Page 1


Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

1


Contents

April 2018

VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 9

24-25

[24-25]

On the Cover:

St. George Village

32-33

Savory Herb Gardening

44-45

Building a Sustainable Home

[32-33]

Follow Us >>>

2

Family Life Publications

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

[44-45]

04

.......................... Perspective

06

............................. Calendar

12

........................ Public Safety

13

.................... Community Life

18

................... Senator Speaks

22

.................... Mayor’s Minute

26

.............. Community Partner

27

........................ Book Review

35

........... Roswell Photographic Society

38

........................ Artist Profile

47

................... Ribbon Cuttings

familylifepublications

@FamilyLifeMags

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

3


Publisher’s Perspective

ART Candice Williams Candice@FamilyLifePublications.com Laurie Litke Laurie@FamilyLifePublications.com SALES Janet Ponichtera Janet@FamilyLifePublications.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS State Senator John Albers, Mayor Mike Bodker, Jim Cheatham, Michael Consoli, Christopher R. Corwin, Kristi Estes, Lisa Ethridge, Micah Fowler, Joshua Fuder, Annell Gerson, Kevin Head, Amanda Kossick, Tina Morris, Vishant Nath, Christy Noll, Debra Robinson, Mike Reynolds, Mark Russell, Mark Tolbert

Family Life Publishing Group, Inc. 630 East Main Street Canton, GA 30114

770-213-7095

FamilyLifePublications.com Family Life publications have the largest monthly circulation of direct-mailed community magazines in our area. North Fulton Family Life is a monthly community magazine with a total print count of over 26,000, direct mailing over 24,000 copies to Roswell, Alpharetta and Milton. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists and submissions are not necessarily those of the editor/publisher, and the publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. The cover and its accompanying magazine content are a paid advertisement. North Fulton Family Life magazine is not responsible for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher.

IS

E R EC Y C

E

© 2018 All rights reserved.

AS

LE

Subscriptions are available for $25 per year. Please contact us for payment options.

TH

Each one of us has a bubble, and inside that personal space, we have the tools we need to reach beyond our fear, and move from (or often straight into) our unknowns. We can then propel ourselves towards newly discovered horizons. Some of us may fly higher, others may explore deeper, or venturing farther may prove to be the course for many. Whichever direction you find yourself moving in, keep going. One of the greatest blessings we can receive is the ability to harvest wisdom from our life. “Go confidently in the direction of your dreams,” said Thoreau. Challenge yourself. Discover. Define, and conquer your fear. Depths, heights, and long distances are only limited by your definition of space. There is always a bigger bubble waiting for you; be confident in your journey and blessed along your way.

EDITORIAL Julie Senger Julie@FamilyLifePublications.com

M AG A ZI

N

Looking Deeper Inside

Developing confidence was one of the largest underlying factors in overcoming the fear of water. It didn’t matter if the student was a toddler, teen, or senior — fear was always due to the unknown. It takes courage to get over fear, and it takes knowledge to gain confidence. Mom was one of the best at helping others learn about water, overcome their misconceptions, and cope with the fear to build that confidence. Once the fear was respected and addressed, it could be processed, understood, and overcome.

PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHER Jack Tuszynski Jack@FamilyLifePublications.com

PLE

G

rowing up, I was fortunate to learn to swim shortly after learning to walk. Being a member of a family that enjoyed the outdoors and respected nature, water became my second home. My mother, Bonnie, taught swimming lessons for many years at our home on Toonigh Road. Watching her help others learn to enjoy water and build confidence was a big part of my early years.

Jack Tuszynski, Publisher

4

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

5


Calendar APRIL Ongoing Alive in Roswell — On the third Thursday of each month, April – October, this FREE, family-friendly festival features live bands, food trucks, kids games, face painting, balloons, etc. Enjoy participation from the many boutiques, small businesses, and restaurants surrounding the venues. 5:00-9:00pm, Canton Street and the historic Town Square. 678-591-2610. AliveInRoswell.com Roswell Farmers and Artisans Market — Every Saturday through October, this local farmers market is a one-stop-shop for fresh produce and handmade goods. It also features dog adoptions, yoga classes, chef demos, and baking contests. Held rain or shine. FREE! 8:00am-12:00pm, Roswell City Hall, 38 Hill Street, 404-4929938. RoswellFAM.com Alpharetta Farmers Market — Shop local at the Alpharetta Farmers Market, featuring food vendors including produce, grass-fed meats, cheese, baked goods, and more. 8:30am1:00pm, 1 South Main, Alpharetta. AlpharettaFarmersMarket.com

1-30

Roswell Azalea Festival — Numerous activities, exhibits, receptions, and events take place at various times throughout the city. Roswell. RoswellAzaleaFestival.com

6

Spring Art Stroll at the Galleries of the Roswell Art District — Join the galleries of the Roswell Art District with

6

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Food Truck Alley — Each Thursday April 13 through October 20 (except May 3), this weekly gathering will have a variety of rotating food trucks, music, and fun children’s activities. 5:00-9:00pm, parking available at 37 Old Roswell Street, Milton Center on Milton Avenue and 2 South Main Street, Alpharetta. 678-297-6000. Alpharetta.Ga.us

Fitness in the Park Series — Each Saturday morning, instructors will help guide you through Yoga, Zumba, Pilates, and boot camps. Enjoy an hour of fitness for all ages and levels. This will take place at various Roswell parks. FREE! Check website for locations and times. RoswellGov.com/wellness

ECO-TINKER Interactive Exhibits — Through the end of May, enjoy five stations where you can experiment and explore. These exhibit stations focus on the science of water. There’s plenty to play with while you learn at these STEM stations. Monday-Saturday 10:00am-5:00pm, Sunday 12:00-5:00pm, Chattahoochee Nature Center, 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell. 770-992-2055, x238. ChattNatureCenter.org

Alpharetta Business Association (ABA) Power Breakfast — On the first Tuesday of every month, enjoy a networking meeting at Smokejack. You will have an opportunity to present information about your company to other Alpharetta business professionals. The fee is $10 for ABA members and $15 for guests/ non-members. Reservations are required. 7:30-8:30am, Smokejack BBQ, 29 South Main Street, Alpharetta. 678-865-6608. AlpharettaBusinessAssociation.com

Bike Roswell! Saturday Morning Ride — This is a no-drop, 25-mile recreational bike ride through Roswell and along the river featuring some difficult climbs followed by flats. This route is for experienced riders. 8:00-11:00am, parking lot next to Roswell North Elementary, 10517 Woodstock Road. LWalker@bikeroswell. com. BikeRoswell.com

Alpharetta Business Association (ABA) Business After Hours — On the last Thursday of every month, business owners gather for networking opportunities. This event is free for ABA members and $10 for guests. 5:30-7:00pm, Harry Norman Realtors, 7855 North Point Parkway, #100, Alpharetta. 678-865-6608. AlpharettaBusinessAssociation.com

show openings, artist meet and greets, live music, and food/drinks, offering an immersive art experience. Galleries include gallery43, MUSE & Co., My Art Studio & Gallery, Synergy Fine Art Gallery, Taylor Kinsel, and Vinings Gallery. 6:00-9:00pm, Roswell Art District, Canton & Oak Streets, Roswell. RoswellArtDistrict.com

Chattahoochee Nature Center, 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell. 770-992-2055, x238. ChattNatureCenter.org

6-7

Spring Native Plant Sale — Going native provides a wealth of benefits to your space including privacy, beauty, blossoms, food, and homes to Georgia’s wide diversity of animals. There will be over 120 species of plants available with FREE admission to the garden area. 10:00am-5:00pm,

6 & 28

Fantabulous Band ATL — Enjoy great food and live music from the 60s through today performed by Atlanta’s hottest party band, Fantabulous! Comprised of musicians with more than 100 years of combined professional music experience, Fantabulous performs songs from multiple genres including pop, country, R & B, and rock, so there is sure to be something for everyone. 10:00pm, Wild Wing Café, 5530 Windward Parkway, Alpharetta. 678-7700029. FantabulousBand.com

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


7

A Taste for Art at The Gallery of Arts Center East Gallery — Enjoy a variety of wines and chef-made tapas, as you make your selection and bid on original artworks including azaleas/ florals, landscapes, still life, and abstractions in a variety of media. $5 per person. 7:00-9:30pm, East Roswell Recreation Center, 9100 Fouts Road, Roswell. RFAA.org

7-11

Cheryl & Co. GHJA Local Horse Show — This is a local Georgia Hunter Jumper rated show. Riders come from all over the southeast to participate and compete in classes and to be judged by nationally ranked judges from throughout the United States. 8:00am6:00pm, Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road, Alpharetta. 678-2976122. Facebook.com/showwiththeco/

8

A Novel Idea — Five local authors will gather to read excerpts from their bestselling novels. The theme is southern writers. Hear authors Mary Ann Hopper, Haywood Smith, Julia Franks, Janet Hogan Chapman, and Deborah Mantella. Door prizes will be given away. This event is FREE and open to the public. 6:30-8:30pm, Alpha Soda, 11760 Haynes Bridge Road, Alpharetta. 770-442-3102.

