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  Alicia  Herzog   Unit  Plan   Fall  2012   Hyatt-­‐Wade                                        


Title:    Intertwined  Introspection     Enduring  Ideas:          Throughout  time  and  across  cultures  artist  have  become  accustomed   to  harnessing  their  experiences  for  art  making.    Artists  should  be   compelled  by  their  emotions  and  use  them  to  create  meaningful  art   work.     Course:    Foundations  (beginning  level)     ELO’s:       -­‐ Expressively  manipulate  the  art  elements  and  principles  to  create   compositions  that  exhibit  a  compelling  division  of  space   -­‐ Develop  personal  responses  to  art  problems  exhibiting  the  ability   to  generate  multiple  and  rich  ideas  that  inform  content  rich  work   -­‐ Demonstrate  fluency  using  multiple  processes  to  show  the   exploration  of  a  variety  of  two-­‐dimensional  media,  techniques  and   tools.     -­‐ Through  the  use  of  a  variety  of  media  and  techniques,  develop  a   repertoire  of  visual  experiences  exhibiting  both  quality  and   breadthe.   -­‐ Show  the  ability  to  integrate  conceptual  and  technical  approaches   in  choosing  appropriate  media  and  techniques.     Essential  Questions   -­‐ What  associations  are  made  with  being  fragile  and  invulnerable?   How  can  materials  and  the  elements  of  art  express  those  associations?   -­‐   -­‐ How  does  this  concept  directly  apply  to  your  life  and  how  will  you   express  it?     Exemplar  Artists:                


Louise  Nevelson  

 

  Claire  Zeisler  

 


El  Anatsui      

  Objectives:   -­‐ The  artist  will  be  able  to  use  a  variety  of  materials  and  explain   each  of  them  symbolically   -­‐ The  artist  will  be  able  to  define  and  use  a  variety  of  weaving   techniques     -­‐ The  artist  will  be  able  to  define  and  use  the  elements  of  art  and   principles  of  design  to  express  key  elements  in  their  work     Materials:   -­‐ yarn   -­‐ foil   -­‐ beads   -­‐ sequins     -­‐ wire   -­‐ thread   -­‐ fabric   -­‐ sewing/embroidery  needles   -­‐ dowel  rods  

 


-­‐ scissors   -­‐ found  objects   -­‐ any  materials  the  artist  finds  suitable  for  expression  (school   appropriate)       Procedures:   -­‐ Artists  will  first  be  asked  to  carefully  consider  the  concept  of   fragility  and  invulnerability,  then  reflect  and  write  down  instances   where  they  felt  each  in  their  journals   -­‐ A  demonstration  will  be  given  exploring  the  various  types  of   weaving  techniques  and  artists  will  then  be  given  time  to  play   with  each  technique.   -­‐ Artists  will  collect  various  materials  as  artistic  research.    Catalogs   will  also  be  provided  if  students  wish  to  explore  materials  that  are   not  provided  in  the  classroom.   -­‐ Artists  will  choose  a  specific  moment  in  their  life  and  express  it   through  weaving  using  various  techniques  and  materials.     -­‐ Artists  will  later  take  a  self  portrait  with  the  piece  and  write  a   short  prose  which  should  reinforce  the  theme  of  their  work     Assessment:     Students  will  be  assessed  on  the  cohesiveness  and  meaning  within   their  theme.    Their  photograph,  prose,  and  weaving  should  all  be  able  to   stand  alone  yet  support  one  another,  and  show  careful  considerations  in   personal  aura.     Culminating  Activity:       Students  are  to  write  a  short  prose  and  take  a  digital  self-­‐portrait   with  their  weavings  to  develop  a  cohesive  story  between  writing,   imagery,  and  artists.                        


Title:    Novel[ties]     Enduring  Ideas:     Throughout  time  and  across  cultures  people  have  told  stories.     From  the  beginning  of  time  we  have  proof  of  human  urge  to  create   fables.    Artists  have  used  all  kinds  of  art  making  to  tell  fictional,   personal,  or  historical  stories.         Course:    Studio  Art  (intermediate)     ELO’s:   -­‐ Analyze  ways  in  which  artists  interpret  ideas,  solve  problems,   reflect,  and  lend  relevancy  to  their  times.   -­‐ Expressively  manipulate  the  art  elements  and  principles  to  create   compositions  that  exhibit  a  compelling  division  of  space.   -­‐ Develop  personal  response  to  art  problems  exhibiting  the  ability   to  generate  multiple  and  rich  ideas  that  inform  context  rich  work.   -­‐ Demonstrate  an  understanding  of  ways  to  assess  development   and  to  defend  ones  personal  aesthetic.       -­‐ Demonstrate  creative  problem  solving  skills  through  the   production  of  art  that  investigates  formal  and  conceptual  art   problems.   -­‐ Describe,  analyze,  and  evaluate  to  show  an  awareness  of  multiple   and  diverse  interpretations  of  art  in  relation  to  culture.     Essential  Questions:   -­‐ What  are  stories  and  why  do  people  tell  them?   -­‐ What  is  significant  in  storytelling?   -­‐ How  can  a  story  be  told  without  words?   -­‐ What’s  your  story?     Exemplar  Artists:                


Brian  Dettmer  

  Guy  Laramee  

     

 

 


