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Contents

September 2018

VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 2

28-29

[28-29]

On the Cover:

Mauldin Body Shop & Towing

34

Riverfest Arts & Crafts Festival

44-45

Quirky Georgia Attractions

[44-45]

[34] Follow Us >>>

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Family Life Publications

Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

04

.......................... Perspective

06

.............................. Calendar

12

..................... Canton Minute

14

................... Sheriff Reynolds

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.................... Community Life

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............. Holly Springs Minute

22

................... Senator Speaks

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............... Community Partner

26

....... Summer Concert Photos

41

........................ Book Review

50

................ Canton First Friday

54

.................... Ribbon Cuttings

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@FamilyLifeMags

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Publisher’s Perspective

PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHER Jack Tuszynski Jack@FamilyLifePublications.com EDITORIAL Julie Senger Julie@FamilyLifePublications.com ART Candice Williams Candice@FamilyLifePublications.com Laurie Litke Laurie@FamilyLifePublications.com SALES Janet Ponichtera Janet@FamilyLifePublications.com

Family Life Publishing Group, Inc. 630 East Main Street Canton, GA 30114

770-213-7095

FamilyLifePublications.com Family Life publications have the largest monthly circulation of direct-mailed community magazines in our area. Canton Family Life is a monthly community magazine with a total print count of over 30,000, direct mailing over 28,000 copies to Canton, Sixes/ BridgeMill, Holly Springs, Hickory Flat, and Waleska. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists, and submissions are not necessarily those of the editor/publisher, and the publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. Canton Family Life magazine is not responsible for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher.

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© 2018 All rights reserved.

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Subscriptions are available for $25 per year. Please contact us for payment options.

M AG A ZI

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When we own our choices, and understand that we alone are responsible for each of them, only then can we learn to accept the effect, whether positive or negative. Only at that time can we build upon the consequences of actions rather than tearing ourselves down. Not one of us has the ability, opportunity, or wisdom to make every decision correctly in our life, and there is balance or sacrifice in every decision we make. The most content and successful people I have met in my life understand that. Choose as wisely, effectively, and intently as you can. You will either make the right decision for you or for someone else. Knowing that I made the move, made the play, made that choice — and own it — is the one decision, regardless of outcome, that keeps me satisfied, happy, and moving forward.

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On the other hand, I have a difficult time narrowing down the array of food on the vast menus in some restaurants, deciding who to spend the holidays with, or what song to play when it’s my turn to choose. I know that my indecision leads to going nowhere. It can also be habit forming, and in one way or another, you’ll probably end up hungry and dissatisfied.

Even though all the possibilities can be overwhelming, I’ll sometimes just roll the dice and enjoy the adventure. It was my turn, and I took it. Win or lose — it will be a learning experience.

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very waking moment we have decisions to make. That is just one of the reasons I enjoy a restful night’s sleep. Each choice we make, or choose not to make, affects our individual timeline of events and often someone else’s. Hit snooze again on that alarm clock? Eggs scrambled or fried? When you get dressed in the morning, you’re often deciding about your behavior the rest of the day. For example, if you put on flip-flops, you probably won’t be doing much running and should be nice to others, especially those wearing sneakers. If you decide to wear a hat because it’s a “bad hair day,” you’re going to have hat head all day, so select a good hat.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Danielle Beatty, Cyndi Braun, Mary Kay Buquoi, Jyl Craven, James B. Depew, Joshua Fuder, Sheila Garrison, Corey Harkins, Lisa-Marie Haygood, Erin Honea, Norman Hunt, Vicki Knight-Mathis, Tim Lanier, Sandy McGrew, Tim Morris, Vishant Nath, Michael Petrosky, Frank Reynolds, Mark Sagaas, Sen. Bruce Thompson, Amy Williams, Farris Yawn

Jack Tuszynski, Publisher

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Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

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Calendar Ongoing Dumpster Day — On the first Saturday of each month, City of Canton residents may dispose of trash, unwanted items, up to ten tires per resident, and recycle many electronics free of charge. Please bring proof of residency when dropping off items. Visit the website for a full list of acceptable items. 8:00am-2:00pm, City Hall, 151 Elizabeth Street, Canton. 770-704-1554. CantonGa.gov Downtown Canton Farmers Market — Each Saturday through October 27, shop for great locally grown produce and handcrafted goods. 9:00am-1:00pm, Cannon Park, 130 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-704-1549. CantonGa.gov Waleska Farmers Market — Each Thursday through November 2, enjoy homegrown produce and handmade arts and crafts. 9:00am-1:00pm, Heritage Fellowship Baptist Church, 3615 Reinhardt College Parkway, Waleska. 404-805-7468. Facebook. com/WaleskaFarmersMarket Farmers Market at River Church — Every Tuesday through November, check out locally grown, fresh produce and other delicious options. 2:00-6:00pm, River Church, 2335 Sixes Road, Canton. 770-485-1975. Facebook.com/Farmers-Market-at-RiverChurch-390585127816595/

SEPTEMBER

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Canton First Friday “80s Night” — Bring the whole family to enjoy this fun themed event. Canton First Friday is a monthly block party, sponsored by the Canton Main Street Program. There will be food trucks, live music by The Breakfast Club, local shopping, and all that downtown Canton has to offer! 6:00-9:00pm, downtown Canton. 770704-1548. CantonGa.gov

Holly Springs Young Professional Experience (HYPE) — On the first Tuesday of each month, young in age, young in your profession, or young at heart — doesn’t matter. Meet at Holly Springs’ newest coffee shop for a cup of coffee and some laidback networking with local professionals. 7:00-8:00am, The Coffee Vineyard, 2800 Holly Springs Parkway, Suite 100, Holly Springs. 770-345-5536. Facebook.com/events/556923864658166/ September is Read a New Book Month — When you open the pages of a book, you find yourself swept up in a new world of characters and stories, or valuable information. Use this celebration as your motivation to pick up that novel you’ve been meaning to finish, that DIY manual you bought to complete that project, or even a self-help book to assist you in becoming a better version of yourself.

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Night Hike — Please bring your own flashlight or headlamp for a cool evening hike with fellow Cherokee County neighbors. $10 per person, pre-registration is required. All ages welcome. 8:00pm, Lewis Park, 200 East Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock. 770-924-7768. CRPA.net

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The Gina Clowes Project — With a stamp from Bluegrass Today as “absurdly talented,” her new album, True Colors, touts two chart toppers. The album was released in September 2017 and debuted at No. 13 on the Bluegrass Billboard chart. 7:30pm, Falany Performing Arts Center, 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska. 770-720-9167. Reinhardt.edu

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Artistry in Wood Exhibit by Etowah River Woodturners — These incredibly talented woodturners are

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Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

back again this year! Check out the wide variety of utilitarian and decorative pieces up for sale. Tuesday-Friday 11:00am5:00pm and Saturday 12:00-5:00pm, Cherokee Arts Center, 94 North Street, Canton. 770-704-6244. CherokeeArts.org

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Ball Ground Concert in the Park — Enjoy a FREE concert by Local Legends! 7:00pm, Ball Ground City Park, Ball Ground. 770-735-2123. Facebook. com/BallGroundMainStreet

12 & 26

“The Changing Family” and “Complicated Grief” — These FREE discussions will be led by Guyeth Nash, M.Div., LPC. Dessert and coffee will also be provided. 6:30pm, Heritage Baptist 3615 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton. 770-479-9415.

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Power Hour — This is an hour of fast-paced networking with fellow business leaders as well as Chamber Board Chair Julianne Rivera and Chamber President/CEO Pam Carnes. Before the hour ends, you will have a chance to share about your business or organization for all to hear. 10:00am, Chamber Board Room, 3605 Marietta Highway, Canton. 770-3450400. CherokeeChamber.com

13 & 15

FREE CPR/AED Course — You never know when you may need these skills to save a life. This is a fundraiser for Hickory Flat Volunteer Association. Donations are appreciated. Thursday 7:0010:00pm or Saturday 9:00am-12:00pm, Cherokee County Fire Department Station #23, 7625 Vaughn Road, Canton. HFVA.org/CPR-Class-Registration.php

14 & 15

GLOW Band — This is an Eagles tribute show followed by a set of dance hits. 8:00pm, Chukkar Farm, 1140 Liberty Grove Road, Alpharetta. 770-314-3735. ChukkarFarmPoloClub.com

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Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None — This is classic English mystery at its finest. Friday and Saturday 8:00pm, Sunday 2:30pm, Canton Theatre, 171 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-591-0282. CherokeeTheatre.org

14 & 28

Parent’s Night Out — Drop the kids off at the pool, so you can enjoy adult time! Kids will play in the pool, enjoy a pizza dinner, do crafts, play games, and end the night with a movie! 5:30-10:00pm, Cherokee Aquatic Center, 1200 Wellstar Parkway, Canton. 678-880-4760. CRPA.net

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The Drifters — The Drifters were the first musical group to sell two million records with their pop classic, “Up on the Roof.” They were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame along with fellow

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inductees the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, and the Supremes. 3:00pm & 7:30pm, Falany Performing Arts Center, 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska. 770-7209167. Reinhardt.edu

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Born to Run 5K Run/Walk — This race benefits Cherokee County students attending Reinhardt University. Registration begins at 7:00am, race begins at 8:00am. Cannon Park, 130 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-720-5506. Reinhardt.edu/5k

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A Novel Idea — Authors discuss their latest novels under the theme of “Southern Writers.” The cafe has sandwiches, salads, and desserts. BYOB. Door prizes will be given away! This event is FREE and open to the public. 7:009:00pm, East Main Cafe (inside Audio Intersection), 210 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-670-9333. Marsha.Cornelius@ hotmail.com

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Gardeners Plant Sale — Plants include perennials, ground covers, cannas, yard art, and more! The demonstration garden at the Senior Center will be open for tours during the plant sale, providing a great opportunity to see what various plants look like. 9:00am12:00pm, Senior Services Center, 1001 Univeter Road. Canton. 770-721-7803. UGE1057@uga.edu

Volunteer Aging Council (VAC) Fundraising Luncheon — Support VAC programs, and get a wonderful lunch for only $5.00! Bring a friend, coworker, family member, or yourself, and enjoy a tasty lunch while supporting the seniors and veterans of Cherokee County. Stay and eat, or pick up and go. RSVP the location, so the amazing chefs can be prepared for all who come to support. 11:30am-1:00pm, Cameron Hall of Canton, 240 Marietta Highway, Canton. 678-230-4067. VAC-CherokeeGa.org

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Constitution Day — Representatives from the Hightower Trail Chapter of the local Daughters of the American Revolution will be donning Colonial attire and will be in the gazebo area to distribute copies of the Preamble to the Constitution to anyone who is interested. 11:00am-1:00pm, Cannon Park, 130 E. Main Street, Canton.

