Woodstock Family Life 6-18

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Contents

June 2018

VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 11

28-29

[28-29]

On the Cover:

Jyl Craven Hair Design

35-44

Health & Wellness Guide

50-51

Completing the Appalachian Trail

[35-44] [50-51] Follow Us >>>

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Family Life Publications

Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

04

.......................... Perspective

06

.............................. Calendar

12

................ Woodstock Minute

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................... Sheriff Reynolds

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.................... Community Life

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................... Senator Speaks

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....... Summer Concert Photos

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............... Community Partner

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........................ Book Review

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......................... Taste of Life

34

............................ Quotables

46

......................... Artist Profile

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................... Friday Night Live

54

.................... Ribbon Cuttings

familylifepublications

@FamilyLifeMags

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Publisher’s Perspective

Destination THE

AHEAD

PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHER Jack Tuszynski Jack@FamilyLifePublications.com EDITORIAL Julie Senger Julie@FamilyLifePublications.com ART Candice Williams Candice@FamilyLifePublications.com Laurie Litke Laurie@FamilyLifePublications.com

630 East Main Street Canton, GA 30114

770-213-7095

FamilyLifePublications.com Family Life publications have the largest monthly circulation of direct-mailed community magazines in our area. Woodstock Family Life is a monthly community magazine with a total print count of over 26,000, direct mailing over 24,000 copies to Towne Lake, downtown Woodstock up to Hickory Flat and toward the Roswell border. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists and submissions are not necessarily those of the editor/publisher, and the publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. Woodstock Family Life magazine is not responsible for errors and omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher. Subscriptions are available for $25 per year. Please contact us for payment options. © 2018 All rights reserved.

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Happy travels along your many roads, and keep moving forward toward your goals.

Family Life Publishing Group, Inc.

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Later, as “grown-ups,” we soon learned that our time and activities had to be budgeted, and we needed to create our own plans to enjoy fun, success, and life, as we would come to know it. We don’t have the watchful eyes, skillful hands, and loving hearts of our parents and grandparents forever. The mile markers and milestones in our lives will keep coming. It’s up to us to understand they are not there for us to know how far we have come; they are there to mark the distance to the destination ahead.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jessica Asbell, J. Daran Burns, Chris Bryant, Jennifer Dattolo, Jimmy Eley, Joshua Fuder, Hillary Gallagher, Hillary Groover, Lisa-Marie Haygood, Tim Morris, Tina Morris, Vishant Nath, Frank Reynolds, Jill Rowlands, Dawn Sams, Sen. Bruce Thompson, Ferdinand Yates

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Traveling along the road to get to destinations with our grandparents was always a well-coordinated adventure. At least four or five times a year, we would pile in the back seat of PapaJack’s big red Chrysler® and drive for hours to their little mountain retreat. Along the way, we would play travel games they kept packed in pockets on the back of the front seats. I would watch mile marker numbers shrink in size, as we approached each little town,

remembering the last time I was there and knowing exactly what was around the corner. It seemed so easy, all so natural as children. We knew that fun was ahead, and soon, we would be in a comfortable place. PapaJack and Nanlil would have everything planned perfectly, from roasting marshmallows, snow skiing, hiking, and tubing, to breakfast, which was always orange sweet rolls, scrambled eggs, and cheese grits with half a big pink grapefruit. I loved it all — except the grapefruit.

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ummer vacation time always brings back fond memories of travels and adventures with my grandparents, Jack and Lillian Briscoe, who I knew as PapaJack and Nanlil. Much like many of our grands, they were two of the people I admired most in my youth. Always happy, inseparable, and seldom angered, PapaJack and Nanlil knew how to live their lives to the fullest and embraced their days together for almost sixty years. My brother, cousins, and I traveled many miles by plane, train, and automobile and listened intently to the optimism and wisdom of two of the kindest souls one could ever meet. They were successful not only financially, through a strong work ethic and wise business practices, but also spiritually and mentally by living right, one day at a time.

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SALES Janet Ponichtera Janet@FamilyLifePublications.com

Jack Tuszynski, Publisher

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Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


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Calendar ONGOING June is National Camping Month — The goal of National Camping Month is to get people outside whether that be a weeklong camping trip, a one-night campground outing, or simply a backyard tent. Spending most of our lives indoors can lull us into a false sense of security. Sleeping in a tent allows us to hear the wind blow, the rain pitter patter, and the nocturnal critters go bump in the night. It puts us back on more equal footing with our fellow planetary inhabitants, and maybe it allows us to afford them a tad more respect.

Woodstock’s Farm Fresh Market — Each Saturday through December, the Woodstock Farm Fresh Market’s rules guarantee that it is the best market in the region to get locally grown, fresh produce because produce vendors are required to grow at least 85% of the product they bring to the market, and they are subject to inspection to confirm this. 8:30am-12:00pm, Market Street, downtown Woodstock. 770-924-0406. VisitWoodstockGa.com Tuesday Night Trivia — Every Tuesday evening, enjoy trivia for a chance to win gift cards, plus nightly giveaways, and food sampling. 6:30pm, The Outlet Shoppes of Atlanta food court, 915 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock. 678-540-7040. TheOutletShoppesAtAtlanta.com YPOW A.M. Coffee — Each Thursday morning, join Young Professionals of Woodstock for coffee and networking. 7:00am, Copper Coin Coffee, 400 Chambers Street, Woodstock. 770-5926056. MainStreetWoodstock.org/connect/ GROW Monthly Meeting — On the third Thursday of each month, join the volunteers in this group to help plan Woodstock’s seasonal plantings,

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Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

annual Scarecrow Invasion, and downtown holiday décor. 6:00pm, Chattahoochee Tech Woodstock Conference Room, 8371 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-5926056. Design@mainstreetwoodstock. org. MainStreetWoodstock.org/ community/#beauty

million cups of coffee. Drop in on this community of innovators to connect with and support local startups. 9:00-10:00am, the first Wednesday is at The Circuit, 1 Innovation Way, Woodstock; check the online schedule for the location of the third Wednesday, which changes monthly. 1MillionCups.com/cherokee Detachment 1311 — Every third Saturday of the month, veterans share their firsthand war experiences, which are then used as editorial research data to assist others. The Woodstock Detachment #1311 is chartered as a subsidiary organization of the Marine Corps League. 9:00am, Semper Fi Bar and Grille, 9770 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-672-0026.

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Karen White’s Dreams of Falling Book Launch — This New York Times bestselling author crafts evocative relationships in this new contemporary women’s fiction novel about best friends who share a devastating secret, set in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. 6:30pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

Holly Springs Young Professional Experience (HYPE) — On the first Tuesday of each month, young in age, young in your profession, or young at heart — doesn’t matter. Meet at Holly Springs’ newest coffee shop for a cup of coffee and some laid-back networking with local professionals. 7:00-8:00am, The Coffee Vineyard, 2800 Holly Springs Parkway, Suite 100, Holly Springs. 770-345-5536. Facebook.com/ events/556923864658166/

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1 Million Cups — Every first and third Wednesday of the month, attend this FREE, nationwide program designed to educate, engage, and accelerate early-stage startups. The notion is that entrepreneurs can discover solutions and thrive when they collaborate over a

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Good Morning Cherokee Breakfast — Held the first Thursday of each month, the Chamber’s monthly breakfast meetings offer both current and future Chamber members the opportunity to conduct business and network with more than 200 fellow business leaders. Please register online by 3:00pm on the Tuesday before the event. 7:00am, Northside Hospital - Cherokee, 1130 Bluffs Parkway, Canton. 770-345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

Action Painting, Color Abstraction, and All That Jazz Art Exhibit by Marc West — Come out to see the variety of abstract work from sketches to paintings and more. There will be an opening reception on 6/8 from 6:00-8:00pm. FREE! Tuesday-Friday

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


11 11:00am-5:00pm, Saturday 12:00-5:00pm, Cherokee Arts Center, 94 North Street, Canton. 770-704-6244. CherokeeArts.org

16th Annual Chamber Classic Golf Tournament — Enjoy some healthy competition! 7:30am registration, 9:00am shotgun start, BridgeMill Athletic Club, 1190 BridgeMill Avenue, Canton. 770-345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

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21st Annual Woodstock Summer Concert Series Presents Love & Theft — 7:30pm, Northside Hospital - Cherokee Amphitheater, 101 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. WoodstockConcertSeries.com

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Heavenly Hydrangeas — These beauties are a traditional favorite. This class will help you choose, plant, and care for hydrangeas. Registration is required. 10:00am & 1:30pm, Hickory Flat Library, 2740 East Cherokee Drive. Canton. 770-721-7803. UGE1057@ uga.edu

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Minnie the Sassy Chick Story Time with Cindy Shirley — Story, giveaways, and lots of fun! Books will be available for purchase. This is a FREE event! 11:00am, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Woodstock. 770-5169989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

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Art in the Park — ABC Easel offers a unique enrichment program that incorporates historical artists, storybook art concepts, and cultural events from around the world, allowing each artist an opportunity to expand his/her knowledge, explore creativity, and experiment with a variety of art forms. This event will focus on 5”x7” puzzle art. This is suitable for all ages and abilities. Parental supervision is required. Registration is $10 and includes supplies. 10:00am-12:00pm, Dupree Park Playground Pavilion, 513 Neese Road, Woodstock. 770-592-6000 x1952. WoodstockGa.gov

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Ricki Schultz Switch and Bait Book Launch — This author’s trademark irreverent humor and wry insight into the absurdities of modern dating are both outrageously

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

funny and genuinely moving in her unforgettable new novel. 6:30pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

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Jack and the Beanstalk — Based on the English fairy tale, this new work follows a farm boy named Jack and his courageous journey to the Land of the Giants. Wednesday 10:00am, Saturday & Sunday 2:00pm, City Center Auditorium, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 678-494-4251. ElmStreetArts.org

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C.O.P. Shop - CPR/AED & First Aid Training — In the event of an emergency, this training can help stabilize someone who is injured or ailing until help arrives. A representative from the Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services will teach the class. You must be 14 years of age to receive certification. 9:00am-3:00pm, Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce, 3605 Marietta Highway, Canton. 770-3450400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Aquatic Center Teen Night — This is a great way for teens to get together for some healthy, electronics-free fun! This is for ages 13-19. 7:00-9:00pm, Cherokee Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. 678-880-4760. CRPA.net

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Volunteer Aging Council (VAC) Fundraising Luncheon — Support VAC programs, and get a wonderful lunch for only $5.00! Bring a friend, coworker, family member, or yourself and enjoy a tasty lunch while supporting the seniors and veterans of Cherokee County. Stay and eat, or pick up and go. RSVP the location, so all the amazing chefs can be prepared for all who come to support. 11:30am-1:00pm, The Arbor at BridgeMill, 700 Freedom Boulevard, Canton. 678-230-4067. VACCherokeeGa.org

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Gardening for the Birds — Create a bird sanctuary right in your own backyard. Learn about birds’ likes and dislikes in housing and food. Registration is required. 10:00am, Hickory Flat Library, 2740 East Cherokee Drive. Canton. 770721-7803. UGE1057@uga.edu

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Susan Boyer A Lowcountry Mystery Book Signing & Discussion — Check out the new book from this award-winning author! 2:00pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

16 Movies in the Park

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle will be shown on a 30’ movie screen! Popcorn, candy, and other popular refreshments will be available. There will be kids’ activities before the movie, which starts at sundown. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs! FREE! Movie starts at 8:50pm, Northside Hospital - Cherokee Amphitheater, 101 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. GeorgiaMoviesInThePark.com [continued on page 8] WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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LIBRARY EVENTS SequoyahRegionalLibrary.org HICKORY FLAT 2740 East Cherokee Drive, Canton, 770-345-7565 ROSE CREEK 4476 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock, 770-591-1491 WOODSTOCK 7735 Main Street, Woodstock, 770-926-5859 COLORING GROUP Mondays, 10:00am, Woodstock The coloring fun continues! Come meet new friends! All materials will be provided. This is for ages 16+. MAHJONGG MEETUP Tuesdays, 10:00am & Fridays, 1:00pm, Woodstock Learn to play American MahJongg, based on the ancient Chinese tile game. Whether you’re just starting out, honing your skills, or an advanced player, this is the group for you! KNIT & CROCHET Tuesdays, 1:00pm, Rose Creek Let Ms. Darlene help you get started on a knitting or crocheting project. Bring your needles and yarn, and be prepared to have fun! No prior knowledge is required. CRAYONS & CONVERSATION Wednesdays, 1:00pm, Rose Creek Drop in to de-stress, and get your creative juices flowing. Players and colorers of all skill levels are welcome! SIT & STITCH Thursdays, 10:00am, Woodstock Get crafty every Thursday! Enjoy socializing with other creative people. DIY FATHER’S DAY CARDS June 6, 6:00pm, Hickory Flat Learn how to make beautiful cards all by yourself! Materials will be provided. Registration is required. READING DOGS June 6, 4:30pm, Rose Creek Children 6 and older can read to a non-judgmental, furry listener who won’t laugh if the reader stumbles or makes a mistake. Children are asked to select their own reading material before their scheduled session. Parents can call to register their child (two weeks in advance) for a 10-15-minute reading session. GOLD PANNING FUN June 7, 11:00am, Hickory Flat Meet Rob Kelley, master gold panner of the Allatoona Gold Panners. Do you have a gold creek? Have pan, will prospect! This is for all ages; children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Registration is required.

