we eat or drink sugar during the day, the longer the harmful acids are present in our mouth wreaking havoc. Moderation in most things is still a good motto. So, what about sports drinks? Always

read the label. Most sports drinks contain sugar, sometimes as much as a soda. All sugary drinks in our diet need to be closely monitored, as they often contribute to too much sugar in our diets. Diet sodas also contain harmful acids that affect our teeth. Summertime is a fun season that can be enjoyed, even with the occasional sugary treat. Be smart about the decisions you make regarding what you and your children eat. These decisions will affect your oral health. After all, it’s your smile (or your kids’), and good dentistry should be all about you.

Dr. Steven Anderson is owner/ dentist with Anderson Dental of Woodstock and East Cobb. 650 Claremore Professional Way, Suite 200, Woodstock. 770-384-8505. DrStevenAnderson.com

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Photos courtesy of Cassandra Bickel

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Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


N

estled in the heart of downtown Woodstock, shoulder to shoulder with the city’s infamous red caboose, Freight Kitchen & Tap is a local

hotspot. Many moons ago, this Main Street gem was not a restaurant, but the city’s now historic train depot. Today, guests dining at Freight drop their forks and head outside to watch the trains that still frequently pass by.

251 E. Main Street, Woodstock 770-924-0144 FreightKitchen.com

Freight came to fruition on November 1, 2011, and owners Robert Morneweck and Neel Sengupta are still holding down the fort seven years later. The building may be over a century old with the original floors in the dining room, but with a farm-to-table concept, everything about Freight’s menu is fresh. “Eat. Drink. Local.” is Freight’s proudly displayed mantra. These words are held true using local ingredients and offering a wide selection of local craft beer. Freight is known for its southern fare with popular menu staples like Chicken and Waffles, and Shrimp and Grits. The local aspect does not end there. One of Freight’s four core values is Community: “We are members of a bigger community

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

and connected to it in many aspects. Through daily actions, we connect ourselves to guests, vendors, employees, other local businesses, and the city. We live up to our responsibility by sourcing local and fostering relationships,” said Robert. Freight also supports many charitable causes in the area, most recently teaming up with Never Alone Food Pantry to help the less fortunate and the Keely Foundation to help combat drug addiction. Freight’s other core values are Guest First, Respect, and Family. Freight Kitchen & Tap is for those who want to feel welcome before they even walk through the door, and Freight proves that the city of Woodstock’s rich history is shared when life is brought inside its landmarks.

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Ribbon Cuttings, Ground Breakings, and Celebrations

Sull Graphics, Inc.

2220 Airport Industrial Drive, Suite 900 Ball Ground 770-740-1134 Printing Services

Ribbon Cuttings, Ground Breakings, and Celebrations

Book Warehouse

915 Ridgewalk Parkway, B-250 Woodstock 678-492-9439 Retail

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Alliance Spine & Pain Centers 134 Riverstone Terrace, Suite 101 Canton 770-929-9033 Health Care

Black Airplane

111 Towne Lake Parkway, #100 Woodstock 404-939-2544 Website and App Design

Kings Toys

915 Ridgewalk Parkway, E-564 Woodstock 678-401-8709 Retail

Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. 2449 Cumming Highway Canton 770-721-7110 Retail

New York & Co.

915 Ridgewalk Parkway, D-410 Woodstock 678-494 2967 Retail

Palmetto Moon

915 Ridgewalk Parkway, E-240 Woodstock 770-485-6395 Retail

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Is Your Child

Hungry for Knowledge? By Lisa-Marie Haygood

[AcademicLife] Have you ever tried to feed a toddler something they don’t like to eat? No matter what you try, it’s almost impossible to get a child to eat something they do not want to eat. For kids, learning is actually a lot like trying to feed them. Some kids come to class willing to try anything, excited to “taste” new offerings. Those children have a willingness to experience what a teacher is trying to share. In this instance, you are likely going to see a symbiotic relationship. Teacher shares information creatively; child absorbs information and can prove on a test that they have mastered the content. Test mastery can reflect that the teacher did a great job conveying the information. But what if the child is not open to learn the

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

material? Or, what if a child is hungry, tired, or not prepared to learn? Do we judge a doctor by the health of their patient? No, of course not; we judge doctors by their education, experience, demeanor, etc. If they were graded on patient health and survival, they would likely all fail. Parents need to share in the responsibility for their children’s education. Teachers, while incredibly important, are not a child’s first teacher. Teachers do not have control of the child’s welfare in the hours beyond the classroom. Before we cast any more blame or responsibility on educators, we need to own what our duties are to our children and be accountable for making sure they are at the table and ready to learn.

Lisa-Marie Haygood is the executive director for the Cherokee County Educational Foundation. 770-704-4213. CherokeeCountyEducationalFoundation. org

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Advertiser Index Anderson Dental 43 Atlanta Gynecologic Onocology 1 Budget Blinds of Woodstock 28 Burns Law Group 39 Cobb EMC 48 Dance Imagination 28 Dawn Sams, Realtor 45 Dr. Fixit, Ph.D. 40 Elm Street Cultural Arts Village 31 Eyes on Towne Lake 38 The Factory Church Cover, 24-25 Fire Stone Wood Fired Pizza & Grill 13 Foot & Ankle Reconstruction of North Georgia 30 Freight Kitchen & Tap 45 Fun Finds & Designs 5 Game Time Results Academy & Blitz Sports 37 Gondolier Italian Restaurant and Pizza 5 Hickory Flat Volunteer Association 45 Jyl Craven Hair Design 23 Landscape Matters 11 LGE Community Credit Union 27 Masterpiece Framer 47 Nature’s Corner Market 1 Northside Cherokee Orthopedics Inside Front & Sports Medicine Northside Cherokee Surgical Associates 5 Northside Vascular Surgery 3 Outdoor Living, Indoor Comfort, LLC 41 Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics Inside Front and Dentistry at Canton Plastic Surgery Center of the South 10 Reinhardt University 5K 9 SchmoozaPalooza 16 Southern Air Pros, LLC 35 Summit Financial Solutions 29 Stars and Strikes 39 Tranquility Counseling Services 11 WellStar Health System Back Cover Woodstock Funeral Home 40 Woodstock Pediatric Medicine 3 Woodstock Summer Concert Series 21 48

Woodstock Family Life | AUGUST 2018

Over 30,000 Each Issue, Every Month


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