1823 Cherokee County Fair — Family fun featuring livestock, shows, carnival rides, games, and more. American Legion Fair Grounds, 160 McClure Street, Canton. 770-479-4405.

Ready-Set-Grow Garden Summit — Programs include Trees: Selection and Planting; Cool Season Veggies; Bulbs; Dividing Perennials; and Mulching and Lawn Care. There will also be mini demos on soils, amendments, fertilizers, houseplants, and indoor herbs. 10:00am-2:00pm, Senior Services Center, 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-7217803. UGE1057@uga.edu

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Ball Ground Movies in the Park — Come out for a FREE viewing of Ferdinand, sponsored by Ball Ground Main Street. The movie will begin at dusk (approximately 7:45pm). Ball Ground City Park, Ball Ground. 770-735-2123. Facebook.com/BallGroundMainStreet

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Tribute to the King, Gospel & Hits Featuring Travis Ledoyt — To those who think they have seen it all when it comes to Elvis tribute acts, this is the one that makes them do a double take. [continued on page 8]

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LIBRARY EVENTS SequoyahRegionalLibrary.org BALL GROUND 435 Old Canton Road, Ball Ground, 770-735-2025 HICKORY FLAT 2740 East Cherokee Drive, Canton, 770-345-7565 R.T. JONES 116 Brown Industrial Pkwy., Canton, 770-479-3090

DIY JAPANESE HERALDRY COASTERS September 7, 4:00pm, R.T. Jones Create your very own stylish felt coaster inspired by ancient Japanese heraldry. Materials will be provided. This is for ages 12+.

HANDS-ON SCIENCE (GRADES 3-5) September 13, 3:00pm, Ball Ground Discover the wonders of science through hands-on activities and exploration. Refreshments will be provided. Children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

RED FLAGS OF FRAUD September 8, 10:30am, Ball Ground Calling all parents! Let your children paint a shark bank while Crystal McPhearson from the Better Business Bureau gives you tips on avoiding scams. Registration is encouraged.

TALK LIKE / DRESS LIKE A PIRATE! September 19, 4:30pm, Ball Ground Ahoy, matey! In honor of National Talk Like a Pirate Day, teens in grades 6-12 are invited to talk and dress like a pirate! Learn how to “speak pirate” by using Mango Languages. Teens are encouraged to dress up.

DIY SIMPLE BLANKETS September 8, 1:00pm, Hickory Flat Get ready for fall and winter by learning to create a simple blanket. Registration is required.

SPECIAL TINKERGARTEN STORY AND ACTIVITY TIME September 20, 10:30am, R.T. Jones Enjoy a fun, free Tinkergarten storytime! Sing; listen to stories; and complete a simple nature project. This is for ages 18 months to 8 years; children must be accompanied by a participating adult. Registration is required.

MOM-DAD & ME YOGA September 10, 11:00am, Hickory Flat Explore and enjoy some fun yoga stretches for parents and children with Certified Personal Trainer Lisa Dudash. Registration is required. FAMILY BINGO NIGHT September 10, 6:00pm, Hickory Flat Join the fun and win prizes! Refreshments will be provided. This is for all ages; children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. VR EXPERIENCE - ANNE FRANK HOUSE September 10, 4:00pm, R.T. Jones Drop in for a virtual reality tour of Anne Frank’s house (Rated “E” for everyone), where she was forced to go into hiding to escape persecution from the Nazis during World War II. This is for all ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. TECHNOLOGY FAIR September 13, 4:00pm, R.T. Jones Discover resources that can make you more tech savvy. Learn computer basics like downloading your own e-books through the library and mastering the skill of coding. This is for all ages; children must be accompanied by an adult.

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Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

VR EXPERIENCE - WHITE HOUSE TOUR September 24, 4:00pm, R.T. Jones Experience a virtual reality tour of the White House (Rated “E” for everyone), featuring Barack and Michelle Obama. This is for all ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. DIY CARDS & BOOKMARKS September 26, 6:00pm, Hickory Flat Learn to make beautiful bookmarks and cards for fall and Halloween! Registration is required. HANDS-ON SCIENCE (GRADES K-2) September 27, 3:00pm, Ball Ground Discover the wonders of science through hands-on activities and exploration. Refreshments will be provided. Children must be accompanied by an adult. AUTHOR MEET-AND-GREET - NICOLE STOREY September 29, 4:00pm, R.T. Jones All teens are invited to participate in this third and final Library Crawl 2018 event! Nicole Storey is a local young adult urban fantasy author. She’s received the Amazon Best Selling Book award for three of her titles as well as many other awards.

Calendar continued from page 7

3:00pm, Falany Performing Arts Center, 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska. 770-7209167. Reinhardt.edu

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Business After Hours — Enjoy this networking event, which is held at various Chamber member business establishments. 4:30-6:00pm, Marietta Marine, 1500 Kellogg Creek Road, Acworth. 770-3450400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Meet & Eat — This networking opportunity will get you out in the community to visit a Chamber member restaurant while enjoying the company of fellow members. $20 registration can be paid for online. 11:30am-12:30pm, Chickfil-A, 130 Keith Drive, Canton. 770-3450400. CherokeeChamber.com

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The University Wind Ensemble — The Reinhardt University Wind Ensemble is comprised of advanced and versatile musicians who perform the finest large ensemble and chamber music literature including world premiere performances from today’s most innovative and exceptional composers. 7:30pm, Falany Performing Arts Center, 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska. 770-7209167. Reinhardt.edu

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Stone Cold Band — This country and southern rock band is back by popular demand! 7:00pm, Canton Theatre, 171 E. Main Street, Canton. 770-7040755. CantonTheatre.com

29 & 30

Riverfest — Enjoy more than 200 arts and crafts vendors, concessionaires, and family entertainers as well as an exciting children’s area. This event raises funds for charitable causes. Saturday 10:00am-6:00pm and Sunday 10:00am-5:00pm, Etowah River Park, 600 Brown Industrial Parkway, Canton. 770-704-5991. ServiceLeague.net

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OCTOBER

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Cherokee Challenge 2018 — This is the Chamber of Commerce’s version of The Amazing Race. Teams of two will register to participate in activities at destinations throughout the county. 7:00am, Cherokee County. 770-345-0400. CherokeeChamber.com

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Holly Springs Autumn Fest — Stay all day, and enjoy local arts and crafts from over eighty unique vendors, food trucks, local singers, bands, and dance companies, and a free kids’ zone complete with a rock climbing wall, double bungee trampoline, carnival games, face painting, and so much more! FREE to park, enter, and enjoy the kids’ zone! 10:00am-5:00pm, Barrett Park, 120 Park Lane, Holly Springs. 770-345-5536. HollySpringsGa.us

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Canton First Friday “Jeep Night” — Bring the whole family to enjoy this fun themed event. Canton First Friday is a monthly block party, sponsored by the Canton Main Street Program. There will be food trucks, live music by Skipper Grace, local shopping, and all that downtown Canton has to offer! 6:00-9:00pm, downtown Canton. 770-704-1548. CantonGa.gov

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River Church Pork and Torque Car Show and BBQ — $5 to show and $15 to compete in the car show, multiple classes with 25+ trophies awarded. The show is open to any car, truck, or motorcycle. BBQ, hot dogs, sides, sweets, and drinks will available for purchase at family-friendly prices. All proceeds will go to provide Christmas presents to group home foster kids through Act Together Ministries. 9:00am-3:00pm, River Church, 2335 Sixes Road, Canton. 770-265-6601. ZachNix74@gmail.com

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Taking Things for Granted My grandmother was very [Lifestyle] unique in the way she lived her life. She was born in 1902 and passed away in 1984, and she never asked for or wanted anything that she couldn’t do for herself. My grandfather was killed in 1947, which left her alone on a big farm for the remainder of her life. She managed by using the resources around her because everything she needed was on that farm. The one thing that puzzled me about her was she didn’t have indoor plumbing. I didn’t understand how someone could live without a bath tub or toilet. She never had it, nor did she ever want it because she didn’t think it was necessary. She had a two-seater outhouse, and on cold and rainy days, she

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Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

had what she called a “slop jar” that was kept beside her bed. She would warm water on her stove and pour it into a wash bowl that she would bathe herself from daily, and she washed her hair once a week using the outside faucet. Today, we take simple things for granted. Could I imagine my daughter without indoor plumbing and what her life would be like? She wouldn’t last a day, and I probably wouldn’t either. We have seniors in our program who need assistive devices to help them with things we take for granted. Cherokee Senior Services collects raised toilet seats, shower chairs, wheel chairs, walkers with seats, and any other device that could assist a senior with daily living. Senior Services needs adult

By Tim Morris

Depends to give to seniors who can’t afford them. We receive a lot of help from the community every year, but we can’t keep up with the demand for Depends. The Volunteer Aging Council purchases Depends for seniors along with other groups, but there is also a very special couple who has been donating Depends for years. I know they would not want the recognition because they truly do it from their heart, and Senior Services is very thankful to them. If you would like to donate or purchase Depends for seniors in need, please contact Cherokee Senior Services at 770-479-7438. L

Tim Morris is the director of Cherokee County Senior Services. 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-479-7438. www.CherokeeGa.com/SeniorServices

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CantonMinute

Reducing

Single-Use Plastic Consumption

to Keep Canton Beautiful

By Sandy McGrew l Plastic lid photo courtesy of Gary Mullet

P

lastic — it’s everywhere we go; it’s a product upon which we have come to heavily depend. It’s also littering everywhere we go now, too. Plastics are made from natural materials such as natural gas, oil, coal, minerals, and plants. Technically, rubber from the rubber tree is a plastic. The number of items that we encounter each day that are made of plastic are nearly infinite: car parts, toys, dishes, storage containers, office supplies, building materials, clothing, grocery/shopping bags, straws, cigarette filters, balloons, and the list goes on. Most of us recycle our plastic that is accepted by our waste collection service. When we’re at the park, most of us search for the recycle receptacle. Even with that effort, “Every year, eight million metric tons of plastic end up in our oceans. It’s equivalent to five grocery bags filled with plastic for every foot of coastline in the world. In 2025, the annual input is estimated to be about twice greater, or ten bags full of plastic per foot of coastline” (Plastic-Pollution. org).