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Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

LEGO® CLUB June 9, 3:00pm, Rose Creek There is a different theme each month! Children may work alone or in teams to build LEGO® masterpieces, which will be displayed in the library until the following month’s meeting. LEGO® and DUPLO® are provided. Children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

Calendar continued from page 7

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Business After Hours — This is a great networking opportunity! 4:30-6:00pm, Shane’s Rib Shack, 4504 Holly Springs Parkway, Suite 101, Holly Springs. 770-345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Wendy Wax Best Beach Ever Book Discussion & Signing — Enjoy hearing about the new book from this great author! 6:30pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

INKLINGS WRITERS CRITIQUE GROUP June 9 & 23, 11:00am, Woodstock Love to write, but need some feedback? All writers interested in joining a group to share writings, ideas, and feedback are invited to attend! QUILTING CLUB BLOCK-OF-THE-MONTH PROJECT June 13, 10:00am, Woodstock This program is designed for those who are interested in trying a new craft. Instruction will be provided on how to sew a different 12” block each month. This is for ages 16+. Registration is required. FAMILY STORYTIME June 13, 20, & 27, 10:30am, Woodstock This is designed for families with children of all ages. The story will be followed by a craft activity. Children must be accompanied by a participating adult. ALL ABOUT HONEYBEES June 15, 11:00am, Hickory Flat Ross Berry Farm from Canton will discuss the different types of bees and how important they are to humans, the pollination of plants, and the food we eat. Taste different samples of honey, and observe a real bee hive! This is for all ages; children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. PROJECT PINTEREST June 17, 3:00pm, Woodstock Explore Pinterest-inspired creative projects! This is for ages 16+. Registration is required. DIY NECKLACES June 20, 6:00pm, Hickory Flat Create your own beautiful necklaces using beads! Materials will be provided, or you may bring your own. This is for all ages; children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

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A Novel Idea — This month’s theme is “beach reads.” Five local authors will gather to read excerpts from their bestselling novels. Door prizes will be given away. This event is FREE and open to the public. 7:00-9:00pm, East Main Cafe (inside Audio Intersection), 210 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-670-9333. Marsha.Cornelius@hotmail.com

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Woodstock Roots — The series has been centered around bluegrass since its inception in 2016. This year, the series will transition from regional bluegrass artists to feature local Americana artists. Cody Bolden (pictured) will be performing on this date. 7:00-9:00pm, Elm Street Arts Village Event Green, 111 Elm Street, Woodstock. 770-592-6056. VisitWoodstockGa.com Cody Bolden photo courtesy of Just a Fan Photography.

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TGIF Concert Series – Atlanta Dance Party — Enjoy an evening full of familiar songs that are sure to keep you on your feet. 8:0010:00pm, Chukkar Farm Polo Club, 1140 Liberty Grove Road, Alpharetta. 770-314-3735. ChukkarFarmPoloClub. com

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Tinkerbell Story Time & Meet & Greet — Tink will read a story and pose for photos. This is a FREE event. Book purchase is appreciated. 11:00am, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Woodstock. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

Street, Woodstock. 770-592-6056. MainStreetWoodstock.org

JULY

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Barbara Davis When Never Comes Reading and Book Signing — This women’s fiction author explores the emotionally charged landscape of pain, loss, despair, and the risk one woman will take in the hope of loving again. 6:30pm, FoxTale Book Shoppe, 105 E. Main Street, Woodstock. 770516-9989. FoxTaleBookShoppe.com

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Bees and Other Pollinators — Learn to build pollinator habitats in your landscape and community. Also, learn how to garden pollinator friendly. 10:00am, Senior Services Center, 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-721-7803. UGE1057@ uga.edu Gardener’s Plant Sale — UGA Master Gardener Extension Volunteers of Cherokee County will have a plant sale including daylilies, pollinator plants, succulents, yard art, and more. The Demonstration Garden will be open for tours during the plant sale, which is a great opportunity to see what various plants look like! 9:00am-12:00pm, Senior Services Center, 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-721-7803. UGE1057@uga.edu

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Downtown Buzz — This event is open to Main Street members and invited guests. There will be networking and a brief topical program. FREE! 8:00am, the Chambers at City Center, 8534 Main

22nd Annual Woodstock Freedom Run 5k and Tot Trot — All runners and walkers receive a colorful T-shirt. FREE fruit and water after the race. 7:15am, Elm Street Cultural Arts Village, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 678-214-5294. WoodstockFreedomRun.com

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City of Woodstock July 4th Spectacular — A festive parade kicks off the daylong celebration, starting at Woodstock Elementary School and traveling down Main Street to Sam’s Club at Highway 92. After the parade, stay until 3:00pm for food, live music, children’s games, inflatables, arts and crafts, Adam the Juggler, and vendors of all types. The day concludes with fireworks at dusk behind the Target shopping center at Highway 92 and I-575. 10:00am, downtown Woodstock. 770-517-6788. WoodstockParksAndRec.com

Friday Night Live Downtown Dance Party — Put on your dancing shoes, and head downtown for a dance party! It will be a night to remember. Thanks to the extended hours during this fun event, everyone has a chance to explore the variety of shops downtown. 6:00-9:00pm, downtown Woodstock. 770-592-6056. VisitWoodstockGa.com

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Home By Dark Concert — Liz Longley and Jesse Terry tell the stories behind their songs in this songwriters-in-the-round concert event that often proves how just one song can change your life. 8:00pm, Chukkar Farm Polo Club, 1140 Liberty Grove Road, Alpharetta. 770-314-3735. ChukkarFarmPoloClub.com

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ily Mealtime Reviving Fam Yates, Jr., M.D., M.A . By Ferdinand

[HealthyLife] Eating together as a family may seem to be a lost art — or even worse — an idealistic holdover from past generations. With all our busy and hectic lifestyles, it may often seem easier and simpler to stop by the nearest fast food restaurant. Meanwhile, the children are absorbed with their electronic devices, and nary a word is spoken. Sound too familiar? It does not need to be, and it is worth the effort to scuttle this detrimental routine. Currently, about half of American families eat together at least five nights a week. The family mealtime should be

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a time to pause and to reconnect with one another. The following suggestions provide good reason for implementing the family table and may help with the process:

Table talking can rejuvenate the family, as the day’s events and discoveries often provide an opportunity to generate support, praise, and enthusiasm. Identified mealtime helps to model good eating habits. Specifically, children tend to be less fussy with foods, and eating disorders seem to occur less frequently. Research has documented that table talking improves the child’s vocabulary, and school grades tend to improve. Children also tend to have better

family relations and less emotional stress. Involve the entire family. Everyone has an appropriate responsibility such as helping cook the meal or set the table. Also, it need not be a gourmet meal. Leftovers are fine. Be creative. Perhaps a family breakfast will work if a dinner is not feasible. Ban electronics. Talk to each other; don’t be glued to a screen.

When families regularly share mealtime, everyone benefits — the children, parents, and even the community. Start your family table today! Sources - American College of Pediatricians and USNews

Dr. Yates is a pediatrician at Woodstock Pediatric Medicine, 2000 Professional Way, #200, Woodstock. 770-517-0250. WoodstockPeds.com

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A Fond Farewell By Pastor Chris Bryant

[InGoodFaith] I have lived in Cherokee County for fourteen years. It has been a great place to live and raise a family. I’ve seen an amazing number of changes. From my perspective, for the most part, the changes, the growth spurts, and the developments have been good and well managed. Yes, parking can be — and often is — a problem. Yes, traffic can really get on your nerves. However, the recreational options we have along with the great restaurants and fun and interesting things to do and see are simply amazing. In short, I have loved living here. This month, my three boys and I are moving to Ringgold, GA. It is a professional

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

promotion and opportunity. Yet, it is hard to leave the one place I have lived longer than any other in my entire life. Two of my three children were born here. All of them have gone to the same schools, in the same school system, their entire lives — something that is unheard of for a United Methodist pastor. Yet, with change comes new possibilities. As uncomfortable as it can be that practically everything will be different, it is also an amazing chance to start over, to reset, to embrace totally new things, new habits, new practices, and yes — even new friends along with a new neighborhood, new schools and, of course, a new church. Woodstock and Canton, you are the two places where I have spent the bulk of my time, and I bid a very fond farewell to you.

What great places to live and work! The church I started and now leave behind, City On A Hill United Methodist Church, continues to shine bright in the community and offer those who feel lost a way home in Jesus. I leave both it, and this column, in the capable hands of Pastor Andy Rogers. While I will miss you greatly, I also know that you will be blessed by having Pastor Rogers as a new friend. May the Lord bless each and every one of you who reads this, and may the Lord’s face shine upon you. This is not “goodbye.” This is, “Until we meet again…”

Chris Bryant is lead pastor at City On A Hill United Methodist Church. 678445-3480. COAHUMC.org

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Woodstock Minute

Fireworks Safety Tips

By Jimmy Eley

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ndependence Day is just around the corner. It is a time for parades, food, family, and yes — fireworks. Many families in our area are planning to have their own private fireworks display rather than attending a public display. Each year, the Woodstock Fire Department responds to calls for service as a result of carelessness and/or the improper use of fireworks. In an effort to keep yourself and the people around you safe, please consider the following fireworks safety recommendations from The National Council on Fireworks Safety:

Recommended Safety Tips • Obey all local laws regarding the use of fireworks. • Know your fireworks. Be sure to read the cautionary labels and performance descriptions before igniting. • A responsible adult should supervise all firework activities. Never give fireworks to children. • Alcohol and fireworks do not mix. Save your alcohol for after the show.

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Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

• Wear safety glasses when shooting fireworks. • Light one firework at a time, and then quickly move away. • Use fireworks outdoors in a clear area, away from buildings and vehicles. • Never relight a “dud” firework. Wait twenty minutes, and then soak it in a bucket of water. • Always have a bucket of water and charged water hose nearby. • Never carry fireworks in your pocket or shoot them into metal or glass containers. • Do not experiment with homemade fireworks. • Dispose of spent fireworks by wetting them down, and then place them in a metal trash can away from any building or combustible materials until the next day. • FAA regulations prohibit the possession and transportation of fireworks in your checked baggage or carry-on luggage. • Report illegal explosives, like M-80s and quarter sticks, to the fire or police department.

