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Sentinel 2019

Giving Sen-


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Page 1 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Judy Bryan

Above: Jerry Nutt, left, the last surviving charter member, and Ron Mosloski, trustee, are leaders at the Fairmont Eagles Club.

Eagles may be ‘best kept secret’ By JUDY BRYAN Sentinel Staff Writer

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Fairmont

n a national level, the Fraternal Order of Eagles pushed for the founding of Mother’s Day, provided the impetus for the Social Security program and championed the end of job discrimination based on age. Numerous charitable organizations have benefited from the Eagles’ generosity, with many of them calling the donors the “best kept secret.” That same description applies to

Eagles Aerie 3394, the Fairmont branch, that has spent the last 50 years giving to charity and to those in need living up to the Eagles’ motto: People helping people. “We started with 50 members in the summer of 1969, and I’m the last surviving charter member,” Jerry Nutt said. “We were up to 160 members at one time in the 1980s. Now. we’ve got 57. Most of our newer members are in their 40s.” He recalls an organizer from Faribault traveling to different towns in Minnesota to generate interest in establishing Eagles aeries,

as the clubs are called. In Fairmont there were enough men impressed by his sales pitch to meet the required starting number of 50 members. Grant Quade, who had moved from Worthington to Fairmont to head up the local phone company, served as the first president. The group initially met at the old Fairmont VFW post on State Street for a few months before renting a building next to the bottling plant located directly behind the Sentinel office for two years. They held social functions, dances and charity fundraisers. Then a small building at 1228

Lake Ave. came up for sale, and the club had enough funds built up to put a down payment on the site, creating a permanent home for the Fairmont aerie. “We had a lot of activities out here,” said Jerry, recalling how he and his wife volunteered to work at least one Saturday a month. “In those days, there were a lot of wedding dances and Christmas parties and, of course, our steak fries every Saturday night. “We raised a lot of money that way. We made enough to put on a 40-foot section, where the bar is

EAGLES

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Page 2 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Sherburn club makes difference By JASON SORENSEN Sentinel Staff Writer Sherburn

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he Sherburn Civic and Commerce Club could be considered a microcosm of Sherburn itself. Consisting of a small group of people dedicated to the betterment of their hometown for all who live there, the club is the definition of service. A representative of the group, Vicki Bicknase, said the group is currently engaged in a project with the Sherburn Economic Development Authority known as the Beautification of Downtown Sherburn. “We’ve been doing the project in three phases,” she said. “Civic and Commerce came up with the idea, and we get help from the EDA, the city, Temperance Lake Ridge, the Lions Club and various other groups. The group is working to help business owners and proprietors with paint, new signage and awnings. The first year consisted of making plans, getting bids, applying for grants and having some fundraisers. The second year, the group purchased four new benches and hired professional painters to paint doors, windows trim, brick and side a vacant store front. In addition, the group helped a business update its sign. The EDA purchased a vacant building. The club helped decorate the windows. “This year’s job has been flower planters and signage,” Bicknase said. “There are a lot of historical buildings in downtown Sherburn, and we’re trying to

keep them looking decent.” Prior to its current projects, the club has donated money toward many things, including the security systems at the school and the digital sign. Along with many other organizations, the group also contributed to Sherburn’s Centennial Park, which was updated a few years ago with new playground equipment. The group also took part in helping to keep the Sherburn Theatre up and running. The project was an entirely community-supported project, with many organizations and private individuals donating to update the projector and the theatre itself. The group also updated the downstairs community hall kitchen with new cabinets, replaced the appliances and purchased utensils, and smaller contributions are made throughout the year. As far as funding, the group holds vendor shows, a membership drive, white elephant auctions, Cow Pie/Chicken Bingo at the Sherburn Holiday Festival, mystery dinners, Newlywed Game, wine-tasting events and a formal dinner. “The people of the area also do a great job,” Bicknase said. “When we have a taco in the park night, people come by. Temperance Lake Ridge put in the new street lights, and the city put up new banners.” Bicknase said the group is a small one and is thankful for the help of others. “There’s about five to ten of us off and on throughout the year,” she said. “We’re just a small SHERBURN

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Photo courtesy Vicki Bicknase

Above: A new flower planter sits at the corner of Second Street and Main Street in Sherburn, while a colorful, patriotic banner hangs from an iconic small-town lamp post.