9 & 23

Roswell United Methodist Church Job Networking — This event includes job networking, dinner, a keynote speaker, a mini job fair, and other additional activities. 12:30-9:00pm, Roswell United Methodist Church, 814 Mimosa Boulevard, Roswell. 770-993-6218. RUMCJobNetworking.com

10, 17

Artists in the Wild — Observe painters from Roswell Fine Arts Alliance working ‘en plein air.’ Artists focus on gardens and picturesque spaces. 10:00am-5:00pm, Chattahoochee Nature Center, 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell. 770-992-2055, x238. ChattNatureCenter.org

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

12-29

Buddy - The Buddy Holly Story — This musical tells the true story of Buddy’s meteoric rise to fame until his tragic death on the “The Day the Music Died.” The show features over twenty of Buddy Holly’s greatest hits. Wednesday 7:30pm, Thursday & Friday 8:00pm, Saturday 4:00pm & 8:00pm, Sunday 2:30pm, Roswell Cultural Arts Center, 950 Forrest Street, Roswell. 770641-1260. GET.org

14

Beyond My Stone — Enjoy a wonderful evening of meeting Roswell citizens from the past. Sponsored by Roswell Historical Society, diverse cast members share amazing stories. Reservations are required. 5:00pm, Old Roswell Cemetery, 100 Woodstock Street, Roswell. 770-992-1665. RoswellHistoricalSociety.org

14

17th Annual Run the River 5k — Enjoy a scenic run/walk along the Chattahoochee River in this event benefitting HomeStretch’s mission of providing housing, education, and hope to homeless families. All ages, strollers, and pets welcome. 7:30am, St. Andrew Catholic Church, 675 Riverside Road, Roswell.770-642-9185. HomeStretch.org

14

Pitch, Hit, & Run — Johns Creek youngsters can challenge their baseball or softball skills at this Major League Baseball (MLB) competition. This is open to children ages 7-14. Those who compete will have a chance to advance, with national finalists competing at the 2018 All Star Game. 10:00am-12:00pm, Ocee Park, 10900 Buice Road, Johns Creek. 678-512-3200. JohnsCreekGa. gov/RecreationandParks/Special-Events/ Pitch,-Hit-and-Run

14

ArtAround Roswell Opening Celebration — Roswell Arts Fund premieres the third annual ArtAround Roswell Sculpture Tour, featuring ten

original works of art on display throughout the Roswell community. These temporary exhibits will join six permanent sculptures purchased from previous tours. The event will feature live entertainment, interactive games, food trucks, arts and crafts, King of PopsTM popsicles, and more. 11:30am-2:30pm, Riverside Park, 575 Riverside Road, Roswell. 770-817-6674. RoswellArtsFund.org

14-28

The Jungle Book — Mowgli is rambunctious and curious, scrappy, and silly. This new adaptation finds a child lost in the Indian jungle where he is adopted by Baloo the Bear, Bagheera the Panther, and all the beasts who call the mysterious wilderness home. Saturday 11:00am, Roswell Cultural Arts Center, 950 Forrest Street, Roswell. 770-641-1260. GET.org

15

Polo Under the Lights — Eat, sip and mingle while watching an exhibition polo match under the lights. Enjoy music, a bonfire, and an after party with the players. Bring chairs/blankets for lawn seating, BYOB, a sweater, or blanket because it cools off after sundown. FREE! Reserved seating available. 6:0010:00pm, Chukkar Farm Polo Club, 1140 Liberty Grove Road, Alpharetta. 770-3143735. ChukkarFarmPoloClub.com

15-29

Azalea Pop Music Series — A series of outdoor band concerts presented by the Southern Trilogy. Bring a lawn chair and a picnic, kick back, and enjoy the music! FREE! 1:00-4:00pm, April 15 at Barrington Hall, 535 Barrington Drive, Roswell; April 22 at Bulloch Hall, 180 Bulloch Avenue, Roswell; and April 29 at Smith Plantation, 935 Alpharetta Highway, Roswell. RoswellGov.com

20 & 22

Spring Classic Dog Agility Trial — Designed to demonstrate a dog’s willingness to work with his handler in a variety of situations, agility is an [continued on page 8] WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

7


[continued from page 7] athletic event that requires conditioning, concentration, training, and teamwork. Dogs and handlers must negotiate an obstacle course while racing against the clock. 8:00am-4:30pm, Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road, Alpharetta. 470-302-3633. AtlantaObedienceClub.org

20 & 21

Safety Kids Program Presented by Roswell Fire & Police Departments — Children learn to be aware of their surroundings, focus on pedestrian safety, fire safety, and personal safety. Lessons include real life experiences. This is a parent and child program. Parents do not need to register but must be an active participant. $6 for residents; $9 for nonresidents. Friday 5:30-7:00pm, Saturday 9:30-11:00am, East Roswell Recreation Center, 9000 Fouts Road. 770-641-3727. RoswellGov.com

21

Roswell Area Park Fishing Derby — Calling all fishermen and women, young and old! There will be various prize categories by age. Grand prizes will be awarded for the heaviest catfish and bass. $6 for residents; $9 for non-residents. 8:00am-12:00pm, Roswell Area Park Lake, 10495 Woodstock Road, Roswell. WebTrac. ci.roswell.ga.us/wbwsc/webtrac.wsc/search. html?module=ar&primarycode=31115

21

Historic Hembree Farm Pancake Breakfast — Pancakes, sausage, and beverages will be served. Proceeds benefit the restoration of the Roswell Historical Society’s Historic Hembree Farmhouse. Please call for prices and reservations. 8:00-10:30am, Lebanon Baptist Church, 11250 Crabapple Road, Roswell. 770-992-1665. RoswellHistoricalSociety.org

21

Heart and Sole 5k — Walk, run, or catch a ride in a stroller to the finish line at this race benefitting The Lionheart School. 7:30am, Avalon, 2200 Avalon Boulevard, Alpharetta. 770-7651000. ExperienceAvalon.com

9th Annual Cars & ‘Q for the Cause — This is an awardwinning car show and party hosted by Choate Construction to support the Georgia Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF). Well known for its stellar cars, super BBQ, craft brews, and sweet music, this fundraiser raised over $325,000 for CFF last year. 4:00pm, Choate Construction, 8200 Roberts Drive, Atlanta. CarsnQ.com

21

21

21

Johns Creek International Festival — This FREE community event will feature restaurants and food trucks, vendors, an international beer and wine garden, live music, dance performances, and fun kids’ activities. 11:00am-8:00pm, Atlanta Athletic Club fields, 1930 Bobby Jones Drive, Johns Creek. 678-512-3200. JCInternationalFest.com

21

Tillman Honor Run — Join the Arizona State University Alumni Georgia Chapter to run or walk 4.2 miles, and raise money to support the Tillman Scholar program. 8:00-11:00am, North Point Mall, 1000 North Point Circle, Alpharetta.770-740-9273. Eventbrite. com/e/atlanta-tillman-honor-runregistration-41861924142

8

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Atlanta Baroque Orchestra — ABO’s Artistic Administrator and Violinist Evan Few takes the helm as guest director for this concert celebrating music of 17th- and 18th-century Rome. Selections from Arcangelo Corelli’s beloved concerti grossi and a variety of other gems from members of this circle. 4:00-6:00pm, St. David’s Episcopal Church, 1015 Old Roswell Road, Roswell. Info@AtlantaBaro. AtlantaBaroque.org

21

Family Reunion Workshop — The Alpharetta Convention and Visitors Bureau family reunion specialist will help attendees gain insight into the planning process and show how Alpharetta’s easy access, mild climate, exceptional facilities, and world-class shopping, dining, and entertainment make it the perfect location

for fun-filled special events. FREE! 10:00am1:00pm, Hilton Garden Inn Atlanta/ North Alpharetta, 4025 Windward Plaza, Alpharetta. 678-297-2811.

21-29

Bike Roswell! Cycling Festival — Recreational rides, educational events, and thrilling races highlight this exciting, action-packed event. Various times & locations in Roswell. RoswellCyclingFestival.com

23

Joe Gransden and His 16-Piece Big Band — Joe and his band are back for another series of big band jazz concerts. 8:00pm, Roswell Cultural Arts Theatre, 950 Forrest Street, Roswell. 770641-1260. GET.org

27-5/6

Spring Bird Seed Fundraiser Orders — Just in time for the Great Backyard Bird Count, fill your feeders with Cole’s premium birdseed to help benefit the Chattahoochee Nature Center. Orders can be placed online or at the Nature Store during regular business hours. Chattahoochee Nature Center, 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell. 770992-2055, x238. ChattNatureCenter.org

28

2018 Garden Faire at Bulloch Hall — Enjoy a pass-a-long plant sale grown by North Fulton Master Gardeners as well as plant and garden art vendors, a vintage fleatique, bake sale, food vendors, and live music. 9:00am-4:00pm, Bulloch Hall, 180 Bulloch Avenue, Roswell. 678-3100873. NFMG.net/garden-faire.html

28

DEA Drug Take Back Day — Safely dispose of expired, unused, or unwanted medications at this event, hosted by the Milton Police Department. 10:00am2:00pm, Target, 13055 Highway 9 N., Milton, 678-242-2527. CityOfMiltonGa.us

28

Milton Rock for Rescues — Combining Milton’s love of

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


music and animals, this new FREE, community festival will showcase a variety of local rock bands, shopping at Crabapple retailers, delicious wares from food and beverage trucks, and more fun activities. All proceeds from this event will benefit local 501(c)3 non-profit animal rescue organizations. 12:00-6:00pm, Broadwell Road, Milton. Courtney.Spriggs@cityofmiltonga.us. RockForRescues.org

29

Bike Roswell! Mayor’s Ride — This full-supported, recreational bike ride fundraiser will offer distances of 18, 42, and 64 miles. 8:00am, Roswell Area Park, 10495 Woodstock Road, Roswell. BikeRoswell.com/ridesmaps/mayorsride/

29

Roswell Moves! An Open Streets Event — A five-block section of Canton Street in historic downtown Roswell, from the south end of Canton Street to Webb Street, Elizabeth Way, Norcross Street, the New East Alley, Plum Street, and North Canton Street will be closed to motorized vehicles from 10:00am-4:00pm. This innovative experience encourages people to explore the community by walking, pedaling, rolling, and even playing. Activities from 11:00am-3:00pm. Live music will be located on two stages along Canton Street near Highway 9 and on North Canton near Woodstock Road, Roswell. BikeRoswell.com

MAY

3

28th Annual Taste of Alpharetta — Dine at more than sixty restaurants in one unforgettable night that has become an annual tradition for 35,000 families, foodies, and festival-goers. Sample delicious appetizers, entrees, and desserts. Experience the culinary arts stage area featuring chef competitions and cooking demonstrations. Dance to live music. Play at the Fun Zone. FREE admission, shuttles, and parking. 5:00-10:00pm, Old Canton Street, downtown Alpharetta. AwesomeAlpharetta.com/taste-ofalpharetta/

4&5

Home By Dark Concert — Michael Logen and JP Williams tell the stories behind their songs in this songwriters-in-the-round concert event that often proves how just one song can change your life. 6:00pm, Chukkar Farm Polo Club, 1140 Liberty Grove Road, Alpharetta. 770-314-3735. ChukkarFarmPoloClub.com

5

10th Annual Down Home Derby — At this great fundraiser, enjoy a live viewing of the Kentucky Derby, bid on live and silent auction items, play fun games, and hear live music by The Relix. 5:00-9:30pm, Shannondale Farm, 2395 Birmingham Road, Milton. 770-9924006. CDAKids.org

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

9


LIBRARY EVENTS AFPLS.org ALPHARETTA

10 Park Plaza, Alpharetta, 404-613-6735

MILTON

855 Mayfield Road, Milton, 404-613-4402

FRIENDS OF THE ALPHARETTA LIBRARY BOOK SALE April 7, 10:00am-4:00pm, Alpharetta Discover bargains galore! All proceeds support the library and library programs! COLORS OF LIFE April 8, 2:30pm, Milton Join other local poets, writers, and musicians, as they share their writings and other creative works. All ages are welcome. MOVE IT TO LOSE IT! April 13 & 20, 11:00am, Roswell Learn how to strengthen your muscles and improve mobility. This class is for those who may have difficulty moving or want a gentle work out to work on strength and health. This is for adults and seniors. KIDS & FINANCES SATURDAY April 14, 2:00pm, Roswell Stephanie Fleetwood will address balancing your checking account, savings, and good spending habits. This is for ages 11-18. ADULT ART CLASS April 14, 2:30pm, East Roswell Create a canvas project while enjoying coffee in a relaxed atmosphere. All levels are welcome. Out of the Box Art Studio will present this class. Reservations are required. CHEF LYNN COOKING DEMO April 16, 6:00pm, Alpharetta Chef Lynn will discuss superfoods. Free samples will be given to all participants. Registration is suggested. All adults are welcome. ATLANTA FLUTE ENSEMBLE SPRING CONCERT April 18, 10:30am, Northeast/Spruill Oaks Enjoy a variety of pleasant tunes by this local favorite. This is for adults and children ages 8+. Reservations are required.