Let’s Not Forget the Safety of Our Pets! • Don’t bring your pets to a fireworks display, even a small one. • If fireworks are being used near your home, put your pet in a safe, interior room to avoid exposure to the sound. • Make sure your pet has an identification tag in case it runs off during a fireworks display. • Never shoot fireworks of any kind (consumer fireworks, sparklers, fountains, etc.) near pets. The women and men at the Woodstock Fire Department wish you and yours a safe and enjoyable holiday.

Jimmy Eley is the assistant chief/ fire marshal for the Woodstock Fire Department. 225 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. 770-926-2302. WoodstockGa.gov

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The e of c n a t r Impo inuing a ip Cont elationsh t in n R e y m h t e l Hea w Enforc unty La ee Co h t i W k o r e Ch ds ynol e R nk

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F her iff By S

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merica has enjoyed a rich tradition of law enforcement weaved into the fabric of its identity. Notable personalities come to mind when one thinks about the lawmen of our past: Wyatt Earp, Elliott Ness, Bufford Pusser, and even Andy Taylor. History extends a certain reverence for strong men with a desire to fight crime and corruption from the saloons of the old west to the big city of New York. Growing up, I was taught to respect law enforcement, especially when I got my first driver’s license. In those days, Georgia State Patrol Sergeant Joel Rogers was the post commander in Canton, and Bo Ballard was the sheriff of Cherokee County. These were men who a kid my age respected but also feared a little — not in a bad way — but I knew not to cross that line. My dad also made it very clear, “If you get in trouble with either Joel or Bo, whatever happens on the side of the road with them, it will be twice as bad when you get home.” Point being, there was a healthy respect for law enforcement and people in positions of authority. Unfortunately, today’s law enforcement is under attack from many different 14

Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

directions. Attacks from the media, attacks from social media “scholars,” attacks from keyboard commandos, and real attacks in the street. The attacks are so prevalent that people are reluctant to enter this profession. I recently attended the National Sheriff’s Institute in Arora, CO with sheriffs from all over the country. Sheriffs in that class shared one common problem, hiring deputies. Police departments are no different in that regard. Law enforcement agencies are losing veteran officers to other professions; employees are seeking early retirement; and recruitment is at an all-time low. In Georgia, the same trend is occurring. For example, the Georgia State Patrol indicates it is short nearly 100 troopers; the Cobb County Police Department and the Cobb Sheriff’s Office are down nearly 200 personnel. The Cherokee Sheriff’s Office is down 35 deputies. Despite an increase in competitive salaries, benefit packages, and education opportunities, recruitment is still difficult. When you combine the moral decay of our nation, the absence of dignity and respect for others, and the total lack of

personal accountability, we are on a very slippery slope. So, where does that leave us? As a nation, we need to do a better job at supporting our law enforcement professionals and stop vilifying them based on their uniform. Fortunately, we still live in a community where we have a positive and meaningful relationship with our law enforcement professionals. We need to continue to enhance that partnership in Cherokee County. People like you make a positive difference in the lives of these brave men and women who wear the badge. Your kind words of encouragement often make their day. I ask for your support to ensure our deputies and police officers continue to have competitive salaries, the most modern equipment, and more importantly, that they have a meaningful relationship with you.

Frank Reynolds is the sheriff for Cherokee County. 678-493-4100. CherokeeGa-Sheriff.org

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Community Cherokee County Celebrates Public Service Recognition Week Celebrated the first full week of May since 1985, Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW) is organized annually to honor the men and women who serve our nation as federal, state, county, and local government employees. Cherokee County uses this week to honor its employees’ efforts and express gratitude for their exceptionalism and commitment to serving the county. In lieu of organizing an employee appreciation day or picnic that not all employees are able to attend due to the broad spectrum of services Cherokee County employees provide to citizens, which demands a variety of schedules, the county uses this week to bring appreciation to every department by supplying a meal of their choosing. It’s a great time to allow each team to take a break together and enjoy some camaraderie. This is the county’s second year celebrating PSRW, and it is anticipated to grow each year. The county hopes to spread this tradition to neighboring cities and counties, as county employees have been extremely receptive to the recognition; just one more reason Cherokee County is a great place to live, work, and play!

Melanie Tugman! Congratulations to our October “7 Differences” winner, Joyce McMichael! Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Community CCSD Wins Top National Award for Excellence in Teaching Practices The International Center for Leadership in Education has named CCSD an Innovative District for 2018 — one of only eleven school districts in the nation to be recognized. Selection is based on criteria including substantive, data-validated, student academic growth; a strong learning-centered culture; and dedication to transforming instruction to best serve students’ needs today and in the future. Dr. Hightower said Chief Academic Officer Dr. Nicole H. Holmes (pictured) and Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction Dr. Keith Bryant (pictured) have played important leadership roles in CCSD’s success. “It’s a challenge to take a high-performing school district and identify how to further improve teaching and learning, and it’s an ever-greater challenge to get buy-in from your organization that change is needed,” he said. “They’ve succeeded at both.”

Downtown Woodstock Gets a Little Free Pantry Something unexpected appeared recently in downtown Woodstock along Wall Street. A whimsical Little Free Pantry has been installed on the stone patio behind the Woodstock Visitors Center. Following the renovation of the Visitors Center this spring, staff needed to find a new home for the 1930s refrigerator that belonged to the Dean family and has been used for years to store antique ledgers in Dean’s Store. Marketing Manager Stacy Brown discovered The Little Free Pantry project — a grassroots, crowdsourced solution that applies the Little Free Library® concept to activate community engagement in regard to food insecurity. According to the project’s website, “Whether a need for food or a need to give, the Little Free Pantry facilitates neighbors helping neighbors, building community.” Artists Deidra Smith and Darryl Reddy collaborated on this piece of functional public art to benefit our community. The Little Free Pantry is installed and accepting donations behind the Woodstock Visitors Center.

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Community Get a First Look at Reformation Brewery’s New Woodstock Location Reformation Brewery’s new brewhouse will be located at 105 Elm Street. It will be a 5-barrel, 6,000-square-foot structure. This new location will be used as a research and development brewery with two public bars serving 16 to 24 unique beers at any given time. It is set to open in August 2018.

New Lantern Concert Series Set to Debut in Woodstock These world-class performances will take place outdoors on the Elm Street Event Green. This series will strive to introduce new music, ideas, and cultures that aren’t typical for the community. The Lantern series will offer tables in lieu of traditional seating to encourage conversation and the hope that this venture will grow into building deeper, more authentic moments that involve every aspect of the community and everyone who is a part of it. Tickets may be purchased at ElmStreetArts.org or by calling 678-494-4251. The 2018-2019 Lantern Series Lineup is as follows: June 2 The Barefoot Movement

Multi-Garden Club Tea To celebrate this year’s recent Garden Week in Georgia, the ladies of the Cherokee Garden Council sponsored a garden tea party for local garden clubs. The event was held at the beautiful Ball Ground Botanical Garden, next to City Hall, in downtown Ball Ground. The Ball Ground Botanical Garden was started by the Anetsa-Ge-Da Garden Club in 2015 and is supported by City Hall and the Ball Ground community. The Garden consists of many separate sections: a butterfly garden in the shape of a butterfly, a bog garden, a Japanese garden, and many more. The Garden is free and open to the public. A tour of the Ball Ground Botanical Garden will be held June 9, from 10:00am-3:00pm, to support the Garden. Admission is $15, which includes four special home gardens. Beautiful daylilies and raffle items will also be available. For more information about the tour, contact Diane Smith at 770-630-2486.

July 21 Royal Wood August 4 Marc Broussard September 15 Sam Reider & The Human Hands October 6 Landscape of Guitar April 13, 2019 Break of Reality May 18, 2019 Huntertones June 2019 TBD

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Community

Georgia Community Support & Solutions Merges with enAble of Georgia to Become InCommunity The enAble of Georgia’s 30th Annual Gala - Founders’ Ball was recently held at The Hotel at Avalon. The event was attended by more than 400 supporters and raised over $280,000 for adults with developmental disabilities who are served by enAble of Georgia and Georgia Community Support and Solutions (GCSS). The event honored the founders who had a dream for independence and inclusion for their children’s future, and they pursued that dream. The enAble of Georgia Founders Ginny Riley, Marian David, Jane Lewis, Kay Briggs, Eleanor Workman, and Becky Willingham, along with GCSS Founder Whitney Fuchs, were all recognized and applauded for their dedication and perseverance. Gala Chairs Bill and Shirley Abernathy and Mark and Kay Lewington did a wonderful job hosting the event. The night’s MC Comedian Derrick Tennant and his sister, Julie, and the Yacht Rock Schooner band were a huge hit. In 2014, a multi-year operational merger was begun by enAble of Georgia and GCSS, joining these two extraordinary groups that have the same mission of providing quality support to people with developmental disabilities. At this year’s Gala, GCSS CEO Fuchs took the stage and asked everyone to hold up their glass for a toast to InCommunity — the new name for the merged organizations.

Retiring Educators Recognized The Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce Education Committee, in partnership with Sold by Julianne - Keller Williams Atlanta North, recently recognized retiring educators from the Cherokee County School District by (L-R) - Julianne Rivera, Sold by Julianne - Keller Williams donating funds to Atlanta North; Anita Summers, director of Sequoyah the Sequoyah Regional Library System; and Pam Carnes, president & Regional Library CEO, Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce. System. The funds will be used to purchase books for all five library branches located in the county. The books will include a label recognizing all faculty, staff, and administrators who retired during the 2017-2018 school year. Each retiree will receive notification that a book is being donated in his/her honor.

CCSD Student Athletes Honored by Cherokee County Sports Hall of Fame The Cherokee County Sports Hall of Fame recently honored a dozen top Cherokee County School District student athletes as part of its annual banquet. The event recognized this year’s Hall of Fame inductees as well as the Most Outstanding Senior Athlete male and female honorees from each CCSD high school.

“The new name, InCommunity, describes our mission as partners, dedicated to enriching and sustaining the lives of individuals who have disabilities, their families, and their communities,” stated Fuchs, InCommunity CEO. Currently, InCommunity has more 650 employees who provide all levels of support in the community to people with a variety of needs including residential support, employment services, respite care, family support, inhome care, and day programs. To date, InCommunity has provided support and service to more than 10,000 Georgian community members.

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2018 Most Outstanding Senior Athletes, Front Row (L-R) - Faith Arthur, River Ridge; Laiken Wade, Cherokee; Skylar Wallace, Etowah; Rachel Renner, Sequoyah; Emilee Harris, Woodstock. Back Row (L-R) - Wesley Potter, Sequoyah; Braden Johnson, Creekview; DeMond Ellison, Cherokee; Noah Frith, Woodstock; Patrick Ferris, Etowah; and Christopher Williams, River Ridge. Not pictured: Makenzie Cherry, Creekview.

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Community River Ridge HS Student Places in National Photography Contest Junior Angelica Millen placed fifth in the Jostens® Photography Contest with her photograph entitled Capturing the Moment. She won photography accessories, and her photo will be displayed in an art gallery in New York City as part of the AllAmerican High School Film Festival Photog Fest this October. “The yearbook staff and all of River Ridge is incredibly proud of Angelica,” Principal Darrell Herring said.

Cherokee Breast Care Opens Practice in Holly Springs A highly-trained oncology breast surgeon recently opened her practice in Cherokee County. Dr. Karen Buhariwalla is a fellowshiptrained breast surgeon who specializes in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of breast cancer and all breast-related disorders. Her new practice is located at 684 Sixes Road, Suite 230 in Holly Springs. She has medical privileges at the new Northside Hospital - Cherokee. “I’m so thrilled to be serving the women in our community,” Dr. Buhariwalla said. “The women who need these types of breastcare services can count on our comprehensive approach to provide them with compassionate and personalized care.” Dr. Buhariwalla received her undergraduate education from the University of Miami and her Master’s Degree in Biomedical Sciences at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine where she also later received her medical degree. She completed her residency in general surgery at Prime Garden City Hospital in Garden City, MI, also serving as chief resident. Dr. Buhariwalla’s fellowship was completed in breast surgical oncology at Emory University. “Mammograms are the best breast cancer screening test,” said Dr. Buhariwalla. “Come see me, whether you have a question or concern about your breasts. If you have not had your screening mammogram, come see me as well.” For an appointment to see Dr. Buhariwalla, call 770-721-9660, or for more information, visit CherokeeBreastCare.com.

