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Fake True Cities Stories Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990

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Osamu Okamura / Unfinished Structures as Creative Challenge - An Inspirational Guide to the Failed Ambitions of Central European Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 9th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa. cz Maria #2

Topolčanská / Remoteness and Proximity as Geographical Conditions and Motivation for Architects’ Activities in Central Europe Today, 17:00, Tuesday 16th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa.cz #3 Roman Rutkowski / The Hyper-Modernism in Polish Post-War Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 23rd October 2012, visiting Vallo Sadovský Architects, Sienkiewiczova 4, Bratislava, www.vallosadovsky.sk #4 Bálint Kádár / Places of Illusion: Tourism Infrastructures of the Socialist Era, 17:00, Tuesday 30th October 2012, visiting Totalstudio Architects, Námestie SNP, Bratislava, www.totalstudio.eu #5 Samu Szemerey / Fanzines, Communes, Rock and Roll – Alternative Architecture Practices Before 1989, 17:00, Tuesday 6th November 2012, visiting Plural Architects, Páričkova, Bratislava, www.plural.sk

Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

coordinator: Maria Topolčanská Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

supported by: Visegrad University Studies Grant


Osamu Okamura (CZ)

„Fake Cities / True Stories. Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990“. Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture, Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava, 2012

„Fake Cities / True Stories. Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990“. Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture, Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava, 2012

Unfinished Structures as Creative Challenge – An Inspirational Guide to the Failed Ambitions of Central European Architecture Osamu Okamura In Central Europe, the successful finalization of large scale urban schemes or architectural visions wasn’t always possible. It may be that too frequent and too fierce changes in the local political, cultural, and economical climate weren’t in favor of the long-term accumulation of forces and resources necessary for their realization. However, it is far more likely that these visions were unrealistic from the very beginning, stemming from false assumptions and erroneous expectations or having simply missed the current demand. On the one hand, we could perceive their unfinished fragments or even sprouted ruins as monuments of our own incapability, but on the other hand, observing many of them after a while we have to admit that it is precisely their incompleteness which brings us much greater inspirational potential and material for reflection today than if they had been realized according to the original intention.

Bratislava Metro – Train Depot (48° 5' 39.05" N 17° 6' 33.38" E) In the 1970’s and 1980’s, Bratislava was going through a period of rapid development, primarily concerning the construction of large housing estates on its outskirts. Construction began in 1985 and the Bratislava metro was intended to connect these new districts with the historical city center. On the southern edge of the biggest housing estate, Petržalka, under the bridging of Panónská street, the Janíkov Dvor train depot was being built for the metro trains made in Czechoslovakia at first, and later in East Germany. Construction continued from the south towards the city center. We can still see terrain modellings today by the entrance to the housing estate in which the tracks should have been placed. After just one year the project was halted and after 1989 it was completely abandoned. The parallel concrete walls realized for the intended metro depot have become an irresistible challenge for local street-artists. Metro engineers have thus unintentionally enabled the creation of an informal, vast, publicly accessible open air graffiti gallery with first-class parameters. Photo: Miroslav Lisinovič http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tABgLFP8uVQ - Bratislava metro remains + metro system project documentary. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADKbMnxvuqw - Život je vzácný (Life is Precious). Da real Petržalka song.

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„Fake Cities / True Stories. Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990“. Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture, Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava, 2012

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„Fake Cities / True Stories. Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990“. Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture, Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava, 2012

Budapest National Theatre – Underground Parking Garage (47° 29' 55.29" N 19° 3' 14.61" E) In 1996, a decision was made to build a National Theatre in the very center of Budapest, on Erzsébet Square. After a successful architectural competition and elaboration of the project, construction began. However, in the 1998 elections the FIDESZ opposition party won, ensuingly taking the decision to stop construction for political reasons - at that time only the vast excavation works had been finished for the foundations of the theatre building with an underground parking garage. The project was reassessed, commissioned to different architects and moved to a new site on the Danube Riverbank on the southern edge of the city center. In 2000, a competition was held aimed at soliciting suggestions for the use of the ever-exposed excavated pit. The winning team Koppány Bánfalvy and István Bikki from Firka Építész Stúdió suggested to place a smaller cultural facility under the level of the terrain and create a park on its partially glass roof. In 2002, a rough construction was built but wasn’t completely finished until 2005 due to financial problems. The Gödör (Hungarian for “hole” or “pit”) music club has since become legendary. The venue hosts daily concerts featuring various musical genres from rap to jazz, local bands as well as international stars, numerous exhibitions, and open air events. Unlike the new National Theatre building, it is one of the liveliest centers on the contemporary Hungarian cultural scene. Photo: eRGé http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9xr3vwTByU&feature=related - Shakira Flash Mob Budapest, Gödör, 2011. Interaction with given architectural situation.

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World Metropolis Germania - Schwerbelastungskörper Berlin Heavy Load-bearing Body (52° 29' 2.45" N 13° 22' 17.84" E) Weighing 12,650 tons, reaching 14 meters in height, 21 meters in diameter and standing on a pedestal of 11 meters in diameter, the heavy load-bearing body made of reinforced concrete located in the General-Pape-Str. in Berlin Tempelhof was constructed between 1941-1942 to test the bearing capacity of the ground for the monumental structures of the so-called North-South Axis planned by Albert Speer within Hitler’s “World Metropolis Germania” project. The axis should have led from the Great Hall of Nations - with a 290 meter high dome designated for gatherings of up to 180,000 people - to the main South Station. The body was built near the site of the future Triumphal Arch. A precondition for the arch's construction was that the testing body would not sink into the ground by more than 6 centimeters. However, during the first three years, it sunk into the Berlin sands by an entire 18 centimeters. Despite the fact that neither the intended war triumphs came true nor had the capital city of Germania been built, measuring was carried out even after the war until 1977. As of 1995, this unique technical monument is listed as a national heritage site. Overall reconstruction of the object was finished in 2009 including a new information center with a steel sightseeing deck. Visitors of the 5th Berlin Biennale of Contemporary Art in 2008 were confronted with the “12,650,000” photographic project by Susanne Kriemann exhibited in the New National Gallery. It consisted of 25 black and white framed photographs of the Berlin heavy load-bearing body. In her work, Kriemann tries to unveil buildings and

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Osamu Okamura (CZ)

„Fake Cities / True Stories. Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990“. Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture, Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava, 2012

„Fake Cities / True Stories. Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990“. Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture, Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava, 2012

other monumental constructions as physical imprints of ideologies and forgotten meanings. Focusing on their common suggestiveness she reveals the paradoxes they’re hiding, affects the subconscious and even through the title of her work refers to the “heaviness” of the history of reunited Berlin. Photo: epha Schwerbelastungskörper: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dgdy4ADKrxc Kahvia, Kahvia (Coffee, Coffee). Finnish music band. Inspiration crosses borders. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kHeM0s0EMk - Lesung unter 12.650 Tonnen (Reading under 12.650 Tons). Berlin-Tempelhof, June 2011. Experiential.

Ťahanovce housing estate and the main link with the city center. The first section of this street was built in 1986, the second one (from the intersection with Evropská třída) featuring a generous pedestrian footbridge was built in 1987-1988. The pedestrian footbridge has never been opened for use. The Urban Impact competition for young artists is one of the various practical tools of the Košice INTERFACE 2013 project used in how to intervene in public space. The aim was to create an artwork in public space referring to the current issues and problems of the urban environment. Michal Hudák’s proposal pushes the dysfunctional footbridge in the middle of the Ťahanovce housing estate into the position of a triumphal arch, ironizing the ever-present relicts of the past. Photo: Košice INTERFACE 2013 archive http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INJ2p3smoJg - Children Power Clan (Le parkour Košice Ťahanovce). Measuring (non)human dimensions of living environment.

Košice “Triumphal Arch” – Pedestrian Footbridge (48° 45' 28.37" N 21° 15' 44.70" E) The Ťahanovce housing estate is the youngest district of Košice. Its construction began on the north edge of the city on May 18, 1984. During the first two years, works on underground infrastructure and terrain modeling were carried out. In 1987, the first panel houses were constructed on Třída Družby (Friendship Avenue; renamed Evropská Třída / European Avenue as of 1992), the first neighborhood was finished in 1989, the second was built in 1991-1993. The second neighborhood’s elementary school was already delayed and was opened as late as 1995, a shopping center has yet to be finished until today. In 1996-1997, a fragment of the third neighborhood was realized however, the construction was cancelled due to unsettled property ownership relations. Currently, construction of the fourth neighborhood is being considered. Třída Solidarity (Solidarity Avenue; renamed Americká třída / American Avenue as of 1992) is the main artery of the

Stalin Monument in Prague – Pedestal (50° 5' 41.57" N 14° 24' 57.12" E) Situated in Letná Park in Prague, it was the largest group sculpture of its time in Europe designed as a tribute to the Soviet leader. The construction based on a project by architects Jiří and Vlasta Štursovi began on December 22, 1949. The sculpture took three years to create from 1952-1955 under the supervision of the author, sculptor Otakar Švec, who committed suicide less than a month before its official unveiling. The monument stood on a reinforced concrete pedestal 15 meters high, embedded in the slope of Letná Park. The sculpture was 15.5 meters high, 12 meters wide, and 22 meters long, consuming 17 thousand tons of material. Construction expenses reached 140 million contemporary Czech crowns. After Khrushchev criticized Stalin's cult of personality

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„Fake Cities / True Stories. Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990“. Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture, Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava, 2012

„Fake Cities / True Stories. Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990“. Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture, Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava, 2012

in 1956, the monument - just seven years old - was blasted apart in several phases in 1962 costing another 4.5 million crowns. The waste material was transported to a Vltava River cutoff near Rohanský Island. In 1990, the Linhart Foundation opened the spaces under the Stalin monument and organized the first event orientated toward the live international confrontation of alternative artists there - the Totalitarian Zone Festival (gallery, music and theatre stage, independent and avant-garde culture). The festival hosted 200 artist from 17 countries from all over the world and saw 30,000 visitors during just two weeks. During the festival, one of the first Czech private radio stations, Radio Stalin, later known as the iconic Radio 1, began broadcasting live. In 1991, on the occasion of the General Czechoslovak Exhibition a moving metronome by sculptor Vratislav Novák was built on the existing pedestal. In 1996, a ten-meter statue of Michael Jackson was temporarily erected on the site, on the occasion of his Prague concert within his European HIStory Tour. In autumn 1999, just before the senate and communal elections, there was a giant billboard on the pedestal with a larger than life sized portrait of Václav Klaus (then the Chairman of the Chamber of Deputies of the Parliament of the Czech Republic, now President). At midnight on January 1, 2009 (Czech Republic joined EU), a giant blue banner with the EU logo was installed at the site, but it didn’t survive in one piece until the next day. Meanwhile, the solid granite pedestal has become “undoubtedly the most luxurious skate spot in the Czech Republic… The area offers a number of grind boxes composed of granite blocks of various sizes. The upper monument levels serve as manual boxes, and there are also many stairs, benches, as well as walls suitable for grinds and slides.” Photo: Aktron http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgfBkJY_n7U - Dokumentární film o stavbě pomníku J. V. Stalina v Praze v letech 1949-1955. (Documentary film about the building of a monument of Stalin in Prague in the years 1949-1955). In Czech language. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yW5Gx7z0_k - Totalitarian Zone/Totalitní Zóna. Documentary about the first international festival after the Velvet revolution in Prague - Stalin monument. Festival was organized by Linhart foundation in summer 1990. Director: Václav Kučera. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8cpcJqrR4Q - Michael Jackson RIP - Prague Letná, June 26th 2009. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AvVRDgjpkc - 10 Tricks with Martin Pek. Camera + edit: David Chvatal, rider: Martin Pek, Stalin, Prague, Praha, Prag. Real time material stress testing.

filled, merely the bridge floor remained above the surface. It is accessible only from one side since in the direction of Brno the bridge ends in the middle of the water. It is strictly forbidden to enter the entire area due to protection of the drinking water source.

(Third) Reich Highway - Bridge (49° 41' 57.26" N 15° 6' 6.14" E) A bridge was built over Sedlický Creek near Borovsko in 1939-1942 and 1945-1950 by the Prague-based construction company J. Domanský with a budget of 5,552,400 contemporary Czech crowns. It was approved in December 1952. However, as early as in 1950 construction of highways was suspended, therefore the bridge wasn’t connected to the highway network. During the completion of the highway in the 1960’s priority was placed on the new Švihov water reservoir serving as a drinking water source for Prague. The highway, opened in 1977, was moved further to the south so as not to endanger the purity of the water source. The existing bridge was abandoned. After the reservoir was 7

In 2001, the unusual bridge attracted singer Petr Kotvald and his film crew to stage a music video there for his song Mumuland - directed by F. A. Brabec. This peculiar construction has a lot of fans and even has its own website where you can find a detailed description of how to get to the forgotten bridge. Try to find it, you might find it inspiring… Photo: Pavel Liedermann http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jde8kEkVj3M - Zatopený most Borovsko 2006 (Flooded Bridge Borovsko 2006). Short visit to the incomplete section of highway in the winter 2006. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRer05GhZ5M - Borovský most located in Czech Republic. Video by T3 Photography. Incl. unique archive photos. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmMMDDDFsBw - Petr Kotvald: Mumuland. Musical vision of promised land. This text was originally published in Czech as “Nerealizované stavby jako tvůrčí výzva – inspirativní průvodce po zkrachovalých ambicích středoevropské architektury” in Rozrazil magazine, 03/2010, Větrné mlýny, Brno, s. 42-47. Internet links were looked up on October 8th, 2012. Osamu Okamura is an architect, Editor in Chief of ERA21 architectural magazine and lecturer. He teaches Project Presentation at the Architectural Institute in Prague (since 2012) and the Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture at the Faculty of Architecture of the Slovak Technical University in Bratislava (since 2011). Besides architecture he is interested in social-ecology projects and site-specific art. He lives and works in Brno and Prague. (okamura@quick.cz).

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MariĂĄn GombarÄ?ek (SK)

LOST MEMORIES In the City there are always places, whose origin is remembered only by few. Old structures and public spaces lost in time, stranded, while the society moved forward. Over the times, their purpose might have changed, making them play new roles in City’s patterns, in lives of its people. A place once representing the nature of totalitarian regime can now be purposely called a place of freedom, while its past memories are slowly fading away. How long can the City remember? And does it even want to remember?

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Mariรกn Gombarฤek (SK)

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Margaux Dutilly (FR)

STRAHOVSKÝ STADION / ON BOTH SIDES 1.1

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Margaux Dutilly (FR)

2.1

2.2

Sources: 1.1 Photo taken by Margaux Dutilly (me) in April 2012 1.2 Photo taken by Margaux Dutilly (me) in April 2012 2.1 Photo taken by Charles-Hippolyte Chatelard in April 2012 2.2 Photo taken by Margaux Dutilly (me) in April 2012

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Andreas Frühwirth (DE)

PAST / PRESENT Vienna anti-aircraft tower / house of the oceans Wiener Flakturm / Haus des Meeres

Air defense tower with four 12,8cm cannons / Aqua Terra Zoo on an area of 40.000 m²

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Andreas FrĂźhwirth (DE)

provide bomb shelter space for 30.000 civilians / home of 10.000 animals from over 400 species

one of 6 anti-aircraft towers in the inner city of vienna, 2 towers acted as a pair / Hundreds of contacts and cooperation’s all over the scientific world

destroy attacking air crafts; to kill / save endangered species; raise awareness for the environment

sources: mail correspondence with Dr. Michael Mitic, Director of the Haus des Meeres www.haus-des-meeres.at; official homepage of the Haus des Meeres www.wien-vienna.at; official homepage of Vienna tourist administration photos: press access on the official homepage www.haus-des-meeres.at

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Barbora Polanská (SK)

SOCIALIST FOUNTAINS ZOOM 1950—1990

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Barbora Polanskรก (SK)

sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fountains_in_Bratislava http://www.paming.bratislava.sk/vismo/zobraz_dok.asp?id_org=600177&id_ktg=51&archiv=0&p1=1006 http://www.panoramio.com/user/6178898?comment_page=1&photo_page=7 http://bratislava.sme.sk/c/6526763/prechadzky-po-bratislave-uranovy-kamen-zmizol-cas-znicili.html

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

MONUMENT OF THE SOVIET ARMY Monument of the Soviet Army in Svidnik

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

... in Four Common Graves is Burried More Than 9 000 Soviet Soldiers ...

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

EDGE OF THE WORLD Around 1948 the construction of the Iron Curtain across Europe separating eastern comunism from the west begun. One of the most heavily guarded part of the border was situated near Devín and Devínska Nová Ves. It existed untill the Velvet revolution in 1989 when it was finally pulled down. I was wondering what my grandfather knows about it. Afterall, he has lived in Devínska Nová Ves his entire life. So I acquired a subjective view from Gustáv Beseda (82), a musician and artistic director of the folklore ensemble Rosica: Do you remember how that area looked like before the comunist regime? All looked very differently. People used to go to riverside often to swim in the river and play on the sand beaches. There were fertile soil with fields and meadows where cows went to graze. Then Germans devised a plan to create a navi-

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gable water road for military boats by connecting the Oder river with Morava and Danube. Yet the plan was not completely fulfilled becouse of changes in war. They just deepened the river bottom and narrowed the river. It What do you remember about the construction of the fence? First years only some soldiers patroled there, but raising number of escapes caused a will to build an unpenetrable physical barrier. The construction started in 1949 and took about three years. The barrier extended basicly around the whole borders with Austria and Hungary. The Morava riverside area was no longer accessible. The fence with barbed wire was built together with watch towers and strip of plowed soil, where footprints of trespassers were well visible. Later they added electric wire. Patrols stayed in barracks here on the upper part of Devínska. How people reacted? Well, common people had other major problems. The new regime brought many changes, took their grounds and collective farming was formed. They couldn´t even visit their former fields without permission. Only tractors and machine tools from collective farming were allowed. Neither cows grazed there anymore. The area behind the barrier was overgrown by trees and thickets, just few paths made by patrols were there. How was the life near the barrier? At night we often heard gun shots, shouts and dogs barking. They used to shot flares into the air to see better. We could only wonder if it was just a training or some poor fugitive. It was awful. Inhabitants had to have their identification card always with them to prove they lived in that border area. All visitor had to have a permission to go there. I remember once my uncle came to visit his parents to Devínska and he was arrested becouse he hadn´t known about this restriction and didn´t have the permission. He was taken to barracks, where he had to chop wood untill soldiers verified his story. The barrier had been standing there for very long time, about forty years, so people got used to it. The life had continued in almost normal way, people lived, worked and had fun. For example we were walking with my wife and friends from Devín to Devínska. We had been


Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

on a party and we were singing and laughing. Suddenly two light points appeared in the dark, it was the eyes of watchdog with a patrol. The light shone on us and we had to legitimate ourselfs. Then they told us to be quiet and leave us. There was a lot of german shepherds as watchdogs, they had kennels right behind the fence. The relations between inhabitants and watchmen were generaly quite good, after all they were just men doing their job, they didn´t want to be there. We blamed the regime, not them. How did the dismantling of the fence go? It was very symbolic gesture, people were excited, but among us it practically influenced only people who had have families abroad. We didn´t feel it so intense. After the removement of the barrier the riverside was accesible by everybody once again. But people were not used to go there, so almost nobody did. What do you say about today´s appearence of the former barrier area? On the spot of plowed land strip a new road was built. Now people walk there, cykle, go fishing and the new bridge was built recently. Especially younger people perceive that as a perfectly natural thing, they can´t imagine such restriction of personal freedom. Relatively recently they would have been captured and maybe even killed on that place. This is important to remember, perhaps also by remains of the barbed wire fence and concrete foundations purposely left in there.

fotka hranice: http://www.upn.gov.sk/obdobie-1939-1945/pohranicna-straz-a-ochrana-statnych-hranic/

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

HAUNTING CONSCIENCE OF AN ABANDONED ICON The top of the „Russian House“ has always been the best place for voyeurs to take a glimpse at the nearby thermal baths̓female population, they say. It stands as a solitaire, now unwanted soviet soldier in the historical center of smalltown Komárno. It is like some leftover from another creepy age, or even Mars or some sci-fi scenery. There it stands in the former glacis territory, a 19th century park between Komarno Fortress and its historical downtown, a quite remarkable location in a town such as this. Now it̓s to be refurbished, finally, they say. And voila! There you can see it on the low-quality renders all around facebook, and – who would have thought – there is a bunch of construction site-stuff around. Even photos! Yes, it seems true… after all kinds of fervent battles, failed political decisions and civil moves regarding the long-detoriated building, much of the public seems to truly believe the fact, that, indeed, a change has come. The comments on a local facebook page, where several photos of its former state and the ongoing construction have been posted and shared, show it clearly. - Haunted House? You bet so! For so many years, nothing has changed around it. It̓s a shame! Is this how the town is to be introduced? - It is all on the move, right now! - A legend is being reborn! - It used to be my town! How nice. - Finally, something frozen is on the move… just before winter. :) - Amazing panorama to all sides. - I̓m not quite sure about it… Are the floor

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slabs not going to collapse on the users? - Those ceilings are to surely break and fall. - Is it not possible to rehalititate the whole thing and create cheap flats for rent? - Cheap flats? For rent? Hah! Joke of the day, my dear! - Steel posts on the top of a concrete structure? I̓m not sure… - It̓s been renamed Hilton… Is it for the homeless, again? Are they the ones who should be using it? Or will they inhabit the devastated health care building on the main square now? - Is it only after 20 years they could finally start refurbishing it? I remember visiting some friends of mine living there in the past. They used to be nice apartments. There is another photo from 1970, or even two or three: “The construction of the brand new hostel with a capacity of 264 takes speed!” “The labourers of “Pozemné stavby“ have finished an up-to-date seven-story block of flatlets!” “Quality dwellings in the neighbourhood of the thermal bath, in Komárno̓s “Park Anglia”, says the advert from 2000. Plasterwork is halfway torn, humidity has made its way in the once so praised buildings bearing structure. There used to be a lift in a central shaft. The windows used to be glazed. It used to be some pretty tower, with a modernist appearance of its prefabricated elements. But not actually too much pretty.


Zoltan Takacs (SK)

In such a nice location. Somehow odd, but everyone knew the “Russian House”. It was Komárno̓s own Soviet pavilion, as if at the Biennale di Venezia. With soviet officials inhabiting it, of course.

Curious youngsters, amateur photograpers found out about the astounding view from the top of the haunted tower, which was built on purpose by the town̓s thermal baths, ensuring a good sight at the town̓s beauties. Architectural ones, of course.

Why? What have you thought? This pretty town with its remarkable history, has always been defined by military ambitions and hundreds of soldiers. The ancient fortress was on all pages of history marked by the army. Each time the actual one… The Austro-Hungarian, the Czechoslovakian, the Hungarian, the Slovak or the Soviet one… Did not actually matter, even though there was a difference in each culture, some did good for the town, some did not much. Komárno has actually been for decades and centuries occupied by the Army, the ever-existing one. This big park by the occupied fortress was ideal for such a landmark. And as it started to fall apart, window by window, it remained an icon. A red star on all those layers of a thousand year history. And those Soviet officials!

But the upper floors had soon gotten locked. Local police had a nerby station. I don̓t even know, how things went this far. The place is to be rehabilitated. It̓s hard to believe. The Russian tower has so deeply been carved in the conscience of the town, it̓s even kind of weird it is being revitalized and turned into another average block of apartments. How can something be revived and revitalized, that had its own life, even uninhabited? Memories have dwellt in there. And they do, even to this day, among the haunted walls of an icon. Right under the new plaster.

I remember my mother̓s aunt, Margitka telling stories of these well-mannered officials from the time she used to work as a waitress in the wellknown bar “Kotva”. They came, ordered heavy alcohol, put the stinking Russian fish their brought on the table and started to eat. The smell of the rotting thing filled the air, as did the smoke of their cigarettes. And all the drinking, oh my… 1989 came, and Russian soldiers left. The homeless have shortly found the abandoned place to be a cozy home. One time, one of them asked for money at Bar “Kryštál”, so he could buy flowers and booze for Manci. “You should not go near by the Russian House in the evening”, Mama said. “It̓s not safe to stroll in the Anglia Park.” Nor was it in the soviet period, of course. But nevertheless, high school teenagers preferred the park unlike any other place. If booze was on the plan, they went to Park Anglia. Park Anglia with the Russian House, the forgotten one still known by everyone.

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Mariรกn Jรกn (SK)

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Mariรกn Jรกn (SK)

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Zuzana Mosna (SK)

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Zuzana Mosna (SK)

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foto: (2, 3, 4, 5) Mareka Skurka, 2009

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

THE BIG BLUE SYNAGOGUE There is the one synagogue in Poznań (Poland) which facade is painted blue…. The reason for this color is that during WW II Nazis redeveloped the synagogue into a swimming pool for Wehrmacht soldiers and this new function stayed there ‘little’ longer than the Nazis. Until this day for many people it’s a controversial and heated topic. A lot of them are busy with thinking how to remove swimming pool and create the Centre of Dialogue. What a shame they don’t see that synagogue already became a centre of dialogue as the ‘swimming pool in synagogue’ where all happenings and festivals are inspired by both – jewish tradition and water. In September 2011 swimming pool was closed because of bad technical condition.

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

Picture: Author: ナ「kasz Cynalewski / Agencja Gazeta

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Nina Horรกkovรก (SK)

GIVING LIFE TO THE BUNKERS OF BRATISLAVA #1


Nina Horáková (SK)

Military bunkers as its name says are protective shelters which were built in Slovakia in its 50s and 60s as military fortifications, often buried partly or fully underground, designed to protect the inhabitants from falling bombs, nuclear or other attacks of mass destruction, including some natural catastrophes. Bratislava was the only city in the whole country included in the “Z” category, giving her the status of the city with the special importance. Because of this, our capital was the city with the most military bunkers, 8602 in total, being able to give shelter to some 760 thousand people. Before the Velvet Revolution, these constructions were regularly but very poorly maintained by the municipality or district governments but after the falling of the communist regime a lot of them lost their primary function. The original reasons for protection have faded away, leaving the place mostly for terrorism and industrial catastrophes. Also, there is a decrease in the demand of the bunkers, because of the change in the strategy, which says that in the case of a crisis situation, the most effective protection is the evacuation of the population so most of these bunkers are unwanted and in desolate conditions. But luckily, the law that concerns civil protection allows for the “peaceful usage” of the structures of protection, letting cities to rent them for various purposes. In these cases, the renter is in charge of the maintenance according to the agreement. But to find the new function for these bunkers is not that simple, because most of them are underground and therefor hard to access. It`s necessary to invest a huge amount of money in the interior and that`s the reason why these structures are mostly used as storehouses, with plumbing or painting material, documents, gas-masks and other chemical protective tools. In one of them, there is actually stored an old fence from the Šafárik square. But, thank God there are few persons that are not scared by this challenge and are able to create interesting places with variety of functions. The bunker on Vazovova Street is utilized for laundry and ironing service. The employees claim they are pretty content there, even if they sometimes need to go outside and get some fresh air. The most famous military bunker is under the Castle Hill, which was originally designed for protection of the most powerful communist functionaries. Nowadays it is split into two parts- one is an underground music club called Subclub and the second one is shooting range known as a Colt Club. The advantage of this music club place is that there is no cell phone reception so no one will bother you during your enjoyment of the house beats and the bartender is also happy, because the temperature there, even in the summer, is ideal for the cold beverages. On the other hand, the shooting rage Colt Club is taking it more seriously. The funny thing is that its new function is quiet opposite as the original function was to protect the people inside from the war taking place outside, but now the firing actually takes place inside. The bunker at the Trnavské mýto is a gym, other one is a flower shop, a tea-house and the one on Nobelova Street is even a pub. Every renter has to take care of the military bunker and in case of some attack being able to clear out everything and leaving it to fulfill its primary protective function. But who knows, maybe is not going to be necessary in every case, because if people are going to be locked in there, a cold beer can serve a charm.

source: http://zodanig.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/IMG_9641.jpg

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Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN CONCRETE Contemporary Art Museum of Wroclaw The bunker which is located on the street Legnicka was built in 1942 as anti-aircraft shelter for civilians. Cylindrical, free-standing building with walls 1.1 m thick, 1.5 m ceiling was designed by Richard Konwiarz.

During the siege of Festung Breslau served as a fortress hospital no. II (Festunglazaret II) and later was used as a point of resistance. In the 50s, the time of PRL behind of the bunker, on the Strzegomski square camped gypsies. Twenty five meter high concrete structure in the 90s housed all kinds of shops, warehouses, pub.

Bunker held various positions, appear and disappear in the minds of the inhabitants of Wroclaw, protected and threatened,wondered, tempted to explore, has been and continues to be a source of innumerable meanings, conjecture, imagination. Not very inviting place to visit after refurbishment has become a place for art.

Currently, the building is the seat of the temporary museum of contemporary art until 2016 when new modern building for museum will be completed. The project of reconstruction bunker and arranging six-floors interior hes been prepared by ch+ architekci.

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Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

The idea of the project was to preserve and highlight the cylindrical shape and the material from which it is built. To enlarge the space was introduced a large amount of glazing and open work elements. The top floor has been arranged for cafĂŠ with panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. The renovated facility includes space for temporary exhibitions, archives, urban activity space, “living museumâ€? that is temporary arrangements of works by young artists and storage facilities. After opening the target building shelter will be used as a space for alternative art activities and an additional magazine collections. Use the bunker as the temporary museum of contemporary art was great idea to show people that old, dilapidated buildings may become perfect place for curtular institutions.

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

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WHEN DID WE LOSE PAST ?!

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Picture 1 to 5: Memorial complex “Hill of fraternity” – Plovdiv, Bulgaria Мемориален комплекс „Братската могила” – Пловдив, България

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

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Sources of the pictures Picture 1, 2: Zhana Koleva (JAKO - http://4coolpics.com/JAKO.htm) Picture 3, 4: Vangel Kolev (wan - http://4coolpics.com/wan.htm) Picture 5: Krasen Vlastanov (kokito - http://4coolpics.com/kokito.htm)

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Andrej DubeĹˆ (SK)

N E T T O G R E G O F HERITA I Z NA image source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d0/Vienna_flak_tower_dsc01594.jpg

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Andrej Dubeň (SK)

Flakturm. Invincible Flak towers. Hitler’s pride. Hundreds of thousands of tons of reinforced concrete. Three meters thick wall home of pigeons. During the WW2 in the 40´s Hitler ordered to build several complexes of incredible structures, like nothing else before. He realised the high important cities like Berlin, Hamburg and Vienna need to be adequately protected. These over 50 meters high medieval looking fortresses were equipped with heavy anti-aircraft guns. With their fire range over 14 kilometres and bunkers for tens of thousands of people were perfect defensive points and shelters used by the Luftwaffe against Allied army. Berlin and Vienna had three, Hamburg had two of these complexes. Every one of them consisted of two towers, the Gun Tower and the Lead tower. These twins are so powerful structures, that some of them surprisingly remained until today. The Berliners already demolished their Flakturms. Their shame! But we can find the remaining ones on their positions. Some of them happily found their new use after the end of the War. One of the G-towers in Hamburg was transformed into a night club with a music school and music shop. Well, that is a great idea of a military building reincarnation. The acoustics must be really impressive in here! Another L-tower in Vienna found its fortune in an amazing public aquarium, the Haus des Meeres. We wonder, if Hitler had any idea what can be his buildings used for after his empire falls. Actually, nobody before him ever build any aquarium big like that!