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“Many marine organisms can’t distinguish common plastic items from food. Animals who eat plastic often starve because they can’t digest the plastic, and it fills their stomachs, preventing them from eating real food” (EarthDay.org). Our grocery stores offer reusable shopping bags, and sometimes, they’re even free with a purchase or donation. Some people have taken torn or stained clothing that was not in good enough condition to donate and used the fabric to make their own shopping bags. This is a great way to upcycle! Plastic shopping bags are one of the worst pollutants on our planet as well as one of the most dangerous items. Animals and birds can get caught in the handles and perish. A plastic

“A plastic bag has been found at the bottom of the ocean at the deepest point of 36,000 feet in the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench.”

Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

bag has been found at the bottom of the ocean at the deepest point of 36,000 feet in the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench. Here are some ways we can reduce our single-use plastic, and keep Canton beautiful and clean: 1. Remember your reusable shopping bags, not only for groceries, but for trips to the farmers market and retail shopping of all kinds. 2. Decline the plastic bag for your takeout food. 3. Decline the use of plastic straws. 4. Take your own cup to the coffee shop. 5. If you do have plastic shopping bags, try to reuse them in your small waste cans or for picking up pet waste while on a walk. There are so many ways to reduce our consumption of single-use plastic, I hope you’ll find your own path that works for you. Every little bit, every baby step we take will only improve our environment.

Sandy McGrew is a ten-year Canton resident who represents Ward 1 in the Canton City Council.

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Bringing Back

IMMENSE PATRIOTISM and GOODWILL This 9/11

By Sheriff Frank Reynolds

W

here were you on 9/11? I was in bed after having worked a night shift on patrol. My phone rang, and it was my mother, “Are you watching the news?” I could tell in her voice something was not right. “Why, what’s going on?” I asked. She indicated two planes had struck the World Trade Center buildings. I told her I would call her back, and I went to the living room to turn on the television. I remember trying to process what I was seeing and trying to make logical sense of what had just occurred. In disbelief, I watched as the tragedy unfolded. The following day, I was at a class at the Georgia Public Safety Training Center in Forsyth. At lunch, I went to a drive-through for some food and then picked up a newspaper. As I sat in my car reading the paper, I noticed there were absolutely no airplanes in the sky. I watched for several minutes as the cool air blew through the car and the clouds passed by, but no aircraft. It was a rather surreal moment. Over the next few days and weeks, I remember the outpouring of support for all public safety. People dropped off food at the precincts, waved to us more than usual, and the American flag was displayed on homes, businesses, and vehicles. The level of American pride was tremendous. When I reflect on that day and the weeks that followed, I can’t help but think of how different America is today. What has changed? I am sure we can all point a finger in any direction to find an answer. You can turn to most any news media outlet and see mostly negative images. Political views, false narratives,

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disrespect, and a laundry list of other things have caused our nation to appear fractured. I wonder if we can find that same love and respect without a national tragedy to bring us together. Yet, when I look at our community, I think we have a lot of good things going on in Cherokee County. I am sure others feel the same way about their communities. So, maybe things aren’t so bad after all. This anniversary, I am going to revisit that patriotism I felt on 9/11. I am going to go purchase a new American flag and hang it on my front porch. I am going to drop off something nice for our safety personnel and tell them how much I appreciate the job they do. It’s the little things that often make their day. I am going to spend more time letting people know how much I appreciate their friendship and tell my loved ones how much they mean to me. I challenge you to do the same. Maybe our collective goodwill will make a difference in the lives that touch us and so on. With that said, I appreciate you, and I am glad you are a member of our great community. It is an honor to serve as your sheriff, and I consider it a blessing to serve our community.

Frank Reynolds is the sheriff for Cherokee County. 678-493-4100. CherokeeGa-Sheriff.org

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Community have all worked together to bring the emergency medical care in Cherokee to a higher standard.

Bright Future Ahead for Emergency Medical Care in Cherokee Cherokee County has seen a big change in emergency medical care during the past few years. Decades ago, the ambulance service was handled by a local funeral home, and their primary purpose was nothing more than to get the injured or sick to the hospital as quick as they could. It was also during this time that most of the fire departments within Cherokee County were handled by local volunteers.

Times have changed, and today, you can no longer be just a firefighter. As the fire department got into the emergency medical services field, three people have been instrumental in the education and training of firefighters. Dr. Jill Mabley, medical director for the department; Randy Pierson, EMS program director; and Danny West, a division chief;

New recruits who come into Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services (CCFES) are trained in firefighting skills for many months, but as soon as they finish, they go directly to school to become an emergency medical technician (EMT). Firefighters today are not only on fire trucks; they are now a part of the ambulance service that was taken over by the County several years ago. Cherokee County has been very fortunate to have several firefighters go forward later in their career to become paramedics, too. In fact, fourteen firefighters graduated from paramedic school last month. According to Dr. Mabley, “There was an effort to make paramedics a more continued on page 16

Congratulations to our October “7 Differences” winner, Melanie Tugman!

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Community continued from page 15

recognized profession that has a national entity supervising it and that can accredit the courses.” Pierson, who does the training for paramedics in the CCFD, also stated that years ago there was a national EMS agenda that looked at where emergency medical services needed to go in the future and what changes needed to be made to get everyone on the same level. Because of all these changes, CCFES is now working hard to make paramedic training an accredited program. “We were able to teach the program under a letter of review. They looked at us initially, and they said that we had enough of the stuff together to start the program. They came back to do a site visit and notified us of their recommendations on anything that needed to be addressed, and now we are waiting to hear if we are approved. And then, hopefully, we will be an accredited program,” stated Pierson.

Cherokee HS 2018 Graduate Earns Private Pilot’s License From Air Force Walker Sosebee earned a private pilot’s license after completing a Liberty University training course, which was funded by the Air Force Flight Academy Scholarship he won while in CHS’s Air Force Junior ROTC program. He was one of 120 AFJROTC cadets around the world to receive the scholarship, valued at approximately $20,000. “There is truly no way to describe the honor one feels,” he said. “This whole program has truly been a blessing upon my life, and I cannot wait to see it change more lives in the future.” Lt. Col. Eddy Stanfill taught Sosebee in Cherokee High School’s AFJROTC program.

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Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

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Community Downtown Canton Cornhole Fall League The cornhole games will be scheduled for either 6:45pm, 7:30pm, or 8:15pm, and there are three divisions: Beginner (hits the board 1-2 times per 4 bags), Intermediate (hits the board consistently and a few in the hole), and Advanced (all four bags are on the board or in the hole). The team captain will choose your division when signing up. However, there may not be separate divisions at smaller locations, and if there is not a minimum of six teams per division, all divisions will be combined into one. Please make sure you are signed up for the appropriate division and correct location before the season begins. Games are scored to 21, and match-ups are best of three games. Each team will have one match-up per week at any of the times previously listed. Check CornholeATL.com for registration information, where you may also review the complete list of rules and additional details.

Starting September 4, on Tuesdays, cornhole teams will once again compete against each other in Canton’s Cannon Park.

Dr. Rohit Panchal and Dr. Raxit Patel Join Cherokee Lung & Sleep Specialists Cherokee Lung & Sleep Specialists, which offers a full spectrum of services to treat pulmonary, sleep, and critical care disorders, announced the addition of Dr. Raxit Patel at its Canton location, and Dr. Rohit Panchel to both the Canton and Woodstock locations.

Seven-week leagues include a season-ending tournament with a championship trophy and other prizes. The qualifying teams from each location will be eligible to compete in the larger City Championship Cornament with a chance to win additional prizes and get their team name on the cup!

Dr. Rohit Panchel Cherokee High School AFJROTC instructor Lt. Col. Eddy Stanfill, left, congratulates Class of 2018 graduate Walker Sosebee upon earning his private pilot’s license through the Air Force’s Flight Academy Scholarship Program.

“Walker Sosebee has been a crown jewel of this program,” Lt. Col. Stanfill said. “The four years he spent in our program helped him to mature, take leadership responsibilities to heart, and deeply root the core values of the USAF: integrity, service, and excellence. I wish I had a dozen Walker Sosebees.”

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Dr. Panchal is a board-certified physician in pulmonary, critical care, internal, and sleep medicine. He specializes in COPD, asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sleep apnea, considering each patient’s unique needs to provide individualized care. He is a member of the American College of Chest Physicians and the American Association of Sleep Medicine.