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Senator Speaks

Do Millennials Care About

Customer Service? By Senator Bruce Thompson

I

recently debated with a colleague about whether great customer service truly matters to millennials or not. I used a recent business trip to California to support my argument that they do care. This trip was designed to educate myself on several components of the 2018 Coachella Music Festival. This massive Festival is situated on nearly 700 acres in Indio, California, and I was allowed access to review ticketing, internal operations, and security. Admittedly, my knowledge of the current music scene is very limited, so it was easy for my daughter to convince me to allow her and two of her friends to accompany me as mentors. I would say that nearly 100,000 college kids a day pile onto the grassy compound to hear their favorite band play from one of the stages. In total, 68 bands performed including seasoned artists such as Beyoncé and Eminem, and each year, several top newcomers such as the Weeknd and Migos are asked to perform. Tickets were not cheap. General admission tickets started at $399, and

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VIP tickets started at $1750, increasing to as much as $7500. Who in their right mind pays that kind of money to attend a music festival you ask? Clearly, a lot more people than I thought because the tickets sold out in just over twenty minutes. This event operated like a well-oiled machine. The crowds flowed through security with ease, the portable facilities were clean and plentiful, and the food and beverage lines were rarely backed up more than a few minutes. From the moment you hit the parking lot, you were met by friendly, welcoming people. AEG monitored virtually every touch point of the event. Of course, there were the usual things you might expect to see at a concert, but I witnessed only one unruly person requiring security. So, how do the Coachella event coordinators create such an incredible experience? They invest in the people who serve their attendees. The moment you enter the parking lot, you will encounter someone charged with making your

experience the best. They want you to be a raving fan. Contrast Coachella with any number of other festival experiences/venues that must invest hundreds of thousands of dollars to attract concert goers. Coachella doesn’t have to advertise at all. So, my position/argument is that millennials do care about how they are treated, and if treated favorably, they will reward a business just as they have this event. This year, Coachella generated nearly 800 million dollars of commerce. I’d say that presents a pretty good case for making sure your customer service is designed to make raving fans of your business’s clients.

Bruce Thompson is a state senator for District 14, which includes Canton. 404-656-0065. BruceThompsonGa. com

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Are Computers

Bad for My Eyes?

By Jennifer A. Dattolo, O.D., F.C.O.V.D. [HealthyLife] Computer screens, as well as all digital devices, emit blue light, which is a high-energy, visible light. This light contributes to digital eye strain. More importantly, it penetrates the eyes and can cause macular degeneration and cataracts. Sleepless nights and fatigue during the day may also occur, as the blue light suppresses the natural release of melatonin (a hormone which signals the brain it’s time to sleep). Therefore, it is recommended to not be on electronic devices 1-2 hours before bedtime.

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More than 87% of Americans report using digital devices more than two hours a day, and over 70% of parents say their children are on these devices as well. Prolonged exposure to blue light in children not only disrupts their sleep patterns, it also causes reduced attention span, poor behavior, and irritability. There are ways to help reduce exposure to this harmful light. Coatings are available for glasses lenses, which filter the light and reduce the negative side effects, helping to protect against retinal damage. Newer computer screens and phones have blue-lightshield applications that decrease the amount of blue light emitted. Extended time in front of computers leads to eye

fatigue, headaches, shoulder and neck pain, and dry eyes. Everyone, including children, should obey the 20-20-20 rule – every twenty minutes, take a twenty second break, and focus on something twenty feet away. It is also important to be consciously aware of blinking, as our blink rate decreases five times when on a computer. To help alleviate neck and shoulder pain, screens should be 10-15 degrees below your line of sight. LCD screens are easier on the eyes, reducing fatigue. For best lighting and reduced glare, position your screen so windows are to the side. Most importantly, have an annual comprehensive eye exam to prevent and treat computer vision problems.

Jennifer A. Dattolo is a physician at Eyes On Towne Lake, 1075 Buckhead Crossing, #130, Woodstock. 770-7025996. EyesOnTowneLake.com

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ck u t Kenrby De y Da

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Roche Bar k n

Photos courtesy of Michelle Russo Photography

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By Jill Rowlands [HealthyLife] An essential oil is an aromatic, volatile substance found within a plant. It is extracted from a specific part of the plant such as the flower, leaf, resin, bark, root, branch, seed, or fruit. Within these oils, hundreds of organic constituents promote beneficial responses when applied or inhaled. There is controversial opinion on the internal use of essential oils, so please discuss with a qualified practitioner.

Essential oils can irritate the skin, so they should be mixed with a “carrier” oil such as almond, avocado, coconut, etc. or unscented lotion, soap, or even water to make a mist. A starting rule of thumb for dilution would be six drops oil to one ounce of base for topical use, but it will vary depending on use and preference. Keep in mind that some oils can increase photosensitivity. Always use a reputable brand. Essential oils have become very popular, and unfortunately, some brands are not pure.

Though it might seem daunting at first, DIY essential oil recipes can be loads of fun. From household cleaners to room fragrance to beautifying the skin, you can create pure and natural products that are healthier for you and save money over many other chemical-laden alternatives. Start with these simple summertime recipes, and before you know it, you will probably be hooked and mixing like a pro!

Simple Cooling Skin Mist

DIY Insect Repellant

For sunburned skin, or just to cool down, this blend is hydrating and cooling — even for hot flashes:

• 3 oz. distilled water • 1 oz. aloe gel • 18 drops lavender essential oil • 4 drops peppermint essential oil • 2 drops spearmint essential oil

Pour the ingredients into a spray-mist bottle, and shake well before each use. To increase the cooling effect, store in the refrigerator or a cooler.

• 4 oz. water • 10 drops geranium essential oil • 5 drops cedarwood essential oil • 5 drops clove essential oil • 10 drops vetiver essential oil

Pour the ingredients into a spray-mist bottle, and shake well before each use. Use on shoes and clothing is recommended, as skin could be sensitive.

There are many essential oils that have pest-repelling abilities. In studies, the stronger the better — 100% oil, undiluted, had the highest, longest-lasting benefit. One study showed clove essential oil to have 100% repellency for up to four hours for three different mosquito species.

Jill Rowlands is the owner of Nature’s Corner Market, 200 Parkbrooke Drive, Woodstock. 678-310-2532. NaturesCornerMarket.com

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Community Partners

While PD research has not yet produced a cure, medication can help PWP manage the crippling symptoms. In addition to a medication regimen, the programs offered by instructors in PD Gladiators’ metro Atlanta fitness network have changed lives. Not only do participants report feeling more energetic, they also praise the camaraderie that ensues from swapping information about getting through a typical day with PD. PD Gladiators was started by Larry and Ellie Kahn in 2014, a short time after Larry was diagnosed. The name was inspired by the Oscar®-winning movie Gladiator, starring Russell Crowe. “In the movie,” Larry explains, “Before a battle, Crowe urges his troops to ‘fight with strength and honor.’ We view the fight against PD as one that also should be fought with strength and honor.”

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Participants in the PD Gladiators boxing program operated by Livramento Delgado Boxing Foundation (LDBF) go through much of the same non-contact training routines as professional fighters, though some do it while seated in folding chairs because of their condition. Instructors trained to work with PWP are deeply affected by these unlikely warriors.

classes in partnership with the YMCA of Metro Atlanta and a coalition of exercise professionals.

“It’s understanding the potential of the human body from a different level,” says Herb Mesa, LDBF’s lead instructor. “The feedback I get from the boxers is the fire I use to light the fuse of inspiration.”

Tim Nantz, a PD Gladiators boxer, says, “You feel more alive when you do it. It’s encouraging to be able to see people who can still move and enjoy life.”

“How do you live your best life with the condition you find yourself in? My goal is not to find out what they cannot do, but rather what they are capable of doing,” says Wendy Haggerty, line dancing class instructor.

Instructor Geoffrey Uhal, who was a trainer in the Army, was drawn to the program almost three years ago. “I like the Socratic idea of if you improve the lives of others around you, you improve your own life.” Even physical therapy students who first participate to earn classroom credit keep coming back. “It’s a learning exercise in dealing with PWP,” says Kayla Reeder. “I discovered that I like doing it. It speaks to what I should be doing in life.” PD Gladiators is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, funded by grants and the generosity of individual donors. In addition to LDBF’s boxing program, PD Gladiators offers PD-specific general fitness, cycling, dance, tai chi, and yoga

PDGladiators.org 770-450-0792 PDGladiators@gmail.com

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view e R L SBEL ook

B

SSICA

BY JE

A

Every once in a while, a book comes along that grabs you and doesn’t let go. Usually, it is a thriller or a mystery, but sometimes, it is the true story of someone’s life. It’s not often that you end a book feeling like everyone should read it, but Everything Happens for a Reason and Other Lies I’ve Loved is one of those books. A friend gave it the highest praise she could by saying that she gives a copy of it to everyone she meets. While you will read this book with tears in your eyes, it can be life changing for anyone who loves someone with cancer, for anyone who has cancer, and for anyone who has simply asked why things happen. “Everything happens for a reason.” When something bad happens, we do our best to comfort ourselves and others with sayings like this. And sometimes, it works. And yes, good things can come out of tragedy. But sometimes, it feels hollow, makes us angry, or makes us wonder what that reason could possibly be. It is out of this feeling that Kate Bowler has written Everything Happens for a Reason and Other Lies I’ve Loved. A professor at Duke Divinity School, Kate specializes in prosperity gospel where prosperity is seen as a blessing from God, and misfortune is seen as punishment for sin. But at 35, married to her high school sweetheart and with a much-prayed-for baby, she received a death sentence: stage IV colon cancer. Everything Happens for a Reason is her story of grief, faith, and facing down the reality of death. What do you do when you realize that control is an illusion? What do you do when faced with the prospect of leaving your family behind? Kate’s wit and humor will have you laughing unexpectedly, as she does her best to live her life. The kindness shown by strangers and family alike will have you crying tears of gratitude along with her. And her resolve to fight in the face of terrible odds will have you cheering her on. And perhaps, this little book will help you look at your own life differently. It may just help you appreciate the things you have and hug your family a little tighter. Get this book however you can, and spend a few hours with Kate. And through the laughter and the tears, you will be forever changed. L

Jessica Asbell is an avid reader and a children’s minister. She holds a BBA from Mercer and a Master of Divinity in Christian education from McAfee School of Theology. She’s also a frequent customer at Foxtale Book Shoppe. 770-516-9989. FoxTaleBooks.com

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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COVER STORY

EXCLUSIVELY OUTSIDE THE PERIMETER density. Once the perfect hair color is chosen, the salon uses a technology provided by SureTint ® to help determine the exact color formulation based on the guest’s individual hair features. This app also guarantees that color services can easily be duplicated with each returning visit.

FINE & THINNING HAIR SOLUTIONS

Upon entering Jyl Craven Hair Design, you will notice a clean, modern atmosphere; a vast line of professional products; and fashionable, refined stylists who are diligently going about making their guests look amazing. Since 1999, the salon has provided an experience that most would expect to only receive inside the perimeter. As a member of Intercoiffure North America Canada, guests who visit Jyl Craven Hair Design can be confident they will receive the best in quality and professional expertise.

U

Jyl Craven Hair Design serves guests of all ages. Designing hairstyles that accentuate your personality, benefit your lifestyle, and compliment your natural features is something the professionals at the salon do every day. 28

Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

“There are many places for people to get haircuts and hair color services. We want to be the salon that creates an experience that transcends the idea of receiving something that seems so predictable,” said Owner Jason Craven.

