Woodstock Family Life 3-18

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Contents

March 2018

VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 8

28-29 On the Cover:

Todd Hayes for Solicitor-General

40-41

Historical Women of Cherokee County

44-45

Women Firefighters

[28-29]

[44-45]

Follow Us >>>

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[40-41]

Family Life Publications

Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

04

.......................... Perspective

06

.............................. Calendar

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................ Woodstock Minute

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................... Sheriff Reynolds

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.................... Community Life

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................... Senator Speaks

25

........................ Book Review

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............... Community Partner

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......................... Taste of Life

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......................... Artist Profile

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......... Main Street Woodstock

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.................... Ribbon Cuttings

familylifepublications

@FamilyLifeMags

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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Publisher’s Perspective

PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHER Jack Tuszynski Jack@FamilyLifePublications.com EDITORIAL Julie Senger Julie@FamilyLifePublications.com

Family Life Publishing Group, Inc. 630 East Main Street Canton, GA 30114

770-213-7095

FamilyLifePublications.com Family Life publications have the largest monthly circulation of direct-mailed community magazines in our area. Woodstock Family Life is a monthly community magazine with a total print count of over 26,000, direct mailing over 24,000 copies to Towne Lake, downtown Woodstock up to Hickory Flat and toward the Roswell border. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists and submissions are not necessarily those of the editor/publisher, and the publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. Woodstock Family Life magazine is not responsible for errors and omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher.

© 2018 All rights reserved.

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Subscriptions are available for $25 per year. Please contact us for payment options.

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As you gear up for travels on the road this spring, prepare yourself, and even your family, to be open to new experiences. Of course, I’m not suggesting anyone intentionally miss a flight reservation or run late for a cruise; however, that would be a fun prank to play on the family if you think you would survive it. I would like to suggest some spontaneity, something off the spreadsheet and timeline of the tightly woven vacation schedule. As hard as it can be these days to get lost on a map, by opening our eyes to new and unplanned adventures, we possess the opportunity to get lost in the moment. Plan some time to be unplanned. May new discoveries find their way into the path, heart, and memories of you and your fellow travelers. Drive carefully, and enjoy the ride.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Steven Anderson, Atlanta Hand Specialist, Cyndi Braun, Chris Bryant, Jyl Craven, James B. Depew, Joshua Fuder, Hillary Gallagher, Corey Harkins, Lisa-Marie Haygood, Michele Ice, James E. Leake, Tim Morris, Vishant Nath, Hannah Olson, Brittany Page, Michael Petrosky, Meghan Quinlan, Frank Reynolds, Jill Rowlands, Mark Russell, Mitzi Saxon, Sen. Bruce Thompson, Ferdinand Yates, Farris Yawn

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When people travel with an open mind and open spirit, they can learn a lot from not only those on similar flights of fancy, but also those who are “in their place.” As many of you may recall, there was no GPS on the market twenty years ago. I took the fullest advantage of getting lost on my journeys, and I typically built time for it into my schedule. Being on the road

has always meant more to me than being in transit. Being on the road was to be in the moment, to see the sights, to get distracted, to get lost while finding. People are what make communities, towns, and cities. It’s a combination of their individual styles, their history, and their stories.

SALES Janet Ponichtera Janet@FamilyLifePublications.com

M AG A ZI

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hen I first got started working with magazines back in the mid-nineties, I was doing quite a bit of traveling around the southeast. Driving from town to town provided ample opportunities to meet people of many different walks of life. One day I might find myself in a chicken house antique shop on a backroad in Carrollton, Georgia, rummaging through a box of dusty, leather-bound, pre-Civil War books, and on another day I might be pulled over on a gravel patch next to Lake Eufaula to take a few casts at a largemouth bass and chat with a local before zipping off to sell an advertisement based on some random concept that I thought up while changing lures. Being on the road has always had a way of making me think. There was always someone somewhere with a story to tell that made me feel at home wherever I happened to be.

Laurie Litke Laurie@FamilyLifePublications.com

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Get Lost

ART Candice Williams Candice@FamilyLifePublications.com

Jack Tuszynski, Publisher

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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Calendar ONGOING Women’s History Month — Women’s History Month is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. WomensHistoryMonth.gov Some Bunny Special — CRPA collects Easter Baskets each year for its Some Bunny Special program. These baskets will be delivered to children in need throughout Cherokee County. The typical goal is to reach 300 children (150 boys and 150 girls). All baskets MUST be prefilled. You may purchase one or create a basket with your own personal touch. Baskets should have Easter‐related items only (i.e. candy, stuffed animals, toys, etc.). Donations may be dropped off at the Recreation Center, 7545 Main Street, Building 200, Woodstock. 770-924-7768. LCollett@cherokeega.com. CRPA.net Pay It Fur-ward — CRPA collects donations to be delivered to the Cherokee County Animal Shelter. Items needed include paper towels, equine pine bedding pellets, lavender essential oil, Windex®glass cleaner, dry dog food, dry cat food, Kong®or other indestructible chew toys, hard or interactive cat toys, and 60-gallon heavy/contractor trash bags. Donations may be dropped off at the Recreation Center, 7545 Main Street, Building 200, Woodstock. 770-924-7768. LCollett@cherokeega.com. CRPA.net YPOW A.M. Coffee — Each Thursday morning, join Young Professionals of Woodstock for coffee and networking. 7:00am, Copper Coin Coffee, 400 Chambers Street, Woodstock. MainStreetWoodstock.org Detachment 1311 — Every third Saturday of the month, veterans share their first-hand war experiences, which are then used as editorial research data to assist others. The Woodstock Detachment #1311 is chartered as a subsidiary organization of the Marine Corps League. 9:00am, Semper Fi Bar and Grille, 9770 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-672-0026.

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

MARCH

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Decision Height — Enjoy the Georgia premiere of this play about the women Air Force Service Pilots in WWII. Fridays & Saturdays 7:30pm, Sundays 2:00pm, City Center Auditorium, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 678-494-4251. ElmStreetArts.org

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Parent’s Night Out — Drop the kids off at the pool, so you can enjoy adult time! Kids will play in the pool, enjoy a pizza dinner, do crafts, play games, and end the night with a movie! 5:30-10:00pm, Cherokee Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. 678-880-4760. CRPA.net

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It’s a Wibit — Enjoy inflatables in the pool for no extra fee! Children must be able to pass a 25yd. swim test to use the Wibit. 1:00-5:00pm, Cherokee Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. 678880-4760. CRPA.net

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Women’s Exchange — Each month, Elizabeth Pehrson and other guest facilitators explore topics like entitlement, serving our community, seasonal depression, our personalities, and more. This month’s topic is, “Start Balancing.” 7:00-9:00pm, Venue 92, 12015 Hwy 92, Woodstock. 706-5063405. TheExchangeUS.org

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Glow in the Dark Egg Hunt — Hunt glow-in-the-dark Easter Eggs at night! There will be a craft station and a snack station. The Easter Bunny will also be present! This is for ages 1-12. The cost is $10 per child. 6:30-8:30pm, Cherokee Veterans Park, 7345 Cumming Highway, Canton. 770-924-7768. CRPA.net

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2018 Regional Issues Awareness — Regional Issues Awareness focuses on topics that affect not only Cherokee County and its residents but the region as well. The Northwest Corridor Express Lanes Project will be discussed; Jill Goldberg, Communications Program Manager, Georgia Department of Transportation will be the speaker. Breakfast is provided. There is no charge to attend. Please RSVP by Wednesday, March 7. 8:00-9:30am, The Chambers at City Center, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Motivational Piano Teaching/ Teaching for the Real World — This program will be presented by Dr. Geoffrey Haydon of Georgia State University and is presented by the Cherokee Music Teachers Association following their meeting. 11:00am, Cherokee Arts Center, 94 North Street, Canton. 678-358-6546. Linda@Lokey. net

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A Novel Idea — This month’s theme is memoir/non-fiction. Bestselling authors Lisa Russell, Lynn Garson, Mark Beaver, William Rawlings, Pellom McDaniels, and Patricia Holt will read short excerpts from their books. Door prizes will be awarded. BYOB. This event is FREE. 7:00-9:00pm, East Main Cafe (inside Audio Intersection), 210 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-670-9333. Marsha.Cornelius@hotmail.com

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YPOW Leadership Meeting — Network with other Young Professionals of Woodstock as they meet to discuss various leadership topics. FREE! 6:00-8:30pm, Pivotal Performance Processes, 8145 Main Street, Suite A, Woodstock. 770-5926056. MainStreetWoodstock.com

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


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Business After Hours — This great networking opportunity is sponsored by the Rotary Club of Canton (RotaryClubOfCanton.org). 4:30-6:00pm, Northside Hospital Cherokee Conference Center, 1130 Bluffs Parkway, Canton. 770345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Power Hour — This is a fastpaced networking event with fellow business leaders as well as Chamber Chairman of the Board Julianne Rivera, and Chamber President and CEO Pam Carnes. Before the hour ends, you’ll have a chance to share about your business or organization for all to hear. 10:00-11:00am, Chamber of Commerce, 3605 Marietta Highway, Canton. 770-3450400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Volunteer Aging Council (VAC) Fundraising Luncheon — Support VAC programs, and get a wonderful lunch for only $5! Bring a friend, coworker, family member, or yourself, and enjoy a tasty lunch while supporting the seniors and veterans of Cherokee County. Stay and eat, or pick up and go. RSVP the location, so the amazing chefs can be prepared for all who come to support. 11:30am1:00pm, The Lodge at BridgeMill, 10451 Bells Ferry Road, Canton. 678-230-4067. VAC-CherokeeGa.org

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Agriculture Expo — There will be over thirty booths showing different agriculture in the county, fun activities for children, animals, agriculture classes, and refreshments. FREE! 4:00-7:00pm, Hickory Flat Fellowship Church, 5301 Hickory Flat Highway, Canton. 770-479-1481, ext.0. CCFarmBureau.org

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Gardener’s Seminar “Ready-SetGrow Garden Summit”— UGA Master Extension volunteers of Cherokee County will present a variety of topics and answer some of your more in-depth questions to help get your garden started off right this spring. Registration is required. 10:00am-2:00pm, Senior Services Center, 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770721-7803. UGE1057@uga.edu

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Branches of Faith Launch Party — The mission is to create faith-based, community outreach events that will make a positive impact in Cherokee County and surrounding areas for children and youth, veterans, and seniors and to support charitable causes that could use a helping hand. Their purpose/vision is to create events that focus on family fun, faith, fellowship, and leadership. Drop by between 6:30-8:30pm, Blank Stage Acting Studios, 11517 Highway 92, #112, Woodstock. 678-232-7488. BranchesOfFaith.org

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A Not So Terrible Parable — This show will be performed by Kids in Praise. It’s a story about helping one another. 10:00am, Bascomb United Methodist Church, 2295 Bascomb Carmel Road, Woodstock. 770-926-9755. BascombUMC.org

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Cherokee Chorale Concert, For Now and the Future — The Chorale is celebrating their 30th anniversary! They will be performing music of Dan Forrest, directed by Scott Martin. This concert will feature Creekview High School as a guest choir. 3:00pm, Canton First United Methodist Church, 930 Lower Scott Mill Road, Canton. 248-342-1268. CherokeeChorale.org

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2018 B.L.A.S.T.T. Wage & Hour Compliance in the 21st Century — This workshop will cover some common mistakes employers make in paying their employees such as the misclassification of an individual as an exempt employee, taking improper deductions from an exempt employee’s salary, failing to pay hourly employees for all hours worked, reducing the hourly wage of hourly employees below minimum wage, failing to implement a comprehensive wage and hour policy. 9:00-11:00am, Chamber of Commerce, 3605 Marietta Highway, Canton. 770-345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Main Street Mastermind “Effective Sales Strategies” — This session will cover effective sales strategies to improve your revenue. 8:009:30am, The Chambers at City Center, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-5926056. MainStreetWoodstock.org

[continued on page 8]

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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LIBRARY EVENTS SequoyahRegionalLibrary.org HICKORY FLAT 2740 East Cherokee Drive, Canton, 770-345-7565 ROSE CREEK 4476 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock, 770-591-1491 WOODSTOCK 7735 Main Street, Woodstock, 770-926-5859 TUESDAY NIGHT TUTORS Tuesdays, 6:00pm, Woodstock Join teachers and volunteers from Woodstock Elementary School, as they help children struggling with homework, projects, and school assignments. CRAYONS & CONVERSATION Wednesdays, 1:00pm, Rose Creek Visit the library to de-stress, and get your creative juices flowing. Socialize over a board game, or color a picture. All skill levels are welcome!