Dr. Patel is board-certified in pulmonary disease, critical care, and internal medicine. He has a focus on diagnosing and treating pulmonary diseases such as asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, chronic cough, and lung cancer. He will offer a patient-centered care approach that includes educating his patients and their families about the various treatment options available. He is a member of the American College of Chest Physicians, Society of Critical Care Medicine, and the American College of Physicians. Dr. Raxit Patel

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Community New CCSD Rodeo Team Established Chamber Names Volunteer of the Quarter The Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce that Jay Street with Automated Solutions Consulting Group, Inc. has been named the Chairman’s Council Volunteer of the Quarter for the second quarter of 2018. Members of the Chairman’s Council are accepted by invitation only from the Chamber’s board chair. In determining the Volunteer of the Quarter, attendance at Chamber events is evaluated for all members of the Chairman’s Council. “Jay is a dedicated Chamber volunteer, and we appreciate the time he has devoted this year,” said Julianne Rivera, Chamber board chair.

Cherokee County School District high school students who love rodeo now have the opportunity to participate and compete on a team! The rodeo team, sponsored by Cherokee High School, is open to all CCSD high school students. The team’s successes have included students qualifying for national competition. Team member Morgan Feltham is ranked No. 1 in Georgia for barrel racing and pole bending. “We are so proud of our kids,” said team co-sponsor Bethany H. Thomas, a Cherokee HS teacher. “I would love to see more of our CCSD kids avail themselves of this opportunity.”

For information on the Cherokee County Chamber and its programs, visit CherokeeChamber.com.

Battalion Chief Recognized for Thirty Years of Service Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services recently recognized Battalion Chief Kerry Hughes for thirty years of service to the department. Cherokee County Fire Chief Tim Prather thanked Hughes for his dedication and service in the fire department and presented him with a certificate of appreciation. “Hughes has done an excellent job for us, and we appreciate him for his devotion and duty that he has given to our department over the years,” stated Prather. Hughes came to work in July of 1988, starting his career working at the Little River Fire Department.

Morgan Feltham, left, and Jordann Wood competed at Nationals in Rock Springs, WY.

Hughes has seen a lot of changes in the fire department during those thirty years. “We’ve seen changes in the way you fight fires. Plus, we have seen the introduction of computers to help us, too,” stated Hughes.

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Baby-Fed Weaning What Is It? Should You Do It? By Vicki Knight-Mathis, M.D. [HealthyLife] Baby-fed weaning, or baby-led weaning, is allowing babies to feed themselves from the onset of introduction to solids rather than being spoon fed by an adult. Solid foods have always been a supplement to breast feeding or formula and are usually introduced between four to six months. Prior to six months and/or if your baby doesn’t have the following skills, solid food should be pureed. Signs that your baby is ready to attempt baby-fed weaning include being able to sit up well without support, loss of tongue thrust (the natural reflex babies use to push food out with the tongue), obvious ability to get food to mouth without assistance, willing to chew even if no or few teeth are present, and showing interest (e.g. trying to grab food from your plate). Potential advantages to baby-fed weaning are joining family meal time, and babies will choose what to eat, how quickly to eat, and how much to eat. Family meal time promotes healthy interaction, and children who choose how much to eat and how quickly to eat are less likely to override normal fullness cues, which will hopefully help alleviate weight issues down the road. Babies are also allowed to explore different tastes and textures, which may decrease pickiness. Studies have shown that babies do not choke any more often during baby-fed weaning than babies fed purees, as long as care is taken to offer soft, mushy, size-appropriate foods, and close adult supervision is provided. Never leave your child unattended while he/she is eating. Make sure your child is seated and in an upright position. Appropriate first foods include soft-cooked fruits, or very ripe fruits, like apples, pears, melons, and bananas. Soft-cooked vegetables like sweet potatoes, carrots, and green beans are good choices. Healthy proteins and fats like avocado, meats that fall apart when forked, and eggs may also be used. If you can easily mash the food between your fingers, it’s probably the right texture. DO NOT give your child foods like nuts, popcorn, raisins, grapes, grape tomatoes, or any coin-shaped foods like hotdogs. Low sodium diets Dr. Vicki Knight-Mathis are recommended for babies. For more is a pediatric physician information, visit ABCKidsInc.com/booksat DV Pediatrics. on-baby-led-weaning, or discuss with 770-704-0057. DVPediatrics.com your baby’s pediatrician.

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HollySpringsMinute

Main Street Holly Springs By Erin Honea

OAD RAILR

Update T

he City of Holly Springs’ Main Street program has again been designated as an accredited Main Street America program for meeting rigorous performance standards set by the National Main Street Center during 2017. Each year, the National Main Street Center and its coordinating program partners announce the list of accredited Main Street America programs in recognition of their exemplary commitment to preservation-based economic development and community revitalization through the Main Street Approach. “Main Streets are the heart of our communities, and the work they do to create quality public spaces, catalyze local entrepreneurship, and support downtown housing is more important than ever. Across the country, Main Street America programs truly strengthen the economic, social, and cultural fabric of their entire communities,” says Patrice Frey, president and CEO of the National Main Street Center. The City’s Main Street Program is evaluated annually by the Georgia Main Street program, using ten performance standards. Evaluation criteria determines the communities that are building comprehensive and sustainable revitalization efforts and include standards such as fostering strong public-private partnerships, securing an operating budget, tracking programmatic progress, and actively preserving historic buildings.

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Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

WALNUT STREET

During 2017, the City continued to make improvements to infrastructure in anticipation of the redevelopment of the Town Center area. Sidewalk and streetscape improvements funded by the Livable Centers Initiative and Community Development Block Grants were completed to improve pedestrian connectivity. Building rehabs gave small businesses a bump, the City welcomed over 11,000 guests to its community events, and in the Main Street District alone, twenty new jobs were created. The Town Center Project continues to move forward, and the Main Street Board could not be more excited with its progress. City council approved the Town Center Road Network Concept Plan in April. The Plan calls for the construction of a roundabout east of Holly Springs Fire Station #8 on Hickory Road and the construction of the Palm Street extension just north of Walnut Street to the roundabout on Hickory Road. The Concept Plan also calls for the removal of the stop sign at the intersection of Palm Street and Hickory Road and the

conversion of the northern terminus of Palm Street to a right-in/right-out intersection. The engineering plans for the roadway improvements are scheduled for completion in August. In the meantime, did you know that the Holly Springs Main Street Program hosts its own young professionals meetup? HYPE (Holly Springs Young Professional Experience) meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7:00am at The Coffee Vineyard for some laid-back networking! We hesitate to even call HYPE a networking event. We are working to build personal relationships among business owners, not just business acquaintances. So, if you are young in age, young in your profession, or young at heart, join us for a cup of coffee, and meet other like-minded individuals.

Erin Honea is a native of Cherokee County and has been the Main Street director for the City of Holly Springs since 2014.

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Senator Speaks

Will the New Law and Express Lanes Provide the Relief We Seek? By Senator Bruce Thompson

I

n July, the hands-free law went into effect, outlawing the use of hand-held devices while driving. This legislation was passed in an attempt to reduce trafficrelated fatalities as a result of distracted driving. Law enforcement has openly stated that the law was necessary to aid in the enforcement of the no texting statute passed back in 2010. Those against it felt that a law already existed prohibiting the engagement in any action that would distract drivers from safely operating a motor vehicle. This

law was cited when a man was issued a citation for eating a juicy hamburger while driving. If eating a hamburger while driving is deemed distracting and unsafe, I’m still puzzled as to why people can puff on a cigarette or vape while driving down the highway. By the end of the year, the express lanes on 575 and Interstate 75 are set to open. These new roads are designed to provide relief to the packed roadways, but the question still remains whether they will work as designed. I personally

have my doubts after traveling south of Atlanta and seeing similar lanes sitting idle or being restricted from use. It seems to me that since taxpayer money was used to build the lanes, they should be available for use 24/7. As far as the fly-over lanes, one major accident, and commuters may wish they had not traded the crawl on 75 for the complete stall on the fly-over. How many times have you been motoring down the interstate at 65 mph and glanced at your passenger mirror just as a motorcycle zips between you and the car beside you? This action of riding or hugging the white line is called lane-splitting, and it is illegal in Georgia. Although some states permit motorcyclists to drive between the cars, many more are taking actions to prohibit the practice.

Bruce Thompson is a state senator for District 14, which includes Canton. 404-656-0065. BruceThompsonGa. com

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Community Partner

The Center for the Visually Impaired in Your Community

Every person with vision loss should be able to live with independence and dignity. This mission guides the activities at the Center for the Visually Impaired (CVI), a nonprofit vision resource and rehabilitation center located in the heart of metro Atlanta. CVI offers programming and rehabilitation services to support people all over Georgia who are visually impaired or blind. It is Georgia’s largest, comprehensive, fully accredited, private facility providing vision rehabilitation services. CVI was started by a group of parents facing a collective challenge: how to help their visually impaired children reach their full potential. Interested in enhancing opportunities for their children, the devoted parents sought specialized training for them in orientation and mobility, advanced communication, and daily living skills. Led by George and Jean Henderson, the group established a new agency in 1962, Community Services for the Blind, which later changed its name to the Center for the Visually Impaired. CVI provides a variety of training for the visually impaired, supporting individuals throughout their lives. For 55 years, CVI has offered vocational rehabilitation for working-age adults, social, therapeutic, academic, and recreational services for school-aged youth, and specialized classes and support for children under the age of five. CVI also offers a community-based program, providing training directly in the home. Additionally, CVI provides training classes on topics such as Braille, white cane travel, diabetes management, assistive

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technology, cooking and meal preparation, health and fitness, financial management, self-defense, and emergency preparedness. Special events are held throughout the year to support CVI’s prgrams. The next event is Dining in the Dark — a one-of-a-kind dining experience designed to raise awareness about vision loss. At this event, guests are served a three-course meal in complete darkness, amplifying their sense of smell, touch, taste, and sound. The featured menu remains a mystery and is delivered to guests’ tables by members of the Atlanta Police Department SWAT Team, using their night-vision equipment. Dinner is preceded by a training session that shows guests the dining techniques CVI teaches clients with low or no vision. The event will be held Sunday, Sept. 30, at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center. When CVI was founded, rehabilitation services for people with vision loss were only just beginning to be developed. The growth of CVI over the years represents more than an expansion of services — it also reflects the organization’s leadership in finding new ways to help people live more independently. The organization is proud to serve more than 4,000 Georgians annually.