Page 3 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

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Birch Street Dentistry.........11 Bowlmor Lanes & Lounge...8 Butcher Block ....................10

El Agave Mexican Restaurant ..........................24

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Janzen’s Greenhouse .........22

Olson Rentals .....................27

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Caver’s Realty, Inc...............8 Century 21-Cinde Andersen... ............................................22 Century 21-Northland Realty. ............................................21 Church Directory .........18-20 City of Fairmont..Back Cover D

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Fairmont Awards.....................8 K Fairmont Aquatic Park ...............................Back Cover Kahler Electric ...................22 Krueger Realty, Inc ............28 Fairmont Family Dentistry P.A......................................24 L Fareway Stores, Inc..............7 First Farmers & Merchants 23 Lakeview Funeral Home & Cremation Service.........6 Fleet & Farm Supply .........25 Lakeview Health Services G .................Inside Front Cover Good News Bookstore .......11 Graham Tire & Automotive .4

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Sentinel ... Inside Back Cover Services Directory .......13-17 Smokey’s Tobacco .............10 St. John Vianney Catholic School ..................................5

EAGLES Continued from Page 1

now, to the original building. Then the property next door became available. We needed someplace for parking so we bought that and refinanced. About three years later, we built on the last section that we use for parties and wedding dances.” Nutt serves as the club’s licensed gambling manager, handling the weekly Monday night bingo games and the pull tab sales, and is paid through the gambling proceeds. Dave Nutt is the only employee paid by the Eagles Club, serving as club manager and handling liquor orders, building reservations and other club matters. If you see Dave working behind the bar or in the club’s kitchen, he is doing that on a volunteer basis. “Everything is all volunteer help here,” Jerry said.

Whether it’s Friday’s burger night, the club’s fish fry or the Sunday breakfast buffet, the people doing the cooking, waiting on tables and doing the cleanup are all volunteer members of the Eagles Club. For those who have not enjoyed an incredibly tasty meal at the club, the “best kept secret” description will take on an additional meaning. After her first dining experience at the club, one lifelong Fairmont resident declared it her new favorite place to eat. “People don’t realize we are open to the public,” Jerry said. “They think you have to be a member to come out here to have a meal or have a drink, and you don’t.” “And a lot that do come out don’t realize we have a full bar

with hard liquor,” Dave said. Prior to obtaining a liquor license in 2015, the Eagles Club had a set-up and beer license. Patrons could purchase beer or bring their own bottle of liquor and purchase a pop set-up to mix with the alcohol. “Back then, when we had a concert, some of the younger people didn’t know what a set-up was. They thought it was a blind date,” Jerry said. Regular club events have evolved over the years. “We used to have a fish or steak fry every Saturday night. Then we just couldn’t find enough help to do it,” Jerry said. So the club switched to a fish fry on the second Tuesday of each month. “We went from 35 people aver-

age on a Saturday to 70 people on a Tuesday,” he said. The fourth Thursday of each month, the women of the Eagles Auxiliary have a beef commercial dinner and a bake sale. Jerry said it is “somewhat” antiquated that membership remains split with men in the club and women in the auxiliary, but it works for now. At the national convention, men have their meetings, women hold theirs and both groups meet for a joint gathering. If auxiliary members want to unite with the club, the auxiliary must first dissolve, and then members must wait one year before joining the men’s organization. The club’s family-friendly CLUB

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Page 4 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

CLUB Continued from Page 3

burger night on Friday continues to grow in popularity as people experience the treat for their taste buds and their wallets. Patrons can select a burger and a la carte toppings as well as a side dish, like french fries or tater tots. Appetizers and other dinners also are available, and there are beer and drink specials offered. A breakfast buffet with eggs, biscuits and gravy, pancakes, bacon, sausage and a variety of other tasty morning foods is served on the first and third Sundays each month. During the winter, on the second and fourth Sundays, local musician Steve Lange performs from 4-8 p.m. “It’s surprising how many people like to drink at 4 o’clock on a Sunday afternoon,” Jerry said with

a chuckle. “It’s usually one of our biggest bar nights,” Dave said. Occasionally, the meal events are used by another group as a fundraiser. The visiting group provides the volunteer help to work the event and keeps all tips and proceeds from the food, less the club’s cost for purchasing the food. “The Girl Scouts have helped us with the breakfast buffet. They come out and work for their tips, and they actually do pretty good,” Dave said. The Eagles building has a capacity of 272, but the sections can be rented out separately. The original section contains the kitchen and restaurant-style seating. The middle section contains the bar and seating, and the back section