10

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

NORTHEAST/SPRUILL OAKS 9560 Spruill Road, Johns Creek, 770-360-8820

OCEE 5090 Abbotts Bridge Road, Johns Creek, 770-360-8897

HERBAL PLAY DOUGH WITH THE UGA EXTENSION April 18, 4:30pm, Northeast/Spruill Oaks Students will learn to identify household herbs and spices, and then will make their own naturally colored and scented play dough to take home. This is for ages 6-11. Reservations are required.

ROSWELL

115 Norcross Street, Roswell, 770-640-3075

EAST ROSWELL

2301 Holcomb Bridge Road, Roswell, 404-613-4050

FURRY FUN WITH FURKIDS ANIMAL RESCUE April 22, 10:30am-2:00pm, Ocee Furkids Animal Rescue and Shelters will be on-site with some of their cutest pups for an educational adoption event. Learn about the importance of adoption, pet ownership tips, and maybe even take home a new Furkid of your own!

EARTH DAY CELEBRATION April 18, 3:30pm, East Roswell Hear the story of The Lorax by Dr. Suess; participate in a recycling relay race; and make a seed bomb craft. Reservations are required. This is for ages 6-12.

FOREIGN FILM NIGHT April 26, 5:30pm, Alpharetta The film will be shown in the library’s auditorium on the lower level. All are welcome. Children under 14 should be accompanied by an adult.

GARDENING WORKSHOP — GROWING HERBS AND VEGETABLES April 19, 6:00-7:30pm, Ocee Learn how to grow delicious and nutritious herbs and veggies in your own garden. All ages and experience levels welcome.

HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY JOB FAIR April 26, 3:00-5:00pm, Ocee Top Job Hospitality will host this job fair in which employers are searching for part-time and full-time positions in the hospitality industry including banquet servers and stewards.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST — A TRAVELING THEATER PRODUCTION April 21, 11:00am, Milton The Hampstead Theatre Company will present their retelling of this classic tale. Seats and tickets are limited. This is for ages 5+.

3RD ANNUAL PUP PARADE April 28, 11:00am, Milton Bring your well-mannered, leashed, and vaccinated dog to the library for the Pup Parade! Photos will be taken, and you and your pup can meet and greet new friends. The parade will be outdoors. All ages are welcome.

ATLANTA AUTHORS Saturday, April 21,2:00 pm Join the community in a reading by a local and renowned author Colleen Oakley about her work. Close Enough to Touch. Register at AtlantaAuthors. eventbrite.com. This is for adults. SOCIAL SECURITY WORKSHOP WITH DEBBIE DORMAN AND CURT SPINNEY April 21, 1:00pm, East Roswell April 28, 1:00pm, Alpharetta Financial Planners Debbie Dorman and Curt Spinney will provide an overview of Social Security as well as answer some of the most common questions. Registration is suggested. All adults are welcome.

TEEN ART PROJECT WITH LESLIE MURPHY April 28, 3:00pm, Milton Enjoy the great outdoors, and celebrate nature through art in this fun workshop. Study the beautiful oak tree and surrounding landscape, as you strengthen your drawing skills while exploring charcoal and chalk media. This is for ages 12-18. Space is limited; email Liane.Wagner@ fultoncountyga.gov to sign up. ACRYLIC PAINTING April 28, 10:30am, Northeast/Spruill Oaks Try your hand at this art medium with instructor Jency Sekaran. This is for adults and teens. Reservations are required.

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Summer Learning Loss by the Numbers By Mark Tolbert

[AcademicLife] Children look forward to the last day of school with almost as much excitement as they look forward to Christmas. “No more reading!” “No more writing!” “No more Math!” they chant. Children view the summer months as a time to sit around playing video games and running around outside — not as a time to keep their brains sharp. And while it is important for children to unwind from the school year and spend quality time with their families, it is equally important that they continue exercising their critical thinking skills. Research is very clear that “summer brain drain,” or learning loss over the summer, is not only real — it’s a major problem facing students. “During the summer months, it is vital for students to keep their minds active and engaged for myriad reasons,” explains Alexandra McMullen, director of the Junior

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

Leadership Academy at St. Andrew’s School in Barrington, RI.

By the numbers, here is the impact of summer learning loss: 2.6 months of math skills are lost over

the summer.

2 months of reading comprehension skills are lost over the summer. 2 months is the amount of time an average student needs to get back on track. 6 weeks in the fall are spent by schools reteaching skills lost over the summer. First grade students are affected, especially with the introduction of Common Core. Sixth grade students who have experienced summer learning loss average two years behind their peers.

enrolling your child into an individualized summer program to help him/her build the academic skills essential to succeed in school. A good program will give your child a comprehensive academic evaluation to pinpoint his/her strengths and weaknesses and then tailor a program to meet specific needs.

Mark Tolbert is executive director of Huntington Learning Center in Alpharetta. 678-240-9221. Alpharetta. HungtingtonHelps.com

So, what is a parent to do? Consider

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

11


TECHNOLOGY FRAUD and Senior Citizens By Jim Cheatham

I

t happens often — someone calls an elderly couple on the phone and convinces them that they are a representative from a well-known company that the couple normally does business with. This “representative” proceeds to tell the elderly couple about a made-up problem and asks them for personal information and credit card numbers to help fix the situation. And before the couple can figure out what has happened to them, a considerable amount of their money goes missing, credit gets ruined, and then the whole mess must be cleaned up by spending countless hours on the phone with banks, credit card companies, attorneys, etc. The internet and personal technology can be confusing enough, but when it’s constantly changing and updating, it can be difficult to stay ahead of the curve. Scammers take advantage of everyone, but they specifically target the elderly. Their goal is to confuse people and then appear to be the “good guy” by “helping” them out of a bogus situation they created.

It has been reported that as many as one 12 North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

in four people over the age of sixty have fallen victim to technology fraud. The victims are often too embarrassed to tell anyone that they fell for a scam, so the crime goes unreported. The people who commit these crimes are hard to trace because they are often out of state or even out of the country. Investigating technology fraud is extremely difficult. The best defense is to prevent these scams from ever happening. How can you prevent a scam from happening to you or your aging loved ones? Be an informed consumer. The National Council on Aging has a great website, NCOA.org, which has useful tips on how to avoid being defrauded. It also educates the public on the current trends and popular fraud scenarios that swindlers are using to take advantage of people. Here are some tips on how to prevent technology fraud:

Jim Cheatham is the chief public affairs officer for the Alpharetta Department of Public Safety. Alpharetta.Aa.us/ publicsafety

Do not give out your personal information to anybody who calls or contacts you. Legitimate companies do not call and ask for personal information, and if they do, they will not have a problem with you hanging up and calling them back on a number that you have used in the past (not the one they just gave you). Be very cautious of the internet, and don’t click on things unless you are sure the company is authentic. Swindlers make their websites look just like the real ones. When in doubt, close the web page, and disconnect from the internet.

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Community New Home for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Atlanta nonprofits Jewish Family & Career Services (JF&CS) and Camp Twin Lakes recently announced the opening and full licensure of a new group home for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Eric M. Robbins Group Home at Camp Twin Lakes will provide support to individuals with the purpose of living as independently as possible and creating a year-round community where they can live, work, and play in an inclusive camp and community environment. “This is the ideal partnership allowing individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to have an affordable home of their own along with opportunities for employment and community involvement,” said LaWanda Crawl, JF&CS’ Director of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services. The organizations are actively looking for the following: •

• •

Residents to live in the new home, located in Rutledge, Georgia, about 45 minutes east of Atlanta. The home is fully compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Home care workers and house managers to support the individuals in their home Employment opportunities within the local community for the individuals

With the support of the Community Foundation of Greater Atlanta, the JF&CS/Camp Twin Lakes partnership began in 2012 with collaborative discussions of building a house together for adults with developmental disabilities on land owned by Camp Twin Lakes. Together, they then collaborated to raise money for and build this unique group home. Finally, individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities from JF&CS’ IndependenceWORKS program began traveling to the new Camp Twin Lakes group home to assist with cleaning the cabins, providing them an opportunity to develop housekeeping skills. In addition, Helping Hands Ministry, located in Rutledge, donated appliances for the home. In 2015, the house was completed, and the process to get full licensure began. For more information about the Eric M. Robbins Group Home at Camp Twin Lakes, please contact LaWanda Crawl at 770-677-9420. Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

13


Community

High S with tyle Hear t

Recently, fab’rik Avalon showcased the brand’s in-house designed line, Asher, and hosted Asher designer Kristi Robinson to share about the heartbeat behind the collection. Launched in 2011, fab’rik’s Asher Collection is named for founder Dana Spionla’s adopted daughter who was abandoned on the side of the road in Ethiopia at six months old. A portion of proceeds from the Asher Collection help to fund basic needs, medical care, developmental therapy, and educational opportunities for orphans through Project 82 Kenya. Each of fab’rik’s 42 stores across the U.S. is paired with an Asher baby to provide financial support and lots of love until he or she finds a forever home.