COLOR SERVICES If you want to cover your grays or desire something more unique, like balayage, ombre, or highlighting, Jyl Craven hairdressers have the training and tools to make your dream a reality. Before getting started, the hairdresser meets with each guest for a color consultation. While the guest reviews color books with hair samples that show all the nuances of color shades, the hairdresser will assess details like hair texture, strand length, and

Since 2012, the salon has offered the Evolve Volumizer™. The Evolve Volumizer™ is a nonsurgical, integrated hair replacement system for women experiencing up to 50% hair loss on the crown or top of their head. This hair system addresses all the needs and desires that a woman has for fuller, thicker, denser hair. It produces immediate results and requires no glue, no adhesives, and no chemicals. “Many women take pride in their hair, and it can be a strong source of self-confidence for them. As strands fall out, so does their sense of security about themselves,” said Jyl Craven. A lady’s hair plays a huge role in self-confidence, self-esteem, and selfimage. Her hair often defines who she is. The Evolve Volumizer™ doesn’t change who you are; it changes how you feel about you.

MEN’S HAIR CARE Gone are the days when only women went to a hair salon. Today, more and more men seek out experienced hairdressers who provide Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


individualized attention and custom styles. From soft parts to hard parts and fades to undercuts, Jyl Craven hairdressers are continually creating specialized styles for men. The full line of Baxter™ of California grooming products is available to help men support their styling and grooming needs.

HAIR CARE PRODUCTS Have you ever left a hair salon looking beautiful and then failed to recreate that style in your home? That should never happen. Jyl Craven hairdressers will take the time to show you how to maintain your new style and how to take care of your hair. Part of that care means using the same salon hair-care products and appliances in your home.

SUMMER SMOOTHING TREATMENTS For some people, summertime means summer frizz. No matter what hair-care product they put on their tresses, once the humidity hits, the frizz starts. If you’re one of these “lucky” people, keratin smoothing treatments may solve your problem. Jyl Craven offers three options: • Express Blow-Out – Reduces frizz and curl on a more temporary basis. This service may last up to six weeks. • Natural Keratin Smoothing Treatment – Reduces frizz and curl while repairing damage and blocking the frizzing effects of humidity. This service may last up to five months. • Personalized Blowout – Great for frizz control, while improving manageability and giving more shine. This service can last up to three months.

APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM

We want to be the salon that creates an experience that transcends the idea of receiving something that seems so predictable.” -Jason Craven

Are you interested in a career in the beauty industry? If you love making people look and feel beautiful, the Jyl Craven Hair Design Apprentice Program may be the right place to start. Participating in an apprenticeship program enables future hairdressers to get real-world, on-the-job training. Experienced trainers work with apprentices to teach hair cutting, coloring, and styling. For more information, inquiries can be sent to Info@jylcraven.com.

INSPIRATION Check the salon’s Instagram and Facebook pages for the latest haircuts and styles created by Jyl Craven’s talented hairdressers. Salon Hours SUNDAY Closed

MONDAY 11:00am8:00pm

TUESDAY 9:00am9:00pm

WEDNESDAY 9:00am9:00pm

7970 Knox Bridge Highway, Canton, GA 30114 • JylCraven.com Facebook.com/jylcravenhaircolourstudio • Instagram.com/jylcravenhair/

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

THURSDAY 9:00am9:00pm

FRIDAY 9:00am7:00pm

SATURDAY 6:00am5:00pm

770-345-9411

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Thinking About Divorce? [HomeLife] Couples going through a divorce are obviously dealing with a great deal of stress. They worry about child custody, parenting time, division of assets and debts, paying the bills, as well as family appearances. There is also the fear of the unknown. Seeing an attorney early in the divorce process can help with these fears and provide a guide for your decision making. An experienced attorney can explain how each of these issues can be resolved and negotiated or how courts view them in the event they cannot be rectified. An attorney will also discuss the role of mediation before a court will hear contested issues.

Topics to Discuss With an Attorney Child Support - If the parties are able to reach an agreement on child custody and parenting time, this issue is pretty

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By J. Daran Burns, Esq.

straight forward. There are child support worksheets that make a calculation and determine the amount of child support that should be paid. Some factors that go into this calculation are the incomes earned by each parent, special needs of the children, health insurance paid for the children, and work-related daycare costs that are necessary for the children. Other unique factors may be reviewed with an attorney and may also be factored in to this calculation. If custody and parenting time are not resolved by agreement of the parties, a judge will resolve the issue. Alimony - This is monetary support paid by one spouse for the benefit of the other. Unlike child support, there is no worksheet calculation. This is an issue that lies in the discretion of the court and is determined by many factors. In some cases, alimony is awarded, and in other cases, it is not appropriate. In theory, the

overwhelming factor is one party’s need for support and the other party’s ability to pay it. Length of your marriage and conduct during your marriage are among other factors that are considered. Division of Assets/Debts - Georgia’s courts make this determination on the basis of an equitable (fair) division. Earning capacity, lack of earning capacity, contributions to the assets, or debt, among other factors, are used to determine “equitable.”

J. Daran Burns is an attorney and heads the Burns Law Group. 181 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-956-1400. BASLG.com

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Taste of

BY HILLARY GALLAGHER

Black Bean Soup Ingredients u 1 lb. black beans u 3.5 quarts chicken stock or low-sodium broth u 1.5 lbs. tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and diced u 3 teaspoons ground cumin u 3 tablespoons cilantro, roughly chopped u ½ cup red, yellow, orange and/or green peppers, chopped u 1 jalapeño, minced u 2 teaspoons garlic, minced u 2 tablespoons olive oil u 1-2 tablespoons sherry vinegar u Kosher salt and black pepper to taste

Jalapeño Cream Ingredients u 1 cup sour cream u 2 jalapeños, minced u 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves, chopped

Black Bean Soup Procedure - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Soak the beans overnight or for at least 4 hours. Drain, and put the beans in a pot with chicken stock (water for vegetarians). Simmer the beans for 1 hour, uncovered. Stir in the tomatoes and cumin, and cook for another half hour. Check the beans for doneness. When about ¾ cooked, add 1 or 2 tablespoons of kosher salt. While the beans are cooking, sauté the onions in the olive oil until translucent. Add the bell peppers and jalapeño, and continue to sauté for 5 minutes. Add the garlic, and sauté for another 2 minutes. Add the sautéed peppers and onions to the soup with the vinegar. Check the soup for seasoning, and add more salt and pepper as needed. The soup is done when the beans are soft. For a thicker soup, push some of the beans against the pot with a wooden spoon. Hillary Gallagher, CCC is the Culinary Stir in the cilantro leaves, and top with *jalapeño sour cream.

*Jalapeño Sour Cream Procedure - Combine all ingredients in a bowl.

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Arts Program Director and Lead Instructor at Chattahoochee Technical College in East Cobb. Hillary.Gallagher@ ChattahoocheeTech.edu. 770-509-6350. ChattahoocheeTech.edu

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I’m Retired! What Now? By Tim Morris

[Lifestyle] I never put a lot of thought into what life would be like after retirement because I have worked since I was fourteen years old, and it’s the only thing I know. I am fortunate to have a job that allows me to make difference in someone’s life. I retired from another county’s senior services division in 2015; I took one week off before becoming the director of Senior Services in Cherokee County. I have been blessed and plan to make the most of this opportunity. However, I’ve seen what retirement looks like for folks who didn’t plan very well, and they struggle to pay the bills each month, which is why many go back to work. They can’t keep up with the cost-of-living inflation in today’s world. We are often contacted to help seniors with various past-due bills. This problem will continue to worsen. This is the same population that continues to rent, perhaps never owning their own home, which creates another hardship. Other retirees don’t know what to do with their over-abundance of free time. Financially, they may be fine, but perhaps they worked for 35 years doing the same thing every day, creating a sense of purpose. When that sense of purpose is gone, some struggle to figure out how to fill the void. The best advice I can give is to become involved in something you enjoy. Get involved in your community with volunteer work; make a commitment to Tim Morris is the director of Cherokee improve your health by joining a gym or a walking club; or take up a hobby. It’s important to adopt a “use it or lose it” approach to life by remaining as active as possible. Get out and enjoy your retirement — you deserve it. L

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

County Senior Services. 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-479-7438. www.CherokeeGa.com/SeniorServices

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Quotables “Smart people learn from everything and everyone. Average people learn from their experiences. Stupid people already have all the answers.”

“If you doubt your power, you give power to your doubts.” -Diane von Furstenberg

-Socrates

“The sun is filled with shining light; it blazes far and wide. The moon reflects the sunshine back, but has no light inside. I think I’d rather be the sun that shines so bold and bright than be the moon that only glows with someone else’s light.” -Elaine Laron

“When a flower doesn’t bloom, you fix the environment in which it grows, not the flower.” -Alexander Den Heijer

“I am telling you that your perception of ultimate reality is more limited than you thought, and that truth is more unlimited than you can imagine.” -Neale Donald Walsch

“When life is sweet, say ‘thank you’ and celebrate. And when life is bitter, say ‘thank you’ and grow.”

“Love is never wasted, for its value does not rest upon reciprocity.”

-Shauna Niequist

-C.S. Lewis

“No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.” -Hebrews 12:11

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Plastic Surgery Center of the South

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FYZICAL Therapy & Balance Centers

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Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates

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Women First Rehabilitation

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Northside Hospital - Cherokee

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Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Spine Program

Pinnacle Orthopaedics

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Anderson Dental

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Plastic Surgery Center of the South

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wenty years ago, three prominent plastic surgeons joined together to establish a successful plastic surgery practice. Twenty years later, they reflect on the over eighty years of combined experience they have brought to the field. Continuing with the same core values that began with the founding partners of Dr. Musarra (deceased), Dr. Leake, and Dr. Petrosky, both physicians and staff operate under the cornerstone of the practice — work hard and treat patients with respect. Dr. Corey Harkins joined the practice in 2014 and blends the latest innovations with time-tested techniques to produce beautiful results. Dr. James Depew joined the practice in 2017 and has training in cosmetic, traumatic, and cancer reconstructive procedures. The addition of these two surgeons, with their elite education, training, and familiarity with advanced cosmetic and reconstructive surgical techniques, has greatly benefited patients. Patients are the heart of this practice, which is why the staff strives to provide the best possible care while creating results patients enjoy for years. From the beginning, Plastic Surgery Center of the South has treated patients like valued family members. They place more value on customer service than sales. Their goal is to establish lifelong relationships with each patient rather than to have a highvolume practice. They are committed to providing patients with detailed, truthful information about procedures. The staff takes pride in being straightforward with patients, helping them weigh the benefits along with the risks of each procedure and answering all questions. Plastic Surgery Center of the South offers a full range of cosmetic and reconstructive procedures, both surgical and nonsurgical, for male and female 36

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Two Decades of Quality and Care patients of all ages. The most common cosmetic procedures include body contouring, breast enhancement, facelifts, eyelid surgeries, and tummy tucks. Reconstructive surgery after cancer and accidents, facial fractures, Mohs surgery, hand trauma, and lacerations are just a few of the noncosmetic procedures performed. As master injectors, physicians administer all injections including Botox® as well as injectable fillers such as Juvederm®, Restylane®, Radiesse®, and many more. The office contains an independent, comprehensive surgical facility with two state-certified operating suites and recovery areas. This ensures patient privacy and a nurturing environment. If more extensive cosmetic or reconstructive surgery is required, all physicians have staff privileges at Wellstar Kennestone Hospital located across the street. The facility also has an extensive medical spa where patients can receive treatments like Coolsculpting®, microneedling, microblading, microdermabrasion and facial rejuvenation. They also have several lasers, including their newest GentleMax Pro®, to provide procedures like hair removal, smoothing away fine lines, and eliminating brown spots. Plastic Surgery Center of the South has employees that have been with the company since it opened. They are very proud of their customer satisfaction rate, which is posted on their website through Intuit/Demand Force as 99.5%.

It is with bittersweet emotion that Plastic Surgery Center of the South announces the retirement of Dr. James Leake. After 34 years of dedication to the practice of plastic surgery, his legacy is nothing short of remarkable. He looks forward to relaxing, improving his golf game, and spending some well-deserved time with his family. Dr. Leake’s last day will be June 30. His hard work, innovative spirit, and unwavering commitment to his patients and staff will be missed.