Objectives:  The  artist  will  be  able  to:   -­‐ Use  an  Xacto  knife  safely  to  cut  with  precision   -­‐ Build  three-­‐dimensional  sculptures  from  paper   -­‐ Assemble  a  piece  that  uses  the  elements  of  art  and  principles  of   design  in  a  fashion  that  effectively  tells  a  story     Materials:   -­‐ old  books   -­‐ xacto  knives   -­‐ scissors   -­‐ adhesives   -­‐ paper   -­‐ any  other  materials  the  artist  finds  suitable  (school  appropriate)     Procedures:   -­‐ Artists  are  to  keep  a  journal  to  document  their  daily  lives  so  they   can  further  reflect  on  important  moments  within  their  life.   -­‐ We  will  explore  various  forms  of  storytelling  as  well  as  look  at   exemplar  artists   -­‐ A  demonstration  will  be  given  to  show  how  to  assemble  paper   sculptures  and  students  will  play  with  various  techniques.   -­‐ Students  will  write  their  own  short  story,  then  create  a  sculptural   book  that  tells  their  story.     Assessment:     Students  will  be  assessed  by  how  effectively  their  sculptures  go   with  the  stories  they  wrote  as  well  as  how  well  the  piece  was  executed.     The  stories  should  be  rich  with  description  and  interesting,  and  the   piece  should  show  careful  attention  to  detail.     Culminating  Activity:         Students  are  to  write  a  short  story,  which  will  stand  in  as  their   artist  statement.    Their  artwork  should  be  a    direct  depiction  from  their   story  and  they  should  be  able  to  talk  about  why  that  specific  moment  is   important.        


Title:    Evolution  of  a  Theme     Enduring  Idea:         Throughout  time  and  across  cultures  artist  have  taken  an  idea  and   made  it  their  own.    Through  the  process  of  creation  artists  have   discovered  what  is  successful  and  unsuccessful  in  their  works  and   worked  towards  perfection.     Course:    AP  Art  (College  Level  Expectations)     ELO’s:   -­‐ Analyze  way  in  which  artist  interpret  ideas,  solve  problems,   reflect,  and  lend  relevancy  to  their  times.   -­‐ Expressively  manipulate  the  art  elements  and  principles  to  create   compositions  that  exhibit  a  compelling  division  of  space.       -­‐ Develop  personal  responses  to  art  problems  exhibiting  the  ability   to  generate  multiple  and  rich  ideas  that  inform  content  rich  work.   -­‐ Demonstrate  an  understanding  of  ways  to  assess  development   and  to  defend  ones  personal  aesthetic   -­‐ Demonstrate  creative  problem  solving  through  the  production  of   art  that  investigates  formal  and  conceptual  art  problems.   -­‐ Describe,  analyze,  and  evaluate  to  show  an  awareness  of  multiple   and  diverse  interpretations  of  art  in  relation  to  culture.   -­‐ Relate  studio  experiences  to  the  real  world  by  exploring  post-­‐ secondary  opportunities  and  by  connection  to  the  larger  art  and   academic  community.     Essential  Questions:   -­‐ What  makes  a  specific  theme  important?   -­‐ How  can  a  theme  be  expressed  using  a  specific  medium  or   technique?   -­‐ What  about  the  theme  engages  an  audience?   -­‐ How  has  that  theme  changed  over  time  in  art  history?     Exemplar  Artists:   -­‐ example:  (theme:  body  image)   Venus  of  Willendorf   Botticelli  “The  Birth  of  Venus”   Rubens  “Venus  in  Front  of  the  Mirror”  


John  Currin  “The  Bra  Shop”   Jenny  Saville  “Flesh”     Objectives:   -­‐ Students  are  to  think  critically  about  the  meaning  of  a  specific   theme   -­‐ Students  are  to  research  that  theme  extensively   -­‐ Students  are  to  know  the  (art)  history  of  the  theme  and  build   upon  such  themes  to  create  their  own  meaningful  piece     Materials:   -­‐ gouache   -­‐ paper   -­‐ pencil   -­‐ ink   -­‐ books/research     Procedure:   -­‐ Students  will  choose  a  specific  theme  in  art  history   -­‐ They  will  research  historically  ways  in  which  the  theme  has  been   presented  over  time   -­‐ Students  are  expected  to  give  a  brief  presentation  of  their   research,  which  should  include  the  works  of  five  artists  who  play   or  deal  with  their  theme   -­‐ With  the  materials  provided,  students  are  to  express  their  theme   in  a  way  that  has  seemingly  never  been  done  before   -­‐ Later  students  wi;  be  expected  to  develop  a  collaborative  show   around  their  theme  using  one  image  from  each  artist  they   researched  and  their  final  piece.    An  artist  statement  should  be   provided.     Assessment     Students  will  be  assessed  by  the  cohesiveness  of  their  final   exhibition.    There  should  be  a  clear  evolution  within  the  works  and  their   final  piece  should  be  carefully  crafted  and  unique.    The  presentation  of   artist  research  and  knowledge  should  be  clear  within  the  artist   statement.     Culminating  Activity:  


Students  are  to  host  a  collaborative  show  with  their  own  work   and  the  work  of  their  five  researched  historical  works.    The  show  should   demonstrate  a  clear  evolution  of  a  theme  and  an  artist  statement  should   be  provided  which  explains  the  relative  and  cohesiveness  of  all  the   works  together  and  the  importance  of  each  within  the  students  specific   theme.  


FoundationsIntermediateAP Ali