is ideal for a reception or dance. Dave said the club waives any rental fee for the building for a charitable or fundraising event. Jerry admits the building’s exterior does not look appealing, but the club is working on that. They hope to find volunteer painters to refresh the appearance. “Every time we think we’ve got enough money saved up to put permanent siding up front or fix up the outside — well, we just finished putting in a new furnace instead,” Jerry said. “Then this winter, ice fell off the roof and crushed both the air conditioning units so we have to replace them. It’s never-ending.” In spite of the constant financial drain for upkeep on an older building, the local Eagles Club has managed to continue its legacy of

donations, on a national level as well as locally. The club sponsors two scholarships through Fairmont Dollars for Scholars and has donated $10,000 to the Fairmont Hockey Association and $150,000 to the Fairmont Community Hospital Association. Dave hopes the bar eventually could establish set hours, rather than being open only during scheduled events as it is now. “If people want to know if we’re open, I would tell them to call to find out the hours,” he said. The phone number is (507) 2382555. Events also are posted on the club’s Facebook page, Fairmont Eagles Aerie 3394. New members always are welcome, and anyone interested in joining or to find out more information may call the club.

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Page 5 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Photo courtesy Vicki Bicknase

Above: The building next to the Sherburn Theatre received some new paint, giving the area a fresher, cleaner look.

Spiritual Environment. Personal Attention. Academic Excellence.

Photo courtesy Vicki Bicknase

Above: A planter highlights the corner of First and Main streets in Sherburn, with the water tower displaying its fresh coat of paint in the background.

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SHERBURN Continued from Page 2

group that tries to come up with things to do. “There’s always various other groups that help out. We seem to get it started, and then they pitch in. It’s a small town with a big heart. Everybody just does their part, and they have really helped our current project succeed.” When asked about people who

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Page 6 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Police group devoted to youth By LIZ WHEELER

Sentinel Correspondent

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Fairmont

cammers and snake oil salesmen have been pandering tickets for policemen’s balls and soliciting funds for sheriffs’ “foundations” for years. Perhaps you’ve received one of those calls requesting a donation from an unregistered organization looking for a windfall from you. But be assured, the Fairmont Police Officers Association is a legitimate and local organization that is working to benefit the youth of Fairmont with its time, talent and treasPhoto courtesy Fairmont Police Department Above: Officer Mike Beletti, left, was “adopted” by Laurie Scottʼs, ure — and they don’t make phone far right, first-graders at Fairmont Elementary School this year. The calls. In the 1930s, the police departstudents are seen along with Judge Mike Trushenski on the bench ment needed equipment for its offias they tour the Martin County Courthouse. cers and created the association to coordinate a fundraiser. The fundraising turned into an annual, legitimate policemen’s ball, and the funds began going toward commuLakeview Funeral Home and Cremation Service is dedicated to nity projects. helping families create meaningful events that celebrate and honor life. In the 1990s, the group’s main fundraising moved to a solicitation letter sent in November to area residents, but the organization is still all volunteer-run, and all funds go back into the community. Each year, the letter raises around $5,000, give or take, and the 18member association puts the money toward youth-oriented events. FPOA “exists so we can help donate money to keep kids safe” and to provide funds for education and development for youth, according to police officer Joshua Nelson, who is president of the group. “The main part is getting kids active.” In recent years, donations have gone to Fairmont Elementary to help with busing first-graders to the law enforcement center and the Martin County Historical Society for field

trips; to Pheasants Forever, which helps train youth in gun safety; to the Martin County Library’s summer reading program; the Fairmont postprom party; the Community Ed summer soccer teams; Adventure Playground; and Fairmont Dollars for Scholars for a scholarship for a Fairmont graduate pursuing studies in law enforcement, to name a few. Association members also create opportunities to get involved in the community. In 2017, the Adopt-ACop program was reintroduced to Fairmont Elementary by the thenschool resource officer, Sgt. Michael Beletti. “The goal of the Adopt-A-Cop program is to interact and build rapport with our youth, beginning at a young age,” he said. The program created “positive interactions with police officers in a setting that kids were comfortable with,” said Michelle Rosen, Fairmont Elementary School principal for early childhood education through second grade. At the beginning of each year, the association asks for volunteers from among its members who are then randomly assigned to first-grade classrooms at Fairmont Elementary, St. John Vianney and St. Paul Lutheran. Each classroom is presented with a plaque by Police Chief Mike Hunter. It has the teacher’s name, the school year and the officer’s name, and is displayed outside the classroom door. Officers meet each month with their classes. At the visit, the officer might speak on various topics such as Halloween safety, read books, help the students with classroom projects, or they may eat lunch with the class. The program ends with a POLICE