120 Vann Street, Suite 150

Marietta 770-421-1242 PlasticSurgeryCenterOfTheSouth.net

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Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates Comprehensive Digestive Healthcare for the Whole Family

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Left to Right: Dr. Bruce Kalmin, Dr. Marc Rosenberg, Dr. Nandha Kanagarajan, and Dr. Basil Al-Awabdy

Gastroenterologists in Canton and Woodstock

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hen it comes to overall wellbeing, a healthy digestive system is critical at any age. For more than forty years, Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates (AGA) has been caring for patients with digestive issues. AGA is one of the largest gastroenterology practices in the United States with over ninety physicians and 46 medical offices across metro Atlanta and North Georgia — including convenient locations in Canton and Woodstock as well as a pediatric office in Marietta. AGA’s board-certified specialists are experts in diagnosing and treating common and complex digestive disorders and liver diseases in both adults and children. Some of these issues may include abdominal pain, heartburn and acid reflux, hemorrhoids, constipation and diarrhea, celiac disease, ulcers, motility disorders, and hepatitis.

As part of their comprehensive care approach, they also offer services such as nutrition counseling, abdominal ultrasound services for diagnosing digestive disorders, and infusion services for treating complex autoimmune diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Dr. Basil Al-Awabdy

Dr. Bruce Kalmin

Dr. Nandha Kanagarajan

Dr. Marc Rosenberg

Dr. Jon Trankina

Pediatric Gastroenterologists in Marietta •

Dr. Tejas Mehta

Dr. Nirav Patel

AGA is a participating provider

In addition, their physicians specialize in screening for colon cancer in adults. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S.; it is also one of the most preventable. Screening colonoscopies are recommended for every adult beginning at age fifty, and younger for those with a family history or other risk factors. It’s important to talk to your doctor, and find out when you should start getting screened.

for Medicaid, Medicare, and most healthcare plans offered in Georgia.

For more information, or to request appointments online, visit www.AtlantaGastro.com, or call 1-866-GO-TO-AGA (468-6242). AGA is open Monday through Friday, 9:00am to 5:00pm.

Woodstock

Canton

Marietta

900 Towne Lake Parkway, Suite 308

2020 Cumming Highway, Suite 102

488 Kennesaw Avenue, Suite 200

770-926-5459

678-593-1295

404-843-6320 (Marietta offering pediatric services)

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Northside Hospital Cherokee Hits Growth Spurt After Just One Year

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he new Northside Hospital Cherokee is a precocious one year old. The hospital may be in its infancy, but it is already experiencing a growth spurt, showing a steady stride, and displaying a solid sense of community.

Women’s Center Atrium

Patient Room

The hospital opened in its new location May 6, 2017 with the latest medical advancements to provide the best healthcare available. Maternity, emergency, and surgical service all have increased volumes, and new construction projects are underway. “I’m incredibly inspired, but not surprised, by the growth we’ve seen in our first year,” said Billy Hayes, Northside Hospital Cherokee CEO. “We knew that the community was excited about the new hospital because we heard it from them throughout our construction and grand opening.” Designed with Patients in Mind Designed for patient comfort, care, and safety, Northside Hospital Cherokee moved to give communities north of Atlanta greater access to quality care with a convenient location off I-575. Cherokee County residents are among the healthiest in Georgia. Cherokee, in fact, is Georgia’s third healthiest county — up from fifth a year ago, according to the 2018 County Health Rankings, compiled by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. A major reason is due to the quality care delivered by Northside, even as the Atlanta Region grows. Families new to the area, as well as longtime patients, depend on Northside for a lifetime of care including maternity services, cardiac care, joint replacement, and cancer treatment. Northside is one of the Southeast’s most trusted health care organizations including two other acute-care, state-of-the-art hospitals in Atlanta and Forsyth County. 38

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Another key is effective community outreach through health screenings, the hospital’s emphasis on sports medicine for an active area that benefits from preventative care education, and Northside’s Partners in Education program, which teaches healthy lifestyles to students. “More patients are choosing Northside Hospital Cherokee for their medical needs because they want exceptional healthcare close to home,” Hayes said.

Main Lobby The hospital has added more inpatient and observation beds including an eightbed Clinical Observation Unit and two new operating rooms, and parking on campus has increased by two-thirds. “We have to keep saying, ‘What’s next,’” said Hayes.

New Patients Across Northwest Georgia Northside Hospital Cherokee already is adding two more floors to its main patient tower and is planning to build a second medical office building on the campus. In the first year of operation, the new Northside Hospital Cherokee has drawn new patients from across Northwest Georgia including Cobb, Pickens, Bartow, and Dawson Counties and beyond.

450 Northside Cherokee Boulevard

Canton 770-224-1000 Follow @NorthsideHosp on social media, and for more information, visit Northside.com.

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Pinnacle Orthopaedics Total Knee Replacement — Getting You Back to the Life You Love it gradually got worse. Her pain and stiffness occurred when walking, bending, twisting, or going down stairs. Her knee would lock up, and she also had occasional swelling. The pain was deep inside her knee. She had tried steroid injections, physical therapy, and bracing. Dr. Ponnusamy diagnosed Ms. Pool with primary osteoarthritis of the left knee and recommended a total knee arthroplasty, also known as a total knee replacement.

Karthik Ponnusamy, M.D., M.S.E.

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arthik Ponnusamy, M.D., M.S.E. joined Pinnacle Orthopaedics last summer. He has a hip and knee replacement fellowship and specializes in arthroscopy, hip and knee conditions, total and partial knee replacements, total hip replacements (including the direct anterior approach), and general orthopaedics. So, when Cynthia Pool came to Pinnacle Orthopaedics in October of 2017 with pain in her left knee, she was referred to Dr. Ponnusamy.

Ms. Pool’s surgery was performed last November. Dr. Ponnusamy cleaned out the damaged joint and replaced her knee joint with an implant. Just six weeks after the surgery, Ms. Pool was doing great. She was doing so well that she had graduated from physical therapy and did not have any pain. She was back to normal, enjoying her new knee. Ms. Pool can now manage stairs with no issues, walk the dogs instead of only letting them out in the fenced area, cut the grass, opt out of using a handicap sticker, manage walking long distances to the park, and totally enjoy retirement pain free! She is very happy with Dr. Ponnusamy and her surgery results!

Ms. Pool had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis when she was a child, but her knee pain started about two years ago — mild at first — but

“My only regret is that I didn’t have the knee replacement sooner. I was off the walker in three days, and two weeks after my surgery, I went Black Friday shopping for seven hours without the use of a cane!” said Ms. Pool.

Cynthia Pool enjoying life again after knee replacement surgery.

General Orthopaedics

Sports Medicine

Joint Replacements

Hand and Foot

Limb Lengthening and Deformity

Physiatry

MRI

Physical Therapy

Surgery Center

Workers’ Compensation

Pinnacle-Ortho.com Canton

Woodstock

720 Transit Avenue, Suite 202

1505 Stone Bridge Parkway, Suite 200

770-345-5717

770-926-9112

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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FYZICAL Therapy & Balance Centers of Woodstock FYZICAL Aims to Stop America From Falling

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YZICAL Therapy & Balance Centers of Woodstock offers some of the most advanced physical therapy in the area. They are on a mission with other FYZICALs across the country to “stop America from falling.” The business, formerly known as SOAR Physical Therapy, has been known for its orthopedic and sports medicine therapies. Since transforming into the first FYZICAL Therapy & Balance Centers in north-metro Atlanta in 2016, it has been dedicated to becoming one of the leaders in balance and vestibular rehabilitation in the country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every eleven seconds, an older adult is treated in an emergency room for a fall; every nineteen minutes, an older adult dies from a fall. FYZICAL owners, Dr. Burt Stevens, PT, and Brian Stevens, MHA, believe they have the answers to begin changing these statistics. “We have worked hard to assemble a dedicated team of FYZICAL therapists and support staff to be able to deliver exceptional care and service to our community. We are so proud and thankful for our staff and their commitment to our mission and vision,” says Brian.

In 2017, FYZICAL Therapy & Balance Centers of Woodstock purchased one of Bertec’s® Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) systems. It is one of only a few Bertec® Systems of its kind in the state of Georgia. “The system is essentially 40

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an MRI of one’s balance system,” states Balance Director Dr. Danielle Ritchie, PT. “It helps us identify which component of the balance system is impaired. The data assists us in determining the appropriate treatment protocols for those deficiencies. In addition to our CDP, we have a safety overhead support system. This harness system provides us the ability to safely work with our clients while providing them the confidence to move without the fear of falling.” “Having a fall does not have to become a part of life as we age,” states Dr. Burt Stevens, PT. “Falls can be prevented. Whether you are an individual worried about your parents or grandparents, a primary care physician or neurologist looking for a resource for these patients, or anyone in healthcare who treats clients with balance deficits, please know that we have the technology and training to

make a difference. We have all seen the unfortunate decline where individuals become less independent. They begin using a cane, then a walker, and then are moved into assisted living. This timeline does not have to become everyone’s life story. Help us prevent these life changing events. Help us keep people safe and independent. We have the knowledge and technology to teach people how to move freely and safely with confidence, so they can live the lives they desire. Help us stop America from falling!” Please visit FYZICALWoodstock.com for additional locations. Most insurances cover these services.

“Spelled Different Because We Are Different”

6884 Hickory Flat Highway Woodstock 770-704-8244 Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Women First Rehabilitation #WeGotThis

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’ve seen a primary care physician, a gynecologist, a urologist, a neurologist, a pain specialist, then back to my gynecologist who made the final referral to a psychiatrist,” explained a patient at Women First Rehabilitation whose identity is confidential. She reflects on the conversations she had at these doctor visits, being told, “It’s all in your head.” “All the tests came back negative.” “There is nothing wrong with you.” “Why don’t you have a glass of wine and use lubrication?” “Just grin and bear it. You’ll feel better eventually.” Yet with each attempt to have intercourse, the patient’s pain intensified, and her relationship became very strained. That is, until she became a patient at Women First Rehabilitation. Within a few visits, she was able to engage in and enjoy intercourse with her husband for the first time in over five years. Pelvic pain is just one of the many diagnoses that is successfully treated at Women First Rehabilitation. Their specialists have advanced training and skills to treat a variety of musculoskeletal and urogenital conditions such as interstitial cystitis, urinary and/or fecal incontinence, organ prolapse, IBS, constipation, pelvic floor dysfunction,

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

tailbone pain, vaginismus and/ or vulvodynia, pudendal neuralgia, abdominal pain, adhesions, myofascial restrictions, and many other medical issues. In addition to treating painful or active conditions, they also offer wellness visits centered around childbirth preparation, weight loss, stress reduction, yoga, hormonal balance, nutritional counseling, dry needling, and aromatherapy. Their specialists have over 43 years of combined experience and individual subspecialty training in functional medicine, nutrition, neurology, yoga, aromatherapy, and clinical education. Most importantly, these specialists are also wives, mothers, daughters, sisters, best friends, PTA volunteers, “room moms,” worship leaders, family taxi drivers, sibling referees, and household managers. They understand and truly know the impact these roles can have on a woman’s body because they are women. They have successfully worn each of the many hats that women must often wear, which helps them to understand where their patients are coming from. If you have been struggling with intimacy, let them help you. Their motto is “We got this!” If you search for the nearest

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restroom every time you venture out, we got this! If you avoid exercise for fear that something will fall out, we got this! If you haven’t felt good in your own body for years, we got this! If you’re getting ready to have a baby, just had a baby, or want to try to conceive one, we got this!!! Women First is here to help you. Women First Rehabilitation is an elite healthcare practice devoted exclusively to treating individuals with pelvic pain, urogenital disorders, fertility challenges, prenatal preparation, post-partum musculoskeletal impairments, and pelvic floor dysfunctions. They offer a holistic approach to healing that is safe and effective. Follow them on Facebook and Twitter, or visit their website for more information. #WeGotThis

280 Heritage Walk Woodstock 770-485-7411 WomenFirstRehab.com WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Spine Program The Importance of Scoliosis Screening & Follow-Up Care

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erhaps your child’s one shoulder blade is slightly higher than the other, or the hips are uneven. Would you notice? These and other early signs of scoliosis are easily missed. That’s why pediatricians and middle school nurses conduct scoliosis screenings. Early diagnosis, careful monitoring, and customized treatment are the key to managing this condition. Dennis P. Devito, M.D., Medical Director of the Spine Program at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, answered the following questions about scoliosis and the importance of screening and follow-up care: What is scoliosis? Scoliosis is a curvature of the spine. It most commonly shows up in young adolescents who are otherwise healthy. The significant issue with scoliosis is that if you’re still growing, curves can get larger. About six percent of the population will have a very minor curve and, in a smaller percentage, the curve will get larger. The trick is to figure out who’s at risk for the minor, little curve becoming a major curve. How is scoliosis diagnosed? Screening is focused on the early adolescent and trying to identify physical signs of a curve. As part of a well check beginning at nine or ten years old, the family practitioner or pediatrician performs a visual inspection of the child’s back to be sure there’s no sign of a curvature. If there is, the pediatrician will investigate further to try to determine the risk of the curve getting worse. Middle school nurses also conduct screenings.

