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No Will to Live M

(This is a model, not the real person)

y mother was a Christian before I was born, and when my brother and I came along, she took us to church and Sunday School every week. I remember waking up each morning to my mom’s Maranatha records playing. My dad was a teacher and coach at the local middle school, but took little interest in spiritual things. Mom stayed home until we were in elementary school, and then went to the local college to get her RN degree. We only had one car so she rode her bike twelve miles each way. After graduating, she worked the night shift at the hospital so she could still make us breakfast and see us off to school. My mom eats very healthy and has always been extremely fit. It bothered her that this had never been important to me. I was promiscuous in high school and lost my virginity with my first boyfriend. I was on the fast track for teen pregnancy— and that’s just what happened! When I found out I was expecting, my dad demanded that I get an abortion and threatened if I didn’t, he wouldn’t allow me to live at home. I moved in with “Tim,” but he was irresponsible and had no interest in getting a job. I had to work to support us, but after learning he’d cheated on me, not just once, but several times, and even bragged about it, I moved out. I gave birth to a beautiful baby boy, and my parents let little “Billy” and me come home. I got back in church and eventually met a Christian man who was a good bit older than me.

by “Sallie Joyner”

We liked each other, but “John” wasn’t interested in a serious relationship. Besides the difference in our ages, he wasn’t interested in a “ready made” family. When he told me, I shrugged, said, “Okay,” and just moved on, focusing on what God had for me. However, a short time later, he asked me out, and we were together constantly after that. One day, we took “Billy” with us on a mountain hike. “John” had him in a backpack, and while we were on top of the mountain, he knelt and asked me to marry him. He looked so sweet with my son on his back proposing to me. And, of course, I said, “Yes!” My parents were very happy with our decision, and Mom helped plan the wedding. I struggled after the first year of our marriage and actually went through a time that I wasn’t even sure I loved “John.” I was so young and by the time I was twentyfive, I had three kids. It was also difficult since “John” was thirteen years older and had lived on his own for so long. Our life together was stressful, and after praying about moving to the town where my folks lived, we put our house on the market. It sold rather quickly, so “John” quit his job, and we packed up the kids and moved east. I’d struggled with insecurity my whole life and never felt comfortable with people paying any attention to me. As I got older and heavier it grew worse, and depression became my constant companion.


John and I struggled financially, and I had to get a job. A short time later I slipped on the ice and fractured my elbow. After six months it wasn’t any better so I ended up having surgery which included nerve restoration. It was a long recovery, and I had some issues getting off the pain medication. At the same time I started gaining more weight. We put our house up for sale to try and alleviate some of the financial pressure. I was on anti-depression medicine but noticed after several months it wasn’t working. I asked my doctor to increase my dosage, but that didn’t seem to help either—I’d feel okay one minute and the next I’d be so depressed I didn’t want to do anything or talk to anyone. Most days I felt like I’d rather be by myself. The bottom had dropped out of life, and I had a hard time just going through the motions day to day. I struggled with my job, too, as I worked in a small office and was the only Christian. The language the other employees used was very offensive! It was hard for me to stay positive or happy in that environment. My emotions were so raw I told my husband I was afraid. I’m not sure I would’ve hurt myself, but I couldn’t help myself either. “John” worked twelve hour night shifts so he slept during the day. It was fine when he first started that job, but over time it really began bothering me. We couldn’t go to bed at the same time, and he had to eat dinner earlier than the rest of the family. Plus, there were often events we wanted to attend, but couldn’t because it was his weekend to work. I became resentful of this, as well as the fact that he could stay home during the day while I had to work. He had a lot of free time, and I had absolutely none! We stopped spending quality time together. In fact, we hardly ever saw each other.

I had no sex drive because I felt so fat and disgusting. I certainly didn’t feel even a little attractive. I’d stop at the donut shop on my way to work and get one or two dozen donut holes. They’d be totally gone before I left work, and of course, I wouldn’t be hungry for dinner. My husband started worrying because he never saw me eating, and yet my weight kept increasing. He figured there was really something wrong. Well, there was, but not in the way he thought. I was so ashamed of myself, but couldn’t seem to get control. No matter what kind of resolve I’d make, I could never stick to it, causing even more anger and depression! All this brought such despair in my life, I lost the desire to live. One day, I opened up a little with my mother, and she urged me to consider going to Faith Family. She told me about a friend of hers who was greatly helped at FFM, so I decided to give it a try. Since “John” gave his support for the idea, I made an appointment. My experience was incredible—I could feel the Holy Spirit the entire time! God convicted me that I’d been relying on myself to do life instead of trusting Him. That was huge! He made it super clear that even though I’d been attending church and Bible Study, I’d been living independent of Him. He helped me deal with so much that the burdens I’d been carrying just lifted off of me. Plus, my eyes were opened to a love for my husband I’d never felt before. That was amazing! Oh, and by the way, the cabin was perfect—so cozy and comfortable. That was a real bonus! Plus they’d taken care of every detail, I didn’t have to do anything but focus on my healing. I was so excited to go home and finally feel the joy of the Lord! Thank you, Faith Family! Your place is truly a center for revelation, restoration and healing! I will be forever grateful!