Yes, two of them are used for new different purpose already. The remaining ones, still sleeping like enchanted princess waiting for a miracle. Or maybe just for anyone with bold ideas and rich friends.

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The destiny of the rest of the Flak towers lies in our hands. We do have them and we can´t get rid of them. The Flak towers are almost indestructible. This quality must be taken as positive thing by young architects like Us. Numerous valuable industrial buildings older than our grandparents are being destructed every day all around Europe. Unfortunately, mostly we cannot save or protect them. We live in the Money Age. The investors and developers seem to be blinded by the contemporary fashion of demolishing valuable structures of the past times. But nobody wants to waste money on demolishing hundreds of thousands of tons of reinforced concrete, Thank God !

Fine Arts, leisure, free time activities, music, sports, education, library, adrenaline activities, shopping etc. These are ones of dozens of possible functions that can be the towers used for. Let´s have a look at the towers from another point of view. They are almost like any other rough construction. Pure reinforced concrete structure with great location. Perfect combination! Generally they were always built close to the city historical centre. That is important not only for a military building. It also means great traffic connection to the rest of the town. European cities have a lack of well-situated and free sites. We can also be sure that the statics is without problems. Something with three meters thick walls can´t fall! What about the height? You can hardly build something 50 meters high near the historical centre in the present. But Hitler could then. So why don´t we enjoy this? Actually, the Flack Towers should be taken as historical and protected structures. There is a big piece of history and heritage in them. If you look at that enormous structure, you should not only see the dead huge concrete Hulk, but also think about their story for a while. Try to imagine the deadly power hidden inside in the 40´s. Kind of makes me scared. But that is all gone. It is up to us, if we can get the most out of it, or just ignore their potential. People walk around every day. They do not realise what is in there. Or maybe they don´t want to see it. Many people even don´t know about their existence. There are so many structures except of these, people forgot about already. Hidden in the forests or in the concrete jungle of our hometowns. Past regimes let us much more than we know or remember.

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David HlinenĂ˝ (CZ)

Military area Ralsko

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Ralsko before‌ This millitary area was first occupied by Germans (sudets) in 1938. The german army occupied the teritory in 1942 and used it for military exercises. They built the airport only in 1945 at the end of the war for gathering Luftwaffe. After the end of the war it was decided by czech government to keep the area to the original purpuse. The military base was expanded for training ground for tanks and secret stores of nuclear warheads. Soviet troops occupied the space from 1968 till 1991. There was 10000 soldiers and 3000 civilians in area of village Hradcany at that time. With the departure of the last of the Soviets the military area was closed down. Subsequently it was opened for turists.


David Hlinený (CZ)

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Ralsko today… It could be called simply „wild east“. The ruins of military buildings line the airport Hradcany, corrected prefabricated high-rises stand next to the ones destroyed by the Russians. The area consist of fero-concrete hangars and other military building set on 250 square meters. The Liberec region was not able to manage the property, so they declared a tender for investors to come up with an idea. The conditions were these, which excluded activities with high ecological loads, heavy industry, dumps or farm of solar power panels. Their aim is to develop turism and merge it with the sport activities that take place there today (inline skate, autoshows and Ultralight flying club).

Text: http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vojensk%C3%BD_prostor_Ralsko http://liberecky.denik.cz/zpravy_region/ralsko-po-sovetech-se-sem-vrati-zivot-mozna.html Foto: http://podralsko.mestomimon.cz/others/letiste.jpg

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Home monument of the Bulgarian communist regime

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BEFORE, NOW AND THEN‌

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)


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What will happen next?? Ideas? Stay tuned!!

sources: 1 – before.jpeg – www.lostbulgaria.com 2 – now.jpeg – www.buzludja.com 3 – before.jpeg – buzludja.com 4 – now.jpeg – Stefan Stefanov 5 – before.jpeg – www.buzludja.com 6 – now.jpeg – Valio Valkanov 7 – before.jpeg – www.buzludja.com 8 – now.jpeg – Valio Valkanov 9 – before.jpeg – www.buzludja.com 10 – now.jpeg – Valio Valkanov

OR THE HISTORY OF UFO

Gergana Kocheva (BG) 6

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Jana Rantova (SK)

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MARTINSKÉ HOLE – AN OLD CABLE CAR The remaining of an old cable car in Martinské hole. It was built in 1974 for tourists and skiers as a fast transportation from Martin-sever to ski centre. The capacity was 300 persons per hour and length 2078 m, it overcome the elevation of 597 m. After it´s running , the ski centre started to growing up fastly and it became popular destination for everyone. It was the only reliable way to get on the Martinské hole for several years. After long disagreements of investors, the cable car ended her days of 31 years of productivity. There were several ideas of renovation or building a new one, but nothing happened. Nowadays only few forgotten columns and two abandoned buildings are here to remaind us glory of that days. At least some of the seats are used as an exhibition, what we had here.

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Jana Rantova (SK)

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sources: 01 – google maps 02, 03, 04, 05 - http://www.geocaching.sk/geocache-detail.php?id=1403909 06 - http://cestovanie.sme.sk/c/3302233/hrozi-uzavera-pristupu-na-hole.html

Legend: 01–google map view on the old cable car 02–red lined way of rising the cable car 03–the bottom building of cable car 04–the old seats of cable car from bottom 05–the old seats of cable car from top 06–hanged down the seats of cable car 07–visible pillars as a relic of an old cable car 08–visible steel ropes as a relic 09–old seats renovated for exhibition in the middle of ski centre 10 – old seats renovated for exhibition in the middle of ski centre

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INTO THE WILD

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Karol Skalski (PL)


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After the war the railway shelter was forgotten. Recently the bunker has been transformed for an exhibition space. It is accessible for visitors – there is an exciting tourist track. Every once in a while events related to military issues are organized there. It is really surprising how these raw, brutal objects can attract so many attention nowadays. There is something special in these structures, something indescribable. Bunkers are creating inscrutable atmosphere with the surroundings in the middle of nowhere. It is very fortunate that such beautiful buildings are still in use, however their original purpose has changed.

One of the most interesting German fortifications built during the second world war is a complex located in Konewka in Poland. The path to the bunker leads trough a dense forest, the concrete shelter is almost four hundred meters long. It was built to protect special trains, which were used as a mobile command centers. Bunkers were never used for their intended purpose. During the war German soldiers used them to store ammunition, bombs and fuel. However, there are some interesting rumors that these buildings were used for a quite different purpose. According to them, rockets V1 and V2 or synthetic gasoline were manufactured there.

There are thousands of bunkers, shelters and military objects in central Europe. Majority of them are now undeveloped, but some of them are already rebuilt. Nowadays, there are restaurants, cafes, touristic objects, museums and artistic places inside.

What is so interesting in old military structures? Why are they so mysterious? What happened to them after the Second World War?

Karol Skalski (PL)

source of the picture: http://www.kolej.one.pl/index.php?dzial=stacje&id=15696&okno=galeria&photoid=57134

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Martin Hatala (SK)

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ARCHITECTURE KILLS TROUT IN MYSLAVA STREAM! In the seventies there was an idea to create a new neighborhood at the edge of the city of Košice. A perfect blend of typical way of housing development and a new one, that appriciates nature and it surroundings. One that would accomedate policemen and families of soldiers. So what happened to tish great urbanistic vision? It met head on with reality. It got finished. And it got used for the very exact purpose, it was supposed to used for. The story of Lunik nine is widely known. It is long, full of unjust decisions and wrong ways of handling problems. But what about the architecture? The urbanistic study created by Ing. Arch Motýľ and Zidorová was never carried out to its full. Thanks to that it actualy became a better place to live. It did not destroy the nature around it and kept a very nice smaller scale. The building of Lunik nine started as one of the last and the smallest contribution to the New town of Košice. It was build as an alternative for illegal settlements built by gypsies in the very area. The idea was to mix the unadaptable gypsy residents with poolicemen and soldiers, so to increase discipline a lwer criminality. The idea was to build it away from general population were the gypsies can be concentrated a “whiped” in to shape. The location close to nature was to be a benefit for responsile residents who were supposed to help in the proces of changing the way gypsies behave.

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All of that seems suprisingly sound and logical in context of typical socialistic thinking and planing. So what were wrong? Urbanisticly. Not a thing. The gypsies came, took hold and did not let go. Policemen that were to take charge moved out and now Lunik nine is not even interesting enough to be a story at the evening news. It has became a fish out of the water. Something completly ot of place in the central Europe. In the country that preteds to be so proud about it’s fast and strong economic growth after the fall of the last regime. Could architecture ever predicted such a thing? Well, from our point of view it seems it could. However I doubt it did. Did it bite more than it could chew as was the case in many other projets at that era? Possibly. The realisation that architecture does not make cities, but that the people do came with a million price tag. And now the trout is no more in Myslava stream.


Martin Hatala (SK)

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

SPOMENIKS Architectural Bones sets a mark on the Land the age of time and to left a mark on the land scape by its monumental appearance. There are hundreds of them scattered throughout villages and rural landscapes in the former Yugoslavia. Once a site of pilgrimages by schoolchildren, military veterans, patriots, and mourners who had lost the whole family in the World War II, these Spomeniks (monuments) are today rarely visited.

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These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where World War II battles took place (like Tjentište, Kozara and Kadinjača, among anothers), or concentration camps. They were designed by different sculptors (Dušan Džamonja, Vojin Bakić, Miodrag Živković, Jordan and Iskra Grabul, to name a few) and architects (Bogdan Bogdanović, Gradimir Medaković...), conveying powerful visual impact to show the confidence and strength of the Socialist Republic. In the 1980s, these monuments attracted millions of visitors per year, but after the dissolution of the Republic in the early 90s, they were completely abandoned. Most of the Spomeniks are built in concrete, in a Brutalist style. This style, was the last period of the modernist movement, oftentimes directly connected to the Second World War. The chosen material was not random, all the Spomeniks were meant to last against Regarding the Spomeniks designs there seems to be no architectural, or interference template from a central committee — the rigid impersonality and conformity of much Nazi and Stalinist architecture and sculpture was studiously avoided, as was any attempt to create heroic, realistic, figurative statues of war heroes or martyrs. Some of the monuments even seem to be of an organic or crystalline origin blown up to steroidal proportions. Some of these structures appear to be actual buildings, though devoid of viable internal living spaces, others resemble futuristic housing with organic lines. They incorporate access long ramps and unusual windows.

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

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source: http://www.cracktwo.com/2011/04/25-abandoned-soviet-monuments-that-look.html

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

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OPORTO URBANISM TERRORIST

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

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8 MILLION EUROS LATER… THEY GIVE IT UP

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

Leaving the place with a colossal pile of concrete

The priority was to build the stadium first in order to respect the deadline imposed by the committee. Regarding this phase there is nothing wrong to report, and it all went as smooth as silk. The chosen architect was the 2011 Pritzker winning award, Eduardo Souto de Moura and as a result to this choice, the city end up with one of the most beautiful football stadiums in the whole world.

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It all started with a proposal to build a new city stadium in order to feature in the European Football Championship in 2004 that would take place in Portugal. The initial idea was to build a sport complex with a football stadium, an Olympic swimming pool and another football field just for practicing.

However, after the conclusion of the stadium and the European Championship, things got different. The state spent too much money to conclude this first phase and there was no more funds left to conclude the rest of the proposal. The main reason is that it was spent too many resources and money on preparing the site for the stadium to be built, because the site chosen by the architect was a quarry hill and the stadium had to be incorporated on it. When they realized that the construction works could not go any further, the Olympic swimming pool had already been started, and its foundations were already set. In 2008, the construction was initially paused, and with the years passing by this created a lot of contestation by the people, because these big structural object was ruining the site and taking all the impact rightfully earned of the stadium. And everyone was asking each other a very simple question, if the state had not got enough money to support all the construction, why did they begin to build the swimming complex after realizing their financial situation? Well no one knows, and the building is on the same phase as it was back in 2008, that is a massive amount of iron steel and concrete waiting to get demolished or turned into something else less expensive. At the beginning of this year, the city council informed the people that the construction site would be abandoned and assumed all responsibility for his mistakes, and announced that they are thinking on a new project for that location. Let’s hope now that it will not end up being another 8 million euros mistake.

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

(41° 18' 21.95" N, I will write about Belchite, wich is a village in the province of Zaragoza, Spain, about 40 km southeast of Zaragoza. The area around Belchite is one of the most arid places of Aragon. Between August 24 and September 7, 1937, loyalist Spanish Republican and rebel General Franco’s forces in the Spanish Civil War fought theBattle of Belchite in and around the town. After 1939 a new village of Belchite was built adjacent to the ruins of the old, which remain a ghost townas a memorial to the war This is a memorial written on the door of a ruined church, the original in Spanish and the translation in English

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I’m not sure if it’s better to put spanish and English versions, or just spanish or english alone

(Original spanish words) Pueblo viejo de Belchite ya no te rondan zagales ya no se oirán las jotas que cantaban nuestros padres

Since then there was nothing done to the city and the remains are left there as they were and sometimes visited by tourist but there’s not even a sign that tells you anything. This strange and unique scenario has been taken advantadge of by using it as setting for several movies (Original Spanish name) “Alas negras” , 1937 “Belchite”. 1938 “Mecanoscrit del segon origen” ,1985 “Las aventuras del Baron Munchausen”, 1988 “Vaya día”, 1955 “Ella esta enfadada”, 1955 “La mirada oblicua”, 2000 “Extranjeros de sí mismos”, 2000 “Jinetes en la tormenta”, 2001 “Buen viaje, excelencia”, 2003 “El otro lado”, 2004 “El laberinto del fauno”, 2005 “14 dias. La Batalla de Belchite”, 2006 “Mundo Perro”, 2007 “El expediente Belchite”, 2008 “El reto de Robbie”, 2009

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(English translation) Old town of Belchite There won’t be any boys nor girls around you, No more jotas will be heard Of the ones our parents sang

(English translation) “Black wings”, 1937 “Belchite”, 1938 “Second origin typescript”, 1985 “The adventures of Baron Munchausen”, 1988 “What a day”, 1955 “She’s angry”, 1955 “Oblique look”, 2000 “Foreigners of theirselves”, 2000 “Raiders in the storm”, 2001 “Good journey, you excellency”, 2003 “The other side”, 2004 “The faun’s maze”, 2005 “14 days. The battle of Belchite”, 2005 “Lousy world”, 2007 “The Belchite’s file”, 2008 “Robbie’s challenge”, 2009


Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

, 0° 45’ 15.64” W) BELCHITE BLURRED FOCUS

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Domingo Bargalló Garcia (ES)

MULTIFUNCTIONAL PROGRAMS: AN ARCHITECTURE TO REPLACE THE NEEDS OF EVERY EPOCH. Actual uses: National parador / Consecrated church / León’s museum

Uses through history: Convent / Institute of secondary / Missionaries’ house and ecclesiastics’ correction / School of veterinary / House of missions of Jesus’ company / Penitentiary hospital / ”Parada de sementales” / Headquarters of studies of the Order of Padres Escolapios / Offices of the Staff Officer of the Seventh Body of the Army / Military prison / Concentration camp of republican prisoners during the Spanish Civil war (from July 25, 1936) and the post-war period. It was between 1936 and 1940 one of the severest and more saturated repressive establishments of Franco’s Spain, reaching a recluse population of 6.700 men. It was the symbol of the repression in León and part of Spain, and cost 791 shot ones, 1.563 walked ones and 598 without assigning (executed, walked, died in the fields, etc.) besides 15.860 political prisoners distributed all over Leon and national fields and prisons / Barrack of cavalry / Deputation / Diocese / Department of War, Estate and Education.

sources: Pictures of San Marcos’ National Parador, León, Spain. Pic. 2: Arturo “Neyzan” Valdeolmos Pic. 3: Leon Government Pic. 4: Jessica Jimenez Text: Álvarez Oblanca, W. Serrano, S. (2009) “La Guerra Civil en León”. EDILESA: León

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Domingo Bargall贸 Garcia (ES)

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Diego Aranda (ES)

WHEN POLITICS ARCHITECTURE FLOODS PEOPLE’S ARCHITECTURE Mediano. This is the Aragonese village in the province of Huesca, Spain that in 29th April of 1969 got flooded by politics and economics with six families still living there. No previous warning was given by Ebro’s Hydrographic Confederation (EHC) engineers, they had to leave their hometown when the water already got into their houses and reached their knees, leaving their belongings, homes, memories and lives, aware that they were starting a non-return travel. This reservoir project was designed in the early 1920s when this kind of constructions were very popular. The idea of hydraulic politics that the politician Juaquín Costa had was erecting reservoirs all around Spain to be able to water productive fields and produce energy to eradicate hunger and also get the nation out of the economic backward state. The idea was to help to those who were hungry, those who weren’t able to work at their hometowns because there was no water to harvest their fields. But actually this hydraulic planning was strongly influenced by concrete and electricity companies. In 1929 started the construction of this project but thanks to a endless number of stops in its erection during the second republic, the civil war and the postwar period the construction progress was very slow. In the 50s the demand of water apparently increased, so the EHC with some new partners, (big electric companies that wanted to build larger energy production technology) rescale the size of the

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Diego Aranda (ES)

project to make its capacity eight times the original volume. This new planning put Mediano underwater and the opposition of Mediano was unanimous. The inhabitants created an association to deal with the EHC and try to save their town from disappearing. The legal fight was would last long.

With that change of scale during 50s Mediano would be under the water level, so when the construction level was close in height with the elevation of the town the government started to offer ridiculous expropriation indemnities, but some people started to move out of town, people who had somewhere to go or people who moved to new houses that EHC constructed. By 1969 there were just six families living in Mediano. The pressure from EHC to people to leave was enormous. When a family accepted a compensation for their house, the government blew up their house the following day. On 27th April 1969 it started to rain heavily during three days, the inhabitants started to check the water level every hour in the lower parts of the village as they were wondering if EHC was (morally speaking) able to close the sluice-gates of the reservoir. The electric supply in the town was also interrupted. They didn’t know if the water was going to keep going up or it was temporally, but first inhabitants started to load they cars and lorries. Some elder people was forced to move by younger neighbors that realized that ECH was actually flooding the town. Some wanted to die at home, but were not allowed. Later this people were told to be dying alive, the sadness didn’t let them live again.

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In 1967 Mediano had 800 inhabitants thanks to the workers from the reservoir construction who came in the last decades. These workers were mainly politic prisoners from the civil war who worked for almost food and minimal resources to survive. The population of Mediano accepted happily this new neighbors. By 1967 there was a cinema, two restaurants, bars, cafes...it was a place full of life.

This dramatic evacuation made this place a culturally rich point in Aragón, with a amazing story behind that can normally not be noticed if you don’t know about it. The only thing that you can see is the top of the church in Mediano that arises from the water level when the reservoir is not completely full. This place has been visited by people who was living there or had a relative living around. But it became specially famous among the water sports fans as diving, fishing or kayaking. Hundreds of divers go to Mediana to visit the underwater church or the surrounding buildings that the inhabitants left on 29th April 1969. Some of them still have furniture inside, covered in water life. For sure is an amazing place, absolutely full of history to enjoy your favorite Sport. During 2006 there was a very dry period in Aragón and the town could be visited dry again. The story of Mediano has recently been documented by Antena Aragón (Aragón TV channel in a very interesting documental called ‘Mediano. The drown memory.’, originally ‘Mediano. La memoria ahogada.’). It is very recommendable to watch if you can understand Spanish.

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Fake True Cities Stories Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990

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Osamu Okamura / Unfinished Structures as Creative Challenge - An Inspirational Guide to the Failed Ambitions of Central European Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 9th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa. cz

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Maria Topolčanská / Remoteness and Proximity as Geographical Conditions and Motivation for Architects’ Activities in Central Europe Today, 17:00, Tuesday 16th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa.cz Roman Rut#3

kowski / The Hyper–Modernism in Polish Post–War Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 23rd October 2012, visiting Totalstudio, KC Dunaj, Nedbalova 3, Bratislava, www. totalstudio.eu #4 Bálint Kádár / Places of Illusion: Tourism Infrastructures of the Socialist Era, 17:00, Tuesday 30th October 2012, visiting Totalstudio Architects, Námestie SNP, Bratislava, www.totalstudio.eu #5 Samu Szemerey / Fanzines, Communes, Rock and Roll – Alternative Architecture Practices Before 1989, 17:00, Tuesday 6th November 2012, visiting Plural Architects, Páričkova, Bratislava, www.plural.sk Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

coordinator: Maria Topolčanská Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

supported by: Visegrad University Studies Grant


Maria Topolčanská (SK)

REMOTENESS AND PROXIMITY AS GEOGRAPHICAL CONDITIONS AND MOTIVATION FOR ARCHITECTS´ ACTIVITIES IN CENTRAL EUROPE TODAY Designing Against Failure

´Wearing White Cloaks´ - Being Start-up Architect in 1970s in Bratislava“, photo: personal archive.

Errors incurred by young architects working in the 1960s and 70s in Bratislava in the conditions of the socialist economy (the term denoting the status quo in societies under communist regimes) are difficult to grasp in terms of success and failure by today´s standards for the young generation of architects. At that time, the state forced architects, in an enormous number of projects, to take into account errors deriving from innate flaws of the system, form construction industry product which were not subject to free-market competition, and from a frequently absurd censorship of building materials available. While it is perfectly natural to design for success, the era condemned architects to design against failure, so to speak, which becomes obvious in many aspects of the completed constructions today, and nonetheless to try to produce architecture in such oppressive conditions. Today´s enthusiasm for the work of architects of the 1960s and 70s in Central and Eastern Europe is a comprehensible reaction to the inadequate reception that their architecture has seen to date. These architects were young in just that era when their peers in Britain or France, just to name two countries, had already rebelled against the inflexible anonymity of the late-modern planning championed by the established older generation. (…) Based on designs by this generation of architects, it was also the beginning of the mass production of precastconcrete slab housing in and around cities, for groups of occupant among whom no distinctions were made. Immediately after graduation, these architects had entered established architectural offices (state-project firms) and thus were able to avoid many of the risks and mistakes that come along today with starting up one´s own small practice, the risks of doing business and trying to get

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clients and commissions. (…) The architect after all was an employee of the state itself, and yet at the same time had to supply his ideas and concepts to that state – or rather, to fellow state employees; his position was more than usually disadvantaged and dependent. (…) Responsibility for failure and credit for success were portioned out anonymously among the dozens of uncreative stuff who made up the colossal apparatuses of the state project offices and studios. (…) In those times, the only possible way for an architect to express his or her creativity in private (and self-initiated) commission projects was to build a single family house, for oneself or for someone else. Text / excerpt from: Topolčanská, Maria: Designing Against Failure. On the success of the late-modern architects of the 1960s and 70s in Bratislava, Wonderland Magazine, Issue ´Making Mistakes´, #2, 2007, ISSN 1818-2070p. 36-37. http://www.wonderland.cx/magazin/downloads/ wonderland%5B1%5D%5B1%5D.magazine_2.pdf

Architecture and Activism

´Measuring Proximity´. Exhibition of the YOUNG BLOOD project „I´m a Young Czeck Architect!“, Self-installation by Osamu Okamura architect. Center for Central European Architecture, 2004, foto CCEA. http://www.ccea.cz/en/projects/?projekt=YoungBlood

Those active and restless individuals who ponder the extension of architecture into the fields of culture, politics, and society are easily discernible from the passive skeptics. Activism requires a certain degree of confrontation of attitudes in public space. Architects are used to controlling and understanding those spaces in that they solve them conceptually and physically form them the less, however, they know how to actually use or share that knowledge with other cultural participants, unable to purposefully express their own firm approach within this area. The border between architects and the public is rarely breached through the mutual understanding and common awareness of problematic topics. The tension sometimes results in individual exclamations, open letters, media cases, but there is rarely any consistent


Maria Topolčanská (SK) pressure placed on cultural policy, and public opinion in relationship to architecture. In this situation, networks of individuals and groups are formed spontaneously, but not always of an architectural character. Their attitudes, projects, and interventions spontaneously mobilize public space. They confirm the fact that open-ended activities, far from the idea of finished forms and final solutions, can have the character of architectural ones. The real qualities of these initiatives remain, for the most part, invisible merely due to their temporality. Their purpose does not lie in being critical, resistant, or in opposition alone. They help to start processes of re-livening public space, of radical debate relevant to contemporary stalemates, of rules and models of behavior related to architecture and to the construction of new ones, imperatively. They keep us in motion. www.ccea.cz www.forum4am.cz www.kek.org.hu www.mestskezasahy.sk www.mestskezasahyjablonec.cz www.punkt.sk www.pblog.sk www.vychodnepobrezie.tumbrl.com (...)

large-scale field project and comparative study of the specific behavior of young professionals under different legal and professional regulations that determine their architectural practice today – is a behavioral game as start-up architects are human beings of potentially undefined, evasive identity; their complex education and implied contemplativeness encourages them to speculative behavior wherever restrictions are imposed on their creative freedom – it is also a personal exercise in how far start-up architects or groups are willing to go today in participating in greater projects and broader discussions about the profession, and of what they can make of, and how they are ready to share, the information obtained. (...) territory – is created on specific sites through participation by architects themselves, their personal confrontation and reflection. – cultural and language differences are not emphasized, there is no traveling to distant realities, no need of too much theory that would deviate discussions from the common architectural concerns – all connections are created to enhance proximity. This can be the territory of proximity for us – our space for group behavior under and towards the rules that define our professional freedom today.

Text / excerpt from: Topolčanská, Maria: Architecture and Activism, editorial, ERA 21, year 8, 3/2008, ISSN 1801-089X, page 5 http://www.era21.cz/novinka_E.asp?NEW_ID=45

Text / excerpt from: Topolčanská, Maria: Territory of Proximity. Or What is Wonderland. Wonderland Magazine, Issue ´Start up´, #1, 2006, p.62, http://www. wonderland.cx/magazin_terr.html

Territory of Proximity

´Excercising Motivation´. 4AM Workshop Move the City / Dancing Expansion to Urban Space., foto: 4AM Brno http://www.forum4am. cz/?p=3682, http://www.facebook.com/events/342399255845024/ ´Measuring Remoteness´. Cover of ERA 21, year 10, 6/2010, ISSN 1801-089X, http://www.era21.cz/novinka_E.asp?NEW_ID=70, curated by Mathiass Rick

(...) network – expands the individual space of young architects by connecting them in a growing cross-border network – is an exercise and a practice test of the creative intelligence of start-up architects, and it is on its way to becoming a complex database of this architectural generation – is an interactive database with a strong personal character – with those big old-fashioned modernist projects that brought together architects from several countries mostly assembling individuals already well established in the practice, or even famous architects, it perhaps only shares a certain romantic tendency to travel , and a belief in the possible solidarity of an interest group of architects amidst the individualism that is so predominant today (...) behavior – it works with many possible contemporary identities of young architectural practices – connecting them in a network is at the same time a

Manifest of KÉK contemporary architecture centre, Budapest, www. kek.org.hu

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Margaux Dutilly (FR)

THE CITY SEEN BY AN ARCHITECT SKATER, Two Visions Combined To Better Understand The City Is it possible to have a wrong or right impression of a city like Bratislava? If you come to Bratislava As an architect and user of the city, is that it makes enough attention to our environment, the potential of our city. These questions apply not only in Bratislava but also in all other cities.That the reason why I chose to interview a user of the city not like other, to discover its different vision of the city. How the skateboarding gives a new perspective on the city? When you practice skateboarding, the city in a way becomes your living room. This is why I spent my time outdoors when I was teen, I was all the time in the street. Inevitably, you have a different vision of public space because you move in all the time. When you learn skateboarding, you observe the city. The skate is a long learning and gradually of your level in fact you test areas more difficult. All skaters starts on the pavement in front of their house and once you know how to climb it up and climb it down, then you go at the end of the street. After that, you attack the furniture, secontly the stairs, the sculptures. At the end, you can appropriate any kind of space. The result is that you become very attentive to everything around you, you seek the potential skateboard has everything that you see. We must be the only people to be interested in a staircase, whether it is longer than higher, what material it is made, to know if it runs well or not. And it’s like this for everything in the street: a plate disgust, a safety rail .. We have

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a report necessarily deeper as we look at the city may be more technical: according to the material, it slips, it rolls, it makes noise or not. In skateboarding, there is no sterile space, you always find something to do. I don’t know if you understand but the skater has a very different view of someone who spends the street. We’re going into town just for fun to wander around and have some fun. The normal manwillnot go in the street if it doesn’t go in a store, a cafe, at work or at someone else’s flat. I don’t know if you know the importance of the issue but the fact is that public space is set so that nobody using it just for fun, it is always to consum. Ask yourself why you went in town these days of the week, you wanted a coffee or meeting someone at home but never to town just to go in town ... Is it a kind of space appropriation? Of course but this is a more sociological approach, that is to say there are many levels of look. The skater acquire space in the sense that it redefined the first use of the city. It begins with the urban furniture: a bench becomes a “slide”, a fountain a space jump. We don’t play in the city but with the city. It’s like an urban “off piste”. In a way, we create another city on the city, a city skatable through the vision that for him. A banister for example, can only be a banister or can be a “hand-rail”, that is seen as a banister used for skateboarding. This allows it to get to know the city better, to get a better apprehension of it?