I’S OF MARCH — iPADS & iPHONES March 15, 10:30am (iPads) & 2:30pm (iPhones), Rose Creek Don’t let your iPad or iPhone suffer the same fate as Julius Caesar. Bring your device for a lesson on basic functions and information about popular apps. A Q&A session will follow. Registration is required.

YOUTH & TEEN COSPLAY 101 March 17, 3:00pm (Youth) & 4:30pm (Teen), Woodstock Leading up to Sequoyah-Con ‘18 and the library’s first-ever cosplay contest, study different types of cosplay materials, READING DOGS and learn how to make a costume that is perfect for you! Wednesdays, 4:30pm, Rose Creek If you need help on a project you’ve started, bring it with Children 6+ can read to a non-judgmental, furry listener you. Youth is for grades K-5; children 9 and under must be who won’t laugh if the reader stumbles or makes a mistake. Children are asked to select their own reading material before accompanied by an adult. Teen is for grades 6-12. their scheduled session. Parents can register their child by BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP calling 770-591-1491. March 20, 12:00pm, Woodstock Enjoy coffee, conversation, and a book discussion with LEGO® CLUB new friends. This month’s selection is One Thousand White March 10, 3:00pm, Rose Creek Children may work alone or in teams to build monthly themed Women by Jim Fergus. All ages are welcome. LEGO® masterpieces, which will be displayed in the library THE GAME IS AFOOT! PARTY until next month’s meeting. LEGO® DUPLO are provided. March 21, 6:30pm, Hickory Flat Children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Have you been playing the library’s month-long, multi-player, interactive game? The Game is Afoot! ends on this date with MUSIC AND MOVES a party for all players. Arrive dressed as a character from March 14, 10:30am, Hickory Flat Get moving and grooving with some friends from Go Noodle! Sherlock, and participate in the costume contest. Prizes will be awarded, and refreshments will be provided. All ages It’ll be a dance party to remember! Children 9 and under welcome; children 9 and under must be accompanied by must be accompanied by an adult. an adult. DIY EASTER-SPRING WREATHS FINDING YOUR KIN — AN March 14, 6:00pm, Hickory Flat INTRODUCTION TO GENEALOGY Lynne Mock demonstrates how to make a beautiful EasterMarch 24, 2:00pm, Hickory Flat Spring wreath! Bring your own ribbon (minimum 6” to 12” wide; 3-4 rolls; wire ribbon recommended), anything you’d like Meet Bob Volz, genealogist, director and program coordinator for the Genealogical Computer Society of to embellish or personalize your wreath, and pipe cleaners Georgia. Whether you’re already into your family search that match your ribbon. Registration is required. or are looking for a place to begin, plan to attend this introduction. Registration is required. MANGA/ANIME 101 March 15, 5:30pm, Woodstock PEEPSHI! Teens in grades 6-12 can enjoy an overview of manga and March 29, 4:00pm, Hickory Flat anime. Assorted Japanese snack foods are provided. Teens grades 6-12 can participate in a Peep®/sushi (“Peepshi”) cook-off contest. Materials are provided.

Calendar continued from page 7

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Cherokee Senior Services Caregiver Support Meeting — This FREE meeting will cover “Understanding and Responding to Dementia Related Behaviors.” Everyone is welcome. 6:00pm, Insignia of Towne Lake, 1835 Eagle Drive, Woodstock. 770-3453297. CherokeeGa.com/Senior-Services/

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Little Women, A Benefit Concert — Based on Louisa May Alcott’s life, Little Women follows the adventures of sisters Jo, Meg, Beth, and Amy March. This concert goes to benefit Elm Street’s RepTour program, which provides free theatrical performances to schools in metro Atlanta where they otherwise wouldn’t have access to it. Friday & Saturday 7:30pm, Sunday 2:00pm, City Center Auditorium, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 678-4944251. ElmStreetArts.org

23-25

The King’s Academy Presents Annie — Follow the journey of Little Orphan Annie, as she tries to find her parents and a home to call her own. Please contact The King’s Academy for ticket information. Friday 7:00pm, Saturday 2:00pm & 7:00pm, and Sunday 3:00pm, Cherokee Arts Center, 94 North Street, Canton. 770-592-5464.

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Johnston Jungle Run 5k and 1 Mile Prowl — This PTA fundraiser encourages students, teachers, and their family and friends to participate. Dress up as your favorite jungle animal, and race with the pack. 8:00am, River Ridge High School, 400 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. RunSignUp. com/Race/GA/Woodstock/Johnston ElementaryJungleRun5Kand1MileProwl

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Once Upon a Dive-in Movie — Visit the indoor pool for a night filled with floating and movie fun. Floats will be available for use, or you can bring your own noodle or clear inner tube. Movie TBD. 6:00pm, Cherokee Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. 678880-4760. CRPA.net [continued on page 10]

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Clip and hang on your refrigerator!

"

2018

SCHEDULE

Church Listings Bascomb United Methodist Church 2295 Bascomb Carmel Road Woodstock 770-926-9755 BascombUMC.org

March 30 Passion Mime Good Friday Service at 7:00pm March 31 Easter Egg Hunt at 11:00am

Empowerment Tabernacle Christian Church 507 Industrial Drive Woodstock 770-928-7478 EmpowermentTabernacle.com

April 1 Resurrection Celebration at 10:00am

Timothy Lutheran Church and School 556 Arnold Mill Road Woodstock 770-924-7995 TLCWoodstock.org

March 25 Palm Sunday Worship Services at 8:30am and 11:00am (Holy Communion at 11:00am only) March 29 Maundy Thursday Services at 11:00am and 7:30pm March 30 Good Friday One Tenebrae Service at 7:30pm April 1 Easter Sunday Worship Services at 8:30am and 11:00am (Easter Breakfast between services)

St. Michael the Archangel Church 490 Arnold Mill Road Woodstock 770-516-0009

March 25 Passion of the Lord Palm Sunday at 7:30am, 9:00am, 11:00am, 12:45pm 2:30 pm (Spanish), and 5:30pm March 28 Confessions 9:30am, Free Spaghetti Dinner at 6:00pm, and Family Outdoor Stations of the Cross at 7:00pm March 29 Holy Thursday at 7:00pm (bilingual) March 30 Family Outdoor Stations of the Cross at 12:00pm and 3:00pm (Spanish), Seven Last Words of Jesus at 1:00pm, Good Friday Service at 7:00pm (bilingual) March 31 Easter Vigil at 8:00pm April 1 Easter Sunday Masses at 7:00am, 9:00am, 11:00am, 12:45pm, and 2:30pm (Spanish)

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

Spend the first Friday of every month in Downtown Woodstock. Enjoy the many restaurants and stores that the area has to offer, as the downtown merchants stay open late, 6:00pm-9:00pm. For each Friday Night Live theme, participating downtown merchants offer creative activities and promotions in their stores. Local bands play throughout downtown Woodstock, which adds to the street-festival feel of the event. The 2018 Friday Night Live Series is presented by Reformation Brewery.

MARCH 2 80s Night Celebrate the 1980s for the kickoff of the 2018 Friday Night Live Series.

APRIL 6 Renaissance Fair Elm Street’s cast from Monty Python’s Spamalot will be joining the fun!

MAY 4 London Calling Downtown Woodstock is transformed into London for this magical night.

JUNE 1 Downtown Luau Enjoy tropical fun in downtown Woodstock to kick off summer.

JULY 6 Downtown Dance Party Put on your dancing shoes, and head downtown for a dance party!

AUGUST 3 Superhero Night Celebrate all things superhero related! Dress as your favorite super hero!

SEPTEMBER 7 Art Night Enjoy the artistic side of downtown Woodstock on this fun night!

OCTOBER 5 Roaring 20s Night Celebrate the spirit of the Roaring 20s!

NOVEMBER 2 Night of Thanks Have fun, and give back at the same time. Local nonprofits will be spotlighted.

DECEMBER 7 Christmas in Downtown Celebrate Christmas on Main! Santa has already RSVP’d to attend!

For more information on the FNL series, please call the Woodstock Visitors Center at 770-924-0406. WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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Calendar continued from page 8

APRIL

2-6

SPLISH SPLASH Break Camp — SPLISH SPLASH your way into the aquatic center’s fun and exciting camp. Children must be able to pass a 25-yard, deep water swim test with no assistance to attend camp. Camp includes lots of pool fun, arts and crafts, off-site field trips, and more! Please register by March 31. 7:30-9:00am drop off; 9:00am-4:00pm camp activities; 4:006:00pm pick-up, Cherokee Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. 678880-4760. CRPA.net

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Easter Egg Hunt — The Easter Bunny makes a stop at Barrett Park to hide over thousands of Easter Eggs, and he’ll even stay to take pictures with all the kids! Each family will go home with a complimentary printed picture. In addition to Easter Egg hunting, kids can enjoy the petting zoo, get their face painted, make Easter-Egg-shaped spin art, and snack on popcorn! Each child will also leave with a special, ageappropriate prize for their egg hunting efforts! FREE! 11:00am, Easter Bunny arrives at 10:30am, Barrett Park, 120 Park Lane, Holly Springs. 770-345-5536. HollySpringsGa.us/events

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Gardener’s Seminar “Pruning Demystified” — Unsure of what and when plants need pruning during spring, summer, or fall? Get your questions answered, and see techniques and tools demonstrated. Registration is required. 10:00am, Hickory Flat Library, 2740 East Cherokee Drive, Canton. 770721-7803. UGE1057@uga.edu

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Wag & Walk — Bring your dog for a 1-mile walk and a doggie treat bag, as you congregate with other pet owners in the community. Breakfast items will be available for purchase. Dogs must be current on all shots; no female dogs

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

in heat. The cost is $5 per dog. 9:00am12:00pm, Pawtriots (Patriots) Park, 1485 Kellogg Creek Road, Acworth. 770-9247768. CRPA.net

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Downtown Buzz — This event is open to Main Street members and invited guests. There will be networking and a brief topical program. Mayor Donnie Henriques will provide a State of the City Address. Main Street Woodstock will provide coffee and light breakfast. FREE! 8:00am, the Chambers at City Center, 8534 Main Street, Woodstock. 770-592-6056. MainStreetWoodstock.org

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Eggs-traordinary Extravaganza — Ready, set, HUNT! This event is your traditional egg hunt for ages 1-3 with an underwater egg hunt for ages 4-10. There will also be inflatables, face painting, crafts, prizes and, of course, a visit from the Easter Bunny himself. Baskets will be provided for all “water” egg hunts but must be returned after the hunt along with the eggs. The outdoor egg hunt for ages 1-3 participants will need to provide their own baskets. Pre-registration is required. 2:305:00pm, Cherokee Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. 678-8804760. CRPA.net