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Why is early diagnosis important? In general, the bigger the curve and the younger the child, the more likely the curve will get bigger. The smaller the curve and the closer the child is to being complete with their growth, the less likely it’s going to get worse. Not all curves are significant enough to require treatment, so our job is to sort through who really has a problem and who doesn’t. If parents respond quickly to the screening process, it is helpful in determining who needs treatment. When we catch curves early, we have the chance to affect the natural history of the curve. What treatments are available? Depending on the child’s age and the severity of the curve, the pediatrician may recommend treatment. Children’s has satellite locations (including Town Center) that make it convenient to tap into doctors who specialize in treating scoliosis. After an initial evaluation and testing, the course of treatment is determined. Treatment is based on the severity of the curve, the age of the child, and how much more growth is expected. In most cases, we start with observation, checking every four to six months to see if there’s significant progression. The first intervention, and the most common, is a brace. We use several different kinds of braces depending on the severity of the curve and the child’s needs. If the child needs a brace, they can be measured right there on the same day, making it a very comprehensive evaluation. In curves that become severe, there are several different kinds of surgeries that we can perform. What are challenges in treatment? Children are still growing, and intervention must account for changes in their bodies and their size. We want

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

to be sure that any interventions hold up for their whole life. So, we pay attention to not only fixing it now but making sure it meets the standards that we would expect in the future. To me, that’s an exciting challenge.

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Spine Care at Children’s Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta has assembled a team of industry leaders who specialize in children’s spinal disorders including advanced treatment for scoliosis. Working closely with other Children’s specialists, they provide complete, coordinated diagnostics and care and a wide range of treatment options. The Orthopaedics Program ranks among the best pediatric hospitals in the country — No. 17 on the U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals 2017-2018” list. Children’s offers numerous satellite locations for the convenience of patients throughout metro Atlanta — including Town Center. As the Medical Director of the Spine Program at Children’s, Dr. Devito specializes in the treatment of scoliosis and other complex spinal disorders and deformities in children, adolescents, and young adults. He has more than thirty years of surgical orthopaedic experience. Dr. Devito is a leading authority on the use of robotics for scoliosis surgery. He studied the Russian-created Ilizarov external fixator as well as advanced techniques with internationally renowned spine surgeons in France and Germany. He received the Health-Care Innovations Heroes award for his work. Dr. Devito is the founder of the International Pediatric Spine Mission, a nonprofit that helps fund the care of underprivileged children in Central America.

CHOA.org Children’s Physician Group – Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine

404-255-1933

Program Questions

404-785-1849

Scoliosis Screening

404-785-7553

Visit CHOA.org/cpgortho for Children’s Physician Group – Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine locations.

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Anderson Dental

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r. Steven Anderson opened Anderson Dental in November 2005 in Woodstock/East Cobb’s Claremore Lake Professional Park. After working for other dental practices, Dr. Anderson decided to build a state-ofthe-art professional building and open his dental practice on the top floor. Dr. Anderson earned his Doctor of Dental Medicine from the University of Louisville in Kentucky. He also graduated with honors from the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology as well as Community Dentistry and Public Health. “Dentistry is a second career for me,” says Dr. Anderson. “I was an executive in computer science and did a couple successful start-up companies, but that career required a lot of traveling, and I was tired of that. My family was starting to grow, too, and I wanted to be home to be a father and watch my boys grow.” Anderson Dental focuses on comprehensive and quality patient care. Dr. Anderson says, “We focus on our patients and their needs and wants. Our patients are very important to us. We do not treat patients like a number or rush through treatment. We want to know each patient, and we demonstrate that by spending time to do quality work.” “It takes time to diagnose a patient’s dental problem correctly and even more time to do quality dentistry; otherwise, things get missed,” he continues. At Anderson Dental you can expect to receive comprehensive, quality dental care, which includes a complete

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oral health examination, accurate diagnosis, and thorough treatment explanation for every patient. Dr. Anderson takes time with each of his patients — with modern diagnostics and training, he is dedicated to knowing and treating the diseases that affect their oral health. Anderson Dental features a modern, well-equipped office and an experienced staff. The practice provides some of the latest, state-of-the-art equipment in a comfortable, clean, and spacious environment. The staff at Anderson Dental has decades of experience in dentistry. “I am absolutely committed to surrounding myself with a highly experienced, caring staff to assist me in everyday patient care,” Dr. Anderson says. “I want my patient’s experience to be smooth and pleasant from start to finish.” Anderson Dental will begin seeing patients at age one. This allows the child

to become acclimated early and arms the parent with valuable knowledge to help prevent the most common dental disease in the world — tooth decay. Other services that Anderson Dental offers include custom-fit mouth guards to adequately protect teeth and oral soft tissue for athletes who participate in contact sports; implant dentistry, which allows the complete replacement of a missing tooth; wisdom teeth extractions; and aligner orthodontics (clear braces), which allows patients to straighten teeth without metal brackets.

650 Claremore Professional Way, Suite 200

Woodstock 770-384-8505 DrStevenAnderson.com Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month



Artist Profile BY TINA MORRIS

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s children, we all have a passion for something, but it isn’t often that our childhood interests become our adulthood careers. For Sue Shefts, that is exactly what happened. Sue Shefts grew up on Long Island, and was raised by parents who nurtured her creativity. Her mother took her to the ballet and encouraged art, culture, and an appreciation of high quality design. Her father was an artist who, along with his brothers, owned a nationally renowned carved glass business. Sue had a love for jewelry at an early age. She began to trade beads with her friends as a child. Not allowed to get her ears pierced until she turned sixteen, Sue designed and created her own clip-on earrings.

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By the time she was in college at Tufts University in Boston, Sue was designing and selling jewelry to others. After graduating college, Sue returned to New York City and completed the management training program at Macy’s and eventually became an assistant jewelry buyer for them. This experience provided critical skills for her future. After getting married, Sue and her husband, Andrew, decided to embark on a six-month, cross-country road trip. Along the way, Sue was able to make connections and began selling her jewelry to gift shops and boutiques. Upon their return, Sue began designing and selling her jewelry full time. In 1995, Andrew accepted a job in Georgia, and the couple now resides in Johns Creek.

Sue is a self-described treasure hunter. She collects interesting, beautiful beads from all over the world, with a few artisans that she buys from regularly. She loves sparkle, especially the precise cut of vintage Swarovski® crystal and fine, vintage crystal settings. Sue’s jewelry is unique and eyecatching, as she creates many oneof-a-kind, miniature works of art. Some pieces are full of texture and color; others show a simple elegance. Her favorite materials are eclectic: vintage Miriam Haskell glass pearls, vintage watch chain, and unique artisan lampwork beads. When it comes to her creative process, Sue admits that her desk is always full

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


of materials. She may be working on one piece, and a bead will catch her eye and inspire something new. She gets excited by color and likes to work with art décor glass and highquality crystals as well as detailed Victorian pieces. Sue is always open to inspiration from various sources including movies, certain time periods, and even a trip she took with her family to Russia. She enjoys making long necklaces because there are more design possibilities, and they do not disappoint. But even her smaller pieces are full of color and charm. Her designs are one-of-akind pieces of wearable art. Sue’s advice to other artists? “Just keep working at it, even if you’re not in the mood. Take classes. Talk to people. Go to museums. Be a sponge, and take in everything around you.”

To view Sue’s work or her show schedule, visit SueShefts.com.

Tina Morris is a student in the MFA creative writing program at Reinhardt University. 770-720-5582. Reinhardt. edu/Graduate/MFA-CW/

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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[HealthyLife] There are a variety of ways in which a tooth may become cracked. There are also many different types of cracks that can form. Not all cracked teeth will be treated the same. Regardless of what causes a cracked tooth, or the type of crack that develops, you will need to see a dental professional right away. Some tooth cracks can be the result of general wear and tear. This is especially true if you have a habit of chewing or biting on hard objects (ice, hard candies, etc.) or if you tend to grind your teeth. Other tooth cracks are the result of dental trauma. This is why it is vitally important to have your teeth examined as soon as possible whenever trauma to the mouth occurs. A crack in your tooth usually extends from the chewing surface vertically towards the root. The tooth may not be totally split at this point, but the crack can widen over time. If the crack extends all the way into the root of the tooth (below

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Oh no! I’ve Cracked My Tooth! By Vishant Nath, D.M.D. the gum line) the tooth probably will not be able to be saved and may need to be extracted. However, if the crack does not extend into the root, there are options for saving the tooth, which is why early diagnosis is important. If the crack extends to the pulp of the tooth, you will need a root canal and a crown to prevent the crack from spreading.

Whenever a cracked tooth is diagnosed, your dentist will typically recommend a visit to the endodontist. Endodontists specialize in the study and treatment of the dental pulp. Their expertise is invaluable when it comes to diagnosing and treating a cracked tooth. You can prevent your teeth from cracking by avoiding chewing on hard objects, wearing a nightguard if you tend to grind your teeth while sleeping, and always wearing a mouth guard when playing sports. A cracked tooth will never be as strong as it was prior to the crack forming, so do your best to keep your teeth healthy.