Kali Kirkham Boatright is Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce’s New Leader Kali Kirkham Boatright has been chosen to serve as president and CEO of the Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce in Alpharetta. Kali previously served in the same position with the Douglas County Chamber of Commerce, a position she held since 2004. Boatright led the Douglas County Chamber from a near bankrupt organization when she arrived to a flourishing business organization with strong financial stability. To accomplish that success, she inspired staff and volunteers to create new sponsorship opportunities and events as well as a Chairman’s Club for membership investment and community engagement.

Congratulations to our March “7 Differences” winner, Karen Sims! 14

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


TOP 100 Boatright is a graduate of the U.S. Chamber’s Institute for Organization Management and a Georgia Certified Chamber Executive. In addition to her Chamber responsibilities, she currently serves as vice president of the Technical College Foundation Association of Georgia, chair of the Georgia Chamber Small Business Federation on the Georgia Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, executive board member of the Regional Business Coalition, and member of the WellStar Douglas Regional Health board.

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

Multiple North Fulton Cities Ranked in Top 100 Best Places to Live in Georgia Niche, which is a website that is dedicated to providing information to homebuyers about schools and neighborhoods to help them discover the best city for their needs, recently released its new ranking of best places to live Georgia. The top 100 communities in Georgia received grades of either A+ or A with 74 communities getting an A+ grade, and 26 communities receiving an A grade. Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Milton, and Roswell each were ranked in the top 100, and each received an A+ rating! To calculate the rankings and assign grades to communities, Niche looks at factors like the quality of local schools, crime rates, housing trends, employment statistics, and access to amenities. Niche gets its data from government sources like the Department of Education, the FBI, and the U.S. Census. For more information, visit Niche.com.

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

15


Community Senator John Albers Introduces the Senate School Safety Study Committee Sen. John Albers recently announced the creation of the Senate School Safety Study Committee. Senate President Pro Tempore Butch Miller (R – Gainesville), Senate Majority Leader Bill Cowsert (R – Athens), and other Senate Members joined Sen. Albers for the announcement. “Based on current events, we feel that it’s necessary to place a focus on school safety,” said Sen. Albers. “Each area of our state is unique, and this will not be a ‘one size fits all’ solution. We have to do what is best for each community to ensure that students can learn and thrive in an environment where they not only feel protected but are truly safe.” Senate Resolution 935 authorizes the formation of the study committee and outlines its membership and duties. The committee will consist of eight members who will study the conditions, needs, issues, and problems related to school safety. The committee will travel across the state, meeting with teachers, students, parents, first responders, community leaders, and experts to gain insight on ways to best serve and protect each community. Before the 2019 Legislative Session, the study committee will make legislative recommendations to the Senate focused on ensuring school safety. Sen. Albers, who serves as Chairman of the Public Safety Committee, introduced Senate Resolution 935, which passed out of the Senate Standing Rules Committee, making it eligible to be placed on the Senate Rules Calendar for a floor vote.

Crabapple Middle School Martin Luther King, Jr. Humanitarian Award Winner Seventh grader Jackson Smith was the student winner of Crabapple Middle School’s (CMS) Martin Luther King, Jr. (MLK, Jr.) Humanitarian Award. Jackson works tirelessly in the community with the Little Helpers organization and has volunteered as far away as Vietnam, spreading a message of compassion and service. Glenn Mize, Jackson Smith & Edward Klaas II The CMS staff winner was Glenn Mize. Glenn volunteers many untold hours in the school’s community garden and also willingly passes on the love of gardening to the students. The community winner is Edward Klaas II. Edward is a committed school business partner, parent, and community volunteer who donates his time to local projects and international missions.

16

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

City of Johns Creek Strives to become a Top City in Healthcare Innovation and Wellness The Johns Creek City Council recently voted unanimously to adopt a strategic focus on healthcare innovation and wellness, which it dubbed “iHeart Johns Creek.” The City Council noted that this aspiration is well-aligned with its mission for economic growth and fits the character of Johns Creek’s active and premier residential lifestyle. “iHeart Johns Creek recognizes the obvious,” said Johns Creek Mayor Mike Bodker. “It is a natural strength of our city that we can become a healthcare innovation and wellness destination of choice.” In its resolution to support and implement “iHeart Johns Creek,” the City Council noted that Johns Creek is already home to many businesses and professionals in the healthcare and wellness industry such as Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Alcon Laboratories, high-growth start-ups, private medical practices, active-adult to full-care facilities, as well as nutritional, spiritual, and physical wellness businesses. The resolution also highlights Johns Creek’s desire to seek a unique identity that builds on preserving its residential footprint, enhances opportunities for community engagement, supports business development and innovation opportunities. It also intends to leverage the city’s existing strengths and assets to create a lasting legacy for its residents. The City Council credited one local resident, Mr. Anand Thaker, for his vision and determination to create iHeart Johns Creek. Mr. Thaker developed the concept and then began the dialogue with City Council members, City staff members, local non-profits, and medical and business leaders throughout Johns Creek that led to its fruition. With the adoption of iHeart Johns Creek, the City Council has directed the staff to incorporate health and wellness into the city’s strategic planning framework and facilitate collaboration and partnerships with local business and residential organizations, neighboring cities, and other related organizations.

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

17


Senator Speaks

Legislative Session Accomplishments T By Senator John Albers

he 2018 Legislative Session was full of accomplishments for the people of Georgia. I would like to share some of what I have worked on during the session – sponsoring several bills that affect both my district and the entire state.

longer provide a ROI and should sunset on December 31, 2018. The third bill I sponsored is the Georgia Tax Credit Business Case Act (SB432), which relates a rolling sunset and evaluation process every five years.

In terms of statewide bills, three bills I sponsored are the direct result of recommendations made by the Senate Study Committee on Special Tax Exemption. Senate Bill 378, the Georgia Measuring Success Act, and Senate Bill 328 both relate to tax exemptions. Under the Georgia Measuring Success Act, any legislation that modifies existing tax incentives or proposes new ones must undergo a thorough financial analysis by both the bill’s author and the state auditor. Through a rigorous and responsible business case or “sunrise process,” SB378 will enhance fiscal notes to better measure effectiveness and return on investment (ROI).

I also sponsored a series of local bills to address an issue that many of my constituents have contacted me about: volatile property tax assessments. Senate Bills 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, and 317 address these concerns in the cities of Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Milton, Mountain Park, Roswell, and the Fulton County School District, respectively. These bills allow citizens in the cities in north Fulton the opportunity to vote later this fall on whether to cap property tax assessment increases at 3%. Representing small government at its finest, these bills return the decision-making power back to the citizens.

SB328 provides an expiration date on three tax credits currently in effect: Qualified Transportation Credit, Driver Education Tax Credit, and Diesel Particulate Emission Reduction Technology Equipment Credit. After careful analysis over the interim, the committee determined that these three credits no

18

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Along with handling tax issues, I sponsored legislation that will help state fire services operate more efficiently while receiving necessary resources and training. SB319, the Consolidation of Fire Safety Services in Georgia Act, and SB327, the Death Investigation Act, will each bring more efficiency to Georgia’s public servants. SB319 consolidates all

services related to fire safety under one mandate to streamline their functions into one department with a single focus. SB327 gives more oversight to medical examiners during the investigatory process and will free up resources needed to investigate serious crimes. As chairman of the Senate Public Safety Committee, protecting and serving our state’s public servants is one of my top priorities, and these bills will do just that. Another bill for our brave public servants is House Bill 38. This bill will provide a “veteran” designation on the license of service members receiving an honorable discharge. It will also make obtaining a driver’s license easier for veterans. These are just a few of the issues addressed this session. Please reach out with any questions, concerns, or comments. I look forward to working with you all during the interim to address the needs of our community. L

Senator John Albers represents the 56th Senate District, which includes portions of North Fulton County. 404463-8055. SenatorAlbers.com, John. Albers@Senate.Ga.gov

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Choosing the Best Toothpaste — What’s a RDA Value? By Amanda Kossick, D.M.D. Most of us walking down [HealthyLife] the dental aisle in the grocery store are completely overwhelmed by the toothpaste choices. How do we know which toothpaste is the right one? A lot of toothpaste selection is personal preference for taste and texture. Most toothpaste brands have fluoride in them, which the dental field highly recommends for tooth decay prevention. Other options can include whitening as well as sensitivity and tartar control. When you are weighing the pros and cons of the toothpaste you use at home, make sure you research the abrasiveness of the toothpaste online or by asking your dentist. Understanding how abrasive a toothpaste is is important because it can cause your enamel and dentin to be

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

“sanded” away, causing an overall increase in tooth sensitivity. The abrasiveness is assigned a relative dentin abrasiveness (RDA) value. There are tons of charts and lists online of popular toothpastes that indicate their score. Typically, whitening toothpastes will have a higher abrasive value. This is due to how they are “whitening” your teeth. These pastes are scrubbing the stain off, which is acceptable if it’s below a certain value. Using a whitening toothpaste with an exceptionally high RDA value over a long period of time can increase general tooth sensitivity and thin tooth enamel. The RDA values range from a 4 (a toothbrush with water) up to 200+ with Colgate® 2-in-1 Tartar Control and Whitening toothpaste. A value of 250 is regarded by the American

Dental Association as the harmful limit. Other factors that can increase tooth sensitivity and abrasion are the hardness of your toothbrush, how firmly you brush, acidic foods/drinks, and oral habits such as clenching, grinding, nail biting, and ice chewing. Considering all this information can help you decide which toothpaste would be the best choice for your habits and needs. When in doubt, ask your dentist or dental hygienist for a recommendation tailored to your situation.

Dr. Amanda Kossick is a dentist with DeMercy Dental in Roswell. 770-641-8010. DeMercyDental.com

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

19


We Must Crawl

Before We Walk By Kristi Estes

[HealthyLife] Oftentimes, parents will rave to friends and family about their child’s early walking skills. Although it is something to be excited about, a pertinent question to ask is whether this child ever crawled. Yes, walking is a great milestone, but crawling provides an important basis for so many other things in a child’s life. A child should begin crawling around 9-11 months. With everyone so concerned about SIDS, parents often do not give children enough tummy time, which, in turn, does not allow for strength development on

20

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

the stomach or in the hands and knees position — a precursor to crawling. Crawling is very important. The repetitive movement of alternating left and right sides stimulates parts of the brain that are important for learning, memory, comprehension, and attention. Crawling also helps with balance, hand/eye coordination, visual motor development and spatial relations (the child moves in the direction of a desired object and around obstacles), and binocular vision development (looking forward then back at hands). Additionally, crawling helps develop tolerance of different textures on hands such as grass, carpet, and sand. Some studies have correlated children who did not crawl as infants with things such as ADHD, sensory processing disorder, dyslexia, and/or poor coordination. It is recommended to encourage tummy time and crawling as much as possible. Placing children on their tummies can

lead to the natural progression of hands and knees, rocking on hands and knees, moving to kneeling on knees, pulling to stand, standing, then walking. Placing things out of reach of your child so they must visually regard something then move towards the object is one way to encourage this process. Placing a baby over a parent’s leg to help promote pushing through arms is a good starting point when a baby is very young. Not all children who skipped crawling will have learning or sensory issues, but many do. Occupational and physical therapists work with children to help them learn to crawl and eventually walk, but also during school age if learning or sensory issues emerge.