Margaux Dutilly (FR)

Of Course. I think this is partly why I have a good sense of direction (laugh). It’s been two months since I live in the center of Lyon and I took my skate all the time. And I can go everywhere without thinking. Moreover, gradually I realize when you skate, the stuff that you know better than anyone what is the surface of the city. Talk to me at any place in Lyon and I know if it’s pavement, tar old or new, if there are holes, if there is wood. Because all of this make place skatable or not. For example, to go from one place to another one I know which street I have to take thanks to the quality of the flooring, if it allows me to go much faster without getting tired. After that, I think as a skater I know the city better because you’re necessarily more attentive to what surrounds you in the sense that you’re always looking for a place that will make you have fun. A guy who goes to work he doesn’t care about new benches in the street, we see it directly. Skaters watch the city all the time whether there are new opportunities.

what is around you. After that, I think a town planner knows better the city beacuse is his job no? At the social level, I think a skater is more cut out to tell you what is really going on in some parts of the city than a town planner who stay in his office ... How this vision of urban space it is a source of inspiration in your work as an architect? I want to make urban space as a swap space. Today, town planning is fix in the capitalist and consumerist vision. Utopia would return to the model of the Roman city, the Agora. A space where you can gather, exchange and share. In addition, I think that may be a source of inspiration for the architect first to realize the potential of a space, of functions that can take the stairs, a bench, a curb. . The architect creates space but it is the users who make the space. We don’t have to forget this.

Do you know the city better than others users? Better on some point of course, but certainly not on all. I can’t say something like that. The city is my playground so I know better what is under my feet or around me. Forms, materials that are in the city. As architects or town planners? I think the fact that skater is closer to reality and people. When you spend your days in the streets, in the city, you observe it and you know

Interview of Louis Bocquier, skater and architecture student. Photo: Thomas Villeneuve, skater: Louis Bocquier.

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When we come back to our tourists, let’s imagine ourselves in their place. They travel by boat from Vienna, through the low-lands, crossing the Hainburg Gate, are greeted by the Bratislava castle and finally arrive in Bratislava. What is their first impression? What do they like? What do they don’t like? What is missing? Likely these are questions without correct or incorrect answers.

But we can also reverse the question: Can a born and raised Bratislavian give an objective (if this is even possible) view of “their city”? Maybe they have a preconceived notion on their hometown, which doesn’t allow them to take a step back. Is architecture, or aesthetic an important part of their thinking and experience of the town where they live? A Bratislavian probably connects events in their personal environment or from their life with the facilities surrounding them, and the interaction of buildings, space and the design is not their primary concern.

But let’s go back to our tourists, who are making their first steps in this capital on the Danube River. They are wandering through the streets, without any relation to the buildings, the architecture or the use of the building. They have lunch in a restaurant, where locals would never drink a coffee. Of course, the local would not fall for such a tourist trap. In the local’s view, this is not Bratislava, not his/her Bratislava.

Is it possible to have a wrong or right impression of a city like Bratislava? If you come to Bratislava as a tourist, the first point of interest is usually the Bratislava castle. After that, the mandatory tour through the old city center. So here is our question: Is this the “real” Bratislava? A nicely renovated castle and a pedestrian area with a slew of historical buildings!? Certainly it is impressive, especially for tourists outside of Europe, but it is obviously not unique within Europe.

Andreas Frühwirth (DE)

THE RIGHT AND THE WRONG VIEW ON BRATISLAVA

Categories to classify a city?


The question after right and wrong repeats and the answer is somewhere in-between.

Let’s go to the point, to the profession of an architect or town planner. Can, should or must the architect take one of the described articles? Can, should or must the town planner find a compromise between these random chosen stakeholders, or are they in a vacuum of interests?

But maybe there is a 3rd point of view, which may help us to uncover answers. If somebody moves to Bratislava and they spend, let’s say a few weeks or months in Bratislava, they will actually know what they or did not like in the city. Maybe they have a better idea of what is missing or needed (obviously cycling routs). Their personal opinions are perhaps not overlaid by personal experiences.

When we ask a local the same questions, where are the similarities, or differences in their answers?

Andreas Frühwirth (DE)

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Marián Gombarček (SK)

APPEEL AN INTERACTIVE INSTALLATION BY DESIGN COLLECTIVE THE GREEN EYL In this case, designers are not the ones to create. They’re just here to push. To cover a wall with thousands orange removable stickers , which when removed, leave a white spot. And to let people do the magic. Strict grid starts to change its appearance, spreading its stickers further away from original location, creating everchanging space designed by people.

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Mariรกn Gombarฤek (SK)

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source: TheGreenEyl

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Nina Horáková (SK)

YOUNG ARCHITECTS IN SLOVAKIA The conditions in Slovakia make it rather difficult for young architects striving to find their space in the business. The society lacks awareness about the need of bequeathing an environment rich in cultural and architectural artifacts. There is no enthusiasm about experimenting and finding new approaches and paths to building something new. Even though Slovakia became the member of the EU couple of years ago, it still fails to bring about the requirements and provisions necessary for the healthy growth and development of the architectural culture typical to the other EU members. There are virtually no architectural tenders for public buildings. Procurement process is generally not transparent and public investments are limited. All of this makes it very tough for aspiring, talented architects to make their ideas count. But there is a meager number of “outliers” people who try to put forward an initiative that calls for advances to be made in all of the aforementioned areas. One of them is Ing.arch Oľga Melcerová, PhD. Born in Žilina, she studied at the STU in Bratislava and during the post-grad studies she spent one year at the KTH Arkitekturskolan in Stockholm. Later, she finished her PhD back at the STU. She can pride herself with having worked for Imrich Pleidel in his studio in Šaľa; ELD Partnership in Antwerp. At the mo-

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ment she works for AVK Architects in Bratislava, and also teaches aspiring architects at her alma mater. I took the liberty of conducting an interview with Mrs. Melcerová and she helped me to grasp the contemporary situation of would-be architects in Slovakia to a greater extent. Having studied in Belgium and Slovakia, could you try to compare the conditions for young architects in these two respective countries? In Belgium, the recent graduates are required to practice for 3 years, which entails mostly doing the paper work for projects all the way up to realization, often right at the construction site. This approach combines the creativity and the contact with the real business. The employers send out a monthly report on their progress to the Commission of Architects, which is responsible for their oversight. If they reach the conclusion that given architect has acquired sufficient experience, they are awarded authorization without any further examination process. Contrarily, in Slovakia there is no such infrastructure, the only requirement for passing the authorization process is a test and showing a portfolio. What are the first steps for aspirants in architecture in Slovakia, and for instance, in Belgium?


Nina Horáková (SK)

Architects in Belgium work for many years under their more experienced colleagues, and only pursue their own business in their forties or fifties. Many of the young architects in Slovakia tried pulling off the trick right after having graduated. It is more difficult to start off like that, as you are left alone and you have to learn from your own mistakes. Here, paradoxically they have gotten some help with the crisis, as the cash flow on the market was strangled and the established, bigger studios could not compete with the prices the young studios brought about as they often work from home and do all the illustrations themselves as they do not face the high fixed costs associated with running a big firm. Of course, the quality is a leading requirement for the project decisions as well and it begs a question whether it is always better to sacrifice the experience of bigger studios in exchange with the pricing. How are the tenders in Slovakia?

the actual winners were left out and their idea and solutions were passed on to the more prestigious architects. On the other hand, the tenders announced by the Commission are disadvantageous to the aspiring architects, as there is a requirement to have someone in the team already authorized by the Commission, which limits access. Therefore I think loosening these rules could be one of the ways to make it easier for young architects to make the ends meet. What are the differences when it comes to “thinking process” of foreign and domestic young architects? Young people abroad tend to think more conceptually, they analyze the problems in full depth, whereas here the analysis gets omitted and the emphasis is on the act of realization itself – i.e. from the functional and operational point of view which results in discrepancies between the object itself and the surrounding environment of the site.

Considering the situation in neighbor countries, here in Slovakia there are only few of those. The contractors are usually either autonomous investors, or the Commission of Architects itself. While the projects in the former case are usually based only on price and bring about the phenomenon of “brain-drain” – as there are many cases in which

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Barbora Polanskรก (SK)

BEFORE I DIE I WANT TO... What Is Most Important For You?

A

B

C

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Barbora Polanskรก (SK)

Where: Nรกmestie Slobody, Bratislava When: 30.11.2012 _share your hopes and dreams in public space _understand your friends and neighbors _get involved into worldwide project

Photography : A http://www.etsy.com/listing/84125148/before-i-die-wall-4-brooklyn-ny-8-x-10 B http://candychang.com/main/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Before-I-Die-NOLA-Candy-Chang-responses.jpg C http://beforeidie.cc/site/budapest/files/2012/08/budapest4.jpg Inspiration: http://beforeidie.cc/ http://beforeidie.cc/site/blog/category/frequently-asked-questions/ Idea: to stop and rethink our values, to understand our surroundings/people..

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

ARCHITECTS SEE THE BEAUTY WHERE YOU DON’T ....OR...?

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

ARE MAKING YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE ...OR...?

photo: Valeria Kocanova

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

JUST

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

IMAGINE...

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

ACCESSABLE GREEN

„People need green open places to go to. When they are close enough, they use them. But if the greens are more than three minutes away, the distance overwhelms the need.“ 1 Christopher Alexander: A Pattern Language, p 153

Making Bratislava a more loveable city by creating an enhanced net of easy-to-access public green for rest and relaxation, with short walking distances in between.

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

1. It can be a park between urban blocks, tailored for the site...

2. ...a great watchman over the square...

3. ... a green rail at stairs...

4. ... or even a green street...

6. ...and it doesn̓t even have to be large-scale‌ 5. ... in case, why not make it portable?

1

(Sara Ishikawa, Christopher Alexander, Murray Silverstein: A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction, 1977)

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Zuzana Mosna (SK)

WE NEED A PARK !

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Zuzana Mosna (SK)

MlynskÊ nivy (near bus station), Bratislava The entrance gate to the centre of the city is 5 years, after demolition of industrial buildings, without any progress. The developer would like to built TWIN CITY, administrative-shopping centre, which we don´t need. They blocked this place that can be for recreation and also therefore is very difficult to get to BAtelier(club) and DesignFactory near here.

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ARCHITECTURE “DO IT YOURSELF”

Afonso Fernandes (PT)

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

BRATISLAVA– LET’S PLAY!

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

CHILDREN VS. TRAFFIC = HOPSCOTCH FT. ZEBRA Accidents involving pedestrians and cyclists - the number increased.

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2012 (January-August)

number of accidents

killed

seriously injured

slightly injured

Accidents caused by pedestrian

43

1

9

31

- Of which the child

16

0

4

12

Accidents caused by non-motorized vehicle driver

201

1

27

150

- Of which the child

10

0

3

6

collision with a pedestrian

126

11

15

95

- Of which the child

23

0

4

18

2011 (January-August)

number of accidents

killed

seriously injured

slightly injured

Accidents caused by pedestrian

35

0

6

29

- Of which the child

13

0

1

11

Accidents caused by non-motorized vehicle driver

176

1

15

141

- Of which the child

15

1

3

12

collision with a pedestrian

104

3

18

85

- Of which the child

24

0

2

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

Map: Bratislava, Crossroad Vazovova – Radlinskeho Streets

How to play Hopscotch: 1 - Draw a hopscotch design on the ground. 2 - Throw a flat stone or similar object to land on square one. 3 - Hop through the squares, skipping the one you have your marker on. 4 - Pick up the marker on your way back. 5 - Pass the marker on to the next person.

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Andrej Dubeň (SK)

ADVERTISEMENTS ARE ALL AROUND US. #2


Andrej DubeĹˆ (SK)

LET S MAKE THEM HAVE SENSE!

image source: http://www.nitralive.sk/images/stories/novinky/aktualne/mhd_nove_zastavky/1/nitra_mhd_zastavka_nabrezie_mladeze_2.jpg http://strana.zeleni.cz/getfile.php?id=10082&cid=247&name= http://zilina-gallery.sk/galleries/Doprava/MHD/Zastavky_a_oznacniky/zastavky_MHD/xIMG_2035.jpg http://zilina-gallery.sk/galleries/Doprava/MHD/Zastavky_a_oznacniky/zastavky_MHD/xIMG_9270.jpg

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David Hlinený (CZ)

WE AND THE CITY! …Makes Us Part Of The City Or Isolates Us!

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David Hlinený (CZ)

How We Move Around…

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Karol Skalski (PL)

CHANGE YOUR POINT OF VIEW

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Karol Skalski (PL)

Wrocław Trough The Bus Window.

source of the picture: http://www.kolej.one.pl/index.php?dzial=stacje&id=15696&okno=galeria&photoid=57134

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Martin Hatala (SK)

ARCHITECTURE TOO PROXIMAL Always green for the pedestrians

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Martin Hatala (SK)

The opinion of Ing. arch. Ivan MĂşranica

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

ALTERNATIVE ARCHITECTURE

These days it is increasingly difficult to guarantee a place in the world of traditional architecture, so we witness the emergence of new ways of making architecture. MOLO is a draft of Michal Martin and Lapej Riabic that exemplifies a new way to create architectural spaces. Was constructed in Martin, Slovakia. It is a multipurpose space orgรกnico and it is a precurso urban, a space for relaxation or a space for cultural enventos. Basically the design of dynamic MOLO gives the possibility to each choose how you want to use it. Is this a future of architecture?

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

photos: http://www.archdaily.com/94636/molo-uniform-architects/

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SM EL LA LE RT !

Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

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Domingo Bargalló Garcia (ES)

TEST TO THE READER ABOUT HIS CITY What is closer to what in your opinion is a city?

a/ It’s buildings b/ It’s streets c/ It’s people d/ It’s history e/ It’s monuments f/ It’s cultural offer 1. What do you think of the life in the public spaces of your city? 2. What activities do you think that might be drawn to public areas of your city? 3. How much importance do you think the sport receives in public spaces in your city? 4. What do you think of the current architectural contributions in your city? 5. What do you think is the direction that your city should take as a global brand? 6. How would you rate the public transportation in your city? What would you do to improve it? 7. How do you think that affects the climate of your city to life on the streets? What would you do to improve life in public spaces considering the weather? 8. How would you rate citizen involvement in the development of your city? 9. Do you think your city is taking advantage of all it’s urban potential? Why? 10. Have you seen anything in other cities that you liked and think that could be done also in yours? 11. What do you think should be the balance between the history of your city and its future? 12. Providing free: What would you improve in your city?

Cut out this interview and send it to the following address “”. All your contributions will be taken into account. Thank you very much for your help.

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Domingo Bargall贸 Garcia (ES)

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Diego Aranda (ES)

A DAY IN MY

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Diego Aranda (ES)

NEW REALITY

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Marián Ján (SK)

BLURRED FOCUS

CAN ARCHITECTS CHANGE THE WORLD?

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Is architecture share-able? Is it possible to make the World a better place by designing better architecture and share it like open source all around the world? Give a damn! They say, Yes! How? Via Internet! Who? Anybody, who cares! Just login and designe! Cameron Sinclair, created an organisation, that helps around the world. Teams of students, registred on his internert site (http://openarchitecturenetwork.org/), work together on various projects. The teams consist of various specialists and help each other with their priceless experience and ideas. Weak and poor are the customers of these designers. There is no significant profit. But they want to change something... The banner says: ‘’WORL CHANGING’’. Is it possible? What do you think?


Mariรกn Jรกn (SK)

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BLURRED FOCUS

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photo: www.metodistadosul.tempsite.ws more info/ contribute: http://openarchitecturenetwork.org/ foto 1: Cameron Sinclair foto 2: project for a shelter for Kosovo region, entry by: Technocraft

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BLURRED FOCUS

Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

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Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

BLURRED FOCUS

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

BLURRED FOCUS

URBAN ROUTES POSTOVA BRATISLAVA

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

BLURRED FOCUS

sculptures by Richard Serra

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Jana Rantova (SK)

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WHAT IS YOUR

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Jana Rantova (SK)

R....

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ENCE OF LIFE ?

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Barbara Brazao (PT)

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64 DAYS BEFORE ARRIVING TO BRATISLAVA

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Some thoughts and a sketch of Bratislava’s silhouette were put in paper. Some rounded towers (very different from the portuguese traditional shape); some hills and roofs. It is fun to compare it with my hometown silhouette. Without the legenda, this could just be the heartbeat of the city.


Barbara Brazao (PT)

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Legenda img_1 - an approximate silhouette of Bratislava seen from the Danube river. img_2 - a sketch of a hypothetical silhouette of Bratislava img_3 - an approximate silhouette of Lisbon seen from the Tejo river.

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FIRST IMPRESIONS BEING HERE – DORMITORY. TRNAVA MARKET BUILDING. RIVER SIDE WALK AREAS. THE NEW BRIDGE. BLUMENTHAL CHURCH. THE TRAFFIC LIGHTS. DELL OFISSES. UNIVERSITY FACILITIES. BRATISLAVA CASTLE. POLUS CITY CENTER. EUROVEA DISTRICT. RADIO BUILDING. NAMESTIE SLOBODY FONTAIN. RAPIDLY CHANGED SCALE. FRIENDLY LOCALS. OLD CITY CENTER WITH NARROW STREETS. PEDESTRIAN ZONES. BYCICLE ROUTES. YOUR BIG GREEN AREAS. CRAZY DRIVERS. EUROVEA

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)


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DISTRICT. JANKA KRALA PARK. PETRZALKA. UNWANTED PLACES. OPEN DISCUSIONS ON CITY PROBLEMS. CONCRETE FOREST-DISTRICT. PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE. OLD CITY CENTER WITH PLACES OUTSIDE TO HAVE MEAL. BLUE CHURCH. BRATISLAVA CASTLE.BEAUTIFULL SIGHTSEENG NEAR BY. CRAZY DRIVERS.RIVER SIDE WALK AREAS. SLAVIN PARK AND PRESERVING THE HISTORY. BUS STATION UNDER SNP. BRATISLAVA CASTLE. NOT STOPPING ON ZEBRAS.

Gergana Kocheva (BG)

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Fake True Cities Stories Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990

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Osamu Okamura / Unfinished Structures as Creative Challenge - An Inspirational Guide to the Failed Ambitions of Central European Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 9th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa. cz #2 Maria Topolčanská / Remoteness and Proximity as Geographical Conditions and Motivation for Architects’ Activities in Central Europe Today, 17:00, Tuesday 16th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www. ksa.cz

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Roman Rutkowski / The Hyper–Modernism in Polish Post– War Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 23rd October 2012, visiting Totalstudio, KC Dunaj, Nedbalova 3, Bratislava, www. totalstudio. eu #4

Bálint Kádár / Places of Illusion: Tourism Infrastructures of the Socialist Era, 17:00, Tuesday 30th October 2012, visiting Vallo Sadovský Architects, Sienkiewiczova 4, Bratislava, www.vallosadovsky.sk #5 Samu Szemerey / Fanzines, Communes, Rock and Roll – Alternative Architecture Practices Before 1989, 17:00, Tuesday 6th November 2012, visiting Plural Architects, Páričkova, Bratislava, www.plural.sk Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

coordinator: Maria Topolčanská Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

supported by: Visegrad University Studies Grant


Roman Rutkowski (PL)

HYPER-MODERNISM IN POLISH POST-WAR ARCHITECTURE: OPEN FORM BY OSKAR HANSEN Architecture has been always a game between the controlled (by the architect) and the uncontrolled. The modern movement is no exception from it. From one hand there were theorists – like Gropius and his Bauhaus collegues – who advocated the total design, starting from the general idea down to the smallest detail and piece of equipment, where everything was right in place. From the other there was Le Corbusier who praised free plan, adjustable garden on the roof, open and accessible ground level and flexible elevations – accepting changes applied to architecture (but rather by the architect). Three projects from Bordeaux illustrate the point. Le Corbusier’s estate in Pessac turned into everything but the piece by the major architect of the modern movement – and the author afterwards sadly stated that it is life that is right, not architecture. The house by Office for Metropolitan Architecture, already a confirmed French national monument, is a deliberate balance between controlled and uncontrolled – as Rem Koolhaas loves it. The house by Lacaton Vassal is only a modest background for furniture and actions of any sort and any price, all assembled in a total and beautiful chaos. Of course Poland is a country where a number of splendid pieces of modern architecture were created after the II world war, especially in the 60s and beginning of the 70s. They all represent a crystalline way of deigning. The elevations are refined graphics, the plans are beautiful and functional compositions, the sections are breathtaking – the space flows, the life goes on, architecture triumphs. Nevertheless the foundation for all of it was a social purpose of fulfilling the needs of Poles and making their lives more comfortable. Oskar Hansen (1922-2005) was an architect of the generation that produced these pieces. But if these pieces were about control, though thought to be social, and if we are presently trying to preserve their beauty and original thoroughly elaborated condition, Hansen was supporting a different approach. He preferred: open form to closed form, partnership to dominance, changeability to permanence, accessibility to inaccessibility, knowledge to dogma, system to finished composition, horizontality to monumentality, anisotropy to symmetry, collective to ego-oriented. Open form meant – and still means – a system in which (almost) everything was possible: adding, eliminating, subtracting, overlapping, cutting off, altering… The result was never final, everything was in a constant transgression, devoid of any central idea except that of permanent changeability. Here Hansen gave two contradictory examples: of user-oriented and user-participated architecture by Lucien Kroll and of total, monumental, mighty and supposedly oppressive production by Ricardo Bofill. Hansen himself did not design much. One of his major contributions was a theoretical urban project called Continuous Linear System which was to revolutionize the landscape of Poland. Four bands of urbanity, running parallel from the north to the south, were to provide a centerless living environment with a great cultural and entertainment offer. The other good instance is Jan Szpakowicz’s own house. There is no confirmation if the author was in a way complying with Hansen’s ideas, but definitely this house is an example of open form. A number of cubes and roofs that spanned the spaces between the cubes in orthogonal layout – all this built a space with no prevailing direction and presupposed action. The house remained undiscovered for years, after its recent re-discovery it was demolished with a promise from the owner of the possible reconstruction in some other space. The most famous realization of Hansen is a housing estate in Lublin, designed according to the principles of open form. Over the years it went through some illegal and legal modifications and alteration. Now a group of people is trying to bring the estate back to its splendor. That will most likely mean the removal of the changes that have happened during the past. If he’s still with us, would Hansen like it? Is life always right?

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Roman Rutkowski (PL)

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

WHAT´S WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE? came to my mind after asking some of my relatives and non architectural friends about this reconstruction. Are you blind or what? I don´t consider myself an architecture freak, but even i can see how bad it is. The department store Slimák -Snail was projected by Ivan Matušík in 1957 and built in 1964 in Bratislava. It was an original and innovative building of its time, with precise, clear simple lines, harmonic mass distribution and elaborate ornamental details. In 1992 the extensive reconstruction was held which has changed the whole character of the building and destroyed its qualities. (It´s pink!) When I picked this object as an example, I was pretty convinced that everyone would have the same opinion as me. I tought this case was obvious for laymans too, but then the surprise came. ALL of asked people claimed that now it´s better, nicer, more functional and that they couldn´t say if the architect had done something wrong, probably not. My mum literally said "I don´t know, the only thing I see is that first it was grey and now it´s colorful, so I like it more." Why? Why did they do such a horrific reconstruction at first place and then why do people like it? The one explanation is that people wanted to change buildings that recalled the old regime or just that the vision of more stores won. The functionality is the only reason I can admitt as a good couse for a reconstruction of this building. But it could be done many times better. And to the question why people like it- I don´t know, really. Maybe becouse in general people don´t like raw concrete and like new things. In my opinion, if the reconstruction had been done more delicately people would have liked it too or even more. Howewer is the question of preserving the architectural objects intact unresolved, I think in this case the reconstruction haven´t brought anything good to the building.

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

obrazky: http://www.asb.sk/architektura/architekti/ivan-matusik-aj-male-narody-mozno-identifikovat-podla-ich-architektonickej-kultury-544.html http://www.panoramio.com/photo/1788398

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Barbara Brazao (PT)

YOUR UNDERPANTS BECOMING PUBLIC As the time went by, people became more demanding and their needs developed to “create” what is known nowadays as a “Cosmopolitan”. Sadly, not the whole fabric of society as followed this “(r)evolution”. One of those examples is the large cities suburbs houses - as the city grew larger, a greater surrounding space was needed to accommodate all the people that had no space or economical income to afford to live in the main city – and that rush to develop new living areas, majorly with under-budget resources has resulted in a number of structural and functional flaws. One of Portugal’s most notorious ones is the complete lack of infrastructures for the people to dry their laundry. As well as you can get many funny and rather corny situations (as seen in Alfama’s neighborhood) in most cases, it makes for really ugly and even chaotic city scape. MY OPPINION This is NOT an appropriate solution at all. There should be a suitable space - for example, a semi-open laundry/drying floor in the top of the building. In some cases, as the well-known neighborhood of Alfama, it can be considered as picturesque – it even has become beauty mark and a part of that niche’s personality. Besides that and in a pragmatic point of view this should not happen. It defiles the architect’s and urban-planner’s work and raises a lot of other issues related to the security and well-being of the people – dangerous structures, clothes flying around landing on car glasses and causing accidents… Yes, it can be functional in a practical way, but it is something the architect should’ve been concerned about. THE OTHER’S OPPINION Though it might be seen as ugly, it‘s actually very functional. People’s needs come first than the building’s. Ropes for hanging our clothes are the best solution. Many people can’t either afford nor have space in their houses to put a drying machine. Not only the best solution…. The only one!

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Barbara Brazao (PT)

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

„OD JEDNOTY K PROFITU – FROM UNITY TO PROFIT“ That building is in my home town Svidník, i have personal experience with both versions of it.

ME is it better? No, its just overfilled. is it more beautiful? No, i liked it more how it was before with original light parrter and columns. is it more functional? No, they just filled all place they had. Inside the building is still enough room for the new functions, so i dont understand why they put it around an original building. is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? No, its because people think that all free place should be build up. (zastavany?)

HANA (my friend from Svidník) is it better? I dont know, i liked it more before, but maybe its just the matter of nostalgy. is it more beautiful? No, i like the original version much more. is it more functional? Maybe it is, its more extended, but now, when its rainnig you cannot hide there. is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? I dont think so.

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

1. picture (from the book „Okres Svidník) Old shoping house „Jednota“ in Svidnik. With open and free parterre. 2. picture (author Hana Stašová) „Jednota“ after renovation with new name „Profit“. Parterre filled with new masses and functions.

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

PRIORITIES Department Store PRIOR is not an unfamiliar name to Slovaks, especially to my parents’ generation. In almost every bigger town or city we had one of them during socialist times. Many of them still function according to their initial purpose, and even carry the same name up to this day. Komárno, my beloved hometown had her own PRIOR, too. I still remember it having several other names during the 90’s: Asia Center, Kilda… Finally, somewhere around the end of the first decade of this century, after years of devastation it was completely renewed in order to create a contemporary shopping mall and now runs as Komárno Shopping Center. Yet, most citizens, especially the older generation got used to its former name and still mention it as Prior, being a prestigeous place of its time. Was it better or more beautiful in the past? Apart from the main load-bearing structure of the dept. store, almost each part of it was changed, especially facades. The modernist ribbon-windows were not very efficient in keeping the heat inside, so new windows and glazings were designed, according to recent technical standards. I see some effort in trying to create a proportional look, but there’s little reason in the shaping of windows. The thing still acts a bit of cheap and average and does not come near the sophistication of the original state. This refurbishment is rather a step back. The uppermost floor’s consoles and the articulation of the floors are not anymore present. These’s some pseudo-composition, which does not comprehend with the content much. Now my personal opinion is that the original look of the building was a lot more expressive, stronger, even though, being a child, I didn`t really realise there`s beauty in modernist buildings. Architectural school taught me to see it. Now I feel kind of nostalgic about something I don’t remember too much. If it did work better? Could it have been done better? The plan did not change too much, it only got more sectioned and organized. Instead of mobile partitions you have plasterboard ones. Nevertheless, due to a lack of parking places it cannot much compete with shopping malls in outer suburbs of the town. We have a consumer society in which one will hardly approach a shopping place without a car. Department stores of this kind are not too much fashionable in times like these. People got used to single-floor malls, nobody wants to make it to the 3rd floor. Then, I decided to ask my mom. She used to visit the place in the 70’s and 80’s, and she’s remained a frequent costumer ever since.

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

Z: How was Prior in times it was called Prior? M: Prior was nice. You had these groceries and a gift shop on the ground floor, then there you had toys, domesticities, clothes, and even a small café on the other floors. Now there’s some boutiques on the ground floor, fast food and services above, a chinese shop with many goods on the second floor, then there’s furniture , and on the top floor you have them ”massage people” and dentists I guess… I haven’t even been there, only Margitka told me she used to go for massages there.

Z: In which state did it work better? Can you tell it? M: I liked both. Formerly you had a lift, too, and stairs also. There was a lady in the lift whose job was to help using it. But now you have stairs, a lift and escalators too. They are not at the same place, but you have them. In the old Prior here you had these free floors with partitions formed of these mobile panels. I`ve read an article on how our Prior was better since it was smaller and how Bratislava`s Prior was too huge, you could hardly find anything in it.

Z: Was it the only store of this kind in town? M: There was Váh and Kormorán, and the big store on housing estate No.7. Z: If you compare these two photos, what do you think, which was a nicer, more aesthetical state, the former or today’s one? M: Well, … I liked both, the old one was nice, it had a good form. But, now you have this nice decent beige thing here [pointing at a rectangular part of the facade], so it’s maybe not so boring having it. But both are good. There’s signs of good taste in both.

Z: So you say there`s not much difference, since it serves the same purpose. M: Maybe it was better in the older days, but per haps it`s just because I was young at that time. We bought Lego for Adam [her oldest child] there, a lady told us at the lift when… [starting to tell a long story] Z: Is it possible the architects could have done better rebuilding it? M: I can`t tell you that. I think it`s not bad.

Note on photos: http://www.facebook.com/komaromifotoalbum.komarnanskyfotoalbum?fref=ts

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Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

NOWY TARG SQUARE. 1. is it better? 2. is it more beautiful? 3. is it more functional? 4. is it because the architect of the building forgot about something?

ME: 1. I think the new project of Nowy Targ can turn the square into a meeting place, like ones from the old times. The unused area will become a public place for tourists and city dwellers. 2. It definitely is. On one hand the Project is very modern, but on the other – some parts of it reminds us of the old version of Nowy Targ. It’s skillfully combine with the architecture surrounding the square. 3. Thanks to the upgraded version, the square won’t be just a transit area for pedestrians anymore. New buildings with new attractions and services will make people stop by and spend some time there . 4. I think the square has been a functional place, but when the new buildings and places were created near, it stopped being interesting. The lack of renovations has made it also look bad, so residents weren’t visiting it a lot.

MAJA DADOS (student of philosophy faculty) 1. I think the new project is much better than the last one. It sounds like an attractive place for both: tourists and dwellers. 2. I think the new place will be definitely more beautiful, especially because of replacing the flowerbed with a fountain. However, I don’t like the idea of arranging the place fully with glass. What I thinks is also great is that there will be no traffics. 3. New stalls will make the place more functional. I think, that building a new pavilion, separating residential apartments from the square will make the dwellers feel more comfortable by giving them privacy. 4. I think the first architect made a fine place for his times, but right now there is a need to rearrange and improve the place. The new project meets with the new requirements of the time and the city as it is.