Dr. Vishant Nath is the owner of Canton/Alpharetta/Roswell Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics. 678-352-1090. KidsHappyTeeth.com

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Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Photos courtesy of Cassandra Bickel

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rowing up in the northern part of Cherokee County, I was fortunate to always be a short car ride away from the North Georgia Mountains. Every fall, my Pop and I would take a long scenic drive through Blairsville to see the leaves change and visit a few of our favorite spots. One place we always stopped was Mountain Crossing, a small outfitter next to Blood Mountain. On a clear day, you can see the city of Atlanta from a wide stone porch right next to the shop. Standing there each year, I always noticed the footpath that cascaded down the hill next to me, but I never could have imagined what that trail would mean to me one day. In 2016, a young woman named Kimber Maxwell was hired at the restaurant I managed in Milton, Georgia. One day, I overheard some of my staff talking about how Kimber had hiked the entire Appalachian Trail by herself the previous year. I was impressed to say the least and immediately inquired about Kimber’s trail travels the next time I saw her, and the next time, and the next time. I interrogated her for weeks, and every time she gave me an answer, it inspired me to ask another question. My curiosity for what was beyond where the path crossed the Outfitter at Blood Mountain grew stronger and stronger, but I still thought to myself, “I could never do something like that.” Then, a few weeks after my initial interrogation, Kimber told me that before

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By Hillary Groover graduating from college and hiking the Appalachian Trail, she had been diagnosed with thyroid cancer at the age of nineteen. After beating the cancer and graduating college, she chose to hike the Trail because it signified to her that she could do the impossible and overcome anything. Kimber’s inspiring story encouraged me to believe that I, too, could do anything I wanted, even the impossible. On May 21, 2017, after a year of planning, researching, and saving funds, I took my first of what would be over five million steps on the Appalachian Trail. The Trail is a 2,189.8-mile footpath that starts at Springer Mountain in Georgia and ends at Mount Katahdin in Maine. Nearly two million people set foot on the Trail every year, but only a couple thousand register to hike it in its entirety. These hikers are known as thru-hikers, and only one in five of them will successfully finish the Trail. I am proud to be one of the minority who completed the entire journey. The first three weeks of my five-month hike were brutal. I was physically fit and had done some training hikes, but nothing can prepare you for what your body goes through when you start hiking double digit mileage each day. It rained the entire first week I was on the Trail, and I was completely unprepared for the mental and emotional anguish wet weather brings to a hiker’s psyche. I also had never slept outside in a tent before starting my hike, so I was quite

naïve when it came to full-time outdoor living. I learned very quickly from a lot of mistakes. I was wet, sore, blistered, lonely, and completely unsure of myself, but every day I survived out there, a little bit of that trepidation slipped away and was replaced with resiliency. The Trail is not just a trail. Ask anyone whose life has been touched by it in some way, and they will surely tell you the same. It is a playground, a sanctuary, a place of magic and wonder. Hiking the Trail is more than just an adventure of a lifetime. It is an opportunity to transcend, a place to learn, and a pathway to completely change your understanding of yourself and the world around you. During my travels, I saw the sunset from Mount Washington in New Hampshire. I got to hear the eerie whistling winds of Mount Greylock in Massachusetts. I swam in waterfalls of the Housatonic, watched trains go by as I paced across the Hudson, and ferried across the Kennebec. I picked and ate wild blueberries on the ridgelines of New York and had the black bears of New Jersey dart in front of my path. I sat on the cliffs of the Shenandoah and gazed at peregrine falcons soaring across the valley for entire afternoons, and I experienced the most incredible sunrise I have ever seen from a shelter in the Great Smokey Mountains. These are just a few of the many wondrous moments that are now a part of my story. More extraordinary than the scenery of

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the Trail were the people. I met all kinds of hikers and locals of the Appalachia who became my friends and family while I was out there. I heard hundreds of amazing life stories, and I received more acts of random kindness than I can count. Whether it was a free ride, or meal, or a place to sleep inside for a night, it was given to me in the spirit of genuine altruism, expecting nothing in return except the sheer joy of knowing they contributed to helping me complete the Trail. I could not have done it without them. I learned a lot from my long walk in the woods, about myself and about others, but if I had to choose one big take away to share with you, it would be this: If you treasure this brief and precious life of yours enough to fully dedicate yourself to accomplishing goals you never thought you could reach, you will be amazed before you are half way through. You will inspire others, and that inspiration is one of the most valuable gifts you can give to another human being. Your impact on this world, while perhaps not vast, will be

deep and substantial. So, take a moment this season to get outside, take a chance, and reach for the impossible. Then, share your story with others. In addition to completing the trail, I wanted to use my time out there to advocate and raise money for the Center for Young Adult Addiction and Recovery at Kennesaw State University. I am a person in long term recovery from drug and alcohol addiction, and this program provided a support system to me while I pursued my undergraduate degree. I created a blog during my travels, in which I wrote about the parallels between my journey on the trail and my journey through recovery. I was able to raise over $5,000 during my hike, and giving back to a program from which I had received so much was beyond rewarding. It was also a great motivator to keep me going when the going got tough.

For more information about my hike or how to donate to the KSU Collegiate Recovery Program, please view my blog at http://hgroover88.wixsite.com/ hillshike

Mount Katahdin, Maine

May 2, 2017

Springer Mountain, Georgia

2,189.8 Miles

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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How to Stage Your Home and Select the Right Listing Agent By Dawn Sams

[HomeLife] When you start making plans to move, you realize very quickly how exciting and overwhelming it can be. What needs to be done to list the house? What can you sell it for? Who is the best agent to work with, or do you even need one? What is the market doing, and how long will it take? These are all common questions that are asked when preparing to market your home. Here are some tips to help you get your home ready to market, and a list of questions to help you select the right agent:

Home Staging Tips • Clean everything. Don’t forget the blinds, ceiling fans, windows, and carpets if they need it. Remove all cobwebs and dust. • Pressure wash the house (especially vinyl siding) and sidewalk if needed. Don’t forget front steps. The outside of your home is part of a buyer’s first impression, so make it look nice. • Install fresh pine straw or mulch, and add a few flowers by the door and/or mailbox for curb appeal. • De-clutter! If you have decided to move, go ahead and start packing.

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Remove all the things you don’t use daily. It will give you a jump start on the overwhelming process of packing. Less is more, and your home will show better with less stuff. Pack away all the personal photos, favorite teams, and anything that is not neutral. You want a potential buyer to be able to picture themselves living in your home. • Open the blinds, and remove curtains. Curtains can be like wallpaper; everyone’s taste is different. If you plan to take them with you, go ahead and take them down. Having the blinds open lets in more natural sunlight. No one likes to come into a dark home. Picking the right agent is crucial. You will be working together as a team, so you want an agent who understands your goals.

Questions to Ask When Selecting a Listing Agent • How much experience does the agent have? Do they do real estate full time or just sell a few homes each year for friends and family? • What is the agent’s marketing plan/ strategy?

• Will the agent get feedback after showings? • Is the agent a strong negotiator? The price of your home is not the only thing that will require negotiation. • Does the agent have contacts for contractors who can make repairs? • Will the agent take quality photos of your home or use their phone for photos? • Is the agent up to date on the changing market and interest rates? • Does the agent provide personalized and professional service? • Does the agent offer any kind of staging or advice before listing? • Does the agent prepare a net sheet, so you can see an estimate of what you will take away from the closing table? • Will they put a home warranty on the house with seller coverage while it’s listed?

Dawn Sams is an award-winning realtor and professional home stager. 770-893-8835. DawnSams.com

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Japanese Beetles

GET BACK! By Joshua Fuder [HomeLife] The Japanese beetle was first observed in the United States in New Jersey in 1916. Every summer since, it has devoured the fruit and foliage of more than 275 kinds of trees, shrubs, flowers, and other plants. Some years, it appears that nothing goes unaffected — from ripening peaches to corn silks to the leaves of our favorite rose.

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

The life cycle takes about a year, and the adult stage only lasts about 4-6 weeks. Egg-laying takes place in July when the female burrows 2-4 inches into the soil and lays small clusters of eggs. About ten days later, the larvae hatch, move into the root zone, and begin feeding on roots. Larvae move deeper into the soil during the winter. As soil temperatures rise in the spring, they move back into the root zone to resume feeding. Pupation into adult beetles takes place in late April and May. Perhaps the only good thing about the beetles is that their adult stage is relatively short-lived. Many established plants can tolerate some foliage loss early in the summer and push out new growth.

placed over more valuable plants during the weeks of high activity. Insecticides can work to protect plants, but applications often need to be repeated every 3-4 days. Beetle traps are not recommended because the pheromone tends to bring more Japanese beetles into an area than are captured. Treating lawn areas with granular insecticides for grubs will reduce grub damage to turf, but since adults fly, this won’t necessarily reduce beetle damage to plants. A diverse landscape will attract beneficial insects that serve as predators, particularly of the larval life stage.

Control While many birds, from robins to blackbirds, feed on adult beetles, they will likely not eat enough to prevent damage to plants. Handpicking adults and dropping them into soapy water will work in small areas. Floating row covers can be

Joshua Fuder is an agriculture and natural resources agent at the UGA Cooperative Extension Cherokee County. Contact the UGA Extension office for any gardening assistance, 770-721-7830 or CAES.UGA.Edu/ extension/cherokee

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Ribbon Cuttings, Ground Breakings and Celebrations

Midgard Self Storage — Woodstock

The Arbor at BridgeMill

Center for Relational Care

Booker Leadership

1425 Big Springs Road Woodstock 770-667-6278 Self Storage/Warehouses

970 Woodstock Parkway, Suite 210 Woodstock 678-653-3272 Counseling Services

700 Freedom Boulevard Canton 770-691-0022 Senior Living Home

2107 Cox Road Woodstock 913-232-0244 Leadership Consulting

Woodstock Elementary School Community Garden 230 Rope Mill Road Woodstock 770-704-1320 Community Garden

Blush Nail Bar

9539 Highway 92, Suite 110 Woodstock 770-575-4036 Mani/Pedi

For information on

For information on

upcoming events, please visit

upcoming events, please visit

CherokeeChamber.com

MainStreetWoodstock.org

Clark Patterson Lee — Design Professionals

615 Molly Lane, Suite 100 Woodstock 800-274-9000 Architecture/Engineering/Planning

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Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

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What is Social Hosting? By Lisa-Marie Haygood [AcademicLife] Life is full of reasons to celebrate — weddings, graduations, and holidays are always upon us. Often, there is alcohol at these celebrations, and when you throw children in the mix, there is the potential for big problems. In many cases, a legal guardian may give consent to their minor child to have an alcoholic beverage while that child is in their care. Property exceptions can also apply in some cases, which generally allow underage possession or consumption in the family home only. Georgia law currently allows parents to make this decision with their own children. However, it is not advisable to be a social host to other minor children in your home. Social hosting is when a person

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

knowingly, willingly, and unlawfully sells, furnishes, or serves alcoholic beverages to a person (not their own child) who is underage or in a state of noticeable intoxication. Though Georgia law does not currently prohibit social hosting, it is being entertained as a possible ordinance for Cherokee County. Condoning underage drinking in their home can make the social host personally liable for any injury or damage that the minor may cause. There are many instances of folks being sued for accidents and damages because they chose to allow underage students to drink in their home. You will not be a “cool” parent when your mug shot appears on the front page of the paper for charges related to underage drinking. Your children have plenty of “friends”; they need you to be a parent. It’s important to know the law, and be aware of the friends your teens entertain in your home. You should also know where your children are going and who

is with them. Parties and celebrations can be as safe as you make them. Make the responsible choice to never provide alcohol to minors in your home.

Lisa-Marie Haygood is the executive director for the Cherokee County Educational Foundation.

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Advertiser Index

770-Arborist Inside Back Anderson Dental 44, 45 Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates 37 Bend Your Knees 5k 10 Budget Blinds of Woodstock 3 Burns Law Group 11 Cherokee County Historical Society 23 Chick-fil-A Cherokee County Moo’ve It 5k 27 The Children’s Haven 22 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta 42-43 Spine Program Coosawattee River Resort 23 Dawn Sams, Realtor 5 Dr. Fixit, Ph.D. 3 Elm Street Cultural Arts Village 16 Eyes on Towne Lake 30 Fire Stone Wood Fired Pizza & Grill 5 Foot & Ankle Reconstruction of North Georgia 48 FYZICAL Therapy & Balance Centers 40 Goin’ Coastal 19 Jyl Craven Hair Design Cover, 28-29 Landscape Matters Inc 56 LGE Community Credit Union Inside Front Masterpiece Framer 34 Mosquito-Free 15 Nature’s Corner Market 31 Northside Hospital Cancer Institute 1 Northside Hospital - Cherokee 38 Outdoor Living, Indoor Comfort, LLC 33 Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics 3 and Dentistry at Canton Perimeter North Medical Associates 5 Pinnacle Orthopaedics 39 Plastic Surgery Center of the South 36 Queenie’s 19 Southern Air Pros, LLC 53 Suite Six Venue 13 Summit Financial Solutions 55 Tranquility Counseling Services 27 WellStar Health System Back Cover Women First Rehabilitation 41 Woodstock Freedom Run 13 Woodstock Funeral Home 15 Woodstock Pediatric Medicine 24 Woodstock Summer Concert Series 21 56

Woodstock Family Life | JUNE 2018

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