For more information about CVI or how you can help, please visit CVIGA.org, or call 404-875-9011.

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Don’t

fungus that attacks Zoysia as it’s going into dormancy.

Zoysia is also struggling with rhizoctonia at this time, the results can be devastating.

[HomeLife] Most people think that

The attack is much worse if the heat extends longer into the fall than usual, as happened in the fall of 2016. Remember the seventy-degree temperatures in December? This type of environment doesn’t allow the Zoysia and Bermuda grass to go into winter dormancy when it should, weakening the grass and delaying spring green up.

with the cooler fall weather, fungus is no longer an issue. However, that depends on the type of grass you have as well as a few other factors such as nighttime temperatures, humidity, and ambient outside air temperatures during the day. As the longer fall nights turn cooler, brown patches on Fescue grass disappears. But rhizoctonia attacks Zoysia grass cultivars no matter the changing season. Rhizoctonia is a cool season

So how do you keep this from happening and protect your Zoysia grass and your investment? A fall Zoysia fungicide program is the answer. Two applications of a liquid fungicide on Zoysia, one in September and another in October, will keep the turf from being attacked by rhizoctonia and bring the grass into winter healthier and happier.

Grass plants take the winter dormant period to store necessary nutrients and do an internal check of anything wrong, fixing issues before spring. But if Mother Nature doesn’t cooperate, the results can be a forced use of the vital nutrients the plants have stored up all summer long and will need to come out of dormancy, as the plants use up their nutrients trying to create food in the shorter days of fall. If the

for It!

By Mark Sagaas

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An ounce of prevention is worth much more than a pound of cure.

Mark Sagaas is a senior relationship builder for Maple Leaf Lawn Care and Pest Control, 890 Sylvan Drive, Marietta. 770-794-7444. MapleLeaf LawnAndPest.com

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Woodstock Summer Concert Series

EVERclear

with special guest The Bitteroots Photos courtesy of PhotoJack.net

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Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

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CCSD’s Anonymous Reporting and Tip Line Communication Systems

Reports can be made in the following ways:

By Lisa-Marie Haygood [AcademicLife] It is not hard for me to recall children from my childhood who were “outsiders” — kids who did not make friends, stood alone on the playground, and didn’t eat lunch with anyone. I do not recall being particularly concerned with their happiness or mental health. I do not recall trying to befriend them or going beyond my normal routine to check on them. I should have. I wish I had been a better friend. Though, it never occurred to me that those same children would harm classmates, teachers, or themselves. Recent years have raised our awareness about these children, and we have seen that more and more young folks

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are experiencing anxiety, compulsions, depression, and extreme mental health issues. There is no way to know if there are more children with these issues, or if we are just more aware now. Regardless, mental health issues are prevalent, and the anti-bullying and #BeKind campaigns combined with the Cherokee County School District’s (CCSD) ad hoc Safety and Security Committee’s updated anonymous reporting and tip line communication systems will help ensure appropriate measures will be taken by community law enforcement and school police/operations officials. Parents, students, and concerned community members can provide discreet information about anything that concerns them, and it will be investigated quickly and thoroughly.

Phone 4ALER T1, ex tensio n 1695 Text # Text 1695 + your t ip to A LERT1 or 253 Email 781 1695@ alert1.u s Online messa ge 1695.a lert1.u s 1-855-

We certainly hope a tragedy doesn’t happen in our community. This is a great way to ensure discretion and immediate action to continue to prioritize the safety of our school children. CCSD and the ad hoc Safety and Security Committee have been great at being proactive.

Lisa-Marie Haygood is the executive director for the Cherokee County Educational Foundation. 770-704-4213. CherokeeCountyEducationalFoundation. org

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COVER STORY By Cyndi Braun

W

henever there’s a need for a heavy-duty wrecker to clear an accident scene, there’s a good chance Mauldin Body Shop & Towing will be there. And if Mauldin is on the scene, you might catch a glimpse of a young woman in a pink safety vest driving the wrecker.

for towing and repairing vehicles. She learned from leaders in the industry: her grandfather Herbert Mauldin, mother Debbie Weaver, and father John Weaver.

Meet Angela Reece, Reinhardt graduate, certified firefighter, softball player, former Mrs. Cherokee County, and WreckMaster Top Ten. Angela breaks all kinds of stereotypes every day. She handles a 75-ton rotator truck with skill and precision, pulling overturned tractor trailers upright, assisting emergency responders with life-saving extrications, and

rescuing large farm animals in trouble — all in a day’s work, and sometimes a night’s work. Angela inherited the family’s penchant

“We handle everything from small vehicles all the way up to moving tractor trailers and construction equipment. We’ve also handled derailed trains and even airplane crashes,” said Angela. “After we tow a car, or if you bring it here, we work with the insurance companies. We can repair any make, model vehicle you have. We can do the body work, paint work, frame work, from start to finish.”

Towing Services

Located on Butterworth Road since 1961, the company offers towing and recovery services, lockout service, relocation of vehicles, and large animal rescue (in coordination with Cherokee County Fire Department). Mauldin has a fleet of vehicles, which includes a Peterbuilt semi with

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a Landoll trailer used for heavy equipment or oversized storage container relocation, three heavy-duty wreckers (a 30-ton Kenworth, 60-ton Peterbuilt, and a 75-ton Peterbuilt rotator), one medium-duty wrecker, and flatbed rollback wreckers for light-duty towing needs. All wrecker drivers are WreckMaster certified, which means they’ve learned the latest skills and techniques in the towing and recovery industry. Six drivers are also trained firefighters, including John and Angela. Four drivers are career firefighters in Cherokee County, including Brian Reece, Angela’s husband. “Our drivers are trained to do towing and recovery, damage-free,” said John Weaver. “We’re the only Cherokee County wrecker service with all its drivers WreckMaster trained and certified.” John has long supported WreckMaster training. He attended his first WreckMaster class in 1996 and continued through the training until he was named WreckMaster of the Year in 2005. He’s so influential in the field that he was inducted into the International Towing Museum Hall of Fame in 2016. He travels throughout the southeast to teach a heavy-duty cross-training course for towers and fire rescue. He also serves as chairman of the operations committee for the Traffic Incident Management Enhancement (TIME) Task Force. Angela is following in her father’s footsteps and is the highest-trained female WreckMaster worldwide. She was named WreckMaster Top Ten in 2010. She is also a member of the Service League of Cherokee County, Safe Kids of Cherokee County, Ghost Out, and TIME Task Force of Atlanta.

Body Shop

Whatever the cause of those dings, dents, and scratches, Mauldin’s fullservice body shop can transform your vehicle. Managed by Debbie Weaver,

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the shop warranties all work for the lifetime the customer owns the vehicle.

specific color. The shop also offers paintless dent removal.

Prior to getting started, technicians meet with customers to learn the history of the car. Technicians then prepare a detailed estimate of what they’ll do to restore the car to preaccident condition.

Using two Brewco frame and alignment racks, technicians can detect misalignments and restore vehicles to proper structural alignment. This ensures that the car not only looks good but is safe to drive.

“We work with the insurance companies for customers. We help argue for what we think is needed,” said Angela. “We fix the vehicle the way we would want it to be if it was our personal vehicle. We treat it like we would be driving it every day.” The shop uses only best quality PPG paints to ensure optimum gloss and durability. Trained technicians mix colors by factory computer codes and then custom tint to match the vehicle’s

The Fourth Generation

While the youngest of Herbert’s descendants is not quite ready to take over the shop, Angela and Brian’s ten-year-old daughter Sierra is already fascinated by the business. She’s been known to provide helpful suggestions for the wrecker drivers and has begged her mom to take her out on calls. In a few more years, Cherokee County may have a second woman in a pink safety vest driving heavy-duty wreckers.

143 Butterworth Road, Canton, GA 30114 770-479-4851 MauldinBodyShop.com Facebook.com/MauldinBodyShop

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money you pay up front, the better your interest rate will be, which brings us to other popular types of mortgages: 3. Traditional fixed-rate mortgage - If you plan to stay in your home a long time, most people will choose a fixed-rate mortgage. You pay a down payment of ten to twenty percent or more, and the rate you receive at the time of the loan will remain fixed for the life of the loan. This can provide peace of mind, as you can always count on what your mortgage payment will be.

Getting the

By Sheila Garrison [Lifestyle] While interest rates have increased in the past year, mortgage loans are still at historically low rates. What’s more, real estate has become a popular investment tool again. Whether you’re purchasing a home to live in or to be used as rental property, you want to get the perfect deal. Where do you start, and what kind of mortgage do you need?