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Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

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Diego Aranda (ES)

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Diego Aranda (ES)

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Martin Hatala (SK)

FACULTY OF CIVIL ENGENEERING, KOŠICE

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Martin Hatala (SK)

My own opinion: Is it better? By far, consediring, the space have not been used at all before. Is it more beautiful? Yes Is it more functional? Definitely Is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? No, the architect simply did not give any function to the space in considaration.

Non-professional: Is it better? Of course. Is it more beautiful? Well, it is cleaner now. Is it more functional? Yes, it is lacking usless beams. Is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? No, I think it is because the space was not meant to be used.

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Andreas Fr端hwirth (DE)

SACRIFICED FOR FOOD Is it okay to give up one of the basic elements in the design of space, in this issue the main sight axis, to run a random snack stand? Or should we reverse the question; is the design really so much more important than the use? Maybe the designer of the Slobody square (which was built during the late 40s and early 50s of the 20th century) would disagree with this kind of change in the space. But what about the 'users' of the square and the snack stand? Probably most of them can live with the previous unexpected use of the space!

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Andreas Frühwirth (DE)

one of the main sight axis is covered by the snack stand

-Slobody square -Fakulty of Architecture -Letný arcibiskupý palace -ministry of transport

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David Hlinený (CZ)

MORITZ GALLERY OLOMOUC Shopping mall Prior is building build in every regional city during communist era. It was usually designed in the brutalist architectural style and situated in historical centre of a town. There is also one in my hometown Olomouc designed by Brno based architect Jan Melichar in 1972. The building was completed in 1782 on the site surrounded by the church of Saint Moritz and historical buildings of 17th-18th century. The company CL Trade which owns all the shopping malls Prior in Czech republic have started planning the reconstruction for the reason of new shopping demands and habits of citizens. Atelier R won the competition for the new Prior design in 2009. New shopping centre will be named Moritz Gallery. It is planned to be opened in November 2012. The person who I have chosen to interview is my girlfriend Alžběta. She has got master in philology, what is not exactly near to field of architecture. This was we will have answers from someone, who had lived in Olomouc and experience the Prior building herself.

Hi Alžběta, what do you think about post-war architecture? Hi, that is simply not my cup of tea. Do you think that the new Moritz gallery will be better than Prior? Yes, it is because the new building fits the site better. The former Prior building with its socialist style of architecture doesn´t belong to a historical centre. On the other hand it is worse because there was my favorite cafe. Great coffee and good service made it such a busy place. It was the hot spot in Olomouc. The new lease is too high, so they will not open there again. Does it seem more beautiful to you? Yes, it looks more beautiful. Although the new building is the same size it appears lighter due to use of new materials. It will fit the place near historical centre. Is it more functional? I suppose it will be more functional thanks to the new atrium. I will open next week so I am about to find out. Is the change of the building happening because the architect of the building forgot something? I think that the architect forgot something but that would not be the reason for such a massive reconstruction.

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Here is my self-interview on the reconstruction of Prior building in Olomouc. Is it better? It is better overall because it communicates with its surroundings due to reflections of a semiglass facade and it improves the quality of the immediate environs. Is it beautiful? Yes, I would say it is despite the fact that building´s volume is exaggerated. But that is not the task to be solved by the reconstruction. Is it more functional? I think I will be because of its special division. The new building will have central atrium, which the old Prior lacked. That will offer better orientation and let more natural light coming in. There is one negative judgement. The architect has decided not to retain the arcade directly by the tram stop which was very useful in bad weather and help the flow of pedestrians. It is one the most frequently used tram stop in the city and he substituted the arcade with a narrow awning. It looks like the investor count the square meters very passionately regardless the public space. Is it because the architect of the building forgot something? No, the time has changed.


David Hlinený (CZ)

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Foto 1: http://olomoucky.denik.cz/zpravy_region/prior-olomouc-galerie-moritz-20091112.html Foto 2: osobní archiv

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Marián Gombarček (SK)

FROM INDIVIDUAL TO COLLECTIVE: THE DESTRUCTION OF RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE Is it better? No, it’s not. But it can be. It just needs a concept, some rules. Like painting every dish with different colour to create colourful patterns with great visual impact like in some cities in Netherlands. Is it more functional? Yes, individually. Is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? No, it reflects the requirements of living, that changes by each resident. All in al it’s about everyone forgetting, that they create their surroundings together.

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Mariรกn Gombarฤek (SK)

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

MY-SPACE

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

1. is it better? KAROLINA: It gives a strong identity for the place so I think it’s better. ARJEN: probably the owner thinks it is, i'd say this question is answered by the result of the answers for questions 2 and 3.

2. is it more beautiful? KAROLINA: snowflakes I saw yesterday were beautiful. ARJEN: no.

3. is it more functional? KAROLINA: in most of cases – yes. ARJEN: apparently the owner felt the need to change it to fit their needs so i'd say yes

4. is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? KAROLINA: He forgot people want more their own space. ARJEN: yes, people want spacious apartments, not small balconies.

photo: part of housing in Sustekova street, Bratislava-Petrzalka

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)

PATTERNZALKA Bus N88 trip through the largest concrete flat district in Slovakia. Is it better? Gergana: Well I think renovation and isolation were needed but not in so various designs. Ivo: Yes – it makes the socialistic buildings look more cheerfull. Is it more beautiful? Gergana: Could be better with less patterns and colours. Ivo: Yes. Is it more functional? Gergana: If we talking about isolation the walls – yes it is better. Ivo: Yes. Is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? Gergana: Hm… well back when the flats were build the architects didn’t pay so much attention to isolation and environment ( not in this case)…. So yes it is something they forgot. Ivo: Yes – they forgot that people are going to live there.

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

PATCHWORK

In the 18th and 19th century art called patchwork was popular in America. This is art where pieces of colorful fabric are sewn together to make quilt, blanket or bedding. Patchwork quickly became known worldwide as an applied art. The complexity of models and masters’ skills are still growing. In Bulgaria, Europe in the late 20th and early 21st century extremly popular became the so-called "patchwork facade". Big in size art where the patch is exported from within the interior and is integrated into the urban environment. The masters of the patchwork facade work normally during the summer and fall so that at the beginning of the next heating season to present their new collections. In the final design is usually preferred white or off-white, which quickly becomes dirty. As the warmer colors including the whole range of yellow, but there are also ideas that are expressing desire for a new provocative character and brilliant individualism. For example, American façade makes your home an American, camouflage facade makes it invisible, etc. However, really monumental is the painting in Bratislava. People avoid relying on individual decisions and rely on a global project designed by the municipality thus definitely cut your chances of developing a young and promising art with individual searches, such as patchwork facade. Meanwhile in Bulgaria, with the massive support of the government in this genre, the monumental mural can now be ordered in such samples of the world's architectural heritage as Hundertwasser House in Vienna. With a good marketing approach that distinctive art would become an interesting tourist attraction and a symbol of Bulgaria in united Europe.

My opinion is it better? No. It isn’t better looking and all of the changes are illegal. is it more beautiful? No. There are too many different ideas without any taste. is it more functional? Not exactly. The building can be more functional if the renovations are made with one big legal project and not by the owners themselves. is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? No. It is because the authorities don’t exercise any control over the owners and the situation.

Non-professional’s opinion is it better? I can’t see what is the first idea of the exterior because all the changes. The building looks bad now. is it more beautiful? It’s not beautiful. It is made like nobody cares about their neighbours. is it more functional? Yes. It is more functional about every apartment by itself. is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? I don’t think so.

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj_lEYFMUHA – TV spot aired the ceremony “Façade of the Year 2009”, by Baumit

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Margaux Dutilly (FR)

CLOTHES DON'T MAKE THE MAN, HISTORY OF THE TOWER BOIS-LE-PRĖTRE IN PARIS Me: In France, there are many towers built in the 60s like this, and very few have such an investment for renovation. What I like above all in the project is the approach : Not wanting to destroy the habitat of many people, don't remove them or change their habits, but try to offer them a better living space. In this sense, I think it is better, and the new project more aesthetic, but I only see this one on magazine's publication so it is a valid opinion?

Olivier Monod, « Portfolio la tour Bois-le-Prêtre, HLM vitrifiés »,Megalopolis, Spring 2012. (Extract from AMC magazine, # 217, September 2012, p.40) : “After 4 to 12 months of occupation, the people haven't really taken possession of the appartment. Often space is almost empty and furnitures can't find their place in the living room. Sometimes plants are beautiful. they are false, smiled Mrs. Benjamin. Real are dead, it's too cold in winter and too hot in summer here!” Anne Lacaton doesn't want to jump to conclusions. “It takes time to appropriate places.”

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Margaux Dutilly (FR)

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

ANTI-MARQUEES MOVEMENT Is it the necessity of comfort and maximization of space worth for the destruction of the urban landscape? Our urban landscape is not supposed to be for sale. The implementation of marquees on our building facades deteriorates its appearance and originates an aesthetic nightmare. It destroys the concept of order and civilization on our streets, making them less visited and consequently turning them into bad neighboring and uncomfortably dangerous. Surely if we asked a regular person that built a marquee on his balcony, why he did such thing he would tell us that it made him feel more comfortable and he also gained a couple of square meters on his living room. So on the one hand, on a social matter this is a great way to improve the standard of living in our society, but on the other hand people have to think about their own streets and neighborhood, because this might also degenerate their livings.

PROPOSAL It is necessary to eliminate this appearance and standardize the facades, turning it into to a more homogeneous landscape. The growing number of marquees, air conditioners and clothes hangers, randomly distributed on a building facade, needs to be stopped. As it is impossible to remove all this things sorted throughout the city, on basic idea to minimize their damaged is “hide them�. It does not have to be anything grand, or with great costs, it could be just a curtain or blinds. Besides being a cheap and suitable material for everybody, it is removable as the law demands it to be. This simple idea would fix one ruined facade, turning it more pleasant to the sight and consolidate the urban landscape.

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

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Jana Rantova (SK)

THERMAL INSULATION

The panel blocks of houses were meant to be a quick and cheap living in 20th century. It was carried out from materials and construction with aim to make maximal “rationalize” the process of building and “optimize” cost of realization without opinion of people. Even some cities were all built by prefab houses. After communist regime fell down, the construction stopped and blocks of flats become the symbol of communist government with showing the inhumanity of regime. Therefore is all around effort to revive housing estates, to modernize the blocks and prompt them an idea of modern living. Nowadays the technical conditions of origin block houses are unacceptable for people living there. They are needed to be renovated. The main reconstruction is about changing old windows for new plastic, with better terms and the facade thermal insulation. Just because of bad insulation, there are huge problems with heating the houses and acoustics. That is why the owners or tenants want to make an additional thermal insulation. The very first insulation system was done in Germany in 1957, since that this system is increasingly used additionally on older buildings, and also included in new projects. The insulation system has its benefits as improving thermal properties, changing the appearance of blocks, but it has also disadvantages as high cost and long time of repayment. The problem arises with owners of flats in different ages, whose have different opinion about whole system, appearance or the cost of it. Some of older people don´t even want any insulation because of money, others are searching for more affordable systems and younger people are not prevented. Than there is a problem with appearance, in Slovakia there is no rule for using the colours. There is no uniform style and the different opinions often cause a disagreement between owners and the city architect. In many cities these facts creates colourfull fields of prefab houses, as “smarties”. How can be fulfilled requirements of both sides? Perhaps, this new wave in building industry should be more discussed!

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Jana Rantova (SK)

me is it better? yes, it is better because of changing the thermal conditions for living

Dušan is it better? Marek is it better?

is it more beautiful? yes, it is better no, in my opinion there should be an exact rule how to do this, in my hometown are almost all prefab houses thermal insulated, but neither two are same, it is like a colouring book...

is it more beautiful? well, it depends is it more functional? yes, it is definitely more functional, they´ll save some energy

is it more functional? yes, that´s why people doing this

is it because the architect of the building forgot about something?

yes, it is better, but at first it should be done perfectly, used suitable material with corresponding thickness, that the construction can breath... is it more beautiful? well, it is more beautiful, but only for a period of time, because the colour starts to pale, but still nicer than peeling facade is it more functional? as answer one

is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? yes, the architects didn´t think about people or humanity... they just made a rabbit houses to collect as many people as they could, and also the construction standards have changed...

I think it is because in past there were not as much developed materials as now and also the economics was different, it was better to pay for energy than construction

is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? yes, the architects that time forgot on many things, but the buildings are still standing, so it is not a big problem

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Barbora Polanská (SK)

EXPRESSING INDIVIDUALITY THROUGH WINDOW To have our own style and opinions is a good thing. People can express their views without words, for example through their clothes choice of colors and shapes to express thier good or bad mood, positive or negative attitudes, rebellion ... In any case, it is only the individual who dresses himself to expresses his individuality. But what happens when an unstoppable individualist is transferred to a larger scale in the collective expression? Today's post is about what impact on the final appearance of the socialist apartment buildings do have replacements of windows by individualists with/without aesthetic feeling? .. Or more, without the need to compromise and adapt to the greater good? .. How does the impact of many individualists occure within a block of flats or in the settlement? The vast majority of the population does not attach great importance to "beauty" of buildings, rather on their functional use. There is a little research based upon these questions: 1. is it better? 2. is it more beautiful? 3. is it more functional? 4. is it because the architect of the building forgot about something?

Dominika, 23, Student: Psychology and English language and literature 1., 3. In my opinion, nowadays it is better to have a plastic windows because of lower expenses on heating, then it looks much better when all windows in the flat are same (wite or brown - doesn´t matter). From the functional point of view, they are better cleaned. 2. I do not like that each window is different, let everyone in flat house have the same type of window, which they voted at camps meeteng. 4. It can be good idea to have a compulsory sitting with an architect, because tenantry of the flats don´t have such experience like an architects and they can tell them what is best in their case (which type or colour of windows). Michaela, 21, Student: Institute of garden and landscape architecture: 1., 2. I think it is better for people who live there. It is not more beautiful, except for gray-one appartment house which almost looks like different windows are there on purpose. It looks funky, in my opinion. 3. It is more funkcional because old windows had bad insulation. 4. No, it is because all buildings are old. Original windows just had not proper parametrs so occupants had to change them.

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Barbora Polanská (SK)

Matúš, 23, Guitar player, Dental technician: 1.Within insulation and heating expenses it is better when everyone changes his windows for new windows although it is wiser to put all the windows of same type before insulation. 2. If each window is of different shape and type, it looks terrible, but on the other hand if windows would be color combined, they could revive an old humdrum building. 3. I tis more functional and faster, within an individuality. 4. I can´t say if architect forgot something, but I don´t think, it is more about modernization of our own flat. If I had an old windows panted through them, I would change them without any regard of others. Lucia, 25, Internal audit specialist: 1., 3. I think that the main point is functionality. They are all old buildings and new windows are plastic. In new built the owners would not change anything. 2. I don´t like it, however when we changed the windows, we tried to focus on layout and style of rooms, we didn t think about the external appearance. The issue can be viewed in several ways: In practical terms, it is the replacement of old wooden windows, which compared with new windows had large voids, through which escaped the heat and natural ventilation was provided by leaks. Thermal insulation properties of new windows eliminate these shortcomings. These are the facts. However there is an aesthet-

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ics point of view, which can be viewed from the interior or exterior. Unstoppable individualist looks only from the interior. His new window is chosen by the style of his living room. He sees his flat as his family house, which is reflected on the facade of an apartment building - colors in contrast with colors - white frames, whitebrown, brown, brown with gold accents, red ... For some people the color difference of their windows is not enough, they choose glazing division - the more columns, the better. Even the most beautiful thermal insulation of building with gaudy painting can not cover the variety of window shapes. Some people do not want to admit that they are part of a larger unit. There are several possible solutions: 1. To change the angle of view and perceive the beauty in variousness - if all windows on the apartment building would have different shape and colour it would act as an intention. 2. To reach an agreement during a camps meeting on a common type of windows and/or to consult with a specialist. 3. Another possible solution would be if some regulations of the city would be introduced. For example, changes of the facades made under mandatory consultation with the city architect and administrator of the building. To regulate requirements of building residents in order to achieve satisfaction of the city and tenants. In Púchov there is a directive according to which facade changes are possible only after consultation (directive n.1/2004). The question is whether it really works. Summary of my opinion on four questions: is it better, prettier, more functional for the individual resident, who replaced the window. The diversity of windows is the diversity of people, which is beautiful in its own way and that is the thing which the architect forgot.

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Pictures: 1 – Unstopable individualist 2 – An intention? Links: 1 - http://mojdom.zoznam.sk/gl/143408/1111283/Okenne-rosady-na-bytovych-domoch-slovenskych-sidlisk 2 - http://mojdom.zoznam.sk/gl/143408/1111285/Okenne-rosady-na-bytovych-domoch-slovenskych-sidlisk

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Andrej Dubeň (SK) Young people from all around Slovakia were asked to answer few questions, but more generally than you could expect. What is their opinion about the situation of contemporary housing estate in Slovak cities, especially the reconstruction combined with insulation and new paint? Is it better when done than before it? Is it more beautiful? Is it more functional? If not, is it because the architect of the project forgot about something? This is current and serious problem in central Europe. Here are their contributions: Natália, 27, manager : If the colors are too gaudy I don´t like it. But if the coloration is chosen carefully and matches the surroundings, then I think it´s fine and the reconstruction revives the entire neighborhood. I can´t judge how much is an architect normally involved in this. Actually, I like our apartment block and it´s really well reconstructed. It´s red and grey, but I hate the one in front of my window. That one green and trully ugly. Veronika, 23, post officer : In my opinion reconstructed houses are better than original ones. I also like the variety of colors. Our apartment house is nicer, looks newer and it´s warmer inside. We also save some money on heating costs. Maroš, 24, masseur : First i want to tell you, that if the reconstruction is done correctly, I agree that it will save on heating costs in winter and it is more comfortable in the summer too. According to this i trust that insulated apartment house serves better. Regarding to the coloration, it all started around the year 2000. The actual situation is not very pleasing for me. I slowly got used to it, I also like to see brightly colored apartment building more than drab grey one. If it was only grey, but they often have 30 years old stains and smudges made by rain. I would really greet the function of the main architect of each city that would say: Devínska will look like this, Dúbravka will be like that... and it would be all harmonized a little. But this is all unreal, because some buildings were reconstructed long ago, some will be in the next years but they don´t care about the previous ones. A fully contrasting color appears that is not matching absolutely anything. That is why I would greet the architect´s decision, when there is often missing. Our family lives in an old family house without added insulation. We are happy with it and we´re afraid of moisture and mold that could appear. Tomáš, 25, student : In my opinion vibrant colors and cheerful settlements are more pleasant than grayed Communist blocks. Of course I like them more. They serve same like before but they represent the housing estate completely differently. I would like to brake the arms of that one who is responsible for the apartment buildings from the 60´s - 90´s and their look. Some people may think that I´m a redneck from a small village, but I´m just happy that I don´t have to live in one of these houses.

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Dana, 24, student : The Asians take it already for another tourist attraction in Bratislava. So I don´t mind the "kikiriki" housing estate of Petržalka yet. I would not like to live in one of these houses, but I really enjoy criticizing the actual reconstructions with my friends. On the other hand, the renovations suppress the feeling of being in Chernobyl when passing through it. Tatiana, 23, student : My opinion is pretty critical. We can see disgusting color excesses visible everywhere in the towns. It´s revolting. That colors have no logic in use, aesthetics neither have any rationale. However the reconstruction and insulation itself destroys the tectonic of the original architecture, it considerably lowers the running costs of the building, thus it saves money. This is a fight of values - beauty vs. function. But I am sure that if the architects were involved more in this, everything would be different. It could be coordinated and the cities would not make the impression of scattered smarties. Despite all the building life is eternal and the apartment houses from the past century will begin to being demolished sooner or later. Marek, 25, salesman : I feel the improvement of the quality of living in cities. The standard of the common spaces in the apartment buildings increases. The final coloring of the house is or is not the result of cooperation between the investor, architect and the city. It is also a result of absence of any plan that could involve the regulations and bring some logic. Yes, it is a little bit better than before, but it also shows the phlegmatic attitude of the residents to the city. The role of an architect is important, but other people make decisions that architect often can´t influence. Katarína, 26, manager : Well, I think this renovation of apartment houses partly hides their defects and lengthens their lifetime a little. But I don´t know what happens if we don´t do so. I also don´t know if people really will save any money or not. From the point of view of their exterior, the houses look like new ones and are more attractive. However, I rate negative some mish-mash combinations of colors. But in general I like more the renovated buildings. Ideal situation is, if the surrounding buildings match in color or tone, crazy color combinations, painted shapes, figurines, ornaments and other attempts of originality are disastrous. finally... authors´ view of the matter : We really need to start to communicate together. This can be impossible if everyone thinks he is an architect, but sometimes rules are must. If we look around, half of the people really like the situation that occurred. Everything is about compromises, but these don´t happen. Everybody does what he likes. But, maybe this is the right way... or not?


Andrej Dubeň (SK)

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Karol Skalski (PL)

IS SOMETHING MISSING HERE?

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Karol Skalski (PL)

UNDOUBTEDLY FOR RESIDENTS

Me

Mr Smith-Passerby (storekeeper, 48 years old, lives in Wrocław, asked on 28. 10. 12)

Is it better? yes

Is it better? yes

Is it more beautiful? definitely not

Is it more beautiful? yes

Is it more functional? yes

Is it more functional? yes

Is it because architect of the building forgot about something? yes

Is it because architect of the building forgot about something? no

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Nina Horáková (SK)

UNDRESSING ARCHITECTUREKLEMENT ŠILINGER AND HIS ŽIVNOSTENSKÝ DOM PERSONAL OPINION: I think the new façade is not that much better because the original one is hidden underneath the advertising, which catches the attention completely leaving the construction unnoticed. On the other hand, the new façade is more modern and eye-catching and this fact helps the theater which is placed on the ground level to promote its performances. I don’t think it’s because the architect Klement Šilinger forgot something, it’s just there are new expectations and needs to fulfill according the new era.

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PETER KOVÁR student of cognitive science Is it better? The overall layout hasn't really changed that much. The facade appears to look a bit more modern, especially, with the newer lower part. I think that the overall impression is more influenced by the change of the surrounding area as a whole than the building itself. Is it more beautiful? Yes, I think so, even though I don't consider it to be that much of a difference. I find the windows to fit much better in the overall picture in 2012 with respect to the historic photograph. And, again, I really like the new look of the commercial, lower part of the building. Is it more functional? I cannot really judge on this one without knowing the details, but I don't really see much of a advancement in this particular aspect. The only thing I noticed is that the modern layout allows for better demonstration of the merchandise in the stores, as the windows are clearly more transparent.

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Nina Horรกkovรก (SK)

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LINKS: http://www.theatre-architecture.eu/res/data/035/004133.jpg?seek=4 http://www.theatre-architecture.eu/sk/databaza/?theatreId=219

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Zuzana Mosna (SK)

WHAT COMES UP BLURRED FOCUS

Residential living on Trenčianska street, Bratislava Architect Emil Belluš (the author of Faculty of architecture building) Year 1930

Tomas (photographer) reacts: I like terass, in slovak language is homonym teraz, what means now! And this looks like contemporary living. I react: In my opinion it´s very good realization of this above addition. Form above follows the structure below, but the function is more for people needs. Perfect completion of building made by atelier AdiF, realization from 2011, really shows the best way of modern architecture, terasses, where can people spend a lot of time on the sun with beautiful view and whole comfort from the flat is accessible.

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Zuzana Mosna (SK)

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My mother (magisterial worker at the Magistrat of Bratislava) reacts: Absolutely insensitive structure above and form addition. Non-acceptance of characteristical principles and elements of functionalist architecture of Belluš´s houses. Inappropriate and unaesthetic addition, non-acceptable dormers, because of their diffrent shape. Disproportion. I react: My opinion is not so absolutely against this structure, but i don´t like it, the dormers is really horrible. But I like diversity and all this designs which shows us the transformation of thinking and building through the time. This is realization maybe from the late 90´s. In comparison with the left realization I see that architecture in the present time make progress to better living and forms. But still the question remains, what would the author of original buildings from 1930 Belluš say and think, maybe in his reincarnation he made the left completion.

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Domingo Bargall贸 Garcia (ES)

QUESTIONS ABOUT SANTA CATARINA MARKET IN BARCELONA Mercat de Santa Catarina Restoration Arquitects: Enric Miralles, Benedetta Tagliabue Date of construction: 1848 Date of restoration: 1997-2005

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Domingo Bargalló Garcia (ES) Evaluate the transformation according to YOUR OWN professional knowledge: is it better? Is better for the city as a brand. The market has been transformed into an iconic building of Barcelona. is it more beautiful? Yes, definitely. is it more functional? The space inside is more diaphanous. is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? No, just because the building was old and it was a good opportunity to refresh the image of the city.

Ask any non-professional to evaluate the transformation according to her/his non-professional knowledge: is it better? It looks more modern and probably has better illumination in the interior. is it more beautiful? Yes, definitely.

is it because the architect of the building forgot about something? I don’t know.

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is it more functional? I don’t know, probably.

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Marián Ján (SK)

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HOW TO “LOAD UP”

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Marián Ján (SK)

SQUARE WITH PEOPLE? BLURRED FOCUS

sources: Námestie pre ľudí Deň pre námestie http://www.facebook.com/namestiepreludi http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/namestie-pre-ludi

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

WILL TO CREATE Since the primitive times man felt the need to stand against the powers of nature creating shelters to protect himself in order to survive through times.

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8000 years back, since the moment in which he abandoned the protection of caves and threw himself to wild world to settle as gatherer tribes, man started working on ways to build and develop construction, using stone, wood and clay. The idea of architect-builders appears in the egyptian, greek and roman civilizations, under assumption of a status given to those with high capacities and skills, determined by the societies - who expected from them the most correct city planning. Architecture applied to the construction of religious, civic, housing, defensive e funcional issues. Although there were people with such training and studies, every dreamy idealist man put into practice his knowledge on construction and created his own house, porch and storage for personal use. Stone, plaster and wood techniques have been used until late 1700. Due to the accelerated scientific discoveries and to the expansion of the cities, different materials and new techniques where explored and started to get used. Today, architects are distinguished among builters and engineers. Shelters and wooden hovels are now skyscrapers made of glass and steal. Man never stoped dreaming; without any qualifications and fleeing the law, he steel builts, changes and often reconstructs the space that he calls a home.

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The elementary construction technics, as with any other kind of knowledge, had become, throw the years, part of the general knowledge and so an usual human way. Not only by empiric experience as for all the science knowledge that became of public access, men acquired a allegedly self-sufficiency to elaborate he’s own spaces/places; even with the lack of proper knowledge and a specific training that would be necessary to the coherence of the project (with itself and its surroundings). Our home is our place and it becomes, in many ways, part of our identity and it propitious to a lot of transformations, in terms of color, materials, furniture arrangement or even constructive interventions for a better functioning space. This urge to change the personal space is ruled, many times, by the lack of men’s conditions to carry out their daily activities or as a way to preserve the space. Therefore comes the search of a new, low budgeted way, to redo the space by their own hands. Companies of DIY products and medium-small sized construction companies are the main faction to encourage the population to do small works in order to enrich their houses, giving everyone full access to construction materials for small restructuring works using essential construction materials, brick, thermal insulation, acoustic, covering tiles, cement, ink… as even interior products, bathroom sinks, coating materials like mosaics, wood, linoleum and interior inks. With this kind of materials that are easily bought on lower prices, the restructurings, changes and expansions in a house’s interior become simpler, and without the extreme need of spending more money ordering services from specialized teams and wait for the architect’s changing project.


Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

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MIESUNDERSTANDING

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Rem Koolhaas: I don't respect Mies, I love Mies. I have studied Mies, digged Mies, reassembled Mies. I even have cleaned Mies. Not like I reverence Mies, I fight with his admirors.


Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

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Special thanks to Helena MartĂ­n Nieva

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

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E R I A N N O I T S E U Q


Rafael Ramalho (PT) 1. lives in a apartment

house

2. your home is isolated your home is part of an urbanization 3. have made any changes visible from the outside: annex

garage

marquise

coverage

large antenna

new garden

4. its building is part of a set your building is one building isolated 5. have made any changes visible from the outside: dish

drying clothes

some closed balcony

painted the exterior of your house a different color 6. Do you consider these changes are essential to your life? Yes

BLURRED FOCUS

marquise

No 7.

Do you think these changes have some kind of impact on the overall appearance of your building or your urbanization? Yes

No 8.

Do you think you should have hired an architect to draw these changes? Yes

No 9.

Do you think these changes flout the architecture of your building or your urbanization? Yes

No

Think about it!