Unwanted Pounds that the holidays are behind us Nandowmany are looking toward a “new

start” for 2014, you may be planning on doing a little dieting to shed some of those extra holiday pounds. Well, if so, may I caution you about the popular and well publicized quick loss schemes. There’s more to them than meets the eye—and none of it is good for you! With a lot of people worried about losing weight, more and more are looking toward over-the-counter or prescription diet pills. Many of these contain Orlistat, which helps you lose weight by poisoning your pancreatic enzymes so you can’t absorb fats. And dietetic foods are not much different because many of those contain Olestra, which is similar to Orlistat. This also inhibits the intestinal absorption of fats. So what could possibly be wrong with that? And why would diet pills and foods that stop the absorption of fats be creating such awful problems? The answer is very simple. When

HealthPoint

you poison fat absorption, you also poison the absorption of all the fatsoluble vitamins, which then leads rapidly to not only skin disease, but heart disease, cancers and everything else you can think of. Only someone who is extremely unknowledgeable of anything to do with healing would be caught dead using any of these. But how anyone in the FDA could ever approve them is a total mystery to me, since using either Orlistat or Olestra begs for the creation of new diseases. This person is guaranteed to avalanche into much more serious issues than obesity. Remember, watch out for Olestra and Orlistat in any form. Besides that, it’s very difficult to lose weight without getting rid of the phthalates (chemicals used in plastics). The far infrared sauna is the only way I’ve heard of to do that. Bill and I use the sauna most mornings, and while it produces great health benefits, it’s also a nice time for visiting!


Success Strategy goals is the secret to success in Sanyetting area whether it be secular or spiri-

tual. However, goal setting is not enough. There are other components in a success strategy that are of equal importance. One is to write down your goals. Written goals give our subconscious mind, not only a thought, but a tangible image to begin working toward. Some of the earliest pictures on the walls of caves depict successful hunts for those cave dwellers. Their drawings were not just art to be enjoyed, but a necessary “road map” for survival. Once our goals are put in written form, they activate our entire person in the process of making them materialize. Of course, pursuing them requires a step by step plan; one that needs to be prioritized. For example, if you desire to be an Olympic runner, you can’t wait until the race begins to get ready. There are many steps to achieve that goal, as well as, an appropriate order for the process. If you desire to develop strong faith, there are steps that must be taken as well.

Studying, surrounding yourself with others who have faith, listening to faith building messages and exercising your faith are all contributing factors. “Seeing” yourself reaching the goal will strengthen your spirit and help you along the path. Many years ago, the Lord told Toni and I to become completely debt free. We began to picture what that would be like. We’ve always honored our commitment to never place the ministry in debt, but in our personal life, that had not been the case. So, when God impressed on us the need for that freedom, we pictured it as a reality, wrote it down, made a strategic plan of action and began to execute that plan. Today we are completely free of debt, which allows us the ability to reach out to others even beyond the ministry of FFM. I’d like to encourage you to find the goal the Lord has for you, write it down, picture it accomplished, make a plan for success and pursue it with your whole heart!


Making Memories

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ver the holidays, John and Margaret Maxwell spent a few special days with their family. And it was a wonderful experience filled with good memories! He said, “With every experience, we make memories. But I believe that by being highly intentional, we can create opportunities for deep, meaningful memories of connection and love. Here are the elements we need to make memories that we will be able to look back on fondly for years to come.” 1. Initiative: Make Something Happen. “Our visit to New York on Thanksgiving weekend didn’t just happen. Margaret and I decided to plan the trip months ago. And we invited the kids and grandkids as soon as we decided to go. The first step in creating a memorable experience is the decision to do it. Start by deciding to lead your life, rather than just letting it lead you. Be intentional about creating memories.” 2. Time: Set Aside Time to Make it Happen. “We all have busy schedules, and it’s easy for time with family and friends to fall by the wayside. The way I avoid that is to schedule that time first. When we decided to go to New York, we put it on the calendar, with the understanding that nothing else would interfere with our family time together. Don’t let your calendar rule you. Remember that ‘quality time’ comes out of ‘quantity time.’” 3. Planning: Plan For Something to Happen. “Soon after we decided to go, the planning began. Again, we knew that it wouldn’t just happen. My assistant worked hard to help us with travel, lodging, and touristy activities. Of course, some favorite memories may come from spontaneous events or even mishaps, but by planning ahead you’ll be opening up the opportunities for memorable moments.” 4. Creativity: Find a Way to Make Something Happen. “It didn’t take us long to discover that a lot of people like to spend Thanksgiving in New York. Everything from finding a hotel to booking a Thanksgiving dinner took creativity. Even when you come up against obstacles in creating a memory, do what you can to make it happen. And don’t be afraid to think outside the box. We had special dietary restrictions in our group, but with creativity we found a place that could accommodate all our

needs.” 5 . Shared Experiences: Make Something Happen Together. “Of course, our first goal in making this memory was to share it with the kids and grandkids. And we had many shared experiences together over those few days, from hearing carolers in Central Park, to riding the wooden elevators at Macy’s, to seeing the balloons for the Thanksgiving Day Parade as they were inflated. Remember that shared memories are made up of little moments together. Be intentional about embracing them, and everyone will benefit.” 6. Momentos: Show That Something Happened. “When we visited Macy’s, one thing the grandkids did was each pick out an ornament to help them remember the trip. And of course, we took a lot of photos, so we can look back at our experiences. What you choose as a memento doesn’t have to be big or expensive; it just has to be meaningful to you.” 7. Relive the memory: Talk About What Happened. “My favorite time together on the trip was during Thanksgiving dinner. We were in a quiet side room at the restaurant, so we were able to go around the table sharing what we were thankful for from the past year. It was incredibly touching. By putting your experiences into words, you strengthen the memories, so you can enjoy the stories for years to come. “One of the last things I did with the grandkids is something I do every time we have a special time together. I made up a story for them. This time, it was about how all five of them named the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. I love coming up with the ideas, and the grandkids enjoy being ‘in’ each story. It’s yet another memory that we intentionally create together. “I hope [for the holidays ahead], you will make memories with your loved ones. Nothing lasts in this world except people and our relationships with them. “By creating memories, you add richness to your relationships and end up with something to enjoy over and over again.”


Jan 14 ik issuu