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Good Morning Cherokee Breakfast — This meeting offers both current and future Chamber members the opportunity to conduct business and network with more than 200 fellow business leaders. Please bring an unwrapped toy to share with a needy child in Cherokee County! 7:00am, Cherokee County Conference Center, 1130 Bluffs Parkway, Canton. 770-345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Friday Night Live Renaissance Fair — Experience the age of the Renaissance for this fun night in downtown Woodstock. Elm Street’s cast from Monty Python’s Spamalot will be joining the fun! Thanks to the extended hours during this fun event, everyone has a chance to explore the variety of shops downtown. 6:00-9:00pm, downtown Woodstock. 770-592-6056. VisitWoodstockGa.com

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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Woodstock Minute

STAY CONNECTED IN

Facebook City Hall @woodstockgagovt Fire Department @wfdga Police Department @wpdga Downtown Woodstock @dtwoodstock Parks and Recreation @woodstockparksandrecreation

YouTube Economic Development/DDA @downtownwoodstock City Hall @cityofwoodstock,georgia

Twitter Fire Department @woodstockfd Police Department @woodstockpd Downtown Woodstock @dtwoodstock

Instagram Downtown Woodstock @downtownwoodstock City Hall @woodstock_ga

By Brittany Page

T

he City of Woodstock believes that excellent, open communication is essential in encouraging civic engagement. Excellent communication provides a better understanding of each party’s purpose, views, and goals. By fostering an environment where citizens are informed and involved, the City of Woodstock will continue to excel as an ideal city in which to live, work, and play. We encourage our residents and businesses to “Stay Connected,” and here are some ways you can do just that: Sign up to receive “Towne Hall News” and other notifications from the City of Woodstock directly to your phone. Visit our website at WoodstockGa.gov, and click on the “Stay Connected” button. You can also subscribe to CodeRed, a free community notification system utilized for relaying time-sensitive information such as weather alerts, missing persons, evacuation notices, traffic, road closures, etc. Visit Public.CodeRedWeb.com/cne/en-US/ BF64AA522EE3 to sign up for CodeRED.

Brittany Page is the information officer for the City of Woodstock. 770-592-6000. WoodstockGa.gov

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


cumulative — it may be permanent.

If I Can Hear the Music, It’s Too Loud! By Ferdinand Yates, M.D. [HealthyLife] One out of five teens has a high frequency hearing loss, and this problem has increased some 30% from 25-30 years ago. Much of this issue is due to the consistent use of earbuds at a high volume. Many of today’s audio devices can produce the volume equivalent of a rock concert — and many teens have this sound delivered directly through headphones or earbuds. Also – fireworks, rock concerts, and motor vehicles without a muffler, can damage hearing and cause medical concern. There are no warning signs of hearing damage, and the loss is not only gradual and

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

Safe listening habits and cautions include the following: - Children and teens should be able to hear conversations around them with the earbuds in. - Children and teens should take a break after an hour of continuous listening and reduce the volume. - If their ears hurt or feel funny after listening, the volume is too high. - The volume should not exceed 60% of the maximum, and then only for sixty minutes a day. - Use headphones rather than earbuds. - If Mom or Dad can hear the music as they get close to you, it is too loud. It would also be wise to refrain from using a hearing device while operating a vehicle or a bike. Consider the following when purchasing toys:

- Check the Sight & Hearing Association Noisy Toy Study. - Listen to the toy before making the purchase. - Put tape over the speakers, or remove the batteries. Notify your pediatrician if your child experiences any of the following problems: - Ringing, buzzing, roaring, or hissing sounds in the ears - Difficulty understanding speech - Muffled sounds - It becomes necessary to listen at a higher volume than before to hear something properly

Dr. Yates is a pediatrician at Woodstock Pediatric Medicine, 2000 Professional Way, #200, Woodstock. 770-517-0250. WoodstockPeds.com

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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Meet the CSO K-9 Unit By Sheriff Frank Reynolds

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he Cherokee Sheriff’s Office (CSO) Canine (K-9) Program is recognized as one of the most professional and capable units throughout the state of Georgia. With a team of five handlers and canines, the CSO K-9 Unit is capable of a wide variety of tasks including narcotics identification, evidence recovery, explosives detection, and patrol.

Not only are our K-9 teams looking for bad guys and illegal drugs, but they are one of our most popular community outreach programs. Just ask any Cherokee County student — they have probably met one of our four-legged friends. Sgt. Matt Azaroff is the Unit commander and trainer. He has been in the unit for fifteen years and is a certified National Narcotics Detector Dog Association (NNDDA) certifying official capable of training canines and handlers in narcotics, explosives, and patrol.

CSO K-9 Unit Sgt. Matthew Azaroff/ K-9 Maxim • •

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Serving since 1998 K-9 handler for 14.5 years (5 years w/ Maxim) K-9 Unit Commander for 5 years Became NNDDA Certifying Official in 2014 for narcotics, explosives, and patrol (the only explosives certifying official in GA for NNDDA) Maxim is an 8-yearold Belgian Malinois trained in explosives detection and patrol.

Sgt. Azaroff and the CSO K-9 Unit train with other municipal agencies in Cherokee County including the Holly Springs Police Department, commanded by Officer Sam Rentz. Interestingly, prior to retiring from the Sheriff’s Office, Officer Rentz helped create and commanded the CSO K-9 Unit from 1992 until 2011. Recently, the CSO K-9 Unit was fortunate to purchase two new canines through the assistance of Cobb EMC and private donations. Canine Volt is replacing Amp, and canine X-Ray is replacing Yoda. The cost of a single canine, including training, is approximately $10k. The CSO K-9 Unit typically utilizes Belgian Melinois due to their intense focus, strength, and agility. Other breeds, such as Dutch Shepherds, are also used.

Deputy Matthew Verber/ K-9 Dixon

Serving since 2009 K-9 handler since 2013 Dyno is a 7-yearold Dutch Shepherd trained in explosives detection and patrol.

Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

Members of the K-9 Unit are assigned large sport utility vehicles to give the canine ample room to move within their kennel. The vehicles are equipped with temperature monitors that remotely notify the handler, activate the horn, and open the windows should the interior temperature rise. The vehicles also carry a variety of tools and equipment, ranging from canine trauma kits to ballistic vests. Handlers have a unique bond with their canine, which is treated like a member of their family. At the end of each day, both handler and canine go home together. And when a canine is ready to retire, the handler has the option of permanently keeping their partner.

Frank Reynolds is the sheriff for Cherokee County. 678-493-4100. CherokeeGa-Sheriff.org

Each canine and handler goes through a rigorous twelve-week training program prior to going into service. The K-9

Deputy Mark Patterson/ K-9 Dyno • •

Unit trains together every week for eight hours, honing their skills and deployment readiness.

• •

in school and will be certified in narcotics, patrol, and evidence recovery.

Serving since 2006 K-9 handler since 2014 Dixon is an 8-yearold Belgian Malinois trained in narcotics detection, patrol, and evidence recovery.

Deputy Jack Fulenwider/ K-9 Volt • • •

Deputy Bryan Stark/ K-9 X-Ray • • •

Serving since 2011 K-9 handler since 2016 Previous partner, K-9 Yoda, is officially retiring in April. X-Ray is 16 months old. He is currently

Serving since 2010 K-9 handler since July 2016 Previous partner, K-9 Amp, is officially retiring in April. K-9 Volt is 18 months old. He is currently in school and will be certified in narcotics, patrol, and evidence recovery.

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First Citizen of Cherokee County Named The Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce recently announced that Scott McElroy is the recipient of its 43rd First Citizen of Cherokee County Award. McElroy is a lifelong resident of Cherokee County. McElroy served in the U.S. Navy as an intelligence specialist, and holds five military occupational specialties: infantryman, calvary scout, intelligence analyst, geospatial imagery analyst, and counterintelligence special agent. In 2000, he transferred to the Georgia National Guard, and received a Purple Heart Medal of Honor after the Humvee he was traveling in was struck with an IED while on patrol. When not deployed or on active duty, Scott served as a deputy with the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office. He has also raised funds for Georgia combat wounded vets/law enforcement/ firefighters.

Other credits McElroy has on his resume include co-founder of the Georgia National Guard Family Support Foundation Half Marathon, Ruck March and 5k, which raises funds to assist soldiers’ families while one spouse is away serving the Georgia National Guard; vice president of Georgia’s Wounded Heroes; Georgia National Cemetery Advisory Council in Cherokee County; and he continually serves his community by speaking to organizations such as the Boy Scouts, September 11th Memorial Events, Veteran’s Day programs, etc.

Community

The title of First Citizen of Cherokee County is bestowed upon a resident of Cherokee County who has resided in the county for a minimum of five years and has shown significant meritorious service to his/her community through family, civic, and/or religious involvement. A panel of out-of-town judges reviews the accomplishments of each applicant, and the winner is chosen based upon merit.

Melanie Tugman! Congratulations Congratulationstotoour ourOctober February “7 “7 Differences” Differences” winner, winner, Joyce LisaMcMichael! Crespin! Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Community CCSD Launching New Online System for Kindergarten Registration Beginning March 12 Instead of handwriting information on a pile of paper forms in a school office, parents can log in from home to the Registration Gateway via CCSD’s web site at Cherokeek12.net. Through the user-friendly process that takes about 15 to 20 minutes, parents will enter their own identification information, such as emergency contact names and numbers, which will increase accuracy and eliminate redundancy. Required enrollment documents (birth certificate, proof of residency, etc.) also can be scanned and uploaded to the system from home. After entering all their information online into the secure system, parents will be asked to schedule an appointment to bring the legally required documents for enrollment to the school. During this appointment, records will be verified by the front office (and scanned and uploaded if you were unable to do this from home), and your child will participate in a brief assessment with a teacher to gauge his or her kindergarten readiness. The Registration Gateway will be open from March 12-31 for parents of children who will begin kindergarten in the 2018-19 school year (must be born on or before Sept. 1, 2013), and children who are starting school for the first time but are ready to enter the first grade (must be born on or before Sept. 1, 2012).

Georgia Power Donates to Cherokee FOCUS Area Manager Joe Brownlee recently presented Cherokee FOCUS Executive Director/ CEO Sonia Carruthers with a donation from the Georgia Power Foundation. The Cherokee FOCUS collaborative is active in building community relationships to benefit the youth and families of Cherokee County through their programs and initiatives including Cherokee Youth Works and Drug Free Cherokee. As a community partner, Georgia Power prides itself on bringing not only energy through their power lines, but energy to the communities they serve through the Georgia Power Foundation charitable donations and the volunteer service and community involvement of their employees. To learn more about Cherokee FOCUS, visit CherokeeFocus.org.

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

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Community

Woodstock MS Student Claims Title as County’s Top Speller Seventh grade Woodstock Middle School student Lydia Lord correctly spelled “endocrinologist” and then “incorrigible” to win the 2018 Cherokee County School District Spelling Bee. Thirty-one CCSD students put their spelling skills to the test in the Georgia Association of Educators and Cherokee County Association of Educators’ annual competition, which went a record 47 rounds over three hours before a winner was decided. Braden Flournoy, a seventh grader at Freedom MS, won second place, and Sharon Pradeep, a sixth-grade student at Mill Creek MS, came in third.

WHS Economics Teacher Named Tops in Georgia by GCEE

CCSD Spelling Bee Champion Lydia Lord of Woodstock MS reacts to her win after almost 50 rounds of words.

It was a repeat performance for all three students, as Sharon, Braden, and Lydia made up the three finalists in 2017, with Sharon in first last year, Braden in second, and Lydia in third. Students in grades 4-8 are eligible for the Bee.

More than 200 words were attempted during the event including tricky terms like “apparatchik,” “coati,” “prevaricate,” “desideratum” and “uncoquettish.” The three finalists went through fifteen rounds of words together, and Braden and Lydia battled another nineteen rounds before the competition was decided. All three finalists could be back for a third year in 2019, as they will all be eligible to spell again. Superintendent Dr. Brian Hightower congratulates Braden Flournoy (2nd place), Lydia Lord (1st place), and Sharon Pradeep (3rd place) on their amazing spelling skills.

Woodstock High School teacher Josh Sailers has been chosen by the Georgia Council on Economic Education (GCEE) as the 2018 Georgia Economics Teacher of the Year. Mr. Sailers was in the middle of a lesson on scarcity with his AP macroeconomics class when he was interrupted by a group of administrators and GCEE officials carrying balloons, cake, and large sign proclaiming him to be the top economics teacher in the state. Mr. Sailers was chosen for the honor after an application process, letters of recommendation, and classroom observations. Mr. Sailers teaches AP macroeconomics and AP microeconomics as well as AP European History. One of his unique projects has been the creation of “Sophie’s World: Women in Economics,” which is a club for young women interested in the field of economics. He schedules speakers to discuss job opportunities with the members as well as how to achieve goals in the economics field. “At Woodstock High School, our mission is to prepare our students to learn from the past, apply to the present, and prepare for the future. Mr. Sailers takes that mission to heart every day,” said Principal Mark Smith. “His students come to class and experience an educator who teaches bell to bell while providing instructional content knowledge for his students to apply to their daily lives. He makes the study of economics applicable to the students and instills in them the desire to learn more.”

Each elementary and middle school sent their top speller to compete at the District Bee.

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

Mr. Sailers will be formally recognized by the GCEE at its meeting in May at the Federal Reserve Bank in Atlanta. Additionally, he will be featured in a video produced by Georgia Power. WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

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Community Cherokee Chamber of Commerce Leadership and Teen Leadership Cherokee Class of 2018 Named This 30th Anniversary Class was chosen following participation in a nomination, application, and interview process. Over the next nine months, the Leadership Cherokee Class will participate in a range of sessions that will focus on a variety of topics such as economic development, infrastructure, government, justice, education, recreation, tourism, public safety, healthcare, and social/human services. These classes will prepare members to take a more active role in the community. The Leadership Cherokee Class of 2018 Front Row (L-R) - Laura Smith, Hamilton State Bank; Jennifer Puckett, In Harmony Pediatric Therapy; Leslie Sullivan, Northside Hospital Cherokee. Second Row (L-R) Jamie Gianfala, Cherokee County Marshall’s Office; Jessica Carvalho, Woodstock City Church; Emili Roman, Georgia Probation Management; Amy Macy, WellStar Health System; Rachel Ashe, Cherokee County Office of the Solicitor General; Shellie Hollingsworth, Hollingsworth & Company Real Estate; Viktoriya Dubovis, Chart, Inc. Third Row (L-R) Julie West, Cherokee County Clerk of Courts; Rick Beaulieu, Cherokee County School District; Kristi Estes, In Harmony Pediatric Therapy; Casey Geiger, Law Office of J. Christopher Geiger; Ariana McPherson, Primrose School of Harmony on the Lakes; Greg Clyburn, City of Holly Springs. Fourth Row (L-R) Will Carlan, Hasty Pope, LLP; Bill Smith, Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office; Ryan McElwee, Cherokee County Fire & Emergency Services; Kyle Bettis, Northside Hospital-Cherokee; Aaron Vincent, Vincent Financial Group; Scott Deal, Cherokee County Fire & Emergency Services. The mission of Teen Leadership Cherokee is to develop the knowledge and leadership skills of young people in Cherokee County, so they may confidently become the leaders of tomorrow. Teen Leadership Cherokee Class of 2018 Front Row (L-R) Faith Holley, Creekview; Emma Gelatt, Sequoyah; Max Marchetti, Etowah; Belle Cool, Cherokee; Jackie Johnson, Cherokee. Middle Row (LR) Ashley Barnett, Etowah; Laney Broussard, Woodstock; Emily LeBlanc, Cherokee; Anna Huller, Cherokee; Alyssa Kirby, Sequoyah; Gwendolyn Peppers, Etowah. Back Row (L-R) Matthew Thomas, 2018 Teen Leadership Chairman; Preslie Cushing, Creekview; Katherine Williams, Sequoyah; Jackson Taylor, Sequoyah; Dilan Mehta, Etowah; Fish Riddick, Etowah; Logan Griffin, Creekview; Natalie Allen, Creekview; Benjamin Prien, Cherokee. Not pictured - Maeter Greene, Sequoyah and Brittany Page, 2018 Teen Leadership Vice Chairman.

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

Woodstock Musician Performs Concert to Raise Money for Childhood Literacy Recently, Ethan Senger, a senior at Woodstock High School, performed a John Mayer tribute concert as part of his senior project to benefit the Ferst Foundation for Childhood Literacy. Ethan’s one-and-a-half-hour concert successfully raised a total of $1075, all of which will stay in Cherokee County to provide books to local children who otherwise may not have access to literature in their home. “I’d like to thank Reformation Brewery for having me, my project facilitators Janet Ponichtera and Patrick Cognitore for helping me learn how to promote and set up the event, and everyone for coming out to the show and donating to this worthy cause,” Ethan said. Ferst Foundation’s Stephanie Dulaney exclaimed, “Just WOW! All of us at Ferst for Cherokee County are still in awe about the outcome of Ethan’s concert. Special thanks to him for choosing us to receive the proceeds from his senior project. This event is proof that we can do amazing things with the wonderful people in our community!” For more information about the Ferst Foundation, or to discover how you can help, visit FerstFoundation.org. To learn more about Ethan Senger’s music, visit EthanSenger-Musician.com.

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Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Got a Cold Sore? By Dr. Steven Anderson, D.M.D.

[HealthyLife] Is this scenario familiar to you? You feel a slight tingle on your lip, and a small, red, hard spot that you can’t see completely begins to emerge. Then, in a day or two, a red blister appears on your lip that only seems to get worse. Cold sores (fever blisters) are caused by the herpes simplex virus, and they are highly contagious. They are sometimes confused with canker sores. In short, canker sores, are a completely different type of ulcer that occurs on the soft tissue inside your mouth — a place where cold sores don’t occur.

mouth — but only on the “hard tissue” like your gums or roof of your mouth. The signs and symptoms may not start for twenty days after exposure to the virus and usually last a week or two. The blisters form, break open, and ooze a little. Then, a yellow crust forms and eventually falls off to uncover the pretty pink skin that will usually heal without a scar. Once you’ve had a cold sore, the virus lies dormant in the nerve cells in your skin, waiting to reemerge and show its true form, usually near or at the original site.

Cold sores are fairly common, so don’t feel you are suffering alone. There are steps you can take to lessen the frequency of outbreaks, prevent transmission to others, and significantly reduce the duration of the outbreak.

Triggers of recurrence may be sun, stress, or even menstruation. Cold sores generally clear up (eventually) without treatment. Treatment regimens vary greatly from doing nothing, applying creams, or taking a medication. Is there another alternative? Yes!

Cold sores usually appear on your lips, making them very visible. Occasionally, they occur on your nostrils, chin, or fingers. Sometimes, they occur inside your

So where does your dentist fit in? Dentists treat cold sores effectively all the time, sometimes with drugs and creams, but more amazingly with lasers.

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

Increasing numbers of doctors are using lasers very effectively, from surgery in the hospital to surgery in the dental office. For cold sores, there are numerous patient clinical research studies that strongly suggest laser treatment of cold sores can actually prohibit the cold sore from ever blistering, so it will simply remain as a small red spot that “disappears” in a few days. However, not just any laser will work. A special type of laser licensed for use by a doctor is required. Flashlights won’t work! The procedure is safe and noninvasive. The lip is never touched with the laser. Many dentists have found great success treating cold sores with lasers. Not all dentists perform laser treatments, so you should inquire specifically. After all, great dentistry should be all about you! Dr. Steven Anderson is owner/dentist with Anderson Dental of Woodstock and East Cobb. 650 Claremore Professional Way, Ste. 200, Woodstock. 770-384-8505. DrStevenAnderson. com

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Senator Speaks

T

he Georgia Legislature reconvened on January 8 for the 2018 session, but many Georgians were distracted by the weather and the opportunity to watch the University of Georgia take on the University of Alabama for the National Championship. Although one of the most exciting games in recent history, the Bulldog nation endured a heartbreaking loss in overtime. Speaking of distracted, there is a bill working its way through the House that is called the Distracted Driving Bill. In essence, the Bill would make it illegal to operate your cell phone while driving your car unless you were hands free. This seems reasonable at first glance, but the issue isn’t that simple. If the legislation seeks to protect lives by reducing accidents caused by distracted driving, then shouldn’t we focus on reducing all distracted driving? I’m willing to bet that most cars traveling interstate 75/575 in the morning have hot coffee in one hand and a breakfast item near the other. We have all seen the lady with the mirror flipped down attempting to put on her makeup while steering with her knees, or the man attempting to eat his footlong sub sandwich without spilling it all over his lap. Since holding your phone in your hand while you are driving is distracting, wouldn’t holding a lit cigarette in your hand also qualify as distracted driving? As if this issue wasn’t complicated enough, let’s consider a bill I introduced recently in conjunction with the Attorney General’s office. Georgia is one of three states that has not updated its statute on computer hacking. SB315 will make it illegal to gain access to another person’s electronic device without authorization. In years gone by, an electronic device would be turned off until it was to be used, and a password was sufficient to prevent an unauthorized individual from gaining access to the information stored. Then, everything changed with cloud-based solutions, the internet of things, and a greater reliance on electronic devices in daily life. The State of Georgia has

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

, g n i k c a H r e t u Comp D i s t ra c t e d

Dr iving,

& S e c u re e s in h c a M g n Voti By Senator Bruce Thompson

endured its fair share of breaches in recent history including the Secretary of State’s voter record breach as well as Kennesaw State’s voter records hack. Prosecution has proven challenging, and this legislation will aid authorities with future breaches. Since we’re attempting to provide the necessary tools to prosecute perpetrators who attempt to access records they are not authorized to access, shouldn’t we also consider securing our voting machines? 2018 elections are extremely important in Georgia, as we elect an entirely new executive branch. I have drafted a similar bill to the one introduced in the House by Representative Scot Turner seeking to modernize Georgia’s voting machines.

voting machines are extremely vulnerable to manipulation and alteration, and the consensus in the country is to move toward paper ballots. This legislation seeks to replace the current voting machines with new machines and new processes. First, you will have the choice of voting on a new electronic touch screen and then print out the recorded ballot to be scanned by an optical scanner, or you can utilize a paper ballot and then scan the marked ballot. Either way, the results of your ballot will be scanned to provide a paper copy for audit purposes.

Bruce Thompson is a State Senator for District 14, which includes Canton. 404-656-0065. BruceThompsonGa. com

It has been determined that our current

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Surviving

Springtime Allergies Naturally By Jill Rowlands [HealthyLife] Spring is such an uplifting time of year. The landscape becomes lush and green, and all the flowers are in bloom. However, it is often looked upon with dread by many who suffer from seasonal allergies. When the immune system detects foreign invaders, it responds by producing histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and other inflammatory molecules that cause symptoms. Allergies can affect the eyes, sinuses, lungs, throat, skin, and even cause fatigue or brain fog. There are many ways to reduce the allergenic load, support the immune system, and look for natural nutraceuticals and herbs to help control symptoms.

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

To Reduce Overall Load … • Keep windows and doors closed to diminish the amount of pollen entering the home. • Have AC ducts cleaned, making sure the company also cleans the coils of the inside unit. This is a huge breeding ground for mold and bacteria that blows throughout your home. • Use HEPA air filters to cut down on dust mites, pet dander, and mold in the air. • Make sure there are no current or previous leaks in the home where mold can be growing. • Do not allow smoking in the home. • Do not use chemical air fresheners or plug ins. Look for 100% essential-oilbased products. • Use a neti pot to wash out sinuses. It takes a little getting used to, but you will love it once you do. • Eat clean. Eliminate refined foods, artificial food ingredients, and sugar.

• Vitamin D — take 1,000IU D3 daily or the sunshine equivalent. Get tested because some people may need more. • Take high quality fish oil (Ortho Molecular Orthomega®, Nordic Naturals®, Wiley’s Finest™). • Mushrooms can be very effective for immune support (Thorne Myco-Immune®) • Vitamin C — take 2,000 to 3,000 mg per day. • Zinc 25 — take 50 mg per day.

Natural Symptom Support • Ortho Molecular D-Hist or D-Hist Jr. • Rootology Breathe Free • Redd Remedies® (adult or children’s) Sinus Support • Xlear® Nasal Spray • Homeopathic System Support • Clearlife™ Nasal Spray • Boiron Sabadil® (adult or kids) • Dr. King’s Regional Allergies Southern U.S.™

Immune System Support • A quality probiotic and other specific nutrients will promote a healthy gut.

Jill Rowlands is the owner of Nature’s Corner Market, 200 Parbrooke Drive, Woodstock. 678-310-2532. NaturesCornerMarket.com

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[HomeLife] Georgia rarely gets snow like we did this past year, and that snow affects the trees. With heavy

snow comes breaks and fractures. So, it’s a great idea to have an ISA-certified arborist, preferably one that’s T.R.A.Q. (Tree Risk Assessment Qualified via the ISA) certified to come out and assess your trees. There are a lot of ways that trees can fail or pre-fail. Having a trained arborist visually inspect your trees helps prevent unwanted consequences from unexpected future tree failure. Here is what an arborist will look for: 1. Broken Branches - Broken branches need to be pruned. When a tree breaks, it will attempt to heal the wound by growing callus wood over the broken area. However, trees don’t break clean. Breaks leave splinters that the tree has to grow around. Pruning broken branches provides a smooth-cut face, which allows the tree to quickly heal and compartmentalize against further decay encroachment. 2. Bent Branches - Trees have no mechanical ability to contract stretched fibers. Once they are stretched, they stay stretched. Next, the bent area of the tree will grow thicker to support the tree’s new

load imbalance. This is called response growth. However, in the short run, a tree that has been bent over by a storm will have a higher propensity for failure. Evaluating the probability of failure plus impact on a defined target is the job of a tree risk assessor.

3. Fallen Trees - Trees that have been

blown over typically have reached the end of their life. This is for two reasons: First, if a root ball comes out of the ground, most of the time it is in a moist environment where the water will cause erosion into

the hole under the root ball. Once this hole fills up with dirt, it prevents the tree from being fully stood back up. Secondly, guy wires are not the best solution. As stated earlier, trees grow in response to the pressure put on them (response growth). Often, we are tempted to install guy wires to help support a tree that has been blown over. However, because guy wires support the tree, the roots don’t. Thus, over time, the roots will not respond and grow as needed. So, once the guy wires are removed, the roots will fail again. Therefore, in full blow-over situations, removal and replacement is typically the recommended approach.

Tree Care After Snow By Mark Russell

Mark Russell is an ISA T.R.A.Q/Certified Arborist SO#6098-A and the owner of 770-Arborist Tree Health Care in Canton. 770-272-6747. 770Arborist.com

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

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Book Review BY FARRIS YAWN

DAWN’S EARLY LIGI-IT There are certain events that are so momentous that they are forever burned in our memory. For those old enough to remember Pearl Harbor or the JFK assassination, they can tell you exactly where they were and what they were doing the moment they heard the news. More recently, the attack on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and United Flight 93 on 9/11 is an event most will “Never Forget.” For three local Cherokee County residents, that dark day hit closer to home than it did for the rest of us. Ty Wheeler, Todd Trainer, and Ken Harriss became friends at Woodstock First Baptist Church. They shared a love for baseball, and when they discovered none of them had been to Yankee Stadium, a plan to correct that oversight was hatched. Tickets were procured, flights were arranged, and soon, the friends left Atlanta for New York City — on September 10, 2001. The plan was to do a little sightseeing before the game, and get up the next morning to have breakfast atop the World Trade Center before flying home. The first sign God was watching over them came when their flight was moved up, so they had to hurry to the airport with no time for breakfast. The second sign was an encounter on their now grounded flight with a lady on her way to Alpharetta. When there were no hotel rooms to be had, she took the three strangers under her wing and brought them home to her and her husband’s Bronx apartment. It took several days to arrange transportation home, but the men finally completed their journey with a much deeper appreciation of God’s grace and mercy. The book details their story and a side of this historic event many have not heard. It also gives full credit to God for their safe return home to their families. Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

Farris Yawn is the owner of Yawn’s Publishing, 2555 Marietta Highway, #103, Canton. 678-880-1922. YawnsPublishing.com

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Photo by Kimberly Evans

Photo by Donna and Paul Grady

Photo by Donna and Paul Grady

Community Partners

I

an’s Friends Foundation (IFF) was founded in 2006 by Phil and Cheryl Yagoda after their thirteen-year-old son, Ian, was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor at the age of two. In the months following Ian’s diagnosis, the Yagodas visited doctors and hospitals across the country in search of answers for their son’s treatment. When they learned how little funding was being allocated to research projects conducted in the field of pediatric brain tumors, Ian’s Friends Foundation was started to fill the void for their son and the approximately 28,000 other children living with brain tumors.

funding innovative research that will lead to groundbreaking therapies and cures.

Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death from disease in children, and nearly thirteen children in the U.S. are diagnosed with a brain tumor every day. There is an immediate need for more research to identify effective treatments and cures, so more children will survive this disease. The Yagodas quickly learned that promising research can only occur with increased public awareness and funding for these projects. And since its inception, Ian’s Friends Foundation’s unwavering mission has been to help more children survive brain tumors by

Since 2006, Ian’s Friends Foundation has raised more than $10 million to fund seventeen ground-breaking research projects at ten worldrenowned U.S. institutions including Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, NYU, Cornell, Johns Hopkins University, Emory University, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and the University of Pittsburgh. This funding leads to unique partnerships with prominent healthcare institutions and novel research that is unlikely to receive funding through other channels.

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

There are only approximately 100 practicing pediatric neuro-oncologists in the U.S., many of whom struggle to secure the resources needed to conduct pediatric brain tumor research. Yet, new medical breakthroughs will save lives. Ian’s Friends Foundation donates hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to support and fast-track innovative therapies and treatments for pediatric brain tumors at leading hospitals and research labs nationwide.

IFF also serves as a beacon of hope and trusted resource for families, healthcare providers, and researchers at leading hospitals and universities around the country, and it is paving the way for industry-wide collaboration that will fast-track lifesaving pediatric brain tumor research with its inaugural WhatIFF Symposium, which was held in September 2017. The WhatIFF Symposium was a Shark Tank style forum during which nearly forty renowned clinicians and researchers from all over the country presented ideas for innovative research in the pediatric brain tumor field. After a robust discussion, WhatIFF Symposium attendees voted on three projects to receive up to $125,000 each from IFF in 2018. The WhatIFF Symposium served as a platform to breakdown research barriers, identify collaboration opportunities, and support lifesaving research ideas that will lead to effective treatments and cures for pediatric brain tumors, so more children will survive.

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teams, oversees office operations, and handles the prosecution of cases such as complex vehicular homicides. Previously, Todd served as an Assistant Solicitor-General in both Forsyth and Cobb Counties, and as an Assistant District Attorney for the Bell-Forsyth Judicial Circuit. For five years, he served as Senior Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor for the Prosecuting Attorney’s Council of Georgia where he provided legal aid and training to thousands of traffic prosecutors and law enforcement officers. A graduate of numerous state and national advanced DUI training programs, Todd has been called Georgia’s most experienced DUI prosecutor. Todd brings this experience and breadth of knowledge to Cherokee County in his commitment to keeping local roads safe.

“The Best Choice for Solicitor-General”

Todd Hayes Leads with Experience and Integrity R

epublican Todd Hayes stands ready to serve as Cherokee County’s next elected SolicitorGeneral. With fifteen years of experience in the field as a prosecuting attorney, Todd offers a solid background to make him the right choice for Cherokee. “I’ve been doing this particular job in this office for the last two years, so I’m ready on day one,”

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said Todd, the appointed Chief Assistant Solicitor-General. “Electing someone with experience is important because the work this office does affects public safety, and you want to leave that in trusted hands.”

Qualifications and Experience _________________________________ As Chief Assistant SolicitorGeneral for Cherokee County, Todd supervises three trial

In 2016, Mothers Against Drunk Driving honored Todd as Georgia Prosecutor of the Year, and the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety recognized him for his outstanding service in keeping dangerous and reckless drivers off the road. Todd earned three degrees from the University of Georgia. He graduated from UGA School of Law in 2002, finished his master’s degree in business administration in 1999, and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in history in 1998.

Roots in Cherokee County

__________________________________ Todd and his wife Sara met in high school while attending church in Marietta. They started dating after college and married in 2002. They purchased a house in Macedonia in 2007 and made Cherokee County their home. They have five children: Clark Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


COVER STORY By Cyndi Braun

“As Cherokee County continues to grow, so will the caseload in state court. Todd has the experience and knowledge to handle the challenges ahead. He has established working relationships with our judges and the entire court staff. He will be ready on his first day to lead the office into the future,” said Jessica Moss, current Solicitor-General for Cherokee County.

and choir member at their church.

The Most Qualified Candidate __________________________________

(12), Alex (10), Ella (8), Walker (5), and Olivia (18 months). Sara directs the elementary program at Classical Conversations of Woodstock, an international homeschool program. She also teaches piano at home and is the orchestra pianist at First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Todd is a 2017 graduate of Leadership Cherokee, an active member of the Rotary Club of Canton and the Canton Optimist Club, and a deacon

Todd’s commitment to serving and protecting the community is more of a passion than a career. He believes in working with law enforcement and the District Attorney’s office to ensure that justice is served. He understands that misdemeanors affect public safety and must be handled in a fair and efficient manner.

By breaking the cycle of criminal behavior, successful accountability courts save taxpayer dollars. “This job is not about getting convictions. It’s about making the world a better – and safer – place,” said Todd.

Todd supports the Cherokee County State Court accountability court programs, which help stabilize destructive behavior and lifestyles. These programs include the DUI court program, misdemeanor drug court, treatment accountability court, and veterans’ accountability court.

TODD HAYES HAS IDENTIFIED THESE AREAS AS PRIORITIES FOR THE SOLICITOR-GENERAL’S OFFICE: DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ACCOUNTABILITY

___________________________

Every victim of domestic violence should have a voice. Often, this type of crime leaves victims in a place where they don’t even want to defend themselves. The job of prosecutors is to step alongside of them and help them find their voices again. Todd doesn’t ever want victims of domestic violence to come through his office and feel like they aren’t important, because they are.

MAINTAIN SAFE STREETS

______________________________

Making Cherokee County streets safe starts with good impaired driving enforcement. Todd believes that motorists should be able to get in their car and do whatever they need to do without having to worry about impaired drivers. With Todd’s DUI enforcement background, he’s uniquely positioned to make that a reality.

SUPPORT LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS

______________________________

Todd believes in working with the police and building relationships. The Solicitor-General’s office should make sure that police work is properly presented in a court of law. Police should feel confident that prosecutors are doing their best for them. That leads to better results across the board.

Remember to vote on MAY 22!

THayes2018@gmail.com • 770-367-2687 • ToddHayesForSolicitor.com Facebook.com/toddhayesforsolicitor/ • Twitter.com/ToddHayesforSG Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Understanding “Bermuda Time” [HomeLife] Around the time of March Madness, the airways will be full of commercials for various lawn products guaranteed to save you time and money while giving you the best yard in the neighborhood. The primary wonder product advertised is “weed and feed,” which contains a pre-emergent herbicide and fertilizer. In theory, this sounds great, but with Bermuda lawns, the timing usually isn’t quite right for the herbicide or the fertilizer. Summer annual weeds, like crabgrass, will germinate when soil temperatures hit the mid-50s, so it is best to get your pre-emergent down from late February to early March. If you don’t know exactly when to apply the pre-emergent, pay

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

attention to the flowers of redbuds or forsythia, as they tend to be a good indicator. Early fertilization of Bermuda can lead to destructive fungal diseases like large patch, which is difficult to control once established. Early fertilization can also lead to frost damage from a late cold snap. Fertilization of a Bermuda lawn should only be done after it has fully

By Joshua Fuder

turned green, and it is best to wait until after the second mowing. Application of a half a pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet is generally recommended for most Bermuda lawns in our area. As your lawn starts to wake up, begin mowing to a height of one to 1.5 inches. It is recommended to mow frequently enough to never cut more than one-third of the leaf height in one cutting.

Joshua Fuder is an agriculture and natural resources agent at the UGA Cooperative Extension Cherokee County. Contact the UGA Extension office for any gardening assistance, 770-721-7830 or CAES. UGA.Edu/extension/cherokee

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Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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Taste of BY CHEF HILLARY GALLAGHER

Ingredients

Procedure

---------------Âź cup lemon juice 2 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro 1 tablespoon sugar Âź cup extra virgin olive oil 1 lb. finely grated carrots 3 oz. golden raisins, plumped and drained Salt and pepper to taste

-

-------------Combine the lemon juice, cilantro, and sugar. Gradually whisk in the oil. Toss the dressing with the carrots and raisins. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately as a side dish to accompany grilled chicken or fish. It also goes great as a condiment with hummus or falafel, and it can be served as a salad component as well.

Hillary Gallagher, CCC is the Culinary Arts Program Director and Lead Instructor at Chattahoochee Technical College in East Cobb. Hillary.Gallagher@ ChattahoocheeTech.edu. 770-509-6350. ChattahoocheeTech.edu

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Talking to Your Kids About School Tragedies By Lisa-Marie Haygood

School shootings and other tragedies have [AcademicLife] happened all over this country, and unfortunately, they are becoming less shocking because we seem to have become desensitized due to the number of times we hear about them. School districts have taken several steps to ensure the safety of students. Some of those measures mean exterior doors are locked and require buzzing into the front office and signing into computers that photograph parents and provide visitor badges. Our kids practice color-coded drills, and emergency plans are in place for any possible incident. We certainly hope that a tragedy

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of this magnitude would never happen in our schools, but it is happening elsewhere, and children are likely to hear about it. When a school shooting or any school tragedy occurs, it is important for parents to talk about the incident with their children, adapting the conversation to the appropriate grade and maturity level. Your kids will listen to the first person there with the information. Getting the truth from Mom, Dad, or a trusted adult is better than hearing it on the playground or school bus, and it gives you control of the message. Assure your child that schools are a safe place to grow and learn. Point out the security features at the schools as well as where to go for help in emergencies. Remain positive and confident in the way you discuss this. Avoid any conversation that expresses fear, anger, or a need for revenge. Limit your child’s exposure to television coverage of the event. News can be sensational, and in a quest for ratings, children might see images that are not appropriate for them to process at their age. Try to keep them on a normal routine, and be aware enough to seek professional help if they struggle to cope with any incident.

Lisa-Marie is the executive director for the Cherokee County Educational Foundation.

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Life’s Greatest Influences By Tim Morris

Most everyone has someone [Lifestyle] in their life who has played a part in helping them become the person they are today. Other than my mother and my brother, my greatest influences have been Mildred Wright and Rodney Collins. Mrs. Wright was the teacher in high school who never gave you anything you didn’t earn. I was a sophomore, and I’d just earned a starting position on our football team. Mrs. Wright was my English teacher, and she informed me that I was failing English. It went in one ear and out the other. I thought Mrs. Wright wouldn’t give me a failing grade because I was a starter, and we were on the path to another state championship. The week prior to our biggest rivalry game, she informed me I failed English for the semester, and just like that, I was dismissed from the team. I let my

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

teammates down. I learned a hard lesson: Nothing should be given to you without working for it. I never held Mrs. Wright responsible, and I’d like to thank her for opening my eyes. Coach Rodney Collins was another influence in my life. While playing football, I sustained a season-ending injury during my junior year. When I started hanging out with the wrong people and getting in trouble, he pulled me aside to give me advice, and I didn’t listen. At the end of the school year, he left for another coaching job. That summer, my friends and I got into some trouble that no one could get us out of. But one day, Coach Collins came to see me. He never said, “I told you so,” but what he shared with me has stayed with me. He prayed for me, told me he loved me, and advised me to do what’s

right. Just last year, at a forty-year State Champions Reunion, I finally got to thank him for being there for me. If you have someone in your life who has been a great influence on you, please let them know; I know they will appreciate it. L

Tim Morris is the director of Cherokee County Senior Services. 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-479-7438. CherokeeGa.com/Senior-Services

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Why is Microblading All the Rave? By Drs. Petrosky, Harkins, Leake and Depew

[HealthyLife] Do you want your first tattoo? How about directly on your face? Thanks to celebrities like Cara Delevingne and Brooke Shields, thick, full eyebrows are in style, and the trend doesn’t seem to be losing steam anytime soon. A technique called microblading can help you achieve this look. It doesn’t matter if you like them arched and feathered or straight and bold, eyebrows are arguably the most important facial feature. If you’re not satisfied with the ones you have, there are so many ways to update them, including brow gel, pencils, and even tattooing. But now, there’s a very natural option that delivers semi-permanent results. Microblading is a form of semi-permanent makeup that provides a means to partially or fully camouflage missing eyebrow hair with the appearance

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

of simulated hair by using fine deposits of cosmetic tattoo pigments. Microblading is a treatment where a technician tattoos eyebrows onto your face using a small tool with nine tiny blades. It takes two visits, approximately 4-6 weeks apart, but the promise is that you’ll wake up with perfect eyebrows every morning. The best part about the technique is that there is no down time. Your new set of brows will be ready for a selfie immediately after the process. The healing process is different for everyone, and it takes between 25 and 30 days. Before the microblading begins, a topical numbing cream is applied to the area to minimize discomfort. No need to worry that the process is painful; some clients may feel a slight discomfort, but it’s relatively painless. Patients will go home with after-care instructions and ointment. Microblading is low maintenance. After healing, you can rub them and enjoy swimming. No special care is required except for a brief touch-up once a year. Now you know what all the rave is about!

Drs. Petrosky, Harkins and Leake are board-certified plastic surgeons, and Dr. Depew is a board-eligible plastic surgeon at Plastic Surgery Center of the South. 770-421-1242. PlasticSurgeryCenterOf TheSouth.net

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in the

limelight

want a fully enclosed porch, Outdoor Living installs screen rooms, too. How about adding sturdy aluminum railings that are maintenance free? And maintenance-free, nearly invisible cable railings are a good option to improve the view from your deck. If your deck is too sunny, pergolas are great for providing style and shade. Once your new porch or deck is finished, you can complete the look and utility with furniture, rugs, and lamps. Outdoor Living’s large selection of quality outdoor furniture is both comfortable and fashionable. Many collections are on display in the showroom, and even more can be custom ordered. Additionally, indoor or outdoor rugs and lamps are on display in the showroom and can also be custom ordered. Julie makes a point of selling only premium brands and materials that can withstand the fluctuating north Georgia seasons, and she stands by all her products. Stop by the showroom at 447 Harmony School Road in Jasper to check out all the products in person.

ENJOY YOUR

Outdoor Spaces with

INDOOR COMFORT W hen outdoor enthusiast and equestrian Julie Heinsman bought her small Pickens County farm eleven years ago, one of her favorite qualities about her new home was a spacious screened porch. It was the perfect size for entertaining family and friends. However, winter temperatures proved inhospitable, and when spring finally arrived, so did great blankets of pollen — all over her patio furniture. Frustrated, she searched for a convenient, affordable option for extending the enjoyment of her porch beyond summer mornings and autumn evenings. Lucky for her and savvy north Georgia homeowners, she didn’t have to search too long or far. As a former executive with Florida-based PGT® Industries, Julie knew the perfect solution: PGT Eze-Breeze® Sliding Panels. Made of heavy-duty, yet flexible, clear vinyl and sturdy aluminum frames, they fit virtually any outdoor space, turning a covered patio or screened porch into a flexible leisure space that can be enjoyed

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

year-round. Highly customizable — offering a variety of colors for the vinyl and frames, multiple ventilation styles, and optional screens — the Eze-Breeze® experience provides a rarity in renovation projects, one that will increase your home’s value and your enjoyment of it, without increasing your stress level or putting a huge dent in your savings. And even better, there’s no construction needed to create your relaxation paradise.

With only a four- to six-week turnaround, you can be enjoying your new room this spring without the nuisance of pollen. To learn more or to schedule your free consultation with Julie, call 706-301-5698, or visit MyEnclosedPorch.com. PGT Eze-Breeze® Sliding Panels from Outdoor Living, Indoor Comfort — SIMPLE, AFFORDABLE, and BUILT TO LAST.

Julie founded Outdoor Living, Indoor Comfort to bring this innovative home improvement technology to the area. Her satisfied customers couldn’t be happier with their new improvements, the speedy one- or two-day installation, or the superior customer service they received. With a growing family of clients, Outdoor Living has added new products over the years to meet more needs. Waterproof, luxury vinyl flooring is a perfect way to finish off your enclosed porch. If you don’t

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39


By Meghan Quinlan

“Don’t tell me women are not the stuff of heroes,” Qui Jin, Chinese Revolutionary (November 8, 1875 – July 15, 1907).

T

here are countless female heroes in Cherokee County’s past and present — pioneers, business owners, educators, nurses, and community leaders. Throughout history (and even today), being a woman meant always being in an uphill struggle for recognition or to have their voice heard. Women have shaped civilization in countless ways, even though their contributions aren’t recorded in the annals of history. Mary Franklin, Magnolia Thomas, and Mary Elizabeth Wheeler are three Cherokee County women who made their mark on history and were each the hero of their own story.

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Mary Franklin

Magnolia Thomas

During Cherokee County’s settlement, Mary Franklin of Clarke County won a forty-acre gold lot in the Cherokee County gold lottery of 1832. Previous accounts describe a demure widow who arrived at her property “on her little gray mule.” Most, if not all, records never gave a full account of Mary’s work as a business owner or her life as the matriarch of her family. Mary was born to a prominent southern family in 1782, got married in 1800, and had five children by 1815. She lost her husband in 1816 when her youngest was only a year old. She became the head of a wealthy, prominent family, and by the time she drew the lot near Ball Ground, GA, all of her children had reached adulthood. When she arrived in the Yellow Creek community, she hired someone to be caretaker until she could return. Over the next 25 years, she ran one of the most successful and largest mining operations in the state. She was shrewd in business and dutiful in recording the daily activities of the mine. She continued to work even while her health was failing and while nearby mines shut down due to lack of profit. By the time the Franklin Mine sold, it was over 1000 acres. Mary Franklin died in 1858. Her gravestone reads, “She left no duty undone.”

At the tail end of the nineteenth century, Cherokee County saw unprecedented growth and development, especially with the advent of the railroad in 1879. Magnolia Thomas, born in 1890 in Canton, grew up during this time of development, but also lived under the harsh realities of the Jim Crow Laws. Magnolia was one of seven children, and she lived with her mother, Caroline Thomas. Her brother purchased land in Woodstock and built the family home. She attended Spelman Seminary in Atlanta, graduating in 1918 when she was 28 years old. Magnolia soon became a teacher, and she taught students for years in Woodstock and Hickory Flat. She lived and worked at a time when segregation was the norm in the south. She taught at a segregated school. She lived and worked in a community where she could not eat or shop in the same places that white people could. These racist laws shaped her life and the lives of countless other African Americans in the south. Despite this, Magnolia nurtured thousands of students over her teaching career. She worked with limited resources and inferior supplies to educate students from all around the area. Some of her students walked over two miles to attend school, and the letters that she kept from former students are a testament to her impact. She was also dedicated to her church and a beloved community leader.

Mary Elizabeth Wheeler During World War II, women went to work in droves to support the war effort. Canton’s Mary Elizabeth Wheeler was no exception. She was a First Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps, and she served three years during the war, including a year overseas in Africa and Sicily. Lt. Wheeler received two battle stars for her service. She later recounted that her division landed two days after the invasion of Sicily, and she and other nurses waded ashore with whatever supplies they had. The hospital was next to the fighting lines and covered an area of four city blocks. In her account, she said air raids happened daily, and personnel could see at night from the light from artillery bursts. The hospital was never struck, although bombs did land on the outskirts. Lt. Wheeler said the soldiers were all dirty, cold, and badly wounded when they arrived at the hospital. She and other nurses tried to raise morale by wearing lipstick, collecting rations of cigarettes, and by providing wholesome meals of fresh vegetables and protein. Lt. Wheeler stated the patients and doctors drew courage from one another and took all of the pain and suffering on the chin. When she returned home from the war, Lt. Wheeler continued to work for the Red Cross and serve her community.

The lives and stories of these women are encouraging. They struggled through adversity, hardships, separation, and loss, and yet — they persevered. Their strength is a communal thread in our history.

Meghan Quinlan is the program manager of the Cherokee County Historical Society. 770-345-3288. RockBarn.org

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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41


How About Faith Practice? This is true regardless of whether we’re active in a church or not. Sometimes, people have the wrong idea that people involved in a church “have everything all worked out.” Occasionally, people in church try to perpetuate that erroneous notion.

[InGoodFaith] Easter is only a month away. How is it going with your faith? Is it stronger? Are you learning and growing more? Is it weak? What role does it play in your life? Could it have an even bigger role, an even bigger positive impact in your life? In your relationships? On your future? Each of us would answer those questions uniquely. From preachers to the most ardent skeptic, we’re all mixed bags of faith and doubt, knowledge and questions. Faith is dynamic, frail, beautiful, and messy.

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However, the truth is just the opposite. We should be involved in a church precisely because we acknowledge that we don’t “have everything all worked out.” Church is God’s plan for how we are to learn to “practice” our faith. We understand practice, whether we are thinking of sports, music, or even spelling and math. It means hard work. Yet, when practice is done well, it makes us feel good. Practice means working out our errors, becoming better, improving our skill and abilities. It’s about training and getting in shape. Your faith is something that will change with the passage of time. For better or for

By Pastor Chris Bryant

worse, we deal with life’s inconsistencies and challenges. Hopefully, it will grow and get stronger rather than more shallow and weak. Faith is something that, if you stick with it — even when you’re at your lowest point — it can come back and lead you to the greatest blessings, some of the most cherished moments in your life. This Easter, how about considering more “faith practice?” I know my church would welcome you, and I’m confident so would many, many others. After all, we are there because faith is something all of us are still working on together.

Chris Bryant is lead pastor at City On A Hill United Methodist Church. 678445-3480. COAHUMC.org

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Lawn Care and Pest Control

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hen asked about the difference between Maple Leaf Landscape Management and other landscape companies, Tom McGaugh, owner of Maple Leaf Landscape Management says, “We don’t sell lawn care to customers, we build long-term relationships.” That answer, in a nutshell, reflects Maple Leaf Landscape’s mission statement perfectly. “The answer hasn’t changed in the twenty years since we first opened our doors. Ask the people who have been with us for twenty years,” says Tom. “They all know a thing or two about how much we value our relationship with the customer. They’re like

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

our family. The only difference being we have a family gathering more often than most!” Mark Sagaas, senior relationship builder at Maple Leaf adds, “There is no way to put into words how much our customers mean to us, and there is no length we won’t go to please them and make sure they know how much they’re cherished by us. No kidding, that’s what my card says,” Mark continues, “and I love that! Building a solid relationship with new homeowners is why

we have been here for twenty years, and why we’re going strong into the next twenty. When a person knows how much they mean to you, even trying situations can be resolved with relative ease.” And that is what Maple Leaf believes in. So, visit, call 770-794-7444, or email MapleLeafLawnAndPest.com for a quote and a good cup of coffee. They have the time to talk, but they have even more time to listen!

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WOMEN FIREFIGHTERS

WOMEN FIREFIGHTERS Darlene Prem Photography

WOMEN

FIREFIGHTERS

STRENGTH UNDER FIRE By Michele Ice

The United States currently has over 6,200 full-time female career firefighters.

Firefighting requires extraordinary physical and mental strength along with a passion to save lives.

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There are over 22 female firefighters in the area.

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W

omen have been represented in fire service for almost 200 years. However, firefighting remains a male dominated field. The United States currently has over 6,200 full-time female career firefighters, representing about 6% of the firefighting community. In the Cherokee County and in north Fulton departments, women make up about 3% of the firefighter population. There are over 22 female firefighters in the area. What draws these women together is their love for the job of firefighting, emergency medical care, and their commitment to serve others. When people call 911 for emergencies, they don’t care what gender or ethnicity the responding firefighter is; they just want highly trained firefighters and emergency medical technicians to respond.

Firefighting requires extraordinary physical and mental strength along with a passion to save lives. But, firefighting is not just about strength; it also requires a very special mindset that includes compassion for people and a love of the job of firefighting. From a physical standpoint, of course, men and women are different. Men typically have stronger upper body strength, but women adapt and use their lower bodies to compensate for this difference. Whether it’s dragging a 180-lb. victim from a burning house or carrying a chain saw up on a roof, these women find the strength and grit to get the job done. Women do have to work harder to stay strong. They must continuously work on cardio, strength training, and flexibility — both on and off duty — to be the best they can be for the citizens of their communities.

All firefighters must complete and pass a yearly physical agility test (PAT) to remain on the trucks. The test consists of eleven stations that measure the candidate’s ability to perform tasks in a given amount of time. Regardless of whether the candidate is male or female, it is a very physically demanding test. All firefighters are held to the same standards. This is also the same test that new hires must pass. So, no matter if you have been on the job for 25 years or two years, you are still held to the same standards.

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

Recently, two female firefighters from Cherokee County Fire completed the F.L.A.M.E.S. program in Chatsworth, GA. This rigorous, 48-hour course is designed to test a firefighter’s personal limitations when working in high stress situations with a limited recuperation period. 260 Firefighters have successfully completed this course with only six women passing. That’s a huge milestone for these firefighters.

Female firefighters not only respond to fires, they also rescue people from car wrecks, provide emergency medical care, respond to hazardous material spills, inspect buildings, provide fire safety education to the community, investigate arson, complete housework, wash the trucks, provide maintenance on their fire equipment, and many other tasks. These women work 24-hr. shifts away from their loved ones. In the last 25 years, fire stations are finally being built to provide separate sleeping quarters, separate bathrooms, etc. Better fitting uniforms and firefighter gear are also being provided for the female firefighters. One firefighter said, “The hardest thing at the station is adjusting to the snoring in the bunk room.” She said she places a fan by her bed and tries to go to sleep before the others do. Women firefighters don’t want to be treated differently; they just want to be respected. Sometimes, when they are moved to a new station or get a new station officer, they feel they must reprove themselves to their fellow male firefighters. The most frequently asked question is, “Would you be able to carry me out of a burning building?” Firefighting is a team effort; rescue cannot be done alone. Dekalb County Fire recently rescued eight children from a third-story apartment fire. This was a team effort. One of the first firefighters climbing up the ladder to get the children was a female captain. That parent didn’t care if that firefighter was male or female, he was just glad they were there to help save his babies. Because of the low pay, increased health risks, and increased number of emergency medical calls, America is facing a serious firefighter shortage. Recruitment for firefighters is at an alltime high. Every department in the state of Georgia is hiring. Hiring qualified women is even more difficult. Candidates must be honest, dependable, a quick learner, and physically fit. The candidate must also function well as a team member as well as communicate and listen well. Cherokee County and north Fulton County have the best of the best female firefighters, and these women keep excelling as they continue their training. In addition to improving our communities, they are also making these outstanding fire departments even better.

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HOT or NOT? Your Haircare Appliance Guide By Jyl Craven

[Lifestyle] Remember when you cooked your very first dish on the stove? Did you overcook it? Or how about learning to do your

laundry or discovering the clothes iron for the very first time? Did you use high heat settings, regardless of the garments? Growing up, we often learn through trial and error. Sometimes, the mistakes we made were fatuous and other times more severe. However, as adults, we realize the significance of temperature control in many areas. Knowing the correct setting for your haircare appliance is important. Here are the three most commonly used hair care appliances and a temperature guide to know whether to choose hot or not:

Blow Dryer

When blowing your hair dry, do you immediately opt for a high heat setting? While it’s true your hair may dry quicker, this approach may not be the best for your hair type. For thin or compromised hair, use a medium setting. Thicker, more coarse hair types can handle higher temperatures. Always remember to keep the dryer moving. Too much heat in a concentrated area can cause damage. If your blow dryer has a cool shot feature, switch it on when your hair is about 95% dry. This will help shut the cuticle down and create more shine.

Flat Iron

The right iron temperature is the difference between achieving a lovely style or creating an unwelcomed disaster. To know exactly what temperature your iron is set at, your appliance will need to have a guide or heat control setting. Most irons with an on/off only button are automatically set to a very high temperature. If your hair texture is thin and fine, or if you have chemically damaged hair, you’ll want to keep the heat setting between 200° and 300° F. For normal to medium-textured hair, you can increase the heat up to 350° F.Thicker, more coarse hair types can withstand up to 375° F. Regardless of your hair type or texture, never go over 400° F.

Jyl Craven is owner of Jyl Craven Hair Design of Canton. 770-345-9411. JylCraven.com

Curling Iron

While the same general temperature settings apply as with the flat iron, the type of curl you want to achieve may cause you to want to increase the temperature. You may find yourself holding the iron in a position to lock in the curl, but this can be achieved with proper sectioning. If your goal is tighter curls, use smaller sections. Looser curls call for larger sections. Smaller sections also mean less heat, 225° to 325° F. For larger sections, you can increase the heat up to 375° F while keeping the iron continuously moving. Yes, too much heat can cause us to overcook our steak, or shrink or scald our favorite cotton T-shirt, but too much heat on our hair is far from one of life’s little plights. So, next time you turn on your favorite hair care appliance, ask yourself, “Do I go hot or not?” L

Appliance Hair Care Guide Appliance Texture

Temperature

Blow Dryer

Thin/Fine Medium Normal/Medium High Thick/Coarse High

Flat Iron

Thin/Fine 200°- 300° Normal/Medium 300°- 350° Thick/Coarse 325°- 375°

Curling Iron Thin/Fine 225°- 250° (Tight Curls) Normal/Medium 250°- 275° Thick/Coarse 275°- 325° Curling Iron Thin/Fine 300°- 325° (Loose Curls) Normal/Medium 325°- 350° Thick/Coarse 350° - 375°

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hen a company is founded on the philosophy of “always do the right thing,” good things happen. For the client, heating and cooling issues are resolved the right way. For the company, it earns a well-deserved A+ Better Business Bureau rating and five stars from loyal customers. For the community — the organizations and charities within it become the beneficiaries. A company like this thrives amongst us in Cherokee county: Southern Air Pro is that company. The husband and wife team of Zora and William Lewis created this customer-centric business in 2014. With well stocked vehicles and a product warehouse on Industrial Drive, their technicians are prepared to service, maintain, repair, or replace your HVAC equipment. Zora quietly steers the company from behind the scenes, and William handles the day-

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

to-day operations. Partnered with Lennox, this team prides itself on being able to offer its customers the quietest and most efficient heating and cooling products at a great value. Southern Air Pro’s staff of veterans and first responders understand timely service and selfless dedication. Collectively, they have served in the Navy, Army, and Cherokee County Fire Department. With almost two decades in the HVAC industry and extensive electronics training, William understands and can fix even the most advanced cooling and heating systems. As for Southern Air Pro’s service techs, Geordan is currently completing intensive training to become a Lennox Factory-Certified Technician, and Georgio — with eighteen years of experience — is one of the most qualified lead installers in the area.

According to William, they are just as dedicated to the community as they are to the customers they serve. “Zora and I are proud that the company was able to support charities like Heavens Gait and Camp Southern Ground last year. We are looking forward to doing more this year to support such great organizations,” said William. An active member and investor in Main Street Woodstock, and locally owned and operated by down to earth, good people who enjoy giving back, Southern Air Pro is the company to call for your HVAC needs.

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ArtistProfile BY HANNAH OLSON

Quilter’s Handmade Blankets Honor Son’s Memory and Give Back

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hen her twenty-two-year-old son died, Wanda Richardson looked for a way to honor his memory and restore her mind. That is when she took up quilting with her mom and sister. Together, they took local quilting classes as a meaningful way to spend time together. Since then, Richardson has made hundreds of quilts for family, friends, and neighbors. “Quilting is not just having a blanket,” Richardson says. “Quilting is a social

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event, a source of pride for the maker, and a great opportunity for gifting.” Richardson has made every kind of quilt from baby blankets and lap quilts to king-sized wedding quilts and decorative wall hangings. Some of her more memorable gift quilts have been the retirement quilts she has made for close friends and retiring teachers. Richardson, now retired, used to teach middle school science and literature. She now teaches her granddaughters and grandson the exciting craft of quilting. “It is good to have something new to learn as we age,” Richardson

says. Quilting has become a way for Richardson to stay young and give back to her community. A big way that Richardson gives back to her community is through her membership with the Etowah Valley Quilt Guild, a chapter of the Georgia Quilt Council located in Cartersville, GA. Involvement with her Guild means that Richardson gets to learn more about her craft through Guildsponsored seminars and classes as well as participate in community outreach opportunities. Richardson and her fellow Guild members donate items for

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women’s shelters, blankets for children who are victims of house fires, “conquer quilts” for children with cancer, and infant supplies for prenatal units. When she is not gathering donations for those in need or sewing around the quilt circle with her friends from the Etowah Valley Quilt Guild, Richardson enjoys time at home in the log cabin she and her husband built. Hanging on either side of the door in the entrance to her cabin are beautifully embroidered, decorative quilts, warmly welcoming the season and the friends who gather beneath them.

For more information about the Etowah Valley Quilt Guild, visit EtowahValleyQuiltGuild.com.

Hannah Olson is a student in the MFA creative writing program at Reinhardt University. 770-7205582. Reinhardt.edu/Graduate/ MFA-CW/

Serving Woodstock, including Towne Lake

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What Causes

By Atlanta Hand Specialist Staff

[HealthyLife] The elbow functions as a hinge for your arm, allowing movement and ease of range of motion. It is a joint composed of a complex set of bones and muscles like the biceps and triceps. When these muscles, tendons, nerves, and bones are injured or irritated, it can cause mild to severe elbow pain. Because elbow pain is a general term, there are many factors that could be the culprit. Usually, elbow pain is caused by injuries incurred during sports or accidents, or sometimes — disease.

Common causes of elbow pain include the following: ä Tendonitis ä Olecranon bursitis ä A sprained or broken elbow ä Various forms of arthritis ä Cellulitis ä Tumors ä Nerve entrapment ä Tennis elbow ä Golfer’s elbow ä Dislocation ä Radial tunnel syndrome ä Overuse due to occupation or hobby

While symptoms vary on a scale from mild to severe, many of the signs and indicators are the same. Patients should see a doctor for the following reasons: ä Severe pain present in the joint ä Swelling or bruising occurs ä Trouble moving the arm normally ä Pain doesn’t improve after a few days ä Pain is present even when the elbow is not in motion

Patients should seek immediate emergency care if there are signs of a deformity in the elbow or if a bone is protruding. Causes of elbow pain can be diagnosed several ways through techniques like a physical exam, x-ray, CT scan, MRI, EMG, and sometimes a biopsy if fluid is present in the joint. Treatment plans differ depending on a patient’s diagnosis. Usually, elbow pain is not serious and can be treated at home with rest, ice, compression bandages, anti-inflammatory medications, and elevating the elbow to reduce swelling. If hospitalization or a doctor’s visit is necessary, in-office treatments range from steroid injections and medications to surgery. Atlanta Hand Specialist is located in Canton, Marietta, Smyrna and Douglasville. 770-333-7888. AtlantaHandSpecialist.com

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

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Looking Back on 2017

in Downtown Woodstock By Mitzi Saxon

M

ain Street Woodstock is a nationally accredited membership organization dedicated to the revitalization of the historic commercial district through preservation-based economic development initiatives. The Main Street movement encompasses a four-point approach, which focuses on economic vitality, design, promotion, and organization. When these four elements are implemented correctly, the perfect environment for strong downtown development is created. Main Street Woodstock programs help promote local businesses and also help citizens develop as individuals. Their Learn & Work initiative hosts Downtown Buzz (a monthly networking and community update breakfast); Excursion (themed familiarization tours to sites within greater Woodstock); Main Event (a quarterly, after-hours, networking event hosted by a Main Street investor); Mastermind (a quarterly, relevant, business training opportunity); and Pivot (an intensive, all-inclusive trip to study the best practices in another community).

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

Main Street grows the community through beautification and community projects such as a year-round, weekly farmers market that is limited to local growers, Friday Night Live, and Main Street Gives. Young Professionals of Woodstock hosts Lunch and Learn meetings, the annual Jingle Mingle, sneak peeks of local businesses, and weekly morning coffee meetings. Looking back on 2017, Main Street Woodstock assisted in the opening of eight new businesses, twice as many as in 2016. The downtown district saw approximately 167 new homes built as compared to seventy the year prior. Main Street Woodstock hosted 226 events that were attended by 139,961 participants and consisted of over 60,000 volunteer hours. Downtown Woodstock has so much to be proud of. Don’t be fooled by the name of this organization — it isn’t just about Main Street; it’s about the entire downtown Woodstock area. Main Street Woodstock appreciates and supports all downtown businesses.

Woodstock has a variety of boutiques, restaurants, specialty shops, a bookstore, pharmacy, post office, and salons — all tucked into its vibrant, historic downtown. This is what makes Woodstock unique. This is why Money Magazine named Woodstock one of the “Top 50 Places to Live in the U.S.” The reason Main Street Woodstock is so successful is because of the downtown merchants, city leaders, countless volunteers, and event sponsors. Please be sure to enjoy everything downtown Woodstock has to offer. Destination Woodstock — A City Unexpected. For more information, please visit MainStreetWoodstock.org.

Mitzi Saxon is the downtown program manager for the City of Woodstock. 770-924-0406. MainStreetWoodstock.org

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The Truth About Gum Disease By Vishant Nath, D.M.D.

[HealthyLife] Though more common in adults, gum disease can occur in children in the form of gingivitis. It’s important to begin gum disease prevention in children, so they will carry good hygiene habits into adulthood. Gingivitis is the swelling of the gum tissue. It is caused by the surface buildup of bacteria and food particles on teeth, which leads to the development of a sticky substance called “plaque.” If not removed, plaque hardens to form tartar, which causes the redness and swelling of the gums that may sometimes bleed during brushing and flossing. If not treated, gingivitis can lead to

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chronic bad breath or the loosening of the teeth. If your child is experiencing any of these symptoms, see a pediatric dentist for treatment. Depending on the severity of the case, treatment can vary from a professional dental cleaning to a deep oral cleaning and antibiotics. Gingivitis can be prevented with good oral hygiene and twice yearly dental cleanings. As your child enters the teenage years, good oral hygiene becomes even more important. Teenagers are more susceptible to the development of gum disease since the gums become more sensitive with the hormone changes of adolescence. As gums become more

sensitive, your teenager may be less likely to want to brush and floss daily. As previously noted, gum disease is much more common in adult teeth, and the treatments and prevention differ from that in children. In adult teeth, the treatment can include scaling and root planing, which is deep dental cleaning that is performed to remove plaque from below the gum line. Normal brushing will not remove plaque that gets trapped in pockets below the gum line. Keep your children’s teeth healthy with disciplined daily hygiene as well as twice yearly visits to the dentist. These are the best tools you have to keep gum disease away.

Dr. Vishant Nath is the owner of Canton/Alpharetta/Roswell Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics. 678-352-1090. KidsHappyTeeth.com

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Ribbon Cuttings

Chamber Celebrates Award Winners at 47th Annual Meeting

Instant Imprints

2340 Towne Lake Parkway, Suite 110 Woodstock 678-695-7988 Embroidered Apparel & Promotional Products, Sign Companies

British Swim School North Atlanta

(Inside Gold’s Gym) 301 Gold Creek Trail Woodstock 770-765-5985 Education

Jamie Pritchett accepted North GA CPA Services’ Small Business of the Year Award, and Nelson Elder Care Law’s Cindy Nelson accepted her company’s Excellence in Customer Service Award.

Hill & Hill Financial, LLC 402 Creekstone Ridge Woodstock 770-672-0402 Retirement/Financial Planning

Janet Ponichtera of Family Life Publications was the Chairman’s Council Volunteer of the Year, and In Harmony Pediatric Therapy’s Kristi Estes and Jennifer Puckett accepted their company’s Going Green Business of the Year Award.

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Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

Stacy Benson & Company Metro Brokers 8265 Highway 92, Suite 101 Woodstock 678-971-9509 Real Estate Agents & Brokers

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770-Arborist Inside Back Anderson Dental 21 Atlanta Hand Specialist Inside Front British Swim School 55 Bug You No More 43 Camp Invention 55 Canton Arts Academy 30 C & T Auto Service 27 Cherokee Chorale 53 Dance Imagination 55 Dawn Sams, Realtor 27 Dr. Fixit, Ph.D. 53 Elm Street Cultural Arts Village 25 enAble of Georgia Foundation 35 Eyes on Towne Lake 19 Fire Stone Wood Fired Pizza & Grill 3 First Baptist Church Woodstock 31 Foot and Ankle Reconstruction 23 of North Georgia Georgia All-Stars Gymnastics 55 Hide and Seek Day Camp 51 Ivy Manor Interiors 51 Jeffrey L. Jackson, CPA, LLC 3 Jyl Craven Hair Design 1 Landscape Matters 30 LGE Community Credit Union 36-37 Maple Leaf Lawn Care and Pest Control 43 Main Street Nail Studio 56 Masterpiece Framer 27 Nature’s Corner Market 33 North Georgia OB/GYN Specialists 13 Northside Cherokee Orthopedics 11 & Sports Medicine Northside Cherokee Pediatrics 5 Northside Heart 3 Northside Vascular Surgery 11 Outdoor Living, Indoor Comfort, LLC 38 & 39 Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics 42 and Dentistry at Canton Perimeter North Medical Associates 19 Plastic Surgery Center of the South 51 The Service League of Cherokee County 39 Dancing for the Children Southern Air Pro, LLC 47 Summit Financial Solutions 31 Taste and Sound of Woodstock 16 Todd Hayes for Solicitor General Cover, 28-29 Towne Lake Primary Care Family Medicine 5 Tranquility Counseling Services 16 WellStar Health System Back Cover Woodstock Pediatric Medicine 34 56

Woodstock Family Life | MARCH 2018

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