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Fake True Cities Stories Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990

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Osamu Okamura / Unfinished Structures as Creative Challenge - An Inspirational Guide to the Failed Ambitions of Central European Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 9th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa. cz #2 Maria Topolčanská / Remoteness and Proximity as Geographical Conditions and Motivation for Architects’ Activities in Central Europe Today, 17:00, Tuesday 16th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa.cz #3 Roman Rutkowski / The Hyper–Modernism in Polish Post–War Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 23rd October 2012, visiting Totalstudio, KC Dunaj, Nedbalova 3, Bratislava, www. totalstudio.eu

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Bálint Kádár / Places of Illusion: Tourism Infrastructures of the Socialist Era, 17:00, Tuesday 30th October 2012, visiting Vallo Sadovský Architects, Sienkiewiczova 4, Bratislava, www.vallosadovsky.sk #5

Samu Szemerey / Fanzines, Communes, Rock and Roll – Alternative Architecture Practices Before 1989, 17:00, Tuesday 6th November 2012, visiting Plural Architects, Páričkova, Bratislava, www.plural.sk

Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

coordinator: Maria Topolčanská Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

supported by: Visegrad University Studies Grant


Bálint Kádár (HU)

ANYTHING CAN GO, AS LONG AS THEY COME – THE HOTELS OF JÓZSEF FINTA IN TIMES PAST ILLUSIONS Hungarian Goulash Communism started with a strangely optimist illusion that a society built after a bloody repression can offer the services, qualities and maybe also the sense of freedom of Western societies. In fact, the 8th congress of the communist party in 1962 stated that „The interior conditions of the Peoples Republic of Hungary are such that can be proudly showed to our friends and to our good willed critics as well. We have nothing to hide.” So international tourism got the green light and tourists were supposed to come to see the many beauties of the country, among them the modern socialist society, where good services and quality leisure time were a right for all. The fine hotel buildings constructed with the help of our best architects meant to be a mirror of this optimist social illusion: all good quality, light and transparent modernist structures with a touch of luxury. But it was all in fact an obvious illusion. The period of optimistic modernization finished in 1968 when the economic unsustainability of the socialist model became evident. From that year on, quality in new building projects became scarce, and all that mattered in tourism were the numbers. Foreign tourism was an important source of revenue for the economy in larger and larger debts, so larger and larger hotels were to be built, without the exclusiveness of the similar structures of the 1960's. The communist government decided to give up some of its ideologies just to continue the expansion of the hotel industry: western multinational chains could build their hotels, and even Austrian constructor companies were welcome to do the building instead of our working class in exchange of some loans. A good symbol for the tourism industry of late socialist times in Hungary is József Finta, the architect who conceived most of the hotels in this period. He had the opportunity to design the first and second hotel on the bank of the Danube, radically reshaping the traditional cityscape. The 1969 Hotel

Duna Intercontinental was more prestigious than the luxury hotels built in the

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previous decade at lake Balaton, but a new name was needed to execute the wills of the American(!) investor, who wanted all windows to be oriented towards the river. The young Finta was flexible enough to design a building with a huge blind wall towards the city, cutting off the downtown from its river probably forever. This flexibility turned out to be profitable at the Hotel Forum (1981), when he had to re-design the southern end of the building in no time: the Austrian constructor had already started the works when it turned out that the complex will not replace the eclectic “Thonet” building, saving it from demolition in the last minute

. József Finta was also the right man to turn the hotel construction practice from sophisticated in-site technologies to much cheaper prefabricated panel building. He designed the Hotel Volga in 1971 entirely with these prefab elements, successfully demonstrating g the feasibility y of such venues

. In fact, he could spread these simplified design methods also in Czechoslovakia, where he built Hotel Bratislava (Bratislava, 1974)

and Hotel Voronez


Bálint Kádár (HU)

(Brno, 1979) . In Budapest he designed Hotel Novotel in 1979 with Hotel in 1992 . While it became the most luxurious hotel in Budapest, its tired postmodernism showed how Hungary gave down on style and innovation during late communist times, not having recovered until today. But 2012 is a year of hope, with some symbolic events. This year Hotel Volga was demolished more expressive forming , but had no trouble to convert it into a panel block building. As a result, the Austrians could build two Finta prefab hotels in 1982, Novotel

and Hotel Buda Penta

. Finta also gave a hotel to Vienna, where the Hungarian hotel company built Hotel Hungaria in 1984

. The 77 year old, still active Finta had to witness how one of his contributions to low quality mass tourism failed definitively. This doesn't mean Hungarian architecture or the tourism sector found the right way forward. But post-socialist times are coming to an end, and the last tourism-related Finta project is an even better sign for this. In 2005 the city of Esztergom opened an ambitious thermal bath complex, and planned to open a hotel joined to it. They commissioned Finta studio, the author of the bath, and started to construct the hotel in 2009. But by then the bath itself was already bankrupt, closing for almost a year in 2011. Today the complex is for sale, the hotel, structurally ready remains a torso, and no one knows when it might be finished following the economic disillusion in all crisis, political corruption and d

. This one took some Hungarian goulash to the Austrian capital, while Finta brought back postmodern style: Hotel Taverna in 1985 became a 100% postmodern building on the .

prestigious Váci street . Surprisingly, Finta could keep on building the most exclusive hotels even after the fall of the Iron Curtain. After Hotel Liget in 1990, he designed Kempinski

While Finta's project of 1992 already spoke in a tired architectural language, the Esztergom hotel 20 years later bought no renewal to the mentality of the old builder. He could adapt to any regime, any investor, any technology, but in a world where uniqueness is the key to successful tourist destinations, the tasteless “anything-can-go” mentality of Goulash Communism works no more.

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

WHERE ARE YOU GOING ON VACATION? almost meaningless question, because only these few possibilities existed: - going camping near lake or trips in the mountains (CSSR, Balaton)) - trade-union company vacation or pioneer camp for kids (CSSR) - a dream holiday in Yugoslavia (between 1962-1972) or Bulgaria, later Romania and German Democratic Republic 1. camping at the lake 2. collective tour 3. convalescent home Morava, High Tatras 1957 4. waiting in front of state travel agency 5. advertising Save up for vacation with State savings bank, 60s 6. socialist passport with stamps and permissions, 70s 7. people always brought their own durable food on vacations 8. beach Rujana, GDR,1973

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

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http://cestovani.idnes.cz/foto.aspx?r=kolem-sveta&c=A091113_161434_igcechy_tom&foto=TOM2f1a49_FO01000963.jpg http://www.vysoketatry.com/obce/tlomnica/galeriah.html http://img.sk.prg.cmestatic.com/media/images/580xX/Nov2009/2109619.jpg http://socikstylearchiv.blogspot.sk/2011/10/ceskoslovenske-reklamygrafika.html

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Barbara Brazao (PT)

THE IMPLOSION OF TROY (BUT NOT BY THE GREEKS) In the beginning of the 70's, a huge enterprise was being developed in Tr贸ia (allusive name to the mythological city - Troy), a small peninsula known for its paradisiac beaches and beautiful landscapes. The project was about a group of resort-hotel towers for middle class average people. The company that was building it went bankrupt and the towers Verde-Mar and T04 were never finished. The towers remained there, unfinished, for more than 30 years until, in 2005, the SONAE group (one of the biggest Portuguese corporations) bought them. In the same year, they demolished them to then start building a luxury complex - which is already finished.

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Barbara Brazao (PT)

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LEGENDA 1 - Tr贸ia, a postcard from the 80's 2, 3 and 4 - the implosion of the towers

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

EVEN IF CONTROLLED... BUT STiLL FUN 1.11.2012 14:30 – 15:20

My grandfather (Michal Timan) was 12,5 years a head of „JRD“ in Kružlova(JRD – were agricultural cooperatives in Czech and Slovakia in 1949-1990 during the totalitarian rule of the Communist party). From his own initiative he used to organize trips and holidays in Slovakia and abroad as a way how to appreciate the work of workers. Today I was in Kruzlova to visit my grandmother(Anna Timanova, 85y.) so I decited to make an interview with her about the trips that she absolved with her husband:

How old were you when you were traveling together? I dont remember exactly but i think a was around 46, as i remember we were travelling a lot for 6-7 years. Which countries did you visit? Former Yugoslavia, in Russia it was Moscow and Soči, Romania, Bulgaria, Poland Then we used to go often to Czech republic and of course High Tatras in Slovakia How offten did you go for a trip? once or twice a year, it depended on how succesfull was JRD that year What was usually the official reason of these trips? Exchange of working experiences, officially only the best workers were allowed to go, only people with suitable history, only supporters of Com-

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munist party. But in Kruzlova it wasnt so strict, here people usually didnt sneak on eachother as it was in bigger towns as for example in Presov. How much was usually the fee for one trip? Nothing. Everything was paid by JRD or by organization which organized the trip. But there always had to be some good reason for a trip, as visiting other JRD, or gaining some experience from brotherly organization or town. Something what will make people to like their country or Communist party even more. First of all, an official request had to be written. I had to add, that even alcohol was for free, what our men really appreciated. Did you meet also the native people when you were abroad? Yes of course. They always prepared some program for us, as dancing and singing performances, the best were in Russia because their folklore is very beautifull.


Valéria Kočanová (SK)

Was it possible to travel only with JRD? No, there was more organizations, when you were a member of it you had to pay a fee ( around 2 CSK a year) for example Trade union organization. We were on a trip in Romania ( in 1978) , with a airplane for two weeks, for free of course. The hotel was really nice and exclusive. Every evening we had some show, during the day many trips to other towns. And as i remember there wasnt many people on the beaches. Then there were also some cultural exchanges but never with western countries. Everything was really well organized, from the way there to the evening happenings. How did you usually travel there? Was it often with a plane? No, the typical way was with a bus. A speciality was, that we usually organized a wedding during a way there. We found some young couple (sometimes there were not couple yet) and we decided to marry then, with all traditions as „courting“, ceremony, with songs music. And the reason for all of that was very simple,,,just to get drunk, specially men :)

And a story my mother (Nadežda Kočanová, 54 y.) add to our conversation ... That time it was very popular to go for shopping to Poland. But on the borders were neverending rows, if you wanted to go ther separately by car. So what people usually did? They wrote official request to „OVKSS“(The district committee of the communist party of Slovakia) as a organization „ Women union“ that they wanted to lay wreaths on some soldiers graves. They bought wreaths to make that illusion even more realistic. As an oficial visit they didnt have to wait on borders. And on Polish side they just throw all wreaths away and shopping day could begin. People always could find a way to feel more free :) ...but people were happy because the rest of their time they were just working...working... working... (pictures are from my grandmothers photoalbum)

Were the people happy that they could travel? In general yes. In one hand, there were glad and proud of themselves when someone appreciated their work and revarded them with a trip. But in other hand it happend also offten that they had lot of work at home so they didnt have time for vacations...but it was so, that someone still HAD to go... Which place did you like the most? If i had to choose i will say Russia. It was a sightseeing trip via Ukraine. The official reason was, as many times, experience-changing with their JRD. We have visited Moscow and Krasnodar. The day started with really big breakfast, than some snack and the best was a lunch. It consisted of twelve meals!!! Then we met some war veterans. And in the evenings and nights everybody were just drinking.(20 bottles of vodka!) Men didnt want to leave this place. We even forgot some of them there ( as a head of neighboring JRD...:) ). I forgot my sandals in a room and they send a taxidriver to the airport who brought me them :) So nice were they on us... :)

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

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ARTIFACTS OF A DECEASED ERA Postcards, souvenirs and other tourism artifacts from the post-war socialist era. This is the outcome of a not much thorough research I did seeking for evidences of tourism during the socialist era in family archives of some of my closer relatives. Since my lineage and family members are mostly Hungarian-speaking Slovaks from the south of the country, thermal baths, lakes, mountain resorts in Czechoslovakia and Hungary were the main destination of trips during the post-war era. I could also find instances of beach vacations in Romania, Bulgaria or the former Yugoslavia. 1. wall decoration from the former Yugoslavia, 70’s 2. decorated mirror from thermal bath Komárom, Hungary, 60’s 3. Postcard from Poprad, High Tatras, Czechoslovakia, 70’s 4. Postcard from Constanza, Romania, 1974 5. Post stamp, Constanza, Romania, 1974 6. Post stamp, Slanog, Yugoslavia, 1974 7. Postcard, Balatonlelle, Hungary, 1977 8. Poscard back side, Balatonlelle, Hungary, 1977 9. Postcard from pioneer camp, Losovice, Czechoslovakia, 70’s 23. 10. Postcard, bath Harkány, Hungary, 70’s 11. Post stamp, Czechoslovakia, 70’s 12. Thermometer from High Tatras, 70’s 13. Carved wooden decoration, Czechoslovakia, 70’s 14. Ring purchased by my grandmother, Baku, Soviet Union, 60’s 15. Gourds, Balatonfüred, Hungary, 60’s – 70’s 16. Seashell decoration, Bulgaria, 60’s 17. Wall decorations from Karlovy Vary and Dobšiná, Czechoslovakia, 70’s 18. „Travelling to Hungary”, Tour Guide Book of Hungary in Slovak language, cover, 1976 19. Modern sights of Hungary from Tour Guide Book of Hungary in Slovak language, 1976 „thermal bath Miskolc-Tapolca” „the most modern college building in Hungary, Nyíregyháza” „New estate, Dunaújváros” „Watchtower, Miskolc” 20. Gothic and modernist sights, postcard, Košice, Czechoslovakia, 70’s 21. Another type of tourism: postcard sent by my grandfather during his military service in Vsetin, Czechoslovakia, 1952 22. Wall decoration, Krásna Hôrka, 1970’s 23. Postcard, Karlovy Vary, Czechoslovakia, 70’s

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

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Diego Aranda (ES)

WHAT IS THE PRICE OF TOURISM MONEY?

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Diego Aranda (ES)

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Karol Skalski (PL)

IF YOU WERE TO HOLIDAY IN 196 WOULD

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Karol Skalski (PL)

O CHOOSE YOUR 60s WHAT PLACE IT BE?

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Andreas Fr端hwirth (DE)

WHEN NEIGHBORS BECOME NEIGHBORS AGAIN! The focus of this article is on the relations, cause of touristic or familial reasons, of the inhabitants of the Austrian border region to their neighbors from Eastern Europe. Vienna was in times of the Cold War the railhead of the Western World. But the "real" end was the region in the north-east of Vienna. This low populated area, unattended, forgotten and suffered under the historical situation of the two political blocks. Since ancient times, this region has been a border between tribes and nations, divided by the river Morava (German: March). After the fall of the Iron Curtain arisen a lot of chances and opportunities, but they weren't taken, especially for the economic development of this region, on both sides of the river. An example: There is no possibility of crossing the border, beside Bratislava, between Austria and Slovakia also with a high water level of the Morava (the ferryboats are not provided in case of high tide). In the following interviews, we will have a look on the changes in Eastern Europe over the last decades, from the perspective of a regular Austrian inhabitant.

1. Gerhard F., 51 When did you visit a country from the former Eastern Bloc for the first time? (Before or after 1989) A view days after the fall of the Iron Curtain in Czechoslovakia

We had to change a particular amount of money into the koruna, but the products in shops were on the one hand from very low quality and the prices were that less, that it was nearly impossible to spend all the money. A problem was also the economy of scarcity; the Slovaks and Czechs weren't very happy about the "rich" Westerns, who bought the stuff, what was needed for the own population.

What was the reason? Just to have a look and we tried to shop.

Do you visit Czech and Slovakia (or until 1993 Czechoslovakia) from time to time? Yes

Why "tried"? What kind of changes have you recognized over the

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Andreas Fr端hwirth (DE)

last decades, since the fall of the Iron Curtain? Nowadays is a huge gap between the "past" and the "presents". When you are at the countryside, you can see a lot of new houses, probably in a better condition than you can find in Austria. But in the direct neighborhood are really poor-quality buildings, which are in the same condition like 23 years ago. Also a lot of the infrastructures, like the streets, are still in a bad shape. Extreme changes are also in the gastronomy. 20 years ago, it was impossible to find a good restaurant. For instance, you couldn't even find a restaurant which served cold drinks. Nowadays, you can even go in a little village and you find excellent restaurants there. The only difference is that the prices are much lower than in Western Europe.

The infrastructure changed completely, especially in cities like Prague. In my first stay, everything had this communist flair. When I visited Prague recently, I can't find a difference to a western city, for instance like Vienna.

3. Silvia W. and Markus S., both 23 When did you visit a country from the former Eastern Bloc for the first time? (Before or after 1989) S: For shopping with my grandmother (note: referred to people who can remember on the time before the Iron Curtain; they have a much deeper connection to their eastern neighbors than young) M: Never Why have you never been?

What is better/what is worse compared to Western European destinations? (touristic aspect) The value for money is much better than in Western European holiday destinations. I was in Hungary at the Lake Balaton, accept from various city trips (Prague, Bratislava,...) and daytrips my only stay in Eastern Europe for more than a weekend, and really nothing was missing compared to a Western Europe destination. Do you plan holidays/a trip into the former Eastern Bloc? Maybe a trip to the Baltic States, because we do know nothing about them and it is probably different than everything else I have seen before.

2. Sabine W., 49 When did you visit a country from the former Eastern Bloc for the first time? (Before or after 1989) 1969, I visited a marriage. Have you been on holidays in any of this country? Yes, city trips to Prague, Bratislava and Budapest. I stayed also for two weeks on the Lake Balaton, what was a really good holiday.

M: I am just not interested. There is no special reason. Do you plan to go to any Eastern European country, for instance for holidays? S: We prefer to spend our holidays on the beach, favored on the Mediterranean Sea. M: I can imagine joining a city trip, but this has no priority for me. What do you associate with the former Eastern Bloc? Mostly negative aspects like poverty! As from this region, I talked to many more people about their experiences, especially to their direct neighbors, the Czechs and the Slovaks. These three interviews are just examples of a huge range of conversations. What interesting is, that the younger the people are, the more lukewarm and uninterested are they in their eastern neighbors. A lot of their assumptions about the East looks more like inspired by a Hollywood-movie from the late 1980s than real experience. So for me it was really shocking to see that older people have a much more realistic view on how was and is the former Eastern Bloc. Usually, this should be the task for the young generation!

What kind of changes did you recognize during your last stay? (compared to previous visits)

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Mariรกn Gombarฤek (SK)

NO ILLUSIONS. LOOKING FOR THE HOLIDAY DESTINATION NO.1 #4


Marián Gombarček (SK)

A quick interview with the 60’s kid Where did you spent most of your summer holidays? My grandparent’s house in the countryside Where did you spent most of your winter holidays? My grandparent’s house in the countryside Where did you spent most of your spring holidays? My grandparent’s house in the countryside Where did you spent most of your autumn holidays? My grandparent’s house in the countryside v

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

LUXURY '60s

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

pictures: HOTEL CRACOVIA, KRAK”W (POLAND), PROJ. WITOLD C CKIEWICZ, 1965 source of pictures: AGENCJA GAZETA

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)

CONCRETE GARDENS

Sunny beach, Bulgaria 1958

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)

Sunny beach, Bulgaria 2012

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Andrej Dubeň (SK)

ŠTRBSKÉ PLESO - THE JEWEL OF HIGH TATRAS CIRCUS ARCHITECTURE

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Andrej Dubeň (SK)

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

THE PEACEFUL REVOLUTION

Berlin, October 1989

My parents have this story that they were in GDR(DDR) in October 1989. I was 10 months old and my brother was 4 years old. My grandparents took care of us in Bulgaria while my parents were travelling. There was a moment when they didn’t know if they will return home.

How did you decide to go and visit GDR? We had the opportunity to see the world abroad and we took it. Was it something usual for Bulgarians to travel abroad before 1989?

abroad first you had to ask for an exit visa. The authorities were checking if you were promising and if you made some offence against the country. How many people you were travelling? We were seven friends.

No. It was almost impossible to travel to the west Europe because of the wall. There were cases that some people from the secret services could go to the other side but not like a free tourist. It was easier to travel in Eastern Europe but it wasn’t for everybody. If you wanted to go

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Which cities did you visit? We visited Budapest, Praha, Berlin and Dresden. Actually we were in the middle of the revolts in Dresden.


Boryana Koleva (BG)

Did you have any problems in Berlin? No, we were there right before the revolts. After Berlin we went to Dresden and there we became witnesses to the start of so-called “peaceful revolution” in Dresden. Tell me more about the demonstrations in Dresden. It was the last day of our visit. We spent all of our money because we were supposed to leave with the train at midnight and we already had out train tickets. We were in a coffee shop right before we went to the train station. When we left the coffee it was all began. The streets were full of citizens, police and military forces. The people were destroying public properties and buildings. We couldn’t stay in a hotel because we had no more money and we couldn’t reach the train station. We spent the night in a telephone cabin. Seven people in a small telephone cabin all night long! Otherwise we could be draged into the crowds in the streets and we didn’t know what could happen then. Maybe we wouldn’t return home… During the night we saw that the police took many people in handcuffs in motor-lorries but they didn’t do anything to us. When we went to the train station in the morning there were military forces that didn’t let anyone to the trains. We showed our passports and thanks God they let us to the train. The station was almost destroyed. All the windows and everything was broken. The ground floor was flood from the fire-brigade that was trying to put out the fire during the night.

So did you come home safely after you get on the train? Yes, we came home safely. However, we explained everything to our families and friends and no one believed us that the communism is on its way down. In Bulgaria it was a secret for some weeks, maybe a month. This is how our country was leaded after the Second World War – less you know, better for everybody. There is one sentence that my father use to say every time we start talking about the life before 10.11.1989 – We were happy, because we didn’t know how miserable we were.

Do you think it was possible that you never return home? It was possible because they arrested many people. It was a matter of luck. We maybe met the right policemen but we are sure that there were people that would arrest us.

Sources: The interview is with my parents – Zhana Koleva and Vangel Kolev. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMVXB4OmdYc – Fall of changes, Bulgaria 1989 (English audio) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6xBDEd3WOI – Dresden in October 1989 (German audio) http://europeforvisitors.com/germany/dresden/dresden-peaceful-revolution.htm - The peaceful revolution in Dresden.v

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Barbora Polanská (SK)

EUROCAMP

- THE BIGGEST AND THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CAMP IN EUROPE, WAS OPENED IN 1974 NEAR TATRANSKÁ LOMNICA, ON THE OCCASION OF THE INTERNATIONAL MEETING OF CARAVANS FICC, NO LONGER EXISTS... Location: 3 km from Tatranská lomnica, foothills of High Tatras Altitude: + 860m Accommodation: 118 Bungalows, 1bungalow / 4 people Visitor capacity: Bungalows 472, Caravans 3000 Facilities: complete bathroom, wheelchair access, restaurants, television, safe deposit, refreshments, nightclub, information, credit card payment, winter equipment rental, fitness, sauna, pools, tennis courts, squash, ski school, lectures, covered/open fireplace, playground, accommodation with dog, parking, taxi, gas station, horse riding, cycling, ice skating, skiing, night skiing

Eurocamp 1974–2009

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Eurocamp 2011-


Barbora Polanskรก (SK)

Source: http://poprad.korzar.sme.sk/c/6332041/zhorela-schatrana-budova-eurocampu-v-tatranskej-lomnici.html Facts: http://www.tatry.sk/kempingy/eurocamp-ficc Facilities: http://www.invitour.sk/index.php?StateID=&ObjectType=&ObjectID=&Cmd=ShowCustomerInfo&CustID=98&lang=sk

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Nina Horáková (SK)

PANORÁMA RESORTTHE CONTROVERSIAL DOMINANT OF ŠTRBSKÉ PLESO Panorama Hotel was built between 1968-1970, for the purpose of hosting competitors during the Nordic skiing World Championship in 1970. The main architect for the project was Zdeněk Řihák, at that time based in Brno. Even though the project was initially met with dismissive sentiment in both the architectonic community and general public; this feeling evaporated over time, and people started to appreciate its dynamic nature, and the fact that its placement offered a mesmerizing view of Tatras. The Panorama Hotel has gradually grown to be a true icon and even after going through a lengthy process of reconstruction, it is still worthy of its representative status of Štrbské Pleso municipality.

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Nina Horรกkovรก (SK)

Link: http://madeinczechoslovakia.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/panorama-hotel.jpg

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Zuzana Mosna (SK)

FROM ILLUSION TO ZEN

Our cottage in Plavecký Štvrtok, 39 km west from Bratislava This cottage was built in early 70´s by my family. They design it by themselves and also built by themselves. At first they sold their house in very near centre of Bratislava, because of mysterious reasons and buy a flat in a new socialistic residential living in Ružinov in Bratislava and also built a cottage in a new socialistic area for recreation in a pine forest by the beautiful lake „Plavecký Štvrtok“ what means „Svimming Thursday“. In this time, early 70´s, many cottages appeared there. People who built the cottages didn´t need architects, they did it like they like. It´s not bad, but… Some mistaces appeared and still exist. For example: They (my family) thought that they don´t need a shower, because they can go bath to the lake; they built a chimney with fireplace, but it is dummy, because they don´t make a fire in it. „The cottage is just a summer residence.“ This sentence told my grandfather when i wanted go there with my friends in winter. It is just illusion that a cottage which looks like a house, with living room, kitchen and two rooms is just for some weeks in the summer. It may be so romantic in winter when the snow is everywhere in the forest and the lake is frozen and you can skating and nobody there. And then, with red nose come to the cottage where the fire burns, you make a tea and watch some fairytales. Yes fairytales, because it is christmas time ! Than you go to the forest cut some pine tree, bring it to the living room, decorate it…

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Zuzana Mosna (SK) Oh ..m. My visualization of these moments are always so realistic. But it is just a dream ! Because my family can´t realize that this can happened. They always see the problems. But i see it in different way, everything is so beautiful and waits for us, but when we don´t live this dream, it is just illusion, very realistic but very elusive. Many times i was begging for living there in the forest with my friends. But it is not in the socialistic way of thinking. My family thinks: It is just summer residence, dot. You can recreate there just in the summer, alone with us, and when the fall will fall the cottage close and everybody have to work and live in the fake city, where all romantic dreams are killed. We don´t have freedom, we have to live in dimensions and conditions which are missing balance: Winter – work, some days celebrate christmas, go to ski to some winter resort Spring – work, some days celebrate easter Summer – not so much work, you can take some rest, some weeks in the cottage, or in some resort by the sea, Balaton etc. Fall – work, depression that summer is far far away. And what about the people who have enough time to rest – seniors. For example my grandfather, who owns the cottage, doesn´t want travelling, he rather sit alone in his 4-room socialistic flat. People don´t know how to enjoy the life. It is always about balance of work and relax. Why separate work with stress and relax with doing nothing? Just bad illusion. Last but not least question which maybe relates with this theme, maybe not: Did you see the movie „Spring, summer, fall, winter and spring“ ? For me is the answer of answer: Just zen anytime and everywhere. Than all illusions will disappear.

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

GARAGE CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY CULTURE The architecture in the socialist countries of the former Soviet Union is a physical memory present in many cities in Eastern Europe, but sometimes left by the wayside. These days cities are forced to flee to expand its borders and begin to rebuild and restore its oldest parts. The buildings Soviets left neglected for decades are excellent backgrounds for the new socio-cultural centers of large old European cities, as a rule have an image and a striking and imposing monumental scale. The Vremena Goda Restaurant in Moscow will be rehabilitated by Rem Koolhaas in the future to be the new home of the Garage Center for Contemporary Culture. This infrastructure Soviet contruída in the 60 lies in Gorky Park that was planned and built in the Stalin era Soviet constructivist architect by Konstantin Melnikov. Has all its functions distributed over 2 floors envolcros a transparent skin on the ground floor - EXPERIMENTAL - there will be video art, performance, sculpture and instalation. The first floor - CONVENTIONAL - will be dedicated to installations, sculpture, video, drawing, photography and paiting. “we are very happy to work on turning the almost-ruin of Vremena Goda into the new house for garage. we were able, with our client and her team, to explore the qualities of generosity, dimension, openness, and transparency of the soviet wreckage and find new uses and interpretations for them.” Rem koolhaas, cofounder of OMA

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

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Marián Ján (SK)

ZIMMER FREI???

Hotel Regia***, Bojnice was build in the socialist era. It is a vast volume standing right next to the castle, which plays significant role as a local landmark. Shaped same as any other of them. Concrete structure looking like a brick. Very original. Maybe that was not the purpose. For the regime a goal was to create capacities to accommodate many. When I was young world wrestling competions were hosted in Prievidza. I think many of the participants were accomodated here. But from these days nothing likewise happened. The internet sites offering hotel services say:”Fairytale holidays in hotel surrounded by a romantic castle and spa. 50% Off! ”. The Bojnice castle, zoo, spa, minigolf and swimming pools made a nice list of activities for the guests. There also used to be an amphitheatre nearby, where the concerts of famous bands too place. Also Karel Gott came and sang for holidaymakers. This small town had many to offer and has many today. Though one of the swimming pools and the amphitheatre were closed. My friends father once said:”There were good r'n'r gigs and cinema was taking place there very often. It was so crowded, people used to climb on the trees to see. Once the trees were so loaded, that one big branch broke and fell down causing many injuries to others beneath it.” He smiled and continued with nostalgy:”But nobody really cared, because there was Van Den Graffs Generator band on the stage. They rocked!” But services in theese hostels were not just for foreign folks. Also for working residents, that the state was so proud of. In nearby cities lived mainly workers of coal producing industry. Most of men had to serve in army for two years, but if they accepted to work “underground”, they were able to leave the training year sooner. Young men, that underwrote fiveteen years in

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coal mine to heavy work. These hotels and and many leisure programs were created also for them, hard working class. They went to rehabilitations, to spa and masages that took place there. Some of them as my father went to Yugoslavia for a ten days rehabilitation holidays. Just them, whitout their family. Everything was paid by the minig company. Was this enough to compensate? "But at least something. Today the company just let you die like a dog. They don't care at all." said one retired miner. As the population in this mainly industrial part of Slovakia began to fall buildings got abandoned. Now the young try as hard as they can to leave this “mining valley”. Company survival is artifically doped with government money. Its just a question of time how long can it last. There is no reason to visit these huge hotels like Regia. I think they are rarely used. Most of tourists are nowdays searching for a smaller guest house or they are accomodated directly in spa buildings. Counting in the hotel Regia capacities in compare to demand are enormous. The tourist come somewhere else. Mainly Czech, Slovak, Hungarian and occasionaly other foreing countries as german speaking. But they have different demands and standards. They accommodate somewhere else. These days it remains occupied very weakly. The entrance was renovated by adding plastic chef offering daily menu and rustic looking wooden porch. That says it all...


Mariรกn Jรกn (SK)

foto: http://www.damonahotel.com

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

DRUZBHA HOLIDAY CENTRE - YALTA, UKRAINE Overlooking a popular beach in the faded Soviet resort town of Yalta, this hotel, built in 1984 by the Ukrainian architect Igor Vasilevsky, may lack an imaginative name, but its hulking cylindrical mass is unmissable. Guests enter the property via a catwalk bridge surrounded by glass. Another interesting detail is that the whole building is sustained by two giant cement legs, The main attraction is the breathtaking view in all the rooms, elevators and staircases, to its own private beach of the Black Sea, providing a refined summer holidays to its guests.