Let’s start with the types of mortgages, as there are many. Most conventional mortgage lenders require a down payment of ten to twenty percent or more, which can be a lot of money for some people. If you have the ability to afford the mortgage payments but the money up front is an issue, consider these two types of mortgages: 1. 100 percent purchase price mortgage - Some lenders offer fixedrate loans that will allow you to borrow

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100 percent of the home’s value. This is a huge benefit to those who haven’t saved enough for a down payment but would like to purchase soon. 2. “No closing cost” mortgage - With this option, you make a down payment, but the closing costs are folded into your loan. This is a great option if you’re unable to afford both the down payment and closing costs, or you’d simply like to have some extra cash for renovations. However, you should know that the more

4. Adjustable-rate mortgage - This option offers a lower interest rate to start, but the rate will adjust after a certain time period, depending on market conditions. For example, a 5/1 ARM will adjust after five years, and could potentially go up as much as two percent, depending on the market. If you’re buying a first home that you plan to leave in less than five years, an adjustable-rate mortgage makes great sense. Lowering your interest rate can save you a tremendous amount of money over the life of your loan. There are a variety of factors that affect your interest rate. For starters, a great credit score will improve your rate. If you’re unsure of your credit score, get a free credit report, and make sure it contains no mistakes. Your employment record is another factor. Two years or more of steady employment are important. Finally, the more money you can put down, the better your rate will be. Your house is likely the biggest investment you will ever make. Understanding how a mortgage works, and choosing a recognized, reputable lender will help ensure you make the wisest choice. L

Shelia Garrison is the Canton Financial Center manager at LGE Community Credit Union. 2018 Cumming Highway, Canton. 770-424-0060. LGECCU.org

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Dentures By Vishant Nath, D.M.D. [HealthyLife] According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), 57 percent of Americans aged 65 to 74 and 51 percent of Americans aged 55 to 64 wear full or partial dentures. Regardless of your age, having teeth is super important! Having teeth allows for the ability to speak and eat more easily, not to mention the importance of teeth in maintaining facial appearance. Since over half of adult Americans have some sort of dentures, chances are good that you or someone you know is in this group. If you or someone you care for has dentures, it is important to understand how to best care for them over time. As stated above, dentures can play a significant role in quality of life for those who

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need them. Having to live without some or all of your teeth will drastically affect the way you eat, speak, and look. Partial dentures are prescribed when the patient still has some of their natural teeth. Full dentures are required when all teeth are missing. New dentures may feel awkward initially, as it can take a few weeks to get used to them. It is common to notice some soreness or mild irritation to the gums and cheeks. It is imperative to continue good oral hygiene habits with dentures. Brushing of the gums, cheeks, and roof of mouth helps to stimulate circulation in these areas. This should be done every morning before putting the dentures in place. Another crucial part of dental hygiene with dentures is to brush the dentures themselves daily after removing them. The tissues of the mouth should be brushed again in the evening to remove any food particles that may remain in the oral cavity.

Some denture wearers see benefit in the use of denture adhesives. Adhesives come in several different forms – creams, powders, pads/wafers, liquids, and strips. Consult your dentist for advice on what might work best for your situation. Regardless of whether you still have some of your natural teeth, it is very important to schedule regular appointments with your dentist. The dentist can examine your mouth and assess your dentures to be sure that the fit is still appropriate. No matter your age, work with your dentist to find the best options for you, so that your teeth can allow you to continue to speak, eat, look, and feel your best!

Dr. Vishant Nath is the owner of Canton/Alpharetta/Roswell Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics. 678-352-1090. KidsHappyTeeth.com

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Riverfest Arts and Crafts Festival Aralyn’s Boulangerie Cupcakes

R

iverfest Arts and Crafts Festival, organized and hosted by the Service League of Cherokee County, is Cherokee County’s longest-running fall festival. More than thirty years ago, the Service League created Riverfest as a way to raise funds for the children in Cherokee County whose families were facing hardships. Riverfest hosts some of the Southeast’s finest artists, crafters, and entertainment, which draws recordbreaking crowds year after year. With a line-up of returning favorites and many new artists and crafters, the 34th Annual Riverfest Arts and Crafts Festival is sure to be the best yet!

Willow and Ash Designs

New to Riverfest this year is Aralyn’s Boulangerie Cupcakes. Not only are the cupcakes and other baked goods amazing, but Aralyn is nothing short of amazing herself! Aralyn Russell is only eleven years old with three years of baking experience under her belt already. She says she has been baking with her mother since she was little. She was inspired to get serious about her baking talent after watching Kids Baking Championship on the Food Network. Her dream is to appear on Kids Baking Championship and to also open her own cupcake shop. No doubt this girl is going places. Be sure to check her out in the children’s area at Riverfest, and you may want to snag an autograph along with that cupcake! Another exciting vendor new to Riverfest this year is Willow and Ash Designs. Willow and Ash Designs features custom, stamped, and beaded jewelry. The jewelry is unique, beautiful, and can be custom made just for you. Anyone looking for the perfect piece of jewelry will be sure to find it here. Check them out in the arts and crafts area at Riverfest this year.

Deeloochia

Riverfest is also excited to host Deeloochia and Southern Pine Restorations, both great places to find stylish, one-of-a-kind home decor. Deeloochia specializes in custom-made gourd lamps. And Southern Pine Restorations is a husband-and-wife team that builds, paints, and refinishes furniture. Visit these vendors, and take home a unique lamp or beautiful piece of furniture to complete your living area. Whether you are a regular at Riverfest or coming for the first time, there is something for everyone. From arts and crafts and jaw-dropping entertainment to pony rides, bounce houses, and delicious food trucks, you’ll find it all and much more at the 34th Annual Riverfest Arts and Crafts Festival. The Service League of Cherokee County will present the Festival from 10:00am to 6:00pm Saturday, September 29, and 10:00am to 5:00pm Sunday, September 30 at Etowah River Park, located at 600 Brown Industrial Parkway in Canton. Admission for adults and children eleven and older is a requested $5 donation. The event will take place rain or shine. All areas will be handicap accessible. Free parking and shuttle service will also be available.

Southern Pine Restorations

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Fight the Fall By Danielle Beatty, D.P.T.

[Lifestyle] September is National Fall Prevention and Awareness Month. Falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries for older adults. Falls threaten the safety and independence of senior adults and generate enormous economic and personal costs. Falls with or without injury greatly impact the quality of life for an older adult. Many older adults have a fear of falling, and as a result, they limit their activities and social engagements. They are also reluctant to mention their fear of falling to their doctors, caregivers, or loved ones for fear of restrictions to their independence. • The Bad News According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention

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1/3 of Americans 65 and older will fall each year. • Every eleven seconds, an older adult is treated in the emergency room for a fall. • Every nineteen minutes, an older adult dies from a fall. • Most fractures among older adults are caused by the result of a fall. • The Good News Falling is not an inevitable result of aging and is highly preventable. Through evidence-based fall prevention programs and community partnerships, the number of falls among seniors can be greatly reduced. • Are you at risk for a fall? If you have fallen in the past twelve months, you are at greater risk for another fall. Do you suffer from dizziness or balance issues? Have you experienced a decrease in flexibility or muscle strength? Do you avoid certain activities or areas for fear you will fall?

What can you do to prevent falls? To prevent falls in your own home, clear walkways and pathways of any objects and clutter. Avoid scatter rugs. If needed, use assistive devices to give you added support such as a cane or walker. Schedule a fall-risk assessment with your doctor, and get started on an exercise program to increase your muscle strength and mobility. L

Danielle Beatty is a physical therapist at Fyzical Therapy and Balance Centers, 6884 Hickory Flat Highway, Woodstock. 770-704-8244. FyzicalWoodstock.com

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What Is Going on With

My Body? By Amy Williams

Amy Williams is the marketing and community relations coordinator for Georgia Medical Treatment Centers & Medical Weight Loss Clinics, 557 Riverstone Parkway, Suite 140, Canton. 770-345-2000. GeorgiaMTC.com

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change your mood and your energy level with a simple and safe procedure? Once these pellet therapy? Did you know that this pellets are placed, they become identical to therapy has been around since the 1930s? the hormones in your body, matching and Pellet therapy is the only form of hormone working to help you become more energetic replacement therapy (HRT) that ensures while feeling patient compliance 100% of the time. exuberant and full There is now another extension available — BioTE of life. — which is customized to you. Pellet therapy helps to keep your hormone levels consistent without the extreme mood swings, and it comes from natural sources: yams and soy.

[HealthyLife] Have you heard of hormone

Symptoms that many people have such as insomnia, weight gain, depression, brain fog, loss of muscle, low libido, and anxiety, among others, can have a huge negative impact on our daily routines. What if you were able to

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=

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Five Things You Can Do to Extend the Life of Your

Tires By Tim Lanier

[Lifestyle] There can be a big difference in the quality of tires from one manufacturer to another. With the right tire equipment, a technician can often predict how smoothly the tire will ride before it’s mounted on the car for the first time. Generally, name-brand tires ride smoother and last longer than offbrand tires. Regardless of what brand you choose, here are five things to prolong the life of your tires:

1. Maintain proper tire inflation. If a tire is under inflated, it will wear

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excessively on its edges. If it is overinflated, it will wear excessively in the middle of the tire tread.

tire rotation intervals between 5000 and 6000 miles.

5. Check your balance. 2. Maintain proper alignment. On a car, if the front or rear tires point even slightly outward, it’s called “toe-out.” If they point inward, it’s called “toe-in.” If the tires have an excessive amount of toe-out or toein, they will wear prematurely and cause a decrease in fuel mileage.

3. Drive with a lighter foot. Rapid acceleration and deceleration will cause the tires to wear more rapidly. Likewise, hugging the turns at a rapid pace will also cause the tires to wear more rapidly.

A tire/wheel that is not in balance can cause excessive vibration, which, in turn, can cause tire wear in addition to suspension component wear. Small weights usually must be added to the wheel for proper balance. The best balance equipment includes a process called “Road Force Balance.” This process includes an additional step in which the balance machine simulates the tire riding on the road surface. This process is used for tires/wheels that are balanced but still vibrate. In these cases, the tire must be replaced to eliminate the vibration. L

4. Rotate your tires routinely. It’s important to rotate your tires from the front to the rear and from the rear to the front. This enables the tires to wear more evenly and prolongs their life. Most manufacturers recommend

Tim Lanier is the owner of Killian Automotive, 1255 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-345-5873. KilliansAuto.com

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Book Review BY FARRIS YAWN

Ollie and the Wise Old Owl As anyone who has spent time around children knows, you are subject to be bombarded with questions about anything and everything. It is easy to forget that just because we may understand the reason some things are done the way they are — they don’t. Childlike wonder and curiosity can be amusing or enlightening, but it can also be frustrating at times. This is where we find Oscar in Ollie and the Wise Old Owl by Dan Carlton. Oscar has quite a time trying to get Ollie to join his fellow owls in their nightly routine. Ollie is not one to just accept the way things have always been done. He wants to really understand! Wise old Oscar comes to realize that instead of just causing trouble, Ollie is acquiring true wisdom by questioning everything. This book, beautifully illustrated by Debbie Byrd, teaches children that it is okay to be curious and question things, as they try to understand their ever-changing world. It also reminds adults that it is important to answer those questions with patience. It is the path to wisdom for young and old.