Kristi Estes is an occupational therapist and co-owns In Harmony Pediatric Therapy with Jennifer Puckett. 770-345-2804. InHarmonyPediatricTherapy.com

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


A common complaint in [HealthyLife] many medical clinics is the recent onset of pain in the heel area. It often starts gradually without a traumatic event. Pain is felt during the first couple of steps out of bed in the morning, and then it eases up somewhat. Sitting down or driving for a while will also cause the symptoms to return when standing up again. The discomfort may also progress as the day goes on and can become fairly severe and affect daily activities. Most of the time, the pain is plantar fasciitis, which is inflammation of a large, fibrous band that spans from the heel to the forefoot. It functions to help provide stability to the arch. It is often aggravated by a change in activity or extended activity in the wrong shoes. People often complain of pain after starting or increasing exercise programs or transitioning from a sedentary job to one that requires them to be on their feet all day. Additionally, this is also common at the start of a new tennis season or at

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

Got Heel Pain?

By Christopher R. Corwin, D.P.M., MS. FACFAS the end of the summer after people have spent months wearing flip flops. Treatment focuses on wearing the appropriate shoes for your activity, stretching exercises, massage therapy, icing the affected area, reducing inflammation, and modifying activity. Sometimes, the fix is as easy as replacing old, broken-down shoes. Runners with plantar fasciitis also benefit from crosstraining activities such as biking and yoga. However, not all heel pain is plantar fasciitis. Tarsal tunnel syndrome, stress fractures, and other inflammatory diseases

can also cause pain in the heel area, so it is important to get an accurate diagnosis prior to starting therapy. A proper evaluation and treatment program will get you up on your feet and back to your daily activities as quickly as possible.

Christopher Corwin is a physician at Village Podiatry Centers, 11459 Johns Creek Parkway, #260, Johns Creek. 770-232-5030. VillagePodiatryCenters.com

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

21


Mayor’s Minute

I

t never ceases to amaze me the amount of talent we have in our relatively small city of 83,000. From Jeff Foxworthy, Usher, and Angelica Hale, and prominent news anchors such as Karyn Greer and Russ Spencer, to Olympic medalists, CEOs and other senior-level corporate executives, and top-tier educators.

Johns Creek Forging a Legacy of Premier Residential Living By Mayor Mike Bodker

Johns Creek continues to be a beacon that attracts high performers from all walks of life. Have you ever stopped to wonder why that is? What is it about Johns Creek that continues to make us so desirable? We began on this journey in 2006 when we developed a vision and plan to become a premier residential community, and we continued to refine the plans that resulted each year until we arrived where we are today. So, now that these plans have become a reality, what do we see in our future? During last month’s annual State of the City address, I asked those in attendance to imagine along with us, and to visualize the future of Johns Creek. The entire event was recorded and is available on the City’s website at JohnsCreekGa.gov. I invite you to view the State of the City, and respond with your thoughts and ideas on where we go next as a community. From the latest draft version of the Comprehensive Plan (JohnsCreekGa. gov/Residents/Community-Development/ComprehensivePlan), which maps out the next ten years for Johns Creek, to the City Council’s decision to adopt a strategic focus on healthcare innovation and wellness — known as “iHeart Johns Creek” (JohnsCreekGa.gov/ NewsAndEvents/News-Archive/2018-News/City-of-Johns-CreekStrives-to-become-a-Top-City-i) — I believe we are on the right path to sustain our success. The City of Johns Creek would have never reached as high as it has without a vision and plan in place to responsibly move us forward. The schools within our city are some of the most awarded in the state, and we are consistently ranked as not only the safest city in Georgia, but also among the safest and most highly desired residential communities in the nation. With this great foundation firmly in place, I believe we will be able to create the vision that keeps us on track and propels us forward. While I am very content with where we are as a community today, and optimistic about our future, I am not satisfied — and I’m not quite sure that I ever will be — but that’s ok. It means that I recognize there is still so much more for us to do together to help ensure our future is even brighter tomorrow than we can begin to imagine today. Together, I am confident we will continue to achieve great things for the City of Johns Creek. Together, we will continue to set the standard by which other communities will measure greatness. And together, I believe we will forge a legacy that truly defines what premier residential living means for the generations that follow. L

Mike Bodker is the mayor of Johns Creek. 678-512-3200. Mike.Bodker@JohnsCreekGa.gov, JohnsCreekGa.gov.

22

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Elder Abuse By Debra Robinson

[HomeLife] As the number of older adults increases, so does the risk of elder abuse — intentional or negligent acts that cause harm or serious risk of harm to a vulnerable adult. The most obvious aspect of elder abuse is the infliction of physical pain or injury, but elder abuse includes much more than that. It can be verbal abuse, neglect of essential needs, financial exploitation, or simply the threat of physical injury. The most common abusers are family members, often an adult child or a spouse. Caregivers, whether family members or professional health care workers, are also often abusers. Professionals with a legal duty to act in the best interest of a client, like investment advisors, lawyers, and accountants, can use their positions of trust for self benefit. And, of course, there are always con artists with fraudulent schemes and services.

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

What can be done to protect vulnerable elders? If you have a family member, a neighbor, or a friend who is elderly, you can help protect that person by being alert for signs of abuse. The most obvious signs of physical abuse are bruises, black eyes, broken bones, and open wounds. Other things that could be signs of physical abuse are broken eyeglasses, torn clothing, or medication overdose. Signs of emotional abuse include agitation, being extremely withdrawn and nonresponsive, depression, lack of interest in daily activities, isolation, or excessive willingness to please.

activity, sudden changes to a will, unpaid bills, unusual gifts, or confusion when discussing finances. The refusal by a caregiver to allow visitors to see the elder alone should raise suspicion of abuse. What should you do if you believe you have seen signs of elder abuse? If it’s an emergency situation, call 911. Otherwise, call Adult Protective Services at 866-5524464, or file a report online at Aging. Georgia.gov/report-elder-abuse. Our vulnerable seniors need families, friends, and neighbors to be on the alert for signs of elder abuse.

Symptoms of neglect include thirst, weight loss, bed sores, poor hygiene, and unsafe or unclean living conditions. Signs of financial exploitation include sudden changes in bank accounts, unexplained withdrawals, unusual ATM

Debra Robinson is an attorney in Johns Creek. 770-817-4999, DebraRobinsonLaw.com

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

23


COVER STORY

We encourage and provide opportunities for our residents to pursue a healthy, independent lifestyle.

There is always something new, exciting, and fun to do with neighbors who share your interests.

24

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Getting Fit, Staying Active Can Improve Your Quality of Life

St.

George Village resident Laureen Johnson can attest to the fact that it’s never too late to improve your quality of life with physical activity. When she moved to St. George last March, Laureen had been suffering from the debilitating nerve pain caused by sciatica for two years.

“That’s when my sciatica went away!” she said. Now, Laureen makes good use of the pool five to six days a week. She does water walking, works out with water weights, and participates in water aerobics classes. Also, she says that the hot tub with its water jets has been great therapy for sore muscles.

“There were times when the pain was so bad, I almost couldn’t get out of bed in the morning. And I was having a lot of trouble taking care of my house and yard after my husband died,” she said. “Even after moving to St. George, I needed my meals delivered to my apartment for a while.”

Just two months after she began exercising in the water, Laureen was able to discontinue the pain medication she’d been prescribed for sciatica.

Laureen kept thinking about her doctor’s continued suggestion that aqua exercise might help improve her mobility. He knew that water workouts can be adapted to fit anyone’s needs, regardless of age and activity level, and that water exercise can do the following:

With her mobility restored, Laureen is no longer limited to spending time in her apartment and feels she has a new lease on life. She enjoys spending time with her best friend and all the new friends that she has made at St. George. She also loves spending time with her daughter and grandchildren who live nearby in east Cobb and are frequent visitors.

770-645-2340 or toll free

866-826-3400 StGeorgeVillage.org Hardscrabble

92

Rd.

d.

ock R

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

“I had a garden at my home before I moved here, and I missed it. There’s nothing like a tomato fresh from the garden,” she said. “Gardening is only one of the many things I can do now that I can be active again.”

11350 Woodstock Road Roswell, Georgia 30075

dst Woo

It took a little time, but a few months after getting settled into her new community, Laureen decided to try out the indoor pool and hot tub at St. George.

In addition to making good use of the pool, Laureen particularly relishes growing vegetables in her raised garden bed, which she then shares with her neighbors. Last summer, she pickled 22 pints of cucumbers.

Come see how a retirement lifestyle of active engagement can be yours at St. George Village. Call Stacy Anthony at 678-9870402 for more information. Find more details about our community, lifestyle, and residents online at StGeorgeVillage.org, and on Facebook and Pinterest.

King Rd.

• Build endurance • Increase flexibility • Relieve stress and decrease anxiety • Increase metabolism (and thereby burn more calories) • Reduce blood pressure

“Getting into the pool was the answer for me,” she said. “I haven’t had any problems with sciatica since.”

At St. George Village, part of our mission as a Life Plan community is to encourage and provide opportunities for our residents to pursue a healthy, independent lifestyle. Water exercise is only one of the many activities we offer! From fitness classes and planned travel to educational workshops and volunteer projects, there is always something new, exciting, and fun to do with neighbors who share your interests.