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

Link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2011/feb/08/chaubin-soviet-russia-architecture-photography

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

COSTA AVENTURA

I will interview Raquel Pàmies, principal at the travel agency Piti Travel from Reus, Catalonia, Spain. We will talk about the past the present and the future of the Catalan coast tourism. How did the tourism begin? It begun in the sixties with Franco's developmentalist theories. European companies settled down in Catalonia and a flow of people started among Europe and Spain, and in this case, Catalonia. First Costa Brava was occupied and then Costa Daurada, being Lloret and Salou the main examples. It's a tourism of sun and beach, aka of the three “s”: sun, sea, sand. To wich usually a fourth is added: Sex, and sometimes even a 5th: Sangría. The weather, priveleged spots and beaches, the possibility of building in the first line of the coast and a purchasing power diffential, makes of it an attractive destination. This creates a good economical situation in the country that makes the middle class of it able to participate in this fenomena. Did it have any bad effects? Of course, it has a devastating side in means of ecology, socioculture and socioeconomy. There's a concrete barrier in the coast and some privileged parages that should be preserved, were suddenly conquered with no mercy. Natural resources are worked to no reasonable limit., and the property especulation accumulates big fortunes in few hands, and in addition by creating low profile and temporary jobs due to seasonery of the job. So to serve the requirements, a kind of cultural pack is generated for touristic uses: paella, sangria, flamenco, corridas and souvenirs of toreros, sevillanas and mexican hats. All this along with the sun the beach and discos make it a so wanted product, even nowadays. How did the society react? It was a salutary lesson for catalan and spanish society. In the middle of the dictatorship when they were celebrating the 25 years of peace, tourism is seen as fresh air: new people , ideas, customs sud-

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES) denly seep throught Catalonia and touristic areas of Spain. With tourism Spain aims unmistekably to Europe. It is said that big scale tourism had a considerable contribution in the weakeing of the regime position. If this is true we could say that touristic boycotts against totalitarian regimes have the opposite effect, they streghten the stance of it's governors. How hast it become? It is based in the intensive ocupation of beaches in summer that come from Europe and other parts of Spain. Also theres an irregular occupation of pied-a-tèrres. We end at the end of the century with the same aged agressive infrastructures, low cost and without any added value. All this along with high seasoning forces the turistic sector to place as a cheap one, with all included packs typical of caribbean resorts. This has angered all the peopled who lived of the tourism. And it's future seems to go through it. And where is it going to? The incorporation of eastern countries in the european union and the political stabilisation of some Magreb countries could mean a threat, so it should be competetitive, not just in price but in quality. So there are being and there will be many changes. Like for example? The quality of the hotels has been heightened, most of our hotels are high or medium high so in a near future most of our hotels will be in a 4 stars standard at minimum. Local administrations have invested in preservation and improvment of beaches, it's services and its avenues. They have alsod helped in legal issues facilitating the development of important operations. Such as? Port aventura. It hasn't only increased the attractive of the destiny, but it has raised the amount of tourist expenses in Costa Daurada. It also has hiven many jobs, being it true than a big part of it is low profile and temporal. Also the product itself has become more autosuficient thanks to its sorroundings.

Photo taken from: www.spainsportive.com

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

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TOURISM LEADS TO EVOLUTION

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

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Martin Hatala (SK)

FAKE VACATIONERS For my interview I have decided to choose an unusual suspect. My driving instructor named Miroslav. (He wished not to have his picture published.) I remembered he mention spending his vacation in Bardejovské kúpele, a spa town. I got hold of him on facebook a started asking questions. (=

So, when was it actually?

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Couple of years ago. 2005, I think. Before the crisis. Why not go to Italy or Croatia, like the rest of the country? Well, the first reason was that I read this article about possible vacation spaces in Slovakia and the pictures looked really good and there were turists from abroad visiting most of them, so I thought why not help our own turism industry. The second reason was of course to save money. And did you? No. The trip was cheaper, but the rest wasn’t. If you want the same standard as a real tourist, you have to spent just as much. So, was it worth it? Well, at first I though I should just cancel my reservation and go straight home, but I didn’t. And it was a good decision. My girlfriend said, that I should not care so much about money when I am on vacation. After the very stressful first day, I started to relax and enjoy myself. We got a massage, we went into the hot tub with some polish couple and talked for the entire time.

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patients or shopkeepers and waiters. However the biggest difference was that I could actually relax and not feel anxious at all. I knew, that if there was something to happen, I am still in my back yard basically. I could just drive back home (Košice) in like two hours. I actually did once, because I forgot some medicine at home. Me and my girlfriend thought that we are really lucky that we are not somewhere in Croatia right now. It was a prescription medicine. Did it feel strange to be a Slovak tourist in Slovakia? A little bit. We soon discovered that waiters actually treat us better when we don’t speak Slovak. When we tried german, the difference was evident. So you spoke german in the restaurant? Yes, and in most of the shops. My german isn’t that good, but I would pretend that it is not my native language. And other tourist were acting differently also. Some of the polish people were a little more polite when they heart us speaking german, rather than Slovak. On a scale of one to ten… How good was your vacation in Slovakia? It was actually the best vacation I remember.

What was the biggest difference?

Really?

Well, I thought it would be very strange hearing Slovak language all the time. But I really didn’t. There was a surprising number of abroad tourists. The Slovaks were actually mostly either

Yes. I don’t care much for the sea. I hate the kind of vacation where you just lay on the beach and do nothing. I didn’t have kids back then, so I wasn’t restricted in anyway. We did a lot


Martin Hatala (SK)

of spa activities. Sauna every day and so on. We went to gather some mushrooms one morining, we went to a bar in the evening, met some people and stayed until morning. So was there a lot of drinking there? Well, this is Slovakia. So what was the biggest problem or an annoyance? Prices?

So why do you think there were so few Slovaks spending the vacation there? I think it is mostly because of bad marketing. And secondly because we, as a nation, don’t appreciate what we have. Sea isn’t everything. We have beautiful nature and most of us simply don’t care. They rather drive for a whole day just to lay on the sun and read a book. I didn’t have time to read back there. I was too busy enjoying my vacation.

Not really. I got used to that quite quickly. What annoyed me the most was the fact that it is a huge resort with a big potential, but it is directed by Slovaks. They only did what was necessary for it to make money. Not a thing more. Also one of the shopkeepers told me, that there are many Slovaks building fake accomondations in the area and actually living there themselves. So you had some houses, that were pretending to be small hotels, but they would not rent you any room because there was just some rich family living there.

I saw about two, when I looked for it. I would not even notice it if I wasn’t told. Some houses just didn’t have any cars in front yard and only one or two lights were on in the evening.

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Was that so common?

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David Hlinený (CZ)

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Swimming pool U továrny – so called Baťák. Designed in 1939 by Vladimír Karfík for manufacturer Baťa in Zlín.

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David Hlinený (CZ)

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FOTO 1 - BATAK:http://www.zlin.estranky.cz/clanky/batovy-zavody/stavebni-etapy-firmy-bata-a-svit.html FOTO 2 - BATAK: http://www.google.cz/imgres?q=koupaliste+U+TOVARNY&hl=cs&sa=X&biw=1024&bih=634&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=YPvaAK8A8i7m1M:&imgref url=http://www.jirikalab.estranky.cz/fotoalbum/-zlin/zlin-3.-cast/&docid=DzDjyWDBuhY3LM&imgurl=http://www.jirikalab.estranky.cz/img/picture/5119/nove-koupaliste-batak-utovarny-1939.jpg&w=502&h=312&ei=lqGWUMffA5CM4gS0hYHwCw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=105&vpy=155&dur=463&hovh=177&hovw=285&tx=218&ty=123&sig=115580 211525350757143&page=1&tbnh=129&tbnw=215&start=0&ndsp=13&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0,i:69 FOTO 3 – STREET MARKET: http://zlin.idnes.cz/vyhorele-zlinske-trziste-by-mely-nahradit-supermoderni-laboratore-11z-/zlin-zpravy.aspx?c=A101220_1502076_zlin-zpravy_toi FOTO 4 – NEW BUILDING FOR LABORATORIES OF UNIVERSITY OF TOMAS BATA

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Margaux Dutilly (FR)

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GHOST CITIES

テ四e de Rテゥ

Biarritz

Courchevel

Grande Motte

St Tropez

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Margaux Dutilly (FR)

Beginning of attraction

Courchevel

St Tropez

Grande Motte

Île de Ré

Biarritz

built in 1946 for tourism

1950’

built in 1960’ for tourism

1930’

XIX century

Number of inhabitants in summer Number of inhabitants in winter

19 19 620 62 20 20

45 000 0 00 0 00 0 45

900 4 900

Russian French

Others

120 120 0 000 0 00 00 00

180 18 80 000 000 0

110 0 000 000

8 200 200

8 000 000 0 18

6 929 9 9 92 26

Others

Others

French

24

Nombres of hotels and quality

Spanish

German French

German

Others

British

Belgian

British

British

British

British

French

Others

French

18

16

15 15 5

2

2

Palace

1

1

hotel 5*

hotel 4*

2

hotel 3*

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Nationality of the tourists

2 00 000

3

hotel 2*

3

hotel

Type of architecture in the 70’s

Type of architecture today

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Jana Rantova (SK)

1960 - 1980: YOUNG BLOOD SPEAKING I made an interview with my parents. They both come from different parts of Slovakia and also different family conditions. Mum comes from Svit, the east Slovakia, she is the middle of 3 sisters, grew up in family big house. Dad is from Turany, the middle Slovakia, he is the youngest from 3 brothers, grew up on small farm.

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How do you remember times between 1960 1980? Mum: I was born in 1961, so I was young that time. I grew up in beautiful country under High Tatras. Dad: I was born 1959, I was a young boy that time. We had a little farm under the mountains of Small Fatra. How do you remember tourism from that time? M: I had really active childhood. From my primary school we used to go on many trips (sightseeing trips on castles), pioneer camps all around Slovakia (in Modra, Michalovce, Šírava, Filakovo, usually for 3 weeks), excursions to fabrics, memorials of second world war (Dukla, Banská Bystrica, Martin). On high school I participated in touristic division where we walked around almost all mountains on Slovakia. I was also an pioneer head in Slovenský raj. Also my father used to take us to the lakes, mountains, nature... D: We did not do tourism that much, we had a little farm, so we had to work on fields and take care of animals. In our free time we used to play sports as football, volleyball, ice hockey, athletics. Or we used to go for a walks in woods with dog, ski. But of course form primary or high school there were lot s of trips, usually in around. Otherwise we were with parents on

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vacations in Poland, Bulgary. Did you walk through whole Slovakia during that time? M: More or less yes. D: Not so much, the most of my surrounding. How was it with work and holidays? M: Exactly in 1980 I graduated and went to work, where I continued the touristic division, the name was Physical education union Svit. The work was also great, I was in organization for employees (Union), where we could go on a vacation just for little money, for example to Czech republic, but others were also in Bulgary or Russia. This organization mostly contributed financially to the employees. D: I graduated in 1983 and went to work. There were lots of sport whole day activities. We didn´t travel from work. Was there any problem to travel abroad? M: There wasn´t a problem to travel into socialistic states but to western countries there had to be lot s of permissions, it wasn´t easy. When we travelled to Juhoslávia, we had to have these permissions from Union, work and also report of behaviour, they couldn´t let us go just like that.


Jana Rantova (SK)

D: I agree with mum. After 1989 was better condition to travel, so we could travel to western countries as Spain, Austria, France also from Union.

to be very active period, many of socialistic states were welcomed in Slovakia.

What about tourism in your surrounding?

M: Nowadays is everything about money. Not everyone can give his child to camps, or go so sightseeing the Slovakia. That time was the Union who contributed free time activities, tourism of workers, the camps did not cost anything, there were much more school trips than now. D: Nowadays are much more options. There are lot s of ski centres, cycle roads, tourism roads.... That time were farms, people had to work hard, they didn´t have much free time as now. Otherwise in winter we could go ski, do some sports or go for a walks.

M: The tourism in Tatras grew up that time, especially for eastern Germany. We had a big house under mountains, so we used to rent one floor for German tourists. My first memories from Tatras are from my 4th year. We were there with aunt on some sport competiton, there were lots of people and from that time also lots of sport games. I think there is lots built from 1970th. D: The tourism in middle Slovakia also grew up. Many German or Netherland tourist admired our Slovakian mountains, they used to come here on touristics, to the lakes, mountains, to visit our caves, castles waterfalls. It seemed

What do you think about tourism nowadays?

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Domingo Bargall贸 Garcia (ES)

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Domingo Bargall贸 Garcia (ES)

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Katarzyna Wczak (PL)

CAPITAL OF SAILORS BLURRED FOCUS

Gizycko

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Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

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Fake True Cities Stories Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990

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Osamu Okamura / Unfinished Structures as Creative Challenge - An Inspirational Guide to the Failed Ambitions of Central European Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 9th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa. cz #2 Maria Topolčanská / Remoteness and Proximity as Geographical Conditions and Motivation for Architects’ Activities in Central Europe Today, 17:00, Tuesday 16th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa.cz #3 Roman Rutkowski / The Hyper–Modernism in Polish Post–War Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 23rd October 2012, visiting Totalstudio, KC Dunaj, Nedbalova 3, Bratislava, www. totalstudio.eu #4 Bálint Kádár / Places of Illusion: Tourism Infrastructures of the Socialist Era, 17:00, Tuesday 30th October 2012, visiting Vallo Sadovský Architects, Sienkiewiczova 4, Bratislava, www.vallosadovsky.sk

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Samu Szemerey / Fanzines, Communes, Rock and Roll – Alternative Architecture Practices Before 1989, 17:00, Tuesday 6th November 2012, visiting Studio Plural, Cvernovka, Páričkova 18, Bratislava, www.plural.sk Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

coordinator: Maria Topolčanská Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

supported by: Visegrad University Studies Grant


Samu Szemerey (HU)

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Samu Szemerey (HU)

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

Faculty of Arts

Between the years 1946 and 1956 were held with some regularity the "General Exhibition of Fine Arts", organized by the Subcommittee on anonymously Plastic Artists - architects, photographers, writers, painters and sculptors, and other artists of the Movement of Democratic Unity (MUD) The exhibition stemmed sporadically, and in alternate locations through the year in question, 1952, in an exhibition that took place in the National Society of Artists Lisbon, and was closed by State Police - PIDE.

Principals intellectuals and artists Coffees

Artists Exhibition Centre and the Lisbon

Part of the organization was teachers in different colleges artistic Lisbon thrilled that freedom of expression among other political ideologies that oppose the state, so many were away from school. But not only were teachers who were part of this artistic art society with other ideologies also journalists and photographers, renowned writers among students ... Contained ideas and bourgeois organized evenings of debates and discussions. This society had specific locations in the city for meeting, information points and collecting materials to make artistic exhibitions or interventions against the state. All supporters had different tasks to proclaim their ideals. The company had 93 participants alleging among other supporters. Finally alerted to the real significance of the initiative, the regime acted violently, first through a story in the Daily Morning (Official Portuguese) and then made ​​to police swoop certain known locations for these intellectual apprehension. From the 3rd exhibition in May 1948, the shows were subject to prior censorship.

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

TWO POINTS OF VIEW are making the question if alternative practice still exists unanswerable.

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

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Andrej Dubeň (SK)

ALTERNATIVE ARCHITECTURE BRINGS AN ALTERNATIVE WAY TO RELAX... IN CZ Sauna on the water Autor: H3T Architekti Country: Czech republic, Podebrady Realization: 2009

Bike sauna Autor: H3T Architekti, Štěpán Řehoř, Vít Šimek, Matěj Velek Country: Czech republic Realization: 2010

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Andrej Dubeň (SK)

Temporary living in the square Autor: mjölk architekti Country: Czech republic, Ceske Budejovice Realization: 2012

Auto sauna Autor: H3T Architekti, Josef Čančík, Štěpán Řehoř, Vít Šimek Country: Czech republic Realization: 2010

Flying sauna above the river Autor: H3T Architekti Country: Czech republic, Stary jez, Obriztvi Realization: 2010

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)

ALTERNATIVE TRANSFORMATION… 1. How did you decide to become part of this organization and what is the different in them? Alexander: My work with Transformatori starts by accident. It was connected with one festival RTM+BEER. They were searching for volunteers for the transportation and placing of some cans with lights, which were going to be used for tables. I have known about the organization for some time and this was a good opportunity to meet them. The thing I like of them is the completely different approach to the working place – it’s not the typical architectural office in Bulgaria with desks, computers and coffee machine. It’s a place where you can experiment with materials, models, prototypes, etc. 2. So the working place is important to be alternative? Alexander: For me is very substantially when you start in the architectural profession – to not just sit in front of the computer, but to have the opportunity to think and invent in real time, to make prototypes. Our work usually consist of the usage of recycled objects (pallets, cans, pianos) and spaces. We are trying to give them new life and function. The other very important thing is communication – in the working place freely come and go people from different fields, who work with us or just need our space to realize their ideas. In this way you can meet new people and

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have exchange of experiences and perspectives. 3. So alternative practice for you means not to do so much building design but to create spaces, connection and dialog between people. Why in Bulgaria these are rare issues? Alexander: I think that in Bulgaria these things are the alternative practices yes. The big architectural offices which make large-scale business out of architecture do not have the time to make artistic prototype architecture. The smaller studios on the other hand bet on artistic approach – they work not only with architects but designers, actor, scientists, experimental chefs and etc. In my opinion in Western Europe these alternative practices are more common – let’s say they are not so alternative like in Bulgaria. It is connected may be with the building madness when the most important think was to make money. They just needed more and more people for drawing and 3d modeling. It wasn’t good time to be artistic. Nowadays organizations like Transformatori are good for the students and young architects who want to be artist first and then people who are making money. 4. Are you connecting this with the fact that until 1989 Bulgaria is ruled by socialist regime and back then it was simply not legal to create organizations that do not work

for government’s model? (I mean that in Western Europe alternative practices are quite common.) Alexander: Rather it associated with the post-socialist reaction. When markets opened the big businesses certainly didn’t fall into the hands of random people. Much public money needed to be swiftly redeployed and to be quickly transferred in other capital in order to turn the new economy. So architecture was driven primarily by the desire for profit. In such circumstances, the architects are very hard to find a creative initiative. At least I think so. So thank you for the talk. About: Alexandyr Todorov is a student in UACEG and part of the Transformatori crew. “Transformatori” is an association, which deals with urban problems, architecture and design. Basic goal of the association is to lay a competition beginning on different levels. A priority is the interaction between state institutions, non-governmental organizations, as well as a partnership on projects with representation of firms and commercial organizations. The association aims to set good practice, realizing common initiatives with the specialized educational schools in the constructional and architectural field for improving the educational process.


Gergana Kocheva (BG)

http://transformatori.net/c/actions/?lang=en And few more: http://kolelinia.com/ , http://funkt.eu/, http://punktrab.tumblr.com/

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Barbara Brazao (PT)

HAPPENING: REQUIEM FOR AN EXPERIMENT In 1971-72 an experiment was made. It was a happening (better, a manifesto) for the release of the students of architecture of the Fine-Arts University in Porto, Portugal – release from the old French principles of what architecture should be: a part of the arts, rather than an autonomous faculty; with its own space, separate thinking and appropriate method. Earlier, in 1958, a group of architecture teachers form this college – Fernando Tavora, Souto de Moura and Alvaro Siza fought against the idea of the Portuguese dictator Oliveira Salazar of building a new school, designed under the principles of the Estado Novo (New State regime), of a more political and traditional school instead of a functional and suitable building. This was the group of teacher that years later, together with the students’ movement, managed to build, in 1987, the new faculty of architecture of Porto under the signature of Alvaro Siza – this building is an excellent example of Siza’s “modernist poetry”.

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Barbara Brazao (PT)

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LEGENDA (1) Requiem for an Experiment, 1971-72 (2) Faculty of Architecture of Porto, today

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Martin Hatala (SK)

ARCHITECTUR SLOV Form: BOX Everywere!

Form: CYLINDER Approved way of experimenting.

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Martin Hatala (SK)

E FORMS IN AKIA Form: UPSIDE-DOWN PYRAMID Bratislava – National radio building Košice – City council building

Form: UFO Bratislava – SNP Bridge Banská Bystrica – SNP Museum

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

BREAK UP THE FLOW OF CONCRETE MONSTROSITIES Arch. Stoyan Dimitrov was born in 1949 in Nova Zagora. He graduated in 1981 with a master degree of architecture from the University of Architecture, Civil engeneering and Geodesy, Sofiq, Bulgaria. He was a part of “MT-architects�. It was unusual for our practice team. They were not satisfied of the eclectic and mannered modernism in our country during the 80s and they were triing to change the way that people think.

The Youth House, the village of Korten, Bulgaria, ca. mid-80s. Korten is a small village of some 1,781 inhabitants, near the town of Nova Zagora in eastern Bulgaria.

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

Sources: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1486207 http://whata.org/blog/kakva-ya-mislehme-kakva-stana-mladezhki-dom-v-s-korten

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

3.

2.

Well, to tell you the truth, I had no idea about any kind of architectural experiments in pre-1989 Czechoslovakia. Or, perhaps, If I even had an encounter with this issue, it swiftly left my memory. After some barren hours of search I got a hint from a friend, who’s maybe more involved in experimental art than me. So, this is the magical story of how I came across this group and their utopistic, self-described prospective architectural experiments. A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away… VAL (Voies et Aspectes du Lendemain / Ways and Aspects of Tomorrow) was formed by Slovak artist Alex Mlynarčik and architects Ľudovít Kupkovič and Viera Mecková. The 30 years of work done by the group was based on presenting their utopistic architectural concepts of the future, involving large-scale models. The philosophy behind was „to dream, and to foresee, yet remain tied to reality by a slight string.” 1 All of it was quite excentric and sometimes provocative and challenging in the society and era they were living in, and thus reamained unsupported by official authorities. Their first appearance abroad in Paris, 1977 was kept a secret at home, yet, became a success. After the fall of the iron curtain, their expositions recieved wide applause. 1. Heliopolis 1968-1970 This bird-nest-like megastructure on top of some of High Tatras’ highest peaks, at 2,150 m above sea level by the Polish border was meant to be the olympic city when Czechoslovakia was proposed to hold the Olympics in the Tatra Mountains. There was a specific environmental tone to the project, by placing the city above nature, leaving it untouched by its greatest threat, man himself. 2. Istroport 1970’s These three giant arches, forming a city on the Danube river are for lucky Bratislava. Under the support of the three Arches, the urban space was to become more structured and understandable. 3. Akusticon, A kinetic concert hall, part of an experiment involving acoustics issues.

The thing that amazes me, is, that the few published visualisations and plans of VAL’s projects done in the deep 1960’s and 70’s show little difference compared to some of the 21st century’s mega-scale projects and their appearance of a Star Wars scene.

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

1.

UTOPIA – THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Sources, literature: http://www.ce-review.org/00/2/havranek2.html http://faktografia.com/2011/09/13/the-art-of-cybernetic-communism/ http://monoskop.org/VAL http://www.scribd.com/doc/82814776/Ringworld-Essay http://zilina-gallery.sk/wiki/index.php?title=Viera_Meckov%C3%A1&printable=yes VAL. Cesty a aspekty zajtrajška, Zilina, 1995 David Crowley: Cold War Landscapes. Looking Down on Spaceship Earth Henrieta Moravčíková: Monumentality in Slovak architecture of the 1960s and 1970s: authoritarian, national, great and abstract, pages 45-65 In: The Journal of Architecture, Volume 14, Issue 1, 2009; Special Issue: Behind the Iron Curtain: architecture in the former communist bloc, between isolation and fascination 1http://zilina-gallery.sk/wiki/index.php?title=Viera_Meckov%C3%A1&printable=yes Thanks to Anna Cséfalvay for the hints.

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

RECETAS URBANAS

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

fotos taken from www.recetasurbanas.net

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

WHAT ARE WE TALKING ABOUT...? ?...Alternative 1. An offer of two things, one of which may be chosen, but not both; a choice between two things, so that if one is taken, the other must be left. 2. Either of two things or propositions offered to one's choice. Thus when two things offer a choice of one only, the two things are called alternatives. 3. The course of action or the thing offered in place of another. 4. A choice between more than two things; one of several things offered to choose among. ?...Architecture 1. The art or science of building; especially, the art of building houses, churches, bridges, and other structures, for the purposes of civil life; -- often called civil architecture. 2. Construction, in a more general sense; frame or structure; workmanship. ?...Practice 1. To do or perform frequently, customarily, or habitually; to make a practice of; as, to practice gaming. 2. To exercise, or follow, as a profession, trade, art, etc., as, to practice law or medicine. 3. To exercise one's self in, for instruction or improvement, or to acquire discipline or dexterity; as, to practice gunnery; to practice music. 4. To put into practice; to carry out; to act upon; to commit; to execute; to do.

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

5. To make use of; to employ. 6. To teach or accustom by practice; to train. (According to: http://machaut.uchicago.edu/?resource=Webster%27s&word=alternative&use1913= on) As i understood it... Before 1989 it was easy to define what was alternative, because everything what was not centrally managed by state was alternative – the other option. But im sure it wasnt easy to survive as alternative option in time, when the otherness was something bad. Today, it is much more harder to find some opposit of architecture of theese days. I even cannot define architecture of todays with one simple sentence...maybe just that, that everyone is doing what one wants and likes. Opposite of the freedom will be just not to be free, and that ist something what we want,,,,so maybe we dont need alternative? ...but maybe im just wrong...:)

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Diego Aranda (ES)

The person who i'm having an interview with today is my father, Antonio Aranda, a fifty-four-years-old man that was born during Franco's dictatorship. As he lived his first seventeen years under the national censorship for all the culture environment, I am debating some aspects of it with him. Q -So in Spain during Franquism there was a strong censorship in communications, information, cinema, music, theater... Could you notice it? A - Yes, I could notice it but I didn't know the real dimension of it. I have never been into politics, even less when I was a teenager – I was seventeen when Franco died – so I just wasn't looking for the original lyrics and stuff like that...i just watched films, listened to music, read the newspapers...not really asking myself if it was censored, even though I supposed it was. Q -What was the common attitude about it? Was the censorship desired by people? A-Well, depending on your background. There was a strong catholic thinking by that time, so all the conservative people liked that not such liberal thoughts/lyrics/pictures were released. I know that some people did the best to get forbiden music and to get original versions of music.

and Serrat got forbidden in all radio stations and TV etc. Later on he was even in exile. Q - Were there many exiled musicians? A - Oh yes. I specially remember Lluís Llach, he was way more radical than Serrat. He was one of the guys whose music came secretly in cassetes. He became famous in France, Germany, Cuba...but not in Spain, at least not in the normal way. I personally didn't like his music, protest songs wasn't my thing. I remember left radical people sang their music as some kind of identity songs. It had strong comunist ideas involved. I think one of his songs was like a anthem for comunist people in Spain. Q - Were comunist ideas present in Spain? A - Well, you knew there were secret comunist organizations, they had their own infrastructure to spread their ideas etc. Printing rooms, ways to get news from communist countries...sometimes their leaflets were found, but it was internal comunication mainly. I personally never had contact with such things, normal people just wanted to avoid these ideas, you know, wrong place and wrong time and you could get in real problems even if you hadn't anything to do with it. Q - Did you see any forbiden magazine?

Q - How did they do it? A - Music came mainly from France recorded on cassetes or 'cancioneros' which were books with the song lyrics and chords written on them. Lots of musicians that were censored here had to move to France or other countries, so music came from there illegally and was distributed later secretly. Q - Did you like some censored artists? A - Yes, some of them, not because of the ideologic content - which I didn't care too much about- but the beauty of their songs. I really liked J.M.Serrat, he was a Catalan singer linked to progressive and even comunist thoughts and he got censored. Comunism was completely prohibited. People got killed for spreading comunism ideas. But he always had some care to avoid censors. I'm not saying that he was comunist, just that certain thoughts were linked to him. Q - Why did he finally got censored? A - He was going to sing 'La, la, la' in Eurovision, a song originally written in calatan language, but Spanish TV told him to sing in Spanish. He refused to sing in spanish, so Massiel went to Eurovision instead of him to sing his song – and actually won –

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A - No, not really. The closest thing was 'La Codorniz', it was a legally distributed magazine that was always playing in the really border of the legal limits area. This magazine was revised by censors very very hard. Sometimes they censored stupid things without politic connotations just for 'just in case' reasons. Q - Comming back to music, you told me about spanish censored musicians but, what about the music that came from abroad to Spain? A - Yeah it was checked as well. Some songs were censored, but sometimes, if the spanish public wasn't very important for the musicians, they didnt record a new version, the song just wasnt in the album or it was replaced with other song. I remember a lot of covers were censored also. The censorers were very powerful at that time. Even the Rolling Stones had to change their covers to get to the Spanish market. Sticky fingers, I remember that one. And they weren't the only ones also The Who, John Lennon&Yoko Ono, UFO, Roxy Music and many more.


Diego Aranda (ES)

ROCK & ROLL

THE WAY I SAY #5


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K. S.: I am glad that you mentioned that. Last week I have read Roman Rutkowski`s interview with Stefan Muller – polish architect, organizer of exhibition “Terra X – idea of total world urbanization” In this article it was written about UTOPIA.

K. S.: Any concept of conversation? Maybe something connected to alternative architecture?

Karol Skalski: I have no idea, frankly speaking I didn’t understand previous lecture.

Karol Skalski: What would you like to talk about?

Karol Skalski (PL)


K. S.: Of course, utopia is helping architects to stretch the envelope and free their minds. It is a kind of fight with everyday schemes. According to Stephan Muller nowadays, architecture is actually mainly dependent on investors, their huge lumps of money and other down to the earth things. The idea of utopia - the thought - is faster than the material, which must be used by an architect. The most prominent authors go far beyond today's capabilities. Obviously, we have not achieved everything yet (‌) when it comes to materials.

K. S. Do you think that creating utopia is an alternative way of thinking in architecture?

Karol Skalski (PL)

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Andreas Frühwirth (DE)

What is radical in these days? This article show radical persons and spiritual movements in a historical context, to recognize what means radical in former times and nowadays. Whereas you got sentenced to death in previous times –nowadays with a “radical” attitude, you are the hero of the opinion section in every quality newspaper. And the best thing is, that this “radical” fits into everything; art, architecture, fashion, leadership…archizine!

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Andreas Fr端hwirth (DE)

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Mariรกn Gombarฤek (SK)

UPSIDE DOWN New architectural forms in a fading city.

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Mariรกn Gombarฤek (SK)

graphic: Slovak Radio building, Bratislava

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Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

ALTERNATIVE FOCUS What is an alternative practise? I know why it’s so hard to answer - the problem is with the word ‘alternative’ which in different conditions has different meaning. Which meaning has it today? Łukasz Wojciechowski (1978) polish architect (vroa architects), teacher, author of blog niepokoje.wordpress.com

You are a young polish architect but beyond designing you teach and write about architecture. Can you call it ‘alternative practise’? ŁW: All these activities can be parallel and influence each other under certain conditions. First, I prefer not to call the exchange with students teaching. Second, designing is a process of searching and learning every time. And last but not least writing is not about fairytales but rather comes from experience and stands for understanding certain processes. All these things go together and can’t exist without each other, so it’s difficult to call any of them alternative. On the other hand the aim is to build architecture, and everything orbits around this simple goal.

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If being an architect is so 'wide' today - does something like 'alternative practise' exist? ŁW: Being alternative in architecture is somehow a paradox in my opininon. As architects we're generally focused on building and as researchers we're interested mostly in built work. So whatever you do: art, actionism, participation, squatting, programming, landscaping you're about to build or deal with built enviroment, even if it's sometimes about demolishing... On the other hand each architect has her or his special approach to design processes. And unless you want to be mainstream you can call yourself alternative if you like. Frankly it doesn't matter if you more arty or alternative, what counts is a good architecture. But what's this? I don' know.


Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

Why did you start to write your blog about architecture? ŁW: At the beginning it was meant as website for students with summaries of seminars and links to further readings. But in time, when researching specific topics, plenty of interesting stories popped up from archival architectural magazines, somewhat forgotten books and interviews with older professionals. The goal was to share all these small discoveries about architecture in the XX century – the time which so strongly inspired today’s building culture. Anyway it’s not historical or personal blog but rather a handful of stories on architecture and its surroundings.

Are you more interested and involved in your other activities than actually designing buildings? ŁW: Architect’s profession is extremely difficult and nerve consuming. On the level of small team office it has more to do with law, politics and money problems than making buildings. Being independent costs much. I admit then that the other activities are a kind of escape from everyday problems in the office. Anyway I’m still trying to keep the balance and not become a theoretician which is different profession.

Thank you.

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Barbora Polanská (SK)

...TODAY´S ALTERNATIVE ARCHITECTURAL PRACITCE IS... architect Martin Jančok, Plural studio responds...

1. What do you think an alternative architect´s pracitice is? Martin: The difference from traditional model of an architectural office usually lies in the way of obtaining orders. You don´t wait for client to appear, you create conditions for formation of a job by your own initiative. The difference is in the organizational structure also. Unlike classic numerous studio, which is forced to costant nourish its employees, individuals are connecting with larger assignments or competitions as needed. I think these are two basic attributes characterizing today´s alternative architectural practice. 2. Would you include any of your projects under the name of "alternative"? If so, which one. Martin: In each of the projects could be found something considered as alternative. If I had to choose only one, wich stands out, it is definitely project of New Synagogue.

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Barbora Polanská (SK)

Photography: 1. http://www.novasynagoga.sk/tim/ - architect Martin Jančok 2. http://www.asb.sk/synagoga-zilina-rekonstrukcia-martin-jancok/galeria/5627/45853/#gallery-image-wrapper – New synagogue, reconstruction 3. http://www.asb.sk/synagoga-zilina-peter-behrens/galeria/5627/45860/#gallery-image-wrapper – Neological Synagogue in Žilina

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Nina Horáková (SK)

UFO ABOVE The Slovak architecture of the 1960’s shows a significant improvement in the quality of its work. As in the majority of artistic trends also in architecture is visible a more “relaxed” approach which made it possible to create a lot of interesting projects, daring theories and experiments. This period also brings new visions in the planning of well-established and new designs. Also brings new tendency in modern architecture which used to be often in conflict with the traditional old one. The most significant construction from all the engineering projects of this era is the unique architectonic creation of the Bridge of the Slovak National Uprising in Bratislava. The steel bridge hung from the tilted pylon with an elegant observatory-restaurant became a construction of the century.

BRATISLAVA

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Nina Horรกkovรก (SK)

Link: http://madeinczechoslovakia.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/panorama-hotel.jpg

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David Hlinený (CZ)

QUESTION: HOW..? ANSWER: ŠKOLKA SIAL!! ŠKOLKA SIAL was established by architect Miroslav Masák in 1969 (Also founding member of SIAL – association of engineers and architects of Liberec.) as a conceptual platform for young architects. They were given the opportunity to invent and study new ways of solving architectural tasks under the supervision of senior architects from SIAL. Their inspiration was mostly western hi-tech architecture. Basically it was a community in which they lived and designed together. There were kind of parallel to neoavantgarde italian and austrian groups in the sixties. It´s members were: Mirko Baum, John Eisler, Emil Přikryl, Martin Rajniš and Jiří Suchomel. Their unusual projects offered a contrast to those from Stavoprojekt (State engineering institute, where all the other architects had worked.)

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David Hlinený (CZ)

1.

2.

TEXT: ŠVÁCHA, Rostislav. Sial, Arbor vitae: 2010. 384 stran. http://www.zpc-galerie.cz/cs/exhibitions/info/20 PICTURE 1: Stavoprojekt: Prefabricated apartment house in 1980th. PICTURE 2: Školka SIAL: Lift station Sněžka 1988.

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Margaux Dutilly (FR)

THE WORLD IS CHANGING ALL THE TIME SO WHY NOT LIKE THIS? Luc Schuiten, an architect / illustrator utopian and visionary

fig 1

fig 2

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fig 1.2


Margaux Dutilly (FR)

The belgian architect / illustrator of sixty years claims his utopianism. He defines utopia as a goal for which it provides the means to achieve it. It is like the dream of sending a rocket-plane to the moon in 1960. 10 years later was in the bag! So today, why not dream of a world in which it is still possible to live in 10, 50 or 100 years? Luc Schuiten's ill-being in today's society is the origin of this utopia. It is not enough to say that the world is in trouble, but we need to find solutions. His concept = use nature as a model in designing a new construction method he calls "archiborescence." (fig 1) He works with bio-metricians to realize this dream. Luc Schuiten refuses this future disaster that everyone announces and gives us a vision of our world full of hope, where man and nature are reconciled. Thus, it makes suggestions for future transport as ornithoplane with flapping wings (fig 2), it offers housing forms archiborescent and projects his ideas on cities such as Brussels and Lyon . He developed this project for nearly 30 years and has realized in the form of architecture on several occasions and also in his own transport mode. Luc Schuiten uses drawing as a means of expression, as a tool for exploration of future possibilities. He comics, also "anti-posters" that are installed in the city to show what could be our future. (See fig. 3) Drawing is a wonderful means of communication as it enables to awaken the consciences of all, adults or children. This man offers a real alternative to architecture, urbanism today. Like Superstudio, we projected a futuristic utopia radical that we can be a little hard to believe, but unlike the Superstudio I want to believe in it!

Alert our governments that this man has a bright future between his hands!!! Stop doing research on nuclear but start on archiborescence!!! Smile at this positive future!!!

Go to the website to know more http://vegetalcity.net/ !!!

fig 3

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Jana Rantova (SK)

ALTERNATIVE ART:

THAN

Jozef JankoviÄ? is one of the alternative artists/sculptor of socialist realism. This monumental aluminium sculpture is one of the realizations created by computer grafics, which was not alowed to exhibit that days.

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Jana Rantova (SK)

AND NOW!

Present alternative architecture by young architects Vallo & Sadovsky architects.

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Domingo Bargall贸 Garcia (ES)

DER BLAUE REITER BLURRED FOCUS

Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc founded Der Blaue Reiter in Munich in 1911. We must look at the situation in which it appears to understand the clear spirit of change it has. The environment is marked by great technological and industrial developments and new natural and humanistic knowledge such as relativity theory, psychoanalysis, X-rays or car. In this situation the artists, in their desire to reform the world, are looking for a new art for a new world. The paintings should be full of emotion, should capture the inner feelings of the human being.

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The ideas underlying the foundation of this group, also joined by August Macke, Gabriele M眉nter, Alexei von Jawlensky, Marianne von Werefkin and Paul Klee, were raised by Kandinsky. The way of painting becomes more subjective and spiritual. Everyone connected with the idea of looking beyond the superficial. As Paul Klee said "art must not reproduce the visible, but to make visible." Their painting focused on the pictorial transformation of feelings. The way it was painted was more important than the thing you painted. Forms and colours, rhythm and melody became important. A spontaneous and intuitive way to approach painting. The group disbanded at the outbreak of the First World War in 1914.


Domingo Bargall贸 Garcia (ES)

BLURRED FOCUS

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Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

RADICAL OR NON RADICAL Fake interview with Le Corbusier The Plan Vison is is considered to be the most insane and radical modernist urban plan which was ever created. Do you think people will like it? Le Cobusier: In my opinion yes. My idea was to create the centrum of Paris as a pleasant, spacious garden city where greenery can be seen through the window, and to play football or sit on a bench among the trees just out in front of the block. I think people will like it more than view from the window on the narrow yard or wade through the crowded, chaotic and dirty streets in search of a piece of the park.

BLURRED FOCUS

Can you present the main assumptions of the Plan Vison? Le Cobusier: The center of the Paris should be razed to the ground with the exception of the most valuable monuments. Streets would be located on a geometric grid as Manhattan. Architecture will consist of a huge (sixty-floors!), with mathematical regularity spread cruciform skyscrapers and lower blocks broken at right angles. The buildings will be created from prefabricated materials and be completely unified. The entire foundation will be filled with green and recreational areas. How did you solve the problem of communication in your project? Le Cobusier: The whole city would cut the highway, and the traffic in the center would be subordinated to the cars passing through the intersection collision, while pedestrians would not have to walk around the city, with green areas in fornt of the block. The Plan Vison met with criticism and was not completed. In my opinion it appears that you wanted to create the perfect place to live for people. Could you presnet some of your UnitĂŠ d'Habitation ? Le Cobusier: I think one of the first and most famous of these buildings, also known as CitĂŠ radieuse is located in Marseille, France. Could you tell us about the idea of the project? Le Cobusier: The idea was to created the place where people will have everything. The Marseille building comprises 337 apartments arranged over twelve stories, all suspended on large piloti. The building also incorporates shops with architectural bookshop,sporting, medical and educational facilities, a hotel which is open to the public,and a gastronomic restaurant, Le Ventre de l'Architecte ("The Architect's Belly"). Inside, corridors run through the centre of the long axis of every third floor of the building, with each apartment lying on two levels, and stretching from one side of the building to the other, with a balcony. The flat roof is designed as a communal terrace with sculptural ventilation stacks, a running track, and a shallow paddling pool for children. There is also a children's art school in the atelier. Thank you. I think your design is brilliant and definitely makes our life easier. But don't we think that human nature is curiosity?? Will we feel good to spend almost all of our life in the same building??

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Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

BLURRED FOCUS

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Mariรกn Jรกn (SK)

BLURRED FOCUS

ALTERNATIVE PRACTISE???

The question is not what, but when to start? So don't waste your time, LET'S PLAY! http://architecture.lego.com/

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Mariรกn Jรกn (SK)

BLURRED FOCUS

pic1 - Model by Ma Qingyun for MADA s.p.a.m. Shanghai/Los Angeles pic2 - Model by Zhu Xiaofeng for Scenic Architecture Shanghai pic3 - Model by Urbanus Architecture and Design Shenzhen/Beijing

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

BLURRED FOCUS

“YES IS MORE” RADICAL MANIFESTO

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

BLURRED FOCUS

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

WARSAW UNDER CONSTRUCTION BLURRED FOCUS

Downing Residential District due to the large scale and prestigious position, was a key six-year investment plan for the reconstruction of Warsaw. Firstly the concept of, a standard residential socialist realism had nothing to do with the idea of restoring the pre-war shape Marszałkowska, quite the contrary - architects “violated” former urban system, creating a large square for the political marches and rallies. Marszałkowska Housing District was designed in accordance with the doctrine of socialist realism and demands the introduction of the working people to the downtown, has set new standards in the construction industry.

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Yet this appreciation of socialist realism by polish architects was conditioned upon the understanding of urban space as visual rather than social, thus programmatically detaching architecture not only from socialist ideology but also from socialist obligations.


Afonso Fernandes (PT)

BLURRED FOCUS

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BLURRED FOCUS

Zuzana Mosna (SK)

UFO lended in 1970 on the Bridge of Slovak national uprising in Bratislava above Danube river but where are they hidden aliens waiting for their comming home to the world where all was waiting to revolution in 1989 and now when they are “so“ free where are they? with all the organic architecture new technologies new thinking new system are waiting... maybe new revolution is comming aliens mobilize themselves infiltrated in the world in human beings themselves first they have to BE Ing. arch. but maybe they feel sad sick and tired from the war and socialism which they have to observed from the sky they are detached from these affairs but now i feel... they are comming they was waiting to long for their chance for good conditions to make an architectural-sociological-spiritual-technological REVOLUTION ! The problem, that they are not manifestated yet is, that they are shy to communicate and make communities because they are scared from all dull people which don´t understand their timeless universal understanding of space And why I know it? Maybe I am one of them, that is very likely true And I will make this world better for living for all sensitive beings I will join to you will join to me to make new reality

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Zuzana Mosna (SK)

BLURRED FOCUS

WHERE ARE THEY

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Fake True Cities Stories Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990

Osamu Okamura / Unfinishedo rn B Structures as Creative Challenge in k r to the - An Inspirational Guide o W d l e of Central EuFailed Ambitions i F / r e ropean Architecture 17:00, Tuesb m thve o day 9 October 2012, visiting Ján th N 7 1Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa. cz Maria #1

#2

Topolčanská / Remoteness and Proximity as Geographical Conditions and Motivation for Architects’ Activities in Central Europe Today, 17:00, Tuesday 16th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa.cz #3 Roman Rutkowski / The Hyper-Modernism in Polish Post-War Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 23rd October 2012, visiting Vallo Sadovský Architects, Sienkiewiczova 4, Bratislava, www.vallosadovsky.sk #4 Bálint Kádár / Places of Illusion: Tourism Infrastructures of the Socialist Era, 17:00, Tuesday 30th October 2012, visiting Totalstudio Architects, Námestie SNP, Bratislava, www.totalstudio.eu #5 Samu Szemerey / Fanzines, Communes, Rock and Roll – Alternative Architecture Practices Before 1989, 17:00, Tuesday 6th November 2012, visiting Plural Architects, Páričkova, Bratislava, www.plural.sk

Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

coordinator: Maria Topolčanská Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

supported by: Visegrad University Studies Grant


Osamu Okamura (CZ)

DOCUMENTATION OF PUBLIC MANIFESTATIONS IN THE CITY SPACE OF BRNO ON THE DAY OF 23rd ANNIVERSARY OF THE FALL OF COMMUNISM IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA, NOVEMBER 17th (2012) Fake Cities / True Stories seminar is focused on parallel realities in Central European urbanity before and after 1990. During the one-day Brno field-seminar we decided to take advantage of the very date of November 17th. It is a national holiday in the Czech Republic. It commemorates the start of so-called Velvet Revolution on NĂĄrodnĂ­ Street in Prague on November 17th, 1989. On that day students demonstrating against communist regime were beaten up brutally by special Public Security Units (= communist police). This act of state violence initiated series of mass protests of Czechoslovak people resulting in government demission and collapse of communist regime in Czechoslovakia. It opened the door to democracy. We were interested, how this official Day of the Fight for Freedom, that became both a turning point in our modern history and also pivotal point of our Intercity seminar, is being commemorated and interpreted today in the public space of Brno. We tried to document six of these public manifestations, discuss them in-situ and analyze them graphically.

#Brno


Osamu Okamura (CZ)

A

9:00 Rooseveltova Street at the Memorial of 1st, 2nd and 3rd Resistance Movement: Official ceremony with city and regional representatives

B

11:00-20:00 Park at Moravské Square: Information kiosk “Be Pirate!” by Pirate Party

C

14:00 Moravské Square in front of the Supreme Administrative Court building: Demonstration “Stop to the Rule of Money” by extreme-right Workers' Party of Social Justice and Workers' Youth; followed by the march through the city centre

D

14:00 Malinovského Square in front of the Mahen Theatre: Demonstration “Let’s Complete the Revolution” by Movement for Direct Democracy

E

17:00 Denisovy sady – Biskupská – Petrská – Zelný trh – Radnická – Panská – Dominikánská – Šilingrovo Square: Lantern procession by Community Centre of the City Hall of Brno-Center District

F

0:00-24:00 Náměstí Svobody (Liberty Square): Most probably all the day reserved by the Brno City Hall representatives to avoid protests in the city center (unverified); no program here

#Brno


Martin Hatala (SK)

A

#Brno


Martin Hatala (SK)

A

#Brno


#Brno

Pink banners "don´t be sheep, be a pirate"

Choice of a place: clearly visible, lots of people passing by, no one minds noisier action here

Elevated podium: unnecessary, communication between people

Computer

Pink banners "for cannabis"

Data projector

Fire in pot in mobile green, Stew in steel cups

Flag of a political party and national flag

Bottle of wine, plastic cups

Premission form: Greenery of city Brno Organizer ´s backpack Electricity: rented from city Brno

Cardboard box with stuff

Mobile stand made from white canvas

Case for harmonica

Park bench

Pink banners "be a pirate for the internet"

Megaphone

Mobile green in concrete pot

Electricity cable, lenght cca 100m, conected to city substation

Papers burdened with wooden sticks

Screening videos

B

National flag

Description of a scene

... music, singing, stew, videos, dancing people, good atmosphere ...this is how presentation of czech pirate´s political party in park looks like. Brno, 17.11.2012.

..Have a pirate´s stew!

Barbora Polanská (SK)


Barbora Polanskรก (SK)

B

#Brno


Mariรกn Jรกn (SK)

C

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Mariรกn Jรกn (SK)

C

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Marián Gombarček (SK)

D

CROWD CONCENTRATING AROUND CENTRAL AREA, NOT MAINTAINING CONTACT WITH THE SPEAKER

17.11.2012 MALINOVSKÉHO SQUARE HNUTÍ ZA PŘÍMOU DEMOKRACII /DIRECT DEMOCRACY LEAGUE DIRECT DEMOCRACY - ‘a form of democracy in which people vote on policy initiatives directly, as opposed to a representative democracy in which people vote for representatives who then vote on policy initiatives.’

#Brno

SQUARE AXIS


Marián Gombarček (SK)

D

MAHEN’S THEATER

SPEAKER

ELECTRIC POWER GENERATOR

MOBILE TEA BAR

TELEVISION CREW

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

E

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Valéria Kočanová (SK)

E

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Zuzana Mosnรก (SK)

F

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Zuzana Mosnรก (SK)

F

#Brno


Fake True Cities Stories #1

Osamu Okamura / Unfinished Structures as Creative Challenge - An Inspirational Guide to the Failed Ambitions of Central European Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 9th October 2012, visiting Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990#2 Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa. cz Maria Topolčanská / Remoteness and Proximity as Geographical Conditions and Motivation for Architects’ Activities in Central Europe Today, 17:00, Tuesday 16th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa.cz #3 Roman Rutkowski / The Hyper-Modernism in Polish Post-War Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 23rd October 2012, visiting Vallo Sadovský Architects, Sienkiewiczova 4, Bratislava, www.vallosadovsky. sk

#4

Bálint Kádár / Places of Illusion: Tourism Infrastructures of the Socialist Era, 17:00, Tuesday t s th e 30 October 2012, visiting Totalp a d studio Architects, Námestie SNP, u B Bratislava, www.totalstudio.eu in k #5 r Samu Szemerey / Fanzines, o W Roll – AlCommunes, Rockldand e i ternative Architecture Practices F / . Before 1989,ec17:00, Tuesday 6th D st 2012, November visiting Plu1 ral Architects, Páričkova 18, Bratislava, www.plural.sk Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

coordinator: Maria Topolčanská Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

supported by: Visegrad University Studies Grant


Bálint Kadár (HU)

14, 19

EVER CHANGING I have a true story. A friend, a famous Viennese architect told me about his first trip to Budapest in the 1970's. He arrived to the Déli (Southern) railway station. Getting off the train, he was shocked. Is this Paris or something? He prepared to arrive to a socialist capital, meaning he expected grayness, closed and secured spaces, out of date technology and architecture. Instead he saw incredibly open and elegant spaces with unexpected modernity, freshly decorative artworks and no sign of deprivation. The station was rebuilt in 1973, designed by a young architect, György Kővári. As this was the terminus of the new underground line and also the arrival point of trains from Vienna – the west, resources didn't count in building this gate representing the modernity of the country. It was also Kővári who could design the terminus of the next metro line opening in 1980. And yes, the gate function had the same importance, as people arriving from the airport of Budapest had to pass under the orange plastic panels of Kőbány-Kispest, called just KöKi. The futuristic bridge structure connected buses, trains and the underground, spanning above the main road to the center. If a tourist arrived to the airport, he probably changed to the metro in this space station like object, and just like at the Déli, he could enjoy generous spaces, fully glazed panorama decks, modern engineering. But did he know why there were no homeless people in the tempered public spaces? Was he conscious that a bigger group gathering there would cause immediate dissolution by police forces? These, and many other spaces in Budapest were places of illusions, designed to look (or be?) open and democratic, but never used like that. Never? Democracy is here since a while...

#Budapest


Bálint Kadár (HU)

14, 19

WELCOME STORIES I have another true story. Some western artists, young people came to Budapest with a cheap flight in the 2000's. They changed from the airport bus at KöKi, and were really happy to do so. They were afraid that Budapest would be just another western city by now. But what they found in the once ultra modern space station-like transport hub was what they called the Balkan. And that was what they were looking for. Homeless people eating in the busy and dark walkways between Chinese shops and temporary-for-ever ticket vending kiosks. And where the additionally built bazaar didn't occupy all that meeting place once designed here, a South-American music band dressed up in the costumes of some native NorthAmerican tribe were playing and selling their self-printed CD's. A unique atmosphere, without all the winners of this new game called democracy. They didn't care that finally all this infrastructure and all this generous space was free to be used. Other tourists sniffed at all this, passing by in discomfort, but these happy young travelers stopped and took many nice and artistic pictures. It is our luck they did so. Few years ago KöKi was demolished. Now the new terminal is open. It is a shopping mall. It is not orange and red any more, but gray. A really closed building, and dull too. And once more, homelessness is not allowed any more...

photographs: archive images of Déli and KöKi stations paintings: Oláh Mátyás László "the old köki" series

#Budapest


Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

1, 16

FROM THE TO THE PARK The favorite entertainment places for young people in the 1960ies and 1970ies. Close and abandoned, because of the conflict between the Great Tree Gang and the Youth Park. How moral panics changed the perceptions of urban space in Budapest? Why the police and the mass media discriminated against subculture? Are the young people can be dangerous because of the way they are dressed ? The dark side of the city or just attempt to control the youth people?

New place - new young people? Erzsébet Square (Erzsébet tér) is the largest green area in Budapest's inner city . Today, Erzsébet tér gives home to the Design Terminal, the former bus depot turned design center, a Bauhaus style building featuring design and fashion related exhibitions, to WAMP, Budapest's monthly design fair and to a cultural center called Akvárium. In the spring Erzsébet tér transforms into one of the nicest green spots in the city center. The new favorite place for young is not dangerous? Why do young people nowdays can create their spaces?

#Budapest


Katarzyna Kazmierczak (PL)

1, 16

YOUTH PARK OF THE YOUTH

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Diego A. Aranda (ES)

2

THERMAL BATHS PUBLIC PRIVACY When i went for the Budapest trip i was willing to know more about the Thermal Baths in this city and its different uses of them through time. I wanted to know if they have been there all this time because of the recreational and health values or it had also some hidden 'society joint' function. From the beginning our guides told me that this was going to be tough as there are not visible signs of this uses remaining in the buildings. And it was. There isn't a record of such a thing. But anyway they told me about today's uses and recommend me to 'go and try it yourself', that probably it would be the best way to try to understand. For example the Luk's Thermal Baths were known to be an intellectual meeting point where writers and musicians were trying to solve world's problems. Also in Margit island we can find two thermal baths specialized in sports, Palatinus and Haj's Baths this last one preferred by local sportsmen. There was also a thermal bath known to be more commonly used by gay and lesbian public that now is closed. So it was clear that all of them have a different character somehow nowadays, but what about it in the past? So I first started my visit in Kiraly, s Turkish bath built in the second half of 16th century. I got into the hall where there was a little terrace where some social event take place in summer and sometimes even lectures. I couldn't get into the baths so I decided that I would visit the other Turkish bath, Rudas, as I really liked the style. Next day I visited Rudas Baths. When I got to the entrance it really wasn't what I expected, modern ticket selling, modern bar, a girl leading visitors as sheeps, a bit of tourism atmosphere...but when I got to the baths I got absolutely amazed. The relaxing atmosphere surrounds you as you get into the steam. You have this feeling of time traveling to ancient times when you walk underneath the dome and the water heats your body. The medieval architecture, the heat, the faint light, people talking in whispers, falling water sound, the floating feeling...it all gets you in a really good mood for social life. Also the lack of clothes added some human and equality feeling. Although we were surrounded by people it still felt very intimate environment. You barely could hear what someone next to you was talking about if he wasn't looking at you, and you couldn't even recognize people not very far away. Then I realized that I might not be able to find out what where the hidden uses of thermal baths in the past, but that I was sure that there were, I could imaging people talking about secret issues in a very public space. It's a perfect place to meet people, share ideas, contrast opinions, relax with your friends and beloveds in a very relaxed and intimate way. My conclusion is that Thermal Baths might have a greater value as a social connection than health care centers and that for sure they have been used as spreading points for rebel ideas, debate centers, flirting spots, meeting points for social minorities and furtive meetings. The true reason or fake reason to go there is not longer clear. And if you don't see why I recommend you to 'go and try it yourself'.

Thank you very much Balint and Samu for such a great way to visit Budapest.

#Budapest


Diego A. Aranda (ES)

2

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Jana Rantova (SK)

3, 4

MEET ME IN A CAFÉ! TRUE STORY Bambi Eszpresszó Bambi is one of the oldest watering holes in Budapest. It was very popular in socialistic times, and it still is. Today you meet in Bambi the sons and daughters of those who used to drink here in the 70s, and the old men playing domino. The place is also known for its nutritious breakfasts, which are authentic Hungarian sandwiches.

New york café The New York Café has lived through many eras, political systems and historical turning points. Still, it has always been reborn, sparkling and occupied by those who longed for its comforts: artists, members of the nobility and commoners alike. The Boscolo Group has reconstructed it in a way which reflects the tendency to regain its old patina and reputation ranking it as the “Most Beautiful Coffee House in the World”.

Gerbeaud Café One of the most famous cafes (and restaurants) of Budapest, Gerbeaud is in business from 1858. It is offers delicious cakes for all tastes (including legendary Esterházy and Sacher). The location makes it too touristy (and pricey) though. Gerbeaud now is not only a confectionary, but also a restaurant and a pub with live traditional music and folklore shows. From 1950 to March 1984, the café bore the name "Vörösmarty." Since then, it is once again "Gerbeaud".The new owner had the café lavishly renovated in 1997, to restore the magic of the past to the present, complete, inconspicuously, with the most modern technology.

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Jana Rantova (SK)

3, 4

MEET ME IN A CAFÉ! FAKE PLASTER Central Café Respecting the traditions and being open to novelty. That describes Central Café the best. The Centrál Kávéház Kft (Ltd.) was founded by dr. Imre Somody in 1999 to rehouse the Central Cafe in the historical building located at the corner of Károlyi Mihály and Irányi streets. The mission of Central is to revive the café cuisine relying on the roots of Hungarian gastronomy and meeting the expectations of the 21st century.

Ibolya Cafe Ibolya is the best known café in downtown that has retained a Communist era feel. IIt was established first time in 1968 and this place was a center of comfort since then for last 40 years. The decor is plain, wood paneling with a counter and a square area in the front and a long, narrow section with a room in the back. Recently this place was re-designed and re-invented for public keeping in mind retro style intact and even improved. The waiting staff are friendly and helpful but can be painfully slow at times. Cheap salads and snacks can also be bought to accompany your drink.

Táskarádió Eszpresszó Experience what it was like in the 60's and 70's in Budapest. Satisfy your retro cravings at this café/restaurant called Táskarádió Eszpresszó next to Egyetem tér in the city center. The Eszpresszó's interior is brimming with colorful retro toys, furniture and accessories. You’ll think you’ve been whisked back to the psychedelic 60s as you enjoy the tasty fare served by very friendly pioneers against the backdrop of disco lights and patterned wall paper. It takes quite a while to wrap your head around everything, but it's all well designed and authentic right down to the wall paper in the bathrooms.

#Budapest


Domingo Bargalló Garcia (ES)

5

FROM ANONYMITY TO EXHIBIT

Spaces where cultural and social life were held after and during communist era The emerge to the surface of public daily life of a, during many years, due to communism, invisible public sphere, start with the collapse of itself. Radical and marginalized cultural and artistic practices were held by the intellectual layer of civil society in private flats and hidden places. There was this secret flowing of knowledge and modern ways of thinking supported by the initiative of men with strong convictions and by the kind of ideal spaces that a city like Budapest can provide, such as the thermal baths or the famous Cafes. However, once vanished the necessity of hiding this kind of activities, cultural spaces and even identity start to reconfigure in this flourishing post-communist panorama. The redefinition of public spaces and other social changes together with the rise of artistic and cultural phenomena resulted into much more open and accessible places which invite the walker to soak in these new conceptions. Nevertheless, this old hidden places remain on the memory and identity of the city, and the main idea of being capable of transforming any place into an exposition area or meeting point is still alive on the collective imagination of Budapest’s citizens. That is why we can find places like the one shown in the first pictures or even a grocery that eventually holds intellectual meetings and exhibitions.

#Budapest


Domingo Bargall贸 Garcia (ES)

5

#Budapest


Nina Horรกkovรก (SK)

6, 18

#Budapest


Nina Horรกkovรก (SK)

6, 18

ALMANAC FOR A SHOPAHOLIC A.K.A. SHOPPING JOURNEY SINCE POST-WAR TILL NOWADAYS Pictures links: http://visitbudapest.travel/local-secrets/kiraly-street/ http://hu.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=F%C3%A1jl:Corvin_%C3%81ruh%C3%A1z.JPG&filetimestamp=20121002170330 http://www.trigranit.hu/media/proj_galeria/nagy/1181808356_westend_city_center_budapest.jpg http://hg.hu/cikk/epiteszet/6866-25-eves-a-skala-metro

#Budapest


Karol Skalski (PL)

7

CHANGES

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Karol Skalski (PL)

7

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Afonso Fernandes (PT)

8 IS IT WORTH BREAKING UP A CITY’S SCALE? Can the private interests of one city extend beyond the common notions of urban planning and urban landscape? How strong is their despise for their own history and monuments, as long as their profit keeps growing? Budapest is a city that it is known for its astonishing lanscape and prevalence over the river Dunaj, but the architects, politicians and private entrepeneurs greed may lead it in the wrong way. The historic center of one city is a place that attracts many tourist attention, and therefore is one of the greatest income of a city, unfortunatly people give more credit to this matter than to the well being of their city. The town center is not a place to expand the city, neither to mess around with its scale, cities expand through their surroundings, developing other areas with much space to take advantage, otherwise the city implodes and its historic center will vanish in a matter of time.

The new and modern buildings that are starting to appear on the edge of the surroundings (right off the Ă rpĂĄd hi bridge in Peste) are the example of a correct growth of a city, they mean the development and exist beyond the barrier created by the historic center. This way, not only they do not interfer with an ancient and establieshed urbanization, but they also create their own rules and appearence providing a smooth passage between the city center and this new area.

#Budapest


Afonso Fernandes (PT)

8

The riverside hotels - they crush the ancient buildings with their scale and their brutalism appearence. They were built to take advantage of a huge tourist area regardless of the consequences that they provoque on the urban landscape. They were built with in a small area which created narrow streets in a place where should be an openspace.