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Page 7 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Photo courtesy Fairmont Police Department

Above: Cops nʼ Bobbers was a first-time program in 2018. Students were invited to go fishing with Fairmont police officers. The kids got to keep the fishing poles afterward.

POLICE Continued from Page 6

tour of the Law Enforcement Center and a snack. “The experience for officers has been positive as they are able to take time out of their day to visit with excited students which gives them a break from what can be a stressful job at times,” Beletti said. “I’ve had plenty of run-ins with my current and past first-graders outside of the school setting. Students are always excited to see us outside of the school.” From Fairmont Elementary’s perspective, the program has been successful. “The kids and the cops look forward to the visits,” Rosen said. “I think a positive view on police officers and their job was gained by students,” said Missy Aukes, a firstgrade teacher. “I also feel the students gained a positive relationship

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with an adult.” The program, currently overseen by school resource officer Jason Christenson, will continue next year. The association also does an annual “Shop with a Cop” at Christmastime where a few kids are paired up with local officers and go shopping for Christmas gifts for their families. The students also get to choose one toy for themselves. A new program, instituted last year, was Cops ’N Bobbers, which teaches kids the basics of fishing. The event is“by invitation only, much like Shop with a Cop,” said Officer Jaime Bleess, who is helping coordinate this year’s fishing outing. “We try to identify kids that we have had some contact with in the community throughout the year, on duty or off duty, [who] might benefit from fishing with a cop.” 

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Page 8 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

BUC Pride helping instill values By BROOKE WOHLRABE Sentinel Staff Writer

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Blue Earth

lue Earth Area’s BUC Pride has been around for several decades. BUC Pride serves as a sort of positive mindset around the school and in the community. Shannon Swanson, youth development coordinator at the high school, works with students of all ages. “The program itself is 10th through 12th grade, but I also work with K-12 on a variety of things through our program,” she noted. Some of the popular programs, BUC PRIDE

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Photo courtesy Blue Earth Area Schools

Above: A group of Blue Earth Area students volunteer to spend time with residents at an area nursing home.

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Page 9 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

BUC PRIDE Continued from Page 8

including peer tutoring and mentoring, are for any ages K-12. The service learning program also is for grades K-12. This is Swanson’s third year in the position, but she estimates it has been around for around 30 years. “Back when I was in high school, the peer helping program was around,” she said. “Things have changed since then, but the idea behind it is all the same. But since I’ve been in it, I’ve put my own spin on it, and a few things have been added. “As each year goes, we find a little more that we can do to make a difference. That’s the goal, to make a positive difference in our school and community.” “What I do is hopefully empower these young people to get a sense of their value and purpose not only in our school, but also what they can offer the community as well, not just when they’re young but when they’re older, too,” Swanson said. She works as a middle person between organizations by planning leadership programs and opportunities for students to help out in the community. She works with teachers and staff at the school, and with staff at places such as the senior center, nursing home and library, for when students go out and perform service learning. Part of the service learning includes service learning cleanups that take place twice per year. Swanson talked about a group of eighth-graders that did a cleanup in the park that consisted of planting flowers, putting mulch around trees and general cleanup. The 11th grade class typically plans its own service learning project. “They gain a lot more when it’s them putting it together and coming

up with ideas,” Swanson said. “One class read to the preschool classes and played some games with them. Another went to the senior center or nursing home and taught tai chi and pretty much interacted with them,” Swanson explained. For service learning days, every teacher can come up with their own ideas, and Swanson helps facilitate. A project can be incorporated into the curriculum as well. Swanson explained that the peer helping program is essentially volunteering. “It’s not expected or demanded of the older students, but all voluntary. It’s the same as a sport or music or every other extra curricular activity, this