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

25


Community Partners

Keeping Girls Safe

and

Free

In a defining moment that quite literally changed the course of her future, Michele Rickett discovered her life’s purpose while working in East Africa as a young woman. “Global slavery” was still a distant phrase when she began witnessing unthinkable injustices against African women and girls. In 2002, with her studies behind her and her children grown, Michele founded She Is Safe, which is a nonprofit organization that is headquartered in Roswell. She then began her life-saving work of prevention, rescue, and restoration of exploited women and girls. Sixteen years later, Michele has leveraged her years of international development to equip oppressed women and girls with the ability to break the cycles of abuse and slavery, while also providing leadership to other ministries that are resolved to end human trafficking. Revealing the story behind her life’s work, Michele thoughtfully shares that she is not just a survivor but a “thriver.” There was a time when she wondered aloud to God how she could help set vulnerable girls free. “There are so many exploited and abused girls,” Michele prayed; “how can I possibly make a difference? Where do I even start?” Now, with more than three decades of advocating, working, and leading the effective counter-trafficking nonprofit she started, Michele has answers to those early questions. She Is Safe’s team of twenty country directors, sector specialists, and corporate staff members manage holistic, grassroots initiatives in seven countries: Indonesia, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Mali, South Sudan, and Lebanon. She Is Safe also provided direct ministry to more than 17,000 women and girls last year. Additionally, the nonprofit equipped more than 50,000 at-risk Indonesian school children with abuse prevention training and established a hotline for help through its Pantaloons, Protection, and Pencil Pouches project. To help others truly understand what the world of human trafficking is like, Michele drew upon her own heart-rending rescue and transformation and then, along with co-author Kay Strom, she also travelled the continents to procure first-hand interviews with girls who share what it is really like to grow up female in the world’s most dangerous places. These accounts are compiled in their book entitled Forgotten Girls: Stories of Hope and Courage. This book explains why 98% of the world’s sex slaves are female and what each one of us can do to help protect these girls from a lifetime of exploitation and enslavement. For more information about She Is Safe, or to learn how you can help, visit SheIsSafe.org, email Info@SheIsSafe.org, or call 770-552-1400.

She Is Safe is located at 11095 Houze Road, Suite 100 in Roswell. 26

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Book Review BY ANNELL GERSON

At twelve, having graduated from the pages of Encyclopedia Brown and The Hardy Boys, Christopher Swann’s grandfather gave him a prized volume of The Complete Works of Sherlock Holmes. As an eighth grader, he created a fictionalized diary for a history assignment. Not only did he receive accolades for his project, but writing had been fun. Hard to know which was more influential, but by the time Christopher Swann was a teenager, he knew he would grow up to be a writer. His adolescent dream became a reality in August 2017, when Algonquin Books published his debut novel, Shadow of the Lions. Lauded as a compelling blend of A Separate Peace, Dead Poets Society, and The Secret History, Shadow of the Lions is a literary thriller complete with page-turning plot lines, believable characters, and heart-twisting social themes. Fritz Davenport and Matthias Glass are seniors, roommates, and best friends at The Blackburne School, a prestigious boys’ boarding school in Virginia. In the symbolic shadow of the two concrete lions that flank the entrance to the school, Fritz and Matthias argue regarding a consequential matter. Fritz runs off into the woods and disappears. A decade later, Fritz has never been found. Although Matthias writes a bestselling novel, life in the fast lane has left him broke and void of ideas for a second book. Since he has no other job prospects, when offered a position teaching English at Blackburne, he accepts. Returning to Blackburne resurrects buried memories, and Matthias, flooded with feelings of loss, loneliness, and guilt, realizes he will never emerge from the shadow of his past unless he finds out what happened to Fritz. Uncovering the truth leads to stunning revelations about himself, his friend, the “adults” of his youth, and Blackburne itself.

Shadow of the Lions is a Townsend Prize Finalist for 2018. In addition, Christopher Swann has been nominated for Georgia Author of the Year 2018, First Novel.

Annell Gerson is co-owner of Bookmiser bookstore, with locations in Roswell and East Cobb. 770-993-1555. Bookmiser.net

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

27


28

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

29


30

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


All About

Dental Implants By Vishant Nath, D.M.D.

[HealthyLife] Archaeologists have discovered that the use of dental implants were present in many cultures thousands of years ago. From 4000 years ago in ancient China to 3000 years ago in Egypt, dental implants have been used to replace teeth both before and after death. Back then, implants were made from anything from bamboo to copper, and were put in place by hammering the implant into the jawbone. There are many modernday options for replacing a missing tooth depending on the needs of the patient.

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

Today’s implant patient may be missing one, several, or all their permanent teeth. If you are missing permanent teeth, implants can be a great solution to restoring the comfort and functionality of your bite as well as improving the look of your smile. Implants are titanium posts, which are surgically placed in the bone under your gums. The bone grows around the implant to provide support, acting like the root of a healthy tooth, giving it stability. A crown or a bridge is then attached to the implant to replace the missing tooth or teeth. Implants can also be used in conjunction with dentures if many teeth are missing. Implants provide more stability than removable dentures. They will not slip or shift, so they are more like permanent teeth. They are comfortable while eating, drinking, and speaking. Implants will also help to preserve the integrity and strength of the bone beneath the missing tooth or teeth.

With proper care, implants can last a lifetime. This is an important consideration when looking at the cost of implants. They are well worth the money when you consider their longevity. Consistent, good oral hygiene is vitally important in preserving and caring for the dental implant. Your dentist can suggest the best way to care for your implant(s) and indicate how often you need a dentist appointment to ensure your implants stay healthy and strong. If you are missing permanent teeth, talk to your dental professional about implants. It may be the perfect solution to restoring your smile!

Dr. Vishant Nath is the owner of Canton/Alpharetta/Roswell Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics. 678-352-1090. KidsHappyTeeth.com

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

31


Summer Annuals Plants like basil, Calendula, and papalo do best once soils have warmed a bit in the spring. Basil should be managed to prevent flowering because leaf quality diminishes once the plant reaches this stage. To delay the flowering stage of basil, simply pinch or cut the tips of stems every so often to keep the plant in a vegetative stage. Papalo is an interesting herb from Central and South America. It has an upright growing habit, and its taste is described as a mix of cilantro and arugula.

Tender Perennials By Joshua Fuder

H

erbs are some of the easiest plants to grow because they often tolerate a wide range of soil conditions and have few insect and disease issues. Because herbs are relatively carefree, they have an obvious fit in a food garden, but they also work just as well incorporated into your landscape or in containers.

Like most vegetables and flowers, herbs do best in a location that receives at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight. Mulching will also help discourage weeds and maintain soil moisture levels.

Herb Culture

Botanically, herbs are classified as annuals, biennials, or perennials. Because of our long growing season and growth characteristics, they can be broken down the following way:

Herbs prefer a well-drained soil with a pH between 6 to 7.5. If planting in our native soil, plan to incorporate at least two to three inches of compost or well-rotted manure to a depth of 8-12 inches. A soil test will tell how much lime needs to be added to change the pH to the optimal range.

32

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Classification of Herbs

Spring/Fall Annuals These are plants that do not seem to thrive during our hot, humid summers: chives, dill, parsley, borage, arugula, and cilantro. You can still get fresh dill and cilantro for those summer pickles and salsa recipes by planting in an area that is sheltered from the afternoon sun.

These plants are not quite perennial, but with a little bit of effort, you can keep them going year after year. Plants like lemongrass and stevia thrive in the summer but will die to the ground with a frost. Dig up a few shoots or half a clump of lemongrass each year, and keep it in the basement. When re-planting, it just takes a few sprigs in a pot or planting area to have more lemongrass than one needs.

Container Plants Even if you have space, these herbs belong in a container due to their aggressive spreading nature. Any of the mints, catnip, anise hyssop, bee and lemon balm are herbaceous perennials, meaning they will die back to the roots during winter. These are excellent plants for fragrance, teas, and a nectar source for pollinators.

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


success. Perennial herbs such as lavender and rosemary are best propagated by cuttings in spring and summer. Take a 3- to 5-inch cutting of new growth, remove the leaves from the lower two-thirds, and dip the end in a rooting hormone. Insert the cutting so almost the entire bare stem is in the potting medium. Keep moist, and in three to six weeks, the plant should have a root system.

Harvesting and Preserving

However, they are ruthless in their quest for world domination. Many gardeners will plant them in halfburied containers to prevent the spread of roots to unwanted areas.

Perennials Perennial herbs are favorites because they incorporate well into the broader landscape. Plants like rosemary, thyme, sage, oregano, lavender, Stachys or lambs ear, and winter savory have excellent characteristics that help them fit into ornamental settings. All are evergreen and provide blooms that help encourage beneficial insect habitats. Thyme, oregano, and winter savory have spreading

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

growth habits that make them great ground covers. Rosemary has needle-like leaves that resemble a small pine and can be pruned or shaped into desired forms. Keeping all of these plants near the house makes collecting them for use in the kitchen more convenient.

Propagation A number of herbs, particularly the annuals, can be grown from seed. Direct seeding can be done but beginning plants indoors 4-6 weeks prior to setting out can increase

Herbs grown for foliage can be harvested any time, but it is ideal to collect early in the morning after any moisture has dried. Drying herbs can be as simple as tying bundles of stems together and hanging in a warm, dry, dark, area or in a paper bag with ventilation holes. Herbs can also be dried in a gas oven at low heat or in a food dehydrator. Simply strip the leaves, and lay them out, so they do not overlap. Herbs can be preserved by freezing dry leaves or by placing leaves in ice trays with water. Frozen herbs begin to lose quality after three to six months.

Joshua Fuder is an agriculture and natural resources agent at the UGA Cooperative Extension Cherokee County. Contact the UGA Extension office for any gardening assistance, 770-721-7830 or CAES.UGA.Edu/ extension/cherokee

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

33


Lobster Cobb Salad Ingredients

Lobster Cobb Salad Procedure

Key Lime Honey Mustard Ingredients

• 3 oz. cooked lobster claw and tail meat • 3 cups spring mix lettuce • ½ cup cucumber, diced • ½ cup grape tomatoes, halved • ¼ cup grilled corn • ¼ cup hardboiled egg, diced • 2 tablespoons crumbled blue cheese • 2 tablespoons chopped, cooked bacon • 3 oz. Key lime honey mustard (see additional recipe)

- Place the spring mix lettuce in a bowl. - Starting with the lobster, arrange the cucumbers, tomatoes, corn, egg, blue cheese, and bacon in lines on top of the lettuce. - Pour the Key lime honey mustard on top of the salad.

• ½ cup mayonnaise • ¼ cup lime juice • ½ cup whole-milk Greek yogurt • ¼ cup creole mustard • ¼ cup honey

34

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Key Lime Honey Mustard Procedure - Combine all the ingredients in a bowl, and whisk until smooth.