#Budapest


Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

9

PARTY AND SLEEP IT Hotel Sport (now Flamenco) 1964 Beautiful area located in green hilly Buda is perfect for your vacation! You can relax in embrace of nature almost in the city center. The amfiteater offers you a cultural experience near the lake and the excellent restaurant.

BUDA

tourist opinions_Buda is hilly, quieter and residential. In a pension in Buda you’ll be slightly far from the busy centre, but the quiet, green, hilly surroundings compensate you. Buda is hilly with many winding roads and mostly residential, which makes it the quieter of the two. I vastly prefer Buda. If you don't mind a short commute, from one side of the Danube to the other, I would suggest Buda. It feels like a neighborhood while Pest feels like a big city. Buda is slightly effete_

Hotel Duna Intercontinental (now Marriott) 1969 The monumental jewel of architecture sits on the very bank of Danube and brings there glamorous and cosmopolitan atmosphere.The luxury hotel offers amazing view for every guest. The hotel has been reconstructed and glass transparent balcone fences lighten the appearence of the concrete building.

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Zuzana Krnáčová (SK)

9

IN PEST OFF IN BUDA Quiet - quieter - abandoned... The era of mass vacations is over and high maintanance theatre is closed and forgotten. The area has turned to park and hotel only remembers its former glory. In present situation the location of the whole area does not work and is not profitable.

PEST

tourist opinions_Pest is flat and busier. Stay at an accommodation in Pest, and you will be in the heart of the city, within easy reach of Budapest's main attractions, restaurants, shops and night life. Pest is much flatter, with straighter roads and has most of the shops, restaurants and the nightlight. The Pest side is more cosmopolitan with newer big name hotels. It is also where the shopping district and most cultural sights are located. If you want to be in the center of everything, Pest is the side for you. I recommend staying on the Pest side. I would much rather have preferred a hotel on the Pest side, closer to the attractions and less dependent upon public transport. I'm a Hungarian tour guide,I had a lot of tourists thinking it nice to stay in the Castle District of Buda with the beautiful view, and realizing the mistake too late._

Urbanized - more urbanized - giant concrete fort... The busy and commercial Pest has created a truly selfish building. It is only concerned only about its own benefit - more rooms with view bring more money. This massive structure completely cuts the rest of the city behind it from the riverbank.

http://www.fodors.com/community/europe/advice-needed-for-the-difference-betwen-the-buda-and-pest-side-of-the-river.cfm http://www.livingthedreamrtw.com/2011/04/it-is-buda-vs-pest-in-budapest.html http://egykor.hu/budapest-xi--kerulet/budai-parkszinpad/80 http://www.budapest-tourist-guide.com/budapest-hotels.html http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/budhu-budapest-marriott-hotel/ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/holidaytypeshub/article-592613/Party-Pest-sleep-Buda.html https://maps.google.com/ photos by me and Janka R.

#Budapest


Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

10

I HATE YOU

#Budapest


Karolina Wrzosowska (PL)

10

UNDERPASS!

source of pictures: http://flickrhivemind.net/Tags/alulj%C3%A1r%C3%B3 http://mojoey.blogspot.sk http://cyclingisgoodforyou.blogspot.sk http://www.flickr.com/people/catloaf/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/grahamlg/

#Budapest


Barbara Brazao (PT)

11

1960s

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Barbara Brazao (PT)

11

1990s

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

12

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Teresa Caldeirao (PT)

12

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Andrej Dubeň (SK)

13

ALIEN SPACES When two aliens meet in the fight across the square... the Mammut and the Swan Mammut Shopping Mall and Hattyóház-The Swan Building, Budapest, Hungary are two alien buildings among an usual urban area. Their architects tried to bring something new, but instead of that these monsters have not addapted and will be taken like aliens forever.

#Budapest


Andrej DubeĹˆ (SK)

13

#Budapest


Rafael Ramalho (PT)

15

In the second large ring of Budapest, was born a long time ago a Jewish neighborhood. Defined by 4 very important avenues that make this big "block" as one of the most important and sought the city. Since always inhabited by Jews, this neighborhood 200 years has many stories to tell to those who visit. Survived the Second World War in which was home to thousands of Jews and later the Communist Era, keeping much sociocultural identity and cohesion. Even after the war the Jews have not left this place, making it an important center of Jewish community of Budapest and Europe. Today is an important tourist center, as well as its history, it also has to offer its visitors the many restaurants, bars, showrooms, museums, etc ... Today also still keeps in operation 3 synagogues that can be visited. This neighborhood is born from an urban plan that would strictly this site one of the most characteristic neighborhoods of europe. Marked by two routes crossing the central district and divided into 3, and with a few more perpendicular secondary roads that guaranteed the fluidity of movement. For people would be created galleries beneath all buildings serving the various shops in the ground floor. And more or less in the center was planned to be a square, along with the synagogues, a center of social life in the neighborhood.

r

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Rafael Ramalho (PT)

15

However, with the establishment of democracy, not everything was positive, and this urban plan suffered numerous "attacks". The local auttorities and capitalist thinking came to cause many buildings that marked this neighborhood were destroyed, many of the public circulation spaces gave way to private interior spaces. The new buildings have stopped 3 or 4 floors of lofty heights and happened to be the same height but with 6 floors. Public spaces are degraded, the roofs are now black and dirty, there are public spaces inaccessible to the inhabitants of the neighborhood. The identity that the district should have given rise to a great mix of urban and architectural errors. But all is not lost, and today there are groups of people interested in preserving this architectural heritage, and primarily interested in stopping this tide of abuse of territory leading to architectural practices respectful as happens in several cities in Europe.

However, with the establishment of democracy, not everything was positive, and this urban plan suffered numerous "attacks". The local auttorities and capitalist thinking came to cause many buildings that marked this neighborhood were destroyed, many of the public circulation spaces gave way to private interior spaces. The new buildings have stopped 3 or 4 floors of lofty heights and happened to be the same height but with 6 floors. Public spaces are degraded, the roofs are now black and dirty, there are public spaces inaccessible to the inhabitants of the neighborhood. The identity that the district should have given rise to a great mix of urban and architectural errors. But all is not lost, and today there are groups of people interested in preserving this architectural heritage, and primarily interested in stopping this tide of abuse of territory leading to architectural practices respectful as happens in several cities in Europe.

#Budapest


Margaux Dutilly (FR)

17

Highway t Budapest Cor

The Corvin project started around 2006. It is based on Eighth District called also Józsefváros. If we asks Budapest natives about their city’s Eighth District they’ll probably conjure is of downmarket hookers. Poverty, prostitution and decay have long EHHQ WKH GHÀQLQJ FKDUDFWHULVWLFV RI this section of the Hungarian capital.

#Budapest


Margaux Dutilly (FR)

17

to the hole rvin Project

So, this project aim at redevelop this area on a 22 hectares area along one street and concern six block of buildings in order to recapture the status it had in the late 19th century ? But, the « funny » thing it’s since 2010, the government stopped the development because of the crisis. So nowadays, the promenade arrives on a empty space, a hole in the city reappropriated by an association that encompasses a hostel, an recreation space, a bar and also vegetables garden called A Grund. I would like to speak about this split because in the Budapest landscape this H[HPSOHLVWKHPDLQDQGWKHPRVWREYLRXVEXW\RXFDQÀQGPDQ\RWKHUVKROHVOLNH this due to the war or of the bad conditions of buildings.

#Budapest


Samu Szemerey (HU)

Ssssooooo. You've seen it, been there, done that? Did you hear all the stories? The New Year's Eve party that lasted two weeks in 1964 where Cartier–Bresson showed up too? No? What a pity, it was a real blast. Did you wear a tie for the concert at the Youth Park1? Did they let you in? No? What then, on to the baths2? Seen any suspicious figures in the steam? Maybe they were in some weird café3 of a hotel. Probably not, those are all wiretapped. A presszó, much more likely. Rózsa, with all the neoavantgarde artists. Or the New York4, with the editors. Rings a bell? No? Hm. I know, it's not that easy. I mean it is, but in a weird way. You don't go to the… the squares and to the opera and all that. It's the non–places. The student dormitories. No, seriously. There's that small one for the architects. I know, especially now that all those rooms are empty or used as storage. But that's where it was happening. And in apartments. The Flying University, it was called. The Samizdat Boutique5. Silly names, right? But still, that's where the real things happened. Or they seemed real, anyway. Who, the police? Yes, of course. They knew about them all along. The agents infiltrated every network. Why let them live, still? Well I mean you cannot shut down everything, right? I mean blasting all the propaganda about socialist development and consumerism, that's only half of the deal. Sure, go to Skála6, do your shopping, take a walk on Margaret island7, don't do anything too conspicuous and you're fine. But nobody believed it anyway. It was all play-acting, the whole society. And all this buzz, the Underground, the Alternatives, the Intellectuals – they didn't do much harm anyway. Or if they did, they got the lessons. It was not that easy, once you were without jobs, a criminal act, apparently. I mean, you don't get to build any luxury hotels8 or park theaters9, not even a subway underpass10 if you're outside. Maybe some small stuff, movies, mortuaries11, family homes. What? Yes, sure, they survived all right. After the change they even got on top of things, at least so it seemed for a while.

#Budapest


Samu Szemerey (HU)

And what's your impression, anything remarkable or strange? What did you visit anyway? The Castle12? Ah, the Must See. I like those 60's infills the best. The rest is just tourists. And down at Moscow square, or whatever it's called right now? Some dead male politician. Yes, those two UFOs13 are total nonsense. That's what you get when you suddenly have to figure out what the hell you've been doing all this century. And the Modernist Vistas? The Déli14? A sorry sight indeed. All those dreams - you know, architects never got around this. All the scorn and the lost battles, during socialism, and then after that, even worse. Being blamed for what you were trying to achieve. That's what reduces ambitions to torsos, like that avenue-forever-to-be in the Jewish district15. Or the National Theater - no, not that monster by the river, I mean the unbuilt one. You still don't get it, I see - it's always the stuff that's not there. Like before. The alternatives. Now it's the unbuilt. That's how it became the Hole16. The most freaking popular place, this time no ties though. So far, at least. Or the Other Hole. The Corvin Hole17. No, not the shopping center18, that's a mega-rooftop pub and an (ehm) alternative cultural center on top of a Chinese thrift store. More or less. The Corvin Hole is that wasteland where Something Big was starting in the bubble and then it all popped. Now I guess the city is breathing there, exhaling some two centuries of misery to the sky through the dust and the weeds. Some community gardens are emerging there. A nice scene in fact with that glitzy shopping mall and the foreign students in the unsold apartments and the local gipsy families all mixing on that halfpromenade on summer nights. But it's winter now, so not much of that is out. I hope you at least went to the baths. They got renovated, you know! Though I liked that gritty atmosphere better. You could still feel all the hundreds of years of love and intricacies. What, how far is the airport? Well, we just passed by KÖKI19, that grey hunk of boredom that replaced the old megastructure. So, not far. What, this one? Ferihegy 1? Or whatever it's called now, another dead male. No, Terminal 1 is closed. Out of national pride. No We Don't Sell National Airways, Rather Let It Go Bankrupt. Ferihegy 2 it will be. Don't worry, this taxi is safe. The driver's a former colleague. You know, architects are no tricksters here. They could never learn that trade.

All images by Péter Szabó-Lencz, www.petyka.com

#Budapest


Fake True Cities Stories Parallel Realities in Central European Urbanity Before and After 1990

#1

Osamu Okamura / Unfinished Structures as Creative Challenge - An Inspirational Guide to the Failed Ambitions of Central European Architecture 17:00, Tuesday 9th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www.ksa. cz #2 Maria Topolčanská / Remoteness and Proximity as Geographical Conditions and Motivation for Architects’ Activities in Central Europe Today, 17:00, Tuesday 16th October 2012, visiting Ján Studený Architects, Partizánska 33, Bratislava, www. ksa.cz

w a l Roman Rutkowski / The Hyoc r W n i per–Modernism in Polish Post– k r o W War Architecture 17:00, Tuesday d l e i F rd / 2012, visiting Total23 October r e b m eKC Dunaj, Nedbalova 3, studio, v o th N 7 www. totalstudio. eu 1Bratislava, #3

#4

Bálint Kádár / Places of Illusion: Tourism Infrastructures of the Socialist Era, 17:00, Tuesday 30th October 2012, visiting Vallo Sadovský Architects, Sienkiewiczova 4, Bratislava, www.vallosadovsky.sk #5 Samu Szemerey / Fanzines, Communes, Rock and Roll – Alternative Architecture Practices Before 1989, 17:00, Tuesday 6th November 2012, visiting Plural Architects, Páričkova, Bratislava, www.plural.sk Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

coordinator: Maria Topolčanská Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

supported by: Visegrad University Studies Grant


Roman Rutkowski (PL) In February 1970 Polish artist Zbigniew Gostomski invented a new urbanism called ‘It starts in Wrocław’. It was in reference to the workshops in which a large number of avantgrade artists participated, supposed to produce sculptures to be placed all around Wrocłw. It is exactly the same urbanism as the La Villette competition winning proposals by Bernard Tschumi and Rem Koolhaas. Below one can find the original explanation of the piece.

--- marked on the layout. While distributing the locations for O / one needs to assume a distance between the elements which would be quite precisely equal to the distances given on the layout. When the distance is settled, it starts to be compulsory for the whole realization, under any circumstances and because of any reason it cannot be even slightly changed. Once assumed initial condition determines the further action - independently of an area and a situation in which O / will happen to exist.

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O / need to be assembled, regardless of the area's topography, in the vertical position on an already existent basis. O / should be permanently mounted to the basis.

O / in the city, in its suburbs and outside it, gradually covering bigger and bigger areas, accordingly to the symposium's assumptions, it is to be realized with durable materials. 1. O - an element of diameter X and of height X 2. / - an element of dimensions X x X x X. Notes: The size of the elements should be appriopriate, not too big and not too small. - O / cannot be heavy, - O / shouldn't cause any difficulties while under construction, - O / always the same, manufactured with industrial method, always out of the same material, always of the same size. The realization must be conducted accurately according to the given scheme O / the places in which O / will happen to be located are unmovable. The locations of O / or --- emergence do not mean anything, their form does not express anything. The fact that they neither mean nor express anything does not exclude... The fact of emergence of O / is a consequence of their emergence in general. The starting point - the beginning of the realization - may be any location freely chosen among O or / or

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The assumption of this work is its consistent direction and unlimited, even in all directions growing progress which will cover more and more distant (in relation to the starting point) areas. From this moment on the existence of O / starts in open terrains: streets, squares, parks, districts, courtyards, industrial areas, sport fields etc. and in buildings, structures, institutions, public volumes etc. In exceptionally unfavorable cases of O / existence one is allowed to not position O / in the settled place. O / It starts in Wrocław. It could start anywhere. It starts on a given area it needn't end here though It is potentially an infinity. In form it is unchangeable, In situation ceaselessly changing.


Roman Rutkowski (PL) On a quite pretty autumn day of 2012 we met early in the morning to explore the most valuable pieces of the post-war modern architecture of Wrocław. We saw only a part of it – these ones which are located next to the city center. If Gostomski’s grid is supermodern tool to cover the entire city with a rigid grid of noticable objects, the locations of the post-war modern pieces do not follow any pattern. However, as the Os and /s of Gostomski’s proposal in many cases were to remain secret as being spread accidentally thoughout Wrocław’s urban tissue, the modern buildings also constitute a constellation of partly concealed structures. If one steps into it, if one associates their placements with the map of city – then they also become a journey full of potential discoveries, hidden corners and unexpected street views. In this moment Wocław ceases to be a city with a rich international history, with plenty of Gothic splendor and German urban design – it becomes genuinely a proof of the talent of Polish architects of the post-war era.

The buildings we saw and discussed: 1. ZETO office building, ul. Ofiar Oświęcimskich 7-13 – Anna Tarnawska, Jerzy Tarnawski (1965) 2. primary school, ul. Podwale 57 – Edmund Frąckiewicz, Jadwiga Grabowska-Hawrylak, Igor Tawryczewski, Maria Tawryczewska (1959-60) 3. residental building, ul. H. Kołłątaja 9-12 – Jadwiga Grabowska-Hawrylak (1955-60) 4. Trzonolinowiec, ul. T. Kościuszki 42-44 – Jacek Burzyński, Andrzej Skorupa (1961-67) 5. Nowy Targ Square, pl. Nowy Targ – Włodzimierz Czerechowski, Ryszard Natusiewicz, Anna Tarnawska, Jerzy Tarnowski (1957-65) 6. Panorama Racławicka, ul. Purkyniego 11 – Ewa Dziekońska, Marek Dziekoński (1958-85) 7. Wrocław University Chemistry Department buildings, pl. Grunwaldzki 2-4 – Krystyna Barska, Marian Barski (1964-1972) 8. Wrocław University Mathematics Department buildings, ul. F. Joliot-Curie 14 – Krystyna Barska, Marian Barski (1964-1972) 9. residential complex, pl. Grunwaldzki 4-16 – Jadwiga Grabowska-Hawrylak, Krzysztof Sąsiadek (1967-73) 10. Veterinary University, pl. Grunwaldzki 47-51 – Krystyna Barska, Marian Barski, Adam Tyczkowski, Leszek Zdek (1956-63)

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Zoltan Takacs (SK)

ON FORGIVENESS Wroclaw is an amazing city.

I’ve never seen this density of gothic-looking churches at any other place. The charm of brick is around every corner. Art Nouveau-style department stores, breathtaking palaces and historical blocks in a beautiful city structure. Then you see all these peculiar pieces of modernism, strange and different, of another quality and beauty. I asked myself, why does modern architecture seem to be so much out of context. It was interesting for me to find out some facts about the history of this city, which was damaged to 70% of its building stock being the last fort of the Third Reich to capitulate at the end of WW2. The then Prussian city Breslau became once again a part of Poland, the surviving German citizens had to leave, being replaced by new Polish settlers. The place underwent major surgery – both physical and mental.1 Rebuilding the ruins, many of the monuments were preferred to be restored to their gothic state, which was being considered Polish, since the town was settled under the rule of the first Polish kings. In other places, new ones were erected on the traces of the former. Interesting. The thing made me think of architecture, asking: Is this not being fake? Some may go further and consider monument restoration being totally fake. Restoring something already gone, what meaning does it have? And you can even choose the layer you prefer the most to reshape an already non-existing building to the image of your way of thinking? Some may not understand. Maybe you have to lose something yourself in order to taste the longing of wanting it back. Nevertheless, I am not about condemning any group, party or nation claiming a right to this land by taking this event out of context, nor trying to make the suffering of Jews, Germans, Polish or any other ethnicities look equal. There is a true side to everything. But architecture is so much an imprint of history and human greed. Also, an imprint of the way we interpret history. And the way we interpret the world, which mostly revolves around us. Each has their side to it, sometimes so different and seemingly

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self-righteous. We tend not to go deep and it is hard to see clearly, especially with pain in your heart.

The mentioned event is so typical of Europe, especially for countries of the former socialist block. Wroclaw is such a microcosm of Europe. It is so much like mankind. The victors define justice. Then victims become victors again, the circle goes on and on. Craving to get rid of your loss, you want to forget. You say, let’s do something completely new on a blank page, because this all will only remind me of the past. But is it possible? Is it not an ongoing circle? Because modernism is just like that. It wants to wipe out any root, throw away any bad memory. Just let’s forget this all, and move on. Let’s find a new way of beauty. But what does modernistic architecture have to offer to us? And why is that most of the people can’t find their way to embrace it? Why do we, involved in architecture love it, or tend to be fascinated by it? Why is there no core connection in people’s hearts to abstract forms? Is it because of the coldness of modernism? Is it that we are too much obsessed with our past that makes us turn down the modern? In the former socialist part of Europe, post-war modernism is in many cases , even whole periods tied to the then prevailing official ideology. Is building in this rootless manner not like pretending you have no records, like sweeping all problems and pain under the rug? Is the old way always the bad way? There is a difference between pretending and actual healing. But is modernism, again, the villain of historical towns? You will find such great pieces of post-war modernism in Wroclaw, too. It is another layer of history, too, with certain values. The Panorama Racławicka, Marian Barski’s university buildings, the apartment towers of architect Jadwiga Grabowska-Hawrylakowa. They have this certain


Zoltan Takacs (SK)

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quality of aesthetics, an interesting taste of nobleness. They are highly loveable and could be refurbished with care. It’s a matter of forgiveness. Real forgiveness forgets the bad, keeps the good and seeks for the further good. Even in architecture. There must be healing for cities, too. Just like for people, individuals. And the common conscience of people has to undergo a process of healing, too. Can architecture really be forgiving? Is there a loving piece of architecture? Sure we can love architecture and urban spaces, but do they love us back? Is it not, in the end, people: men, women, children who make them valueable?

Forgiving people make architecture forget the bad. Forgiving people can reshape even bad, sinful architecture for the better. Forgiving people look at the preciousness of their monuments. Perhaps there is no justice in architecture, that’s why it can only remain an idol to those who are willing to sacrafice for her. There will always be many interpretations, and it will always be a means. Or, sometimes, something more.. And because it is people who inhabit the built environment, they are the ones who shape it and it is them who define its real value. So Wroclaw must be an amazing place.

1. Krystyna Barska and Marian Barski: Auditorium, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw http://www.wroclaw-life.com/wroclaw/breslau 2. Rynek, main square 3. Anna Tarnawska, Jerzy Tarnawski: Administrative building, Ofiar Oświęcimskich Street, Old Town 4. Post WW2 Wroclaw

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

YOU CAN HAVE AS ANY COLORS SO LONG AS IT’S BLACK

The Communist era’s architectural legacy backdrops the historical centres of most Eastern European cities. An endless sea of grey concrete flats and office blocks do little to allay the supposed void in architectural aesthetics during the Communist years. However, there are still many outstanding buildings to be found nestled amongst Eastern Europe’s Cold War edifices. This is a housing estate near Grundwaldzki square in Wroclaw, Poland (1967-1975). It’s author is Prof. Jadwiga Grabowska-Hawrylak. She is a living legend of polish modern architecture. This project breaks the boring idea of the grey concrete flats, which are so common during the 60s and 70s.

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Boryana Koleva (BG)

Sourses: http://www.inyourpocket.com/poland/wroclaw/Phoenix-From-the-Flames:-The-Rebuilding-of-Wroclaw_70936f http://www.sztuka-architektury.pl/index.php?ID_PAGE=1234

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David HlinenĂ˝ (CZ)

KEEP WALKING WROCLAW

Wroclaw follows other European cities in creating valuable public spaces (slowly but surely). They try to reflect the qualities for pedestrian spaces and bicycle routes set by one of the first cities, where it all started, Copenhagen, Denmark. Here I am in Wroclaw, ready to take a close look at pedestrian and bicycle movement within the city. What I find very unusual compare to Czech cities are the widespread passage ways through building blocks creating pleasant shortcuts. It makes you discover semiprivate spaces with its community life. This element really stands out among others and adds an extra value to the city.

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David HlinenĂ˝ (CZ)

Foto 1 - B Polaka Street Foto 2 - K.Wielikiego Street - Ring Road Foto 3 - Swidnicka Street - Pedestrian Boulevard Towards The City Centre Foto 4 - W. Stwosza Street Foto 5 - Courtyard By Nowy Targ Square Foto 6 - Grunwaldzki Square

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)

SYMBOLS DO NOT CHOOSE – THEY ARE TO BE CHOSEN!

First time walking through Wroclaw historic center – approaching the best preserved medieval building in Wroclaw – the church of St. Stanislaus St. and St. Dorothy. But right next to it something is bothering my eyes -flashy edgy body strongly contrasting with the church and the other buildings through the street. It left an expressive image in my mind.

Perhaps this is the most controversial building in Wroclaw, often considered being the ugliest, but for many it is a symbol of transformation and Wroclaw icon of postmodernism. Its name is Solpol I. The building was a post-modern voice of freedom in the historic city patched of better or worse examples of historicism and later post-war modernism. It was the pioneer – the first of its kind in terms of many reasons – architectural, technical and mental. The architect behind it - Wojciech Jarzabek was one from the generation which left Poland, study and practice in other non-communist countries and after 1989 returned home it is a bold example of postmodernism in architecture inscribed in the context of street Świdnicka famous for its collage of architectural styles and changed times. Nowadays there is a discussion about demolishing the building. Demolishing will means trying to forget a period which in my opinion is not a good practice. Paradoxically the potential disappearance will make the building even more legendary. The fast changing times and technologies, also the different and growing needs made the original use of the building more or less inappropriate anymore. And still stays the question- If not demolishing it what to do with it? It’s always hard to find function for building which already is legend for its appearance but the idea of destroying just doesn’t fit.

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Gergana Kocheva (BG)

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

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Enric de la Hoya Nolla (ES)

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Axonometry 1 - Krystyna Barska and Marian Barski, Wroclaw, Poland, 60's and 70's Axonometry 2 – OMA, Utrecht, Netherlands, 90's

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Andreas FrĂźhwirth (DE)

HOW MANY A CITY-CEN HOW MANY AN EXAMPLE Wroclaw, Poland’s 4th largest city is a beautiful example for a medieval city core. Before the start of the UEFA European Football Championship in summer 2012, the municipal authority banned the car traffic out of parts of the city centre. The following map shows the official traffic management of the city centre. The yellow coloured area is closed for motorised vehicles.

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Andreas Frühwirth (DE)

CARS DOES TRE NEED? CAN IT TAKE? FROM POLAND. It’s also in the discussion to narrow a part of the ring road which surrounds the inner city. The policy is also to support bicycle riders and raise the number of bicycle ways in the city. The question now is how a city administration should deal with the individual motor-operated traffic in the city centre. Usually, people always connect a city centre with a large pedestrian area. But where is the compromise between a lively pedestrian area and the conveniences of a parking spot in front of your favourite café. Maybe local shops benefits from enlarging the pedestrian area. Big multiple retailers are searching for locations with a good connection for car traffic. So the city centres which is closed for motorised vehicles is less attractive for this kind of retailer chains. This probably beware a city centre from the uniformity which is spreading out in whole Europe.

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map source: www.wroclaw.pl picture 1: shared space, a good compromise? picture 2: the ring road around the city centre

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LECTURERS / CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Bálint Kádár is architect, urbanist and publicist. He lives in Budapest (HU). He teaches at the Faculty of Architecture TU Budapest. Osamu Okamura is architect, publicist and editor. He lives in Brno (CZ). He is editor-in-chief of ERA21 architecture magazine published in Brno and teaches at Architecture Institute in Prague - ARCHIP. Roman Rutkowski is architect and publicist. He lives in Wroclaw (PL). He teaches architectural design at the Faculty of Architecture, TU Wroclaw. Samu Szemerey is an architect, urbanist and curator. He lives in Budapest (HU). He teaches at the Technical University and the Eötvös Loránd University. He is a member of KÉK Hungarian Center for Contemporary Architecture. Maria Topolčanská is architect and publicist. She lives in Bratislava (SK). She teaches at the Faculty of Architecture, STU and is researcher in contemporary architecture at Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Katarzyna Kazmierczak is a student of Faculty of Architecture TU Wroclaw (PL), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Teresa Caldeirao is a student of Faculty of architecture, Universidade da Beira Interior (PT), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Rafael Ramalho is a student of Faculty of architecture, Universidade da Beira Interior (PT), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Afonso Fernandes is a student of Faculty of architecture, Universidade da Beira Interior (PT), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Barbara Costa Brazao Ferreira is a student of Faculty of Fine Arts University of Lisbon (PT), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Margaux Dutilly is a student of School of architecture ENSAL Lyon (F), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Enric de la Hoya Nolla is a student of of School of Architecture La Salle Arquitectura, University Ramon Llull in Barcelona (ES), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava

Ľubica Segečová is graphic designer. She lives in Bratislava (SK) and is a cofounder of trivjednom design studio.

Domingo Bargalló Garcia is a student of School of Architecture La Salle Arquitectura, University Ramon Llull in Barcelona (ES), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava

STUDENTS / CONTRIBUTORS

Andreas Frühwirth is a student of School of architecture HSWT UASW Triesdorf (D), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava

Gergana Kocheva is a student of Faculty of architecture, UACEG in Sofia (BG), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Boryana Koleva is a student of Faculty of architecture, University of ACEG in Sofia (BG), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Karolina Wrzosowska is a student of Faculty of Architecture TU Wroclaw (PL), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava Karol Skalski is a student of Faculty of Architecture TU Wroclaw (PL), currently Erasmus student at FA STU Bratislava

Diego Aranda is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava Nina Horáková is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

Martin Hatala is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava Zoltan Takacs is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava Andrej Dubeň is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava David Hlinený is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava Marián Ján iis a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava Zuzana Mosná is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava Marián Gombarček is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

EDITOR—IN—CHIEF

Maria Topolčanská mariatopolcanska@hotmail.com Faculty of Architecture STU in Bratislava, Námestie slobody 19, 812 45 Bratislava, Slovakia

CO—EDITORS

Bálint Kádár Osamu Okamura Roman Rutkowski Samu Szemerey

GRAPHIC DESIGN Ľubica Segečová

PAPER

Creamy book 70g

TYPEFACE

Times, Okay DCE

PRINT

Devin printing house, Bratislava

PUBLISHER

STU Bratislava / VUSG

Barbora Polanská is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

Fall 2012 © Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture

Valéria Kočanová is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

Number of copies: 200 350 pages

Zuzana Krnáčová is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava

ISBN 978–80–227–3775–3

Jana Rantová is a student of Faculty of Architecture STU Bratislava


FAKE CITIES/TRUE STORIES IS A FAKEZINE

It is an open ended experiment in teaching, learning and researching in the field of contemporary architecture and urban culture by making of a weekly archizine. It supports students to engage debate, take positions and communicate them in public space. FAKE CITIES / TRUE STORIES was founded in fall 2012 as a tool for communication and feedback between lecturers and students of the Visegrad Intercity Seminar in Architecture at the Faculty of Architecture, Slovak Technical University in Bratislava, Slovakia. This seminar is an intercity platform of a critical community of architects, editors, teachers and students from many European schools of architecture who – temporarily or not - live, work and study in Central European cities today. FAKE CITIES / TRUE STORIES is an exercise in observation, understanding and critique of the parallel realities in Central European urbanity before and after 1990. Maria Topolčanská

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Fake Cities / True Stories  

FAKE CITIES / TRUE STORIES IS A FAKEZINE It is an open ended experiment in teaching, learning and researching in the field of contemporary a...

Fake Cities / True Stories  

FAKE CITIES / TRUE STORIES IS A FAKEZINE It is an open ended experiment in teaching, learning and researching in the field of contemporary a...

Profile for fakezine
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