Ollie and the Wise Old Owl was selected as the sole 2018 Children’s Finalist at the Georgia Writers Association Annual Georgia Writer of the Year awards. Available in hardcover and paperback, Ollie and the Wise old Owl can be found at WisdomCapBooks.com, YawnsPublishing.com, and Amazon.com.

Farris Yawn is the owner of Yawn’s Publishing, 2555 Marietta Highway, #103, Canton. 678-880-1922. YawnsPublishing.com

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Encourage Outside-the-Box Thinking in Your Preschooler By Mary Kay Buquoi, Ed.S.

A fantastic [AcademicLife] way to get your little one to think outside the box is with cooking. For example, you can make numerous different croissant dishes with a simple roll of the dough. Unfold each section from the packaged roll, and form it into an individual triangle. Once it is separated and open, ask your child what to add to the middle. There are a ton of possibilities! Here are three examples: 1. Add a piece of ham and a piece of cheese, roll the dough closed, and bake for a delicious ham and cheese sandwich. 2. Add pepperoni and cheese, and serve with a tomato sauce dip to create a mini-croissant pizza. 3. Add shredded chicken and bacon, and serve with ranch dressing.

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Another way to encourage your child to think outside the box is with riddles: Q. A man went on a trip riding his horse. He left on Friday, stayed in town for three days, and came back on Friday. How did he do it? A. His horse’s name is Friday. Q. What has three hands but cannot clap? A. A clock How do you encourage outside-the-box thinking? Be sure to share your ideas with other parents!

Mary Kay Buquoi is owner of The Goddard School, 140 Foster Road, Woodstock. 770-720-1311. GoddardSchools.com

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By Julie Senger

W

hile many folks already know about things like Atlanta’s Olympic Torch Tower, Marietta’s Big Chicken, Alpharetta’s Cagle Castle, or Ball Ground’s Burger Bus, there are many other interesting/peculiar Georgia attractions you may not know existed, which may be worthy of a short detour on your next road trip. Here are a few you may want to check out:

Photos courtesy of 57th Fighter Group Restaurant, JandDImages

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Howard Finster’s Paradise Garden 200 North Lewis Street Summerville 706-808-0800

Known for designing album covers for rock groups such as R.E.M. and the Talking Heads, artist Howard Finster originally started out to build a roadside folk-art tribute to inventors out th 57 Fighter Group Restaurant of junk and scraps. However, according 3829 Clairmont Road to the Paradise Garden Foundation Atlanta website (ParadiseGardenFoundation. 770-234-0057 org), Finster shifted his focus when he This aviation-themed restaurant is was “using his fingers to apply paint to a decorated to look like a WWII refurbished bicycle, he noticed that the active war zone, with vehicles paint smudge on the tip of his finger had and planes on the grounds formed a human face. A voice spoke to outside, while the restaurant him, saying, ‘paint sacred art.’” Finster itself is made to look like went on a bomb-damaged French to create farmhouse. Inside, you can almost put on headsets to listen 47,000 to nearby air traffic control pieces of tower chatter because the art in his establishment is located lifetime, on the runway of Peachtree many of Dekalb Airport, so you can also which can watch small planes take off and be seen in land while you eat. Additionally, Paradise the interior walls are covered with Garden. Paradise Garden Artist Howard Finster’s 1940s memorabilia and pictures. World’s Folk Art Church

Canton Family Life | SEPTEMBER 2018

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Tank Town USA

10408 Appalachian Highway Morganton 706-633-6072

You’ll be driving around in a dirt pit that gets especially muddy when it rains, so you probably don’t want to wear expensive designer duds on this field trip. If you really want to get rid of some pent-up angst in a healthy way, for $599, you can drive the “tank” over a car and crush it!

Pasaquan

238 Eddie Martin Road Buena Vista 706-507-8306 Eddie Owens Martin, the artist/creator of Pasaquan, had been “sick with a fever when he was visited by three very tall humanoids from the future world of Pasaquan. They chose him, they said, to be their envoy, ‘St. EOM,’ the only Pasaquoyan of the twentieth century.” Eddie’s job was to “make art and live his life in a way that would show people how wonderful the future would be.” Eddie went on to spend thirty years adding rooms onto his deceased mother’s farmhouse and filling them with paintings and sculptures of “Pasaquoyans in their anti-gravity power suits.” The seven-acre compound is covered with mystic symbols and zany structures that are a testament to this artist’s colorful past and eclectic personality.

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Old Car City USA photos courtesy of Brittany Petish

Old Car City USA

Wampus Box

3098 Highway 411, NE White 770-382-6141

2315 Georgia 17 Sautee Nacoochee 706-878-2281

This place is a haven for photographers who love to scour its 32 acres for the perfect rusted-out old vehicle with the best mix of light and shadows dancing across its hood from just the right angle. Opened as a general store during the Great Depression, Old Car City gradually evolved into a large old automobile junkyard. In 2009, owner Dean Lewis realized he could turn it into a tourist attraction because “lots of people seemed to share his love of decomposing automotive carcasses.”

This box/cage contraption is located outside the Old Sautee Store. It has delighted, intrigued, and frightened travelers for more than twenty years. One traveler recalled visiting the wampus box as a child: “Inside, they say there’s a rare and dangerous animal. You can peak inside, but you can’t reach in. All you see is a wampus tail sticking out from an inner hole. Now, being kids, we wanted to see the whole wampus, so we did what they dared you not do and opened the box from the front latch. Well, needless to say, a ‘wampus’ leaps out and nearly scares the bajeebees out of you!”

While in White, have lunch at Wes-Man’s restaurant (3167 Highway 411, NE), where the old 1940s truck parked out front is repainted every single day and utilized as a welcome sign and message board.

Bettis Tribble Gap Road Cumming

labyrinth has only one path, and the

Source - RoadsideAmerica.com/location/ga/all

Booger Hill

A gravity hill, it is said that “ghosts haunt the nearby slave burial ground” because they don’t want visitors, “so they pull your car back up the road. Labyrinth of Rome And leave hand prints.” At 402 Civic Center Drive the bottom of the hill, Rome when you put your car 706-295-5576 in neutral, it will defy gravity and roll up Need to get out of the hill. According your car to stretch to one person who your legs and tried it, this road clear your head? is very busy in the In 2010, the 1930s daytime, so you may Works Progress want to try it at night Ph Administration ur ot To o of co when it is less busy (and e urt c amphitheater was fi f esy eO o f Ge orgia’s Rom creepier!). The same person transformed into a meditative also claimed that the car “picked up labyrinth composed of 5,490 bricks. speed” as it ascended. According to RomeGeorgia.org, “A is m

Have you ever wanted to drive a tank, but you just don’t think you’re cut out to join the military, endure the rigors of boot camp, and then uproot yourself to go wherever Uncle Sam sends you for training and duty? If your answer is, “Yes!” then this place is for you. Well, you won’t actually get to drive a tank because the U.S. will not sell operational armor to the public. Instead, you can operate a FV432, which is an armored personnel carrier that the British army used to drive. However, most people would label this vehicle a tank, as it is fifteen tons of armor-plated steel.

intention is not to confuse, but rather to help one focus. The path into the center is a search for your true self, as the stresses and concerns of the world slip away from your consciousness. This particular labyrinth is a bit more strenuous than most as it is on different levels, not unlike how we live our lives.”

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Fall Is Prime Time for Vegetable Gardening By Joshua Fuder It is a common [HomeLife] misconception that vegetable gardening ends with the summer. Many vegetables like spinach, collards, lettuce, and turnips prefer to grow in cooler temperatures. Not only do many vegetables tolerate cool temperatures, they actually thrive and are sweeter and more flavorful when grown under cold conditions.

Things to Consider for the Fall Garden Planting from seed - Successive plantings of quick growing plants like radishes, spinach, beets, turnips, and lettuce can be made up to about mid-

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September to mature before frosts come. These plants do best when planted directly from seed. Soil temperatures in the fall tend to be warmer than in spring, so it is recommended to plant seeds twice as deep as normal. Transplanting Things like collards, kale, broccoli, and cabbage can be transplanted in the garden up to the end of September. These plants are very tolerant of mild frosts and get sweeter in taste after a few freezing nights. Turn up the flavor - To add some flavor to the roots and greens coming out of the garden, think about planting herbs

like parsley, dill, arugula, and cilantro — all of which prefer to grow under cooler temperatures. The fall is also the time to plant garlic, onion sets, and shallots for harvest next year. A little protection goes a long way - If a frost is predicted, try to cover plants with a floating row cover, straw, or old bed sheets. If just a few plants are left, you can protect them with things like milk jugs. Simple cold frames can also be constructed with old windows or plexiglass, which will make growing things like lettuce possible all winter long.

Joshua Fuder is an agriculture and natural resources agent at the UGA Cooperative Extension Cherokee County. 770-721-7830. CAES.UGA. edu/extension/cherokee

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Andouille Sausage Stuffing Ingredients (Note - This recipe yields about 6 cups, so reduce quantities based on your needs.)

1 Vidalia onion, diced 1 red bell pepper, diced 3 celery stalks, diced 1 tablespoon Creole seasoning 1 tablespoon Old Bay seasoning 1 teaspoon salt 1.5 pounds andouille sausage 3 cups bread crumbs 1 lemon, zested 12 oysters per person

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Andouille Sausage Stuffing Procedure

• In a pan sweat the onion, red bell pepper, celery, and all the seasonings. • In a food processor, pulse the sausage until it’s ground. • Add the onion and pepper mixture, bread crumbs, and lemon zest to the food processor, and mix well.

Choron Sauce Ingredients

3 egg yolks 3 tablespoons tomato paste 1 tablespoon paprika 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 3 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon salt 2 pounds butter 1 cup hot water

Choron Sauce Procedure

• Heat butter to 115-145 degrees. • In a food processor, combine the egg yolks, tomato paste, paprika, cayenne pepper, and lemon juice. • Slowly add the hot butter into egg yolk mixture, making sure not to go too fast. (If the butter is too cold, it won’t cook the eggs. If it is too hot, it will break.) • Add lemon juice, and adjust viscosity with hot water.

Oysters Procedure

• Shuck the oysters. • Top each oyster with about a tablespoon of stuffing. • Bake for about 4-5 minutes at 400 degrees. • After removing from the oven, top the oysters with the desired amount Choron sauce. • Garnish with chives or green onions (optional).

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Have You Ever Asked, “Why?” [InGoodFaith] It has been my observation along the way, looking at the lives of God’s people, that there are some Christians who seem to have more problems and difficulties than other Christians. There are more trials that come their way than come in the lives of other Christians. On the other hand, there are some Christians who seem to go through life with everything upbeat and positive. Everything falls their way, and there are very few difficulties and trials in their life.

And then, of course, there are those who believe that once you become a Christian, you never again have problems. They have the attitude that their problems are over. Life now becomes a walk in the rose garden — until reality sets in. Job, an individual we all know in the Old Testament, said these words, “Man who is born of woman is of few days and full of trouble” (Job 14:1). The bottom line is this: No matter how much you love the Lord, there are problems, troubles, difficulties, and disasters that constantly come into our lives. Now sometimes when this happens, we may wonder, “Why is God permitting these things to come to me?” I think it is only a natural thing for us to question when troubles and problems come into our lives, and we can’t find an observable reason for them, or we can’t understand any purpose in them.

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By Rev. Norman R. Hunt

I want to encourage you by saying that it is not necessarily wrong to ask “Why?” when troubles and trials come. Jesus Himself on the cross of Calvary asked the question, “Why?” Jesus asked, “My God, why have you forsaken me?” So, when troubles and trials come into your life, remember it is okay to ask “Why?” Remember Paul said in Romans 8:28, “All things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.” Consider this the next time a problem, trial, or tragedy comes your way. It may have caught you by surprise, but God is never caught off guard or surprised!

Norman R. Hunt is the reverend of Hopewell Baptist Church, 78 Ridge Road, Canton. 770-213-1690. HopewellBaptist.com

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Photos courtesy of PhotoJack.net

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#Freeze Your Fat Away

Why CoolSculpting Is Here to Stay By Drs. Petrosky, Harkins, and Depew There are a lot of aesthetic treatments that come [HealthyLife] and go, but one that is definitely here to stay is CoolSculpting. It is an innovative, non-surgical treatment for men and women who want to lose stubborn inches from their waistlines. If you aren’t familiar with the perks of this procedure, here are a few highlights: CoolSculpting is a unique body contouring procedure that utilizes patented Cryolipolysis to freeze and destroy fat cells in designated areas of the body, specifically the abdomen, back, waist, and flanks. Since fat freezes at a higher temperature than surrounding tissues, no surrounding tissue or skin is damaged during the procedure, so you can return immediately to your daily activities.

Non-Surgical CoolSculpting is completely non-surgical and requires no needles or anesthesia. Unlike liposuction, which manually removes unwanted fat cells, CoolSculpting gently freezes unwanted fat from outside the body. Your body then naturally metabolizes the destroyed fat cells, resulting in a slimmer silhouette. No Downtime Patients love the fact that CoolSculpting does not require a lengthy recovery period and has no significant side effects. Most people go back to their normal routine immediately and experience nothing more than slight redness, swelling, or soreness at the treatment site. Quick Treatments CoolSculpting treatments typically take less than an hour per session, but this can vary depending on the size of the treatment area and the number of areas treated. The procedure is so quick, in fact, that many people have it performed on a lunch break. For best results, make sure your CoolSculpting treatment is performed by a specialty trained, experienced plastic surgeon.

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Drs. Petrosky and Harkins are board-certified plastic surgeons, and Dr. Depew is a board-eligible plastic surgeon at Plastic Surgery Center of the South. 770-421-1242. PlasticSurgeryCenterOf TheSouth.net

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3 Easy Hairstyles for Moms and Daughters By Jyl Craven

[Lifestyle] Now that kids are back in school, and summer is coming to a close, the freedom of all-day wild hair is no longer an option. Hairstyles that make sense, save time, and are easy to care for can be a saving grace for the fast-paced family morning of darting back and forth from breakfast to the hair dryer. Moms and daughters across the globe are rushing through turbulent mornings together — some for work, and some for school. Looking clean with minimal effort and styling is the best way to get busy gals moving and ready to take on their day. To save precious minutes, here are three simple, chic hairstyles that moms and daughters can don and style together:

One-Length Bob A one-length bob is typically worn above the shoulders but can creep a few inches below for desired longer lengths. This hairstyle has no layers, is incredibly easy to style, boasts clean lines, and looks elegant with either straight or wavy hair. If you like to keep the length of your hair a bit longer, you can wear a bob below the shoulder and have the freedom to pull it up, giving you more styling versatility. Style Tips - Many styling ranges can accompany a bob hairstyle. Wear it half up;

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load up on some volumizing spray; or flat-iron your strands into submission.

Layered Bob Another wonderful style for mothers and daughters, a layered bob adds more movement to the hair. It is also a great option for both straight and curly locks. Layered bobs will add volume and give hair a complimentary shaggy tousle that’s fun and easy to work with. Depending on your hair texture, with a layered bob, you can roll right out of bed, sweep a brush through a few times, and be on your way out the door. Style Tips - For an added style bonus, you can cut your bangs to better frame and compliment your face. A texturizing spray for a shaggy effect works well with this hairstyle.

mother-daughter hairstyle. Face shape and specific hair textures will be the determining factor on whether or not this style works well for each of you, but the length of a pixie cut can vary depending on your attributes. For example, leaving a longer pierce-nape length to slim the neckline or creating a short, choppy fringe to bring out your eyes and strengthen your brow bone can be very flattering. Style Tips - For styling, a small amount of pomade is recommended, as it helps to hold that fashionably disheveled look throughout the day. For many women/girls, hair often takes up the bulk of their morning effort. With these three easy, manageable haircuts, mothers and daughters everywhere can enjoy more relaxed dawns. L

Pixie Cut If shorter hair is your go-to, a pixie haircut can be a contemporary and marvelously easy-to-work-with

Jyl Craven is owner of Jyl Craven Hair Design of Canton. 770345-9411. JylCraven.com

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Ribbon Cuttings, Ground Breakings and Celebrations The Magnolia Salon and Spa

Joy’s House Cleaning Service 1039 BridgeMill Avenue Canton 678-787-9082 Cleaning Services Residential

Bethesda Community Clinic, Inc. 111 Mountain Brook Drive, Suite 100 Holly Springs 678-880-9654 Nonprofit Organizations

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Planet Fitness Canton

423 Bartow Street Waleska 770-224-6502 Hair Salon and Spa

2243 Cumming Highway, Suite 108 Canton 678-880-8113 Health & Fitness

360 Tumble and Gymnastics

Canton Physical Therapy & Sports Rehabilitation

110 Prominence Point Parkway, Suite 110 Canton 770-704-1750 Gymnastics & Cheer Training

Panera Bread

205 West Main Street Canton 678-389-4848 Restaurant

147 Reinhardt College Parkway, Suite 9 Canton 770-345-3057 Health Care

Berkshire Hathaway

1431 Riverstone Parkway, Suite 110 Canton 770-876-1822 Real Estate Agents & Brokers

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Alpine Bakery 40 Atlanta Cardiac & Thoracic 5 Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates 42 Budget Blinds of Canton 49 Bug You No More 37 Burns Law Group 51 The Carpenter’s Shop 1 Christian Preschool Cherokee Celebrity Feud 53 Cherokee Theatre Company 41 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta 39 Crabapple Festival 37 Dance Imagination 33 Danco Property Care 49 Dentistry at Hickory Flat 55 Discover Downtown Canton 31 Dr. Fixit, Ph.D. 19 DV Pediatrics 32 Falany Performing Arts Center at Reinhardt 38 Foot & Ankle Reconstruction 43 of North Georgia Georgia Medical Treatment Center 25 Georgia Zombie Fest 19 The Goddard School 16 Goin’ Coastal 16, 48 Goshen Valley Classic 53 Great Allatoona Lake Clean Up 33 Healing Hands Youth Ranch 27 Heritage Fellowship 23 Hickory Flat Volunteer Association 55 Holly Springs Autumn Fest 23 Junk Drunk Jones 27 Jyl Craven Hair Design Inside Front Killian Automotive 11 Landscape Matters 56 LGE Community Credit Union Inside Back The Lodge at BridgeMill 43 Mandy Marger - Safe Harbor Mortgage 53 Maple Leaf Lawn Care and Pest Control 37 Marsha Malone Farmers Insurance 21 Masterpiece Framer 46 Mauldin Body Shop & Towing Cover, 28-29 Medical Associates of North Georgia 5 Next Step Ministries 47 Northside Cherokee Orthopedics 3 & Sports Medicine Northside Cherokee Surgical Associates 13 Northside Vascular Surgery 10 Outdoor Living, Indoor Comfort, LLC 21 Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics 36 and Dentistry at Canton Plastic Surgery Center of the South 47 Provident Village at Canton 23 Queenie’s 16 Reinhardt University 55 Riverfest 35 Southernite Interiors 33 Suite Six Venue 3 Towne Lake Primary Care 1 Twilight Run F.O.R Cherokee 9 Union HIll Grill 32 WellStar Health Systems Back Cover Windsor House Assisted Living 11 Woodstock Summer Concert Series 26

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