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


T

he Roswell Photographic Society (RPS) is one of the largest photography clubs in metro Atlanta, with more than 400 members and attendees. The club is sponsored and supported by the Roswell Adult Recreation Center through the City of Roswell, and members typically meet on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Roswell Adult Recreation Center, 830 Grimes Bridge Road. Meetings are FREE and open to anyone. Members range from photographic beginners to working professionals. Meetings are a fun and educational forum at which to share members’ photographic interests and experience. Social time begins at 6:30pm. Meetings begin at 7:00pm and end at 8:30pm, and the first Tuesday usually features a speaker on a photographic subject of interest. The third Tuesday is a photo review, which provides members with the opportunity to have their work critiqued by a respected professional. Membership is $30 per calendar year and provides the opportunity to submit photos for monthly photo reviews, participate in exhibits, and attend field trips. More than ten venues/ opportunities are offered throughout the year for members to display and/or sell their work. For information about ongoing activities and how you can participate, visit RoswellPhotoSociety.com, or call 404-933-5473. RPS also offers a variety of photo-related courses throughout the year including topics such as using your camera, Photoshop® Lightroom, and Photoshop® Elements. Check their website often to see upcoming courses. You may also interact with RPS on Twitter, Flickr, Facebook, and Meetup.

Photos by Gittel Price

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

35


Embrace the Shade

light levels. Three to four hours a day is considered shade; four to six hours qualifies for partial sun/shade. This important information will help you make wise plant choices when visiting the nursery.

Home gardens are not [HomeLife]

Another consideration for the new garden is moisture. Poor drainage may need to be addressed. Many plants don’t do well with constant “wet feet.” On the other hand, a thick tree canopy can stop rain from reaching the plants on the ground. Make sure you have a water source handy for periods of drought.

By Lisa Ethridge

static. Over time, landscapes mature, and shade increases. Instead of accepting the scientific fact that turf grasses do not grow in the shade, some individuals dementedly plant and replant grass every year then bemoan the dismal results. It’s time to stop the madness, and consider creating a woodland-style garden plan for your property. Woodsy settings are perfect for growing a wide variety of beautiful plants. However, it’s important to select plants that thrive in lower-light conditions. If you’re contemplating a yard makeover, observe the targeted area carefully for a while. Map out and make notes about

36

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

When it’s time to select specimens for your peaceful, cool, woodland garden, head to a nursery where perennials and annuals for shade are separated from sun-loving plants. Nursery personnel can help guide your selection and give planting advice. You will need some bushes to plant under trees, groundcovers, seasonal bulbs, and vines. Look for plants that will multiply.

Plants such as ferns, Solomon’s seal, Hosta, Lenten rose, Trillium, common jasmine/Carolina jessamine, honeysuckle, Vinca, and mondo grass add texture and color. When underplanted with the right specimens, Hydrangeas, dogwoods, redbuds, azaleas, Japanese maples, Camellias, and Fothergilla create striking vignettes. Avoid English ivy. If your yard is full of shade, don’t give up on gardening. Stop the madness, and embrace the shade. For help planning a woodland garden, visit Extension.uga.edu. There, you will find helpful brochures such as Native Plants for GA, B-987-1,2,3, and 4; and Landscape Plants for GA, B625 among others.

Lisa Ethridge is a member of the award-winning Roswell Garden Club and a certified master gardener with North Fulton Master Gardeners, part of the UGA Cooperative Extension Service. 404-613-7670, NFMG.net

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

37


ArtistProfile BY TINA MORRIS

The Lion in Winter

A

Tennessee native, Brian White has been performing all his life, beginning in church choir and progressing to high school plays and musicals. Brian moved to Georgia after earning a role in a live musical show at Six Flags. While there, he auditioned for the Atlanta Jazz Theatre and was cast in their professional dance company. On scholarship with the company, Brian took thirteen dance classes a week to further develop his talents. During this time, he landed a role in The Music Man at the Alliance Theatre. Originally cast in the chorus, three days before opening, the director asked him to take over the role of Tommy Djilas, the younger male lead, because the original actor became ill and was unable to perform. While performing at the Alliance, Disney posted an audition notice back stage, and Brian seized the opportunity. After earning a role with Disney, he went on to perform with them for eleven years on eight different stages. Brian participated in a U.S. and European tour with Disney. On the European leg of the tour, he learned and performed the show in German and French. He was also part of some beloved shows including the Hoop De Doo Dinner Review and, his personal favorite, The Diamond Horseshoe Review, which was a lively can-can show.

38

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

First Date The Musical

In 1986 while recovering from torn ligaments in his ankle, Brian obtained his real estate license and began flipping houses in downtown Orlando. Ten years later, he returned to Georgia to pursue real estate full time. However, when the housing market slowed in 2008, Brian had time to return to the stage, performing a couple of shows a year. Since his return to the stage, Brian has performed in many shows including The Great American Trailer Park, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, and The Lion in Winter. His favorite genre to perform is musical theater. When he is acting, he immerses himself in the role. Brian states that the most difficult role he’s even undertaken was King Henry because it was emotionally, physically, and mentally draining. However, Brian’s most recent role was in the fun, comedic First Date – The Musical with the Marietta Theatre Company. In addition to theatre, Brian discovered a new creative outlet in quilting. He has quickly found success in this timeless

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee

folk art, as a pattern of his was recently published, and he was commissioned by a major company to create a quilt for a billboard advertisement. Brian plans to continue acting, as he is offered roles that he feels would be a good fit for him. He truly is multitalented — acting, singing, dancing, and quilting! Brian’s advice to aspiring artists is, “Don’t give up. Push through challenges, and keep doing the work.” That’s actually pretty great advice for any of life’s pursuits.

Tina Morris is a student in the MFA creative writing program at Reinhardt University. 770-7205582. Reinhardt.edu/Graduate/MFA-CW/

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

39


The Good News of Easter

of the resurrection. Jesus is no longer physically present with us, but He is with us spiritually.

[InGoodFaith] Six-year-old Tommy was at the pediatrician’s office for a checkup. Upon looking in Tommy’s ears, the doctor asked, “Do you think I’ll find Big Bird in here?” Tommy giggled. Next, the doctor took a tongue depressor and looked down his throat. This time, the doctor asked, “Do you think I’ll find the Cookie Monster down there?” Again, Tommy giggled. Then, the doctor put a stethoscope to his chest. As he listened to Tommy’s heartbeat, the doctor asked, “Do you think I’ll hear SpongeBob in there?” “No,” said Tommy, “SpongeBob is on my underwear. Jesus is in my heart.”

Where does that idea come from? In the words of 1 John 4:15-16, “If anyone acknowledges that Jesus is the Son of God, then God lives in him and he in God. And so, we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in him.”

By Kevin Head, Ph.D.

40

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

At the first Easter, the disciples and other followers were wondering where Jesus was. If His body was no longer in the tomb, then where could Jesus be? Soon, Jesus would answer this question for them — He would appear to them on several occasions before His ascension and assure them of His abiding presence in their lives. In fact, Matthew tells us the last thing Jesus said to His disciples was, “And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” But, if He was leaving to ascend into heaven, then how would Jesus always be with them? Six-year-old Tommy knew the answer. That is the wonderful news

The good news of Easter is that Jesus is resurrected not only to live in heaven with God but also to live within us and give us abundant life. Thanks be to God for the victory of the resurrection! Thanks be to God for the presence of Christ within our hearts and lives each new day! Blessings!

Dr. Kevin Head is senior pastor of First Baptist Roswell. 770-587-6980, kevin@fbroswell.org

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


By Michael Consoli [Lifestyle] Before you plan your next road trip, consider the many choices and affordability of family cruising. If you’ve vacationed with your children, you know the look: a couple of blearyeyed, bedraggled parents returning back to the hotel at 6:00pm, with two hyperactive children wearing mouse hats or whale T-shirts and sporting cotton candy hair extensions. Do you wash them up only to suffer through another dinner, or collapse in the bed with hotel room service or take-out pizza? Today’s receipts for all this fun? Well, let’s just say it cost more than your first car did!

months to sixteen years, is covered, and childcare is offered at various levels. Cruise lines are savvy enough to plan nighttime activities for children, so parents can enjoy the facilities of the ship in a relaxed style that isn’t available at most land-based resorts. Cruises are an exceptionally good idea for single parents as well, as they have a controlled environment and childcare on the ship, but have the freedom and time to make new friends. Extended families also love ships because cousins and friends can hang out together while the adults reconnect.

Don’t forget that all meals, snacks, entertainment, accommodations, and transportation are included in one upfront price. This year, take a cruise, and leave the mouse hats, maps, and (cotton candy remover) shampoo at home. L

Michael Consoli is a professional travel and cruise specialist and owner of Cruise Planners. 770-650-7667. PlanMyCruise.com

If this is how you define vacation in your household, maybe it’s time for something different. How about an experience where everyone, including the parents, actually gets a vacation? The answer is quite simple and does not end with the words “park,” “world,” or “land.” But, it does end with the word “happy.” On a cruise, it is possible for everyone to have a happy vacation. Contemporary cruise lines figured out quite a while ago that if you can keep the kids happy and occupied, then the parents follow right along. Over the years, children’s on-board programs have expanded from one children’s counselor over the holidays to year-round programs and separate facilities for different age groups. Every year, from six

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

41


Photo Credit:

Audra Brown

By Micah Fowler

The Ne Café st

W

hat is a downtown without a charming coffee shop? The Nest Café on Canton Street is Alpharetta’s downtown caffeine fix. It’s not just coffee, either! Mouthwatering breakfast, lunch, and snack menu items tempt you from the confines of your cubicle. Owner Jordan Segal is Cali-born but Georgia-bred. He studied entrepreneurial management at KSU, and after graduation, he purposefully explored employment opportunities that would best prepare him for his entrepreneurial endgame. “I always knew I wanted to work for myself. ‘I want to get a college degree and never have to show it to anyone for approval,’ I would say to myself in class. So, as soon as I graduated, I got to work,” states Jordan. “I chose Alpharetta for the first location of The Nest Cafe not only because I was raised here, but also because I understood the demographic and the anticipation for the overall growth of the city,” Jordan says. “It’s a great city, and I knew it was in need of an establishment like The Nest. It was in need of something homey and real — something healthy, delicious, nutritious, and quick — not another cookie cutter.” He was right, and The Nest Café has become something of a staple downtown as a result. So, now you’ve made it back to the office with your coffee and you sit down at your desk only to become frustrated by your outdated, unorganized business technology. Alpharetta’s Edge Solutions is majority owned by Washington native, Julie Haley. Before opening a business, Julie earned a Juris Doctor from the University of SC and had her roots firmly in business and commercial litigation. However, when Julie started practicing law, researching and drafting legal briefings required countless hours of staff energy. “When Lexis Nexis came out with its first legal search engine software, it changed my life. What used to take me ten hours would only take a couple of hours, and that meant huge savings for our clients. After

42

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

Edge s tion Solu

Photo Cre

dit: Audra

Brown

that, I always looked for how the newest technology could improve business processes, and that became my passion,” she says. Her husband was an IT professional, so together they forged a new and influential business. At Edge Solutions, “We exist to help our clients embrace innovative technologies that improve business outcomes.” Edge Solutions is in the old Waters Warehouse on Milton Avenue. Choosing Alpharetta to establish her business was no coincidence, though. “In the past ten years, Alpharetta has become the ‘Technology City of the South,’ with over 640 tech businesses springing up inside the city limits. We confer and partner with many of these tech companies to bring the best cloud services and newest technology infrastructure to our clients. We also found amazing engineering and technical sales talent here to round out our leadership team,” says Julie. Edge Solutions is also a founding board member of Tech Alpharetta Innovation Center and a true advocate for Alpharetta.

Micah Fowler is the economic development manager for the City of Alpharetta, 2 Park Plaza, Alpharetta, 678-297-6024. Alpharetta.Ga.us

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

43


By Mike Reynolds

A

high performance, energyefficient home may include features like geothermal heating, wind power, and solar panels, but these are not the defining features of green living. They come in second, and some you can even do without. A green home starts with being well designed, well insulated, and if possible, it will have glazing oriented to the south for passive heat gain.

Energy Efficiency, Insulation, and Orientation

An efficient and resilient home is one that uses minimal energy to heat, cool, light, and run appliances. The biggest draw is almost always climate control, so reducing heating and cooling requirements is the best way to reduce operational costs. Depending upon whether you desire the climate in your home to be warmer

or cooler will play a big role in window placement when designing your home, as careful window placement can reduce heating or cooling requirements by as much as 25% for virtually no cost. A well-insulated, well-sealed, building envelope is imperative to the performance of your home. Windows and walls that leak heat, air, and moisture can quickly negate the positive effects and financial savings of the green, sustainable upgrades you make in your home’s design.

A Reasonably Sized House

A smaller house is a more efficient house — it’s that simple. A smaller house means less land to excavate, less materials to manufacture and ship, less space to heat, less space to cool, less taxes to pay, less to clean, and less money to buy or build.

A green home starts with being well designed.

44

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

According to Mark J. Perry’s article on AEI.org, “The average new house in the U.S. is getting larger in size at the same time that American households are getting smaller, the square footage of living space per person in a new U.S. house has increased from 507 to 971 square feet using the median size house, and from 551 to 1,058 square feet using the average size house. In percentage terms, that’s a 92% increase for both the median or average house size per person.” This square foot average per person can easily be reduced and still allow you to live quite comfortably.

A Flexible House

Your family size will change throughout your life, and a flexible house is one that has been designed to accommodate that change with as little cost and disruption as possible. You can reduce both the financial and environmental costs of a big renovation by anticipating and designing for these changes. Think about potential layout changes, such as where a future granny suite would be, and during your build, you can run the necessary plumbing and wiring along with framing future door openings. So, when the time comes, rather than a major disruptive renovation, you already have the infrastructure in place to create a new bathroom and kitchen.

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Using Reclaimed and Local Materials

By re-using existing building materials and buying locally, you just became part of the green building trend. Knowing what materials you will use ahead of time can save you some headaches, since you can make any necessary adjustments right away. For example, if you have plans to use old doors or a specific flooring material, you many need to adjust framing or floor heights. Old doors don’t always meet the standard openings, and its best to know the exact sizes before you start building.

Mechanical Systems

Sadly, a typical sacrifice in home construction is quality mechanical systems. Purchase and installation usually come towards the end of construction, and if you're over budget, there is a strong temptation to look towards downgrades when you really shouldn't. Your heating and cooling equipment is your comfort delivery system, this is not the place to try and save a dollar, and doing so will also probably cost you more in the long run by being less efficient, and your family being less comfortable.

Appliances and Electrical

Don't underestimate the amount of energy that will be consumed by appliances, electronics, and lighting. Read the tags on appliances to see what they consume, and look for those that are ENERGY STAR certified. LED lights will save electricity and money, and they will also help keep your house cooler in the summer. Incandescent bulbs convert 80% of their energy to heat, so turning on eight 100-watt bulbs is like turning on an 800-watt heater.

Who Will Draw Your Plans? Architects An architect will provide you with full professional services, meaning design, contract bidding, taking care of all contract documents, and getting

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

all permits and approvals. However, they aren’t cheap, so plan on spending approximately 10-12% of your total construction cost. Before signing on with someone, make sure you have either a good understanding of what you are looking for, or that there is a good working relationship where you are involved in the process.

Architectural Technologists or Designers This route can be a lot more affordable than hiring an architect. You will probably pay $5,000-$10,000 depending on size and complexity, and the plans will still comply with municipal regulations. This can be a nice option for smaller projects or renovations. A technologist or designer may approach a project more mechanically than an architect. Once the plans are drawn, they will often relinquish responsibility, and the ball is then in your court.

Purchasing Pre-Drawn Plans This can be useful if you are looking for a standard house. It's a much quicker process, and it is certainly an affordable option. On the downside, you likely

won’t find plans that match your vision perfectly, and any changes to the existing plan means the price will be higher than you originally thought.

Drawing Your Own Plans This can be quite fun and rewarding, and if you do your research, you can get a great product that suits your lifestyle and needs quite well. Keep in mind — it will be quite time consuming, and there might be a hefty learning curve if you’re new to it. Some municipalities aren’t too keen on plans drawn by owners, so check what their requirements are before getting too deep into it. In addition, you may forget some key points, so it can cost you a lot in the long run if you aren’t really careful in your planning. Whatever options you choose, take time to do your research to ensure a final product you can be really satisfied with.

Mike Reynolds is the operations director for LEED AP Homes. 613-366 3702. EcoHome.net

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

45


Children and Recycling [HomeLife] There are many benefits to recycling that we may not think of when we’re collecting our paper products and plastic containers for the recycling bin each week. Knowing how much impact it has on the environment will encourage us to be more diligent about recycling and to get our kids in on the action as well. If your trash company does not pick up recyclable products, there are places where you can drop off recyclables.

Benefits of Recycling • • • • •

46

Reduces the amount of waste sent to landfills and incinerators Conserves natural resources such as timber, water, and minerals Increases economic security by tapping a domestic source of materials Prevents pollution by reducing the need to collect new raw materials Saves energy

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

• •

Supports American manufacturing and conserves valuable resources Helps create jobs in the recycling and manufacturing industries in the United States

Recycling helps to conserve resources. When we recycle, used materials are converted into new products, reducing the need to consume natural resources. Also, using recycled materials in manufacturing consumes less energy than what is needed to produce new products from raw materials. Recycling reduces the need for extracting (mining, quarrying, and logging), refining, and processing raw materials, all of which create substantial air and water pollution. When we recycle, recyclable materials are reprocessed into new products, and as a result, the amount of rubbish sent to landfill sites is reduced.

By Christy Noll steps to make the Earth a better place, they are more likely to emulate us. Make sure your kids know where your trash and recycling bins are, and that they are clear on what goes in each. Having a conversation with your kids to enforce how you are helping the environment, creating jobs, and reducing waste will spur them to do the same.

Happy Earth Month! Resources: EPA.gov/recycle/recyclingbasics RecycleNow.com/recycling-knowledge/ why-recycle

Christy Noll is founder of AlpharettaMoms.org, a resource that connects North Fulton families with community organizations, programs and events.

As our children see us conserve and take

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


Grand Openings & Ribbon Cuttings

11605 Haynes Bridge Road, Suite 100, Alpharetta, 770-993-8806 GNFCC.com

Caliber Collision

Kamstrup

3295 Caliber Street Suwanee 470-297-5673 Automotive Repair

245 Hembree Park Drive, Suite 110 Roswell 404-835-6716 Water Meters & System Solutions

Lily Sage Apothecary

Body G.O.A.L.S.

Talk of the Town

Righteous Guitars

1097 Alpharetta Street Roswell 770-545-8811 Pharmacy

875 Old Roswell Road, Suite F-100 Roswell 678-821-6827 Exercise/Fitness

30 Woodstock Street Roswell 404-586-4719 Catering & Special Events

1455 Hembree Road Roswell 678-735-3115 Guitar Store

Serving Roswell, Alpharetta & Milton

WWW. FAMILYLIFE PUBLICATIONS.COM

47


ADVERTISER INDEX

770 Arborist

Back Cover

ABA Business Expo

39

Alpharetta Farmers Market

39

Alpharetta Foot & Ankle Specialists Inside Back The Big Ketch Saltwater Grill

27, 34

Camp Invention

43

Childrens Charities Ga

5

ChoicesToYou.com 21 Crabapple Physical Therapy

23

Cruise Planners

20, 47

Debra Robinson Law Group

5

DeMercy Dental

46

Dykstra and Kemp Allstate

5

Fantabluous Band

5

Huntington Learning Center

21

In Harmony Pediatric Therapy

19

Internal Medicine Specialists

Inside Front

of Roswell Internal Medicine Practice

Inside Back

of Northside LGE Community Credit Union

28-29

Law Offices of J. Christopher Miller, PC Martha B. Boone, M.D.

17 3

Milton’s Cuisine and Cocktails

27

Nail Eagle Luxury Nail Salon & Spa

48

Newtown Medical

Inside Front

North Atlanta Vascular Clinic & Vein Center 37 North Atlanta Women’s Care

36

Northside Hospital Cancer Institute Northside Heart

1

3

The Orthopedic Sports Med Center of Atl. 17 Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics

39

Pete’s Plumbing, Inc.

31

Play By Play Sports Broadcasting Camp

43

Queenies 15 Rock for Rescues

11

Roswell Azalea Festival

30

Roswell Family Series St. George Village

48

North Fulton Family Life | APRIL 2018

9

Cover, 24-25

Thrivent Financial

17

Tracy Morton - Harry Norman Realtors

15

Trek Medicial

13

Vickery Creek Capital Management

43

Village Podiatry Centers

40

Over 26,000 Each Issue, Every Month


POSTAL CUSTOMER

PRSRT STD ECRWSS US Postage

PAID

Stone Mountain, GA

Permit #1037

North Fulton Family Life 4-18  
North Fulton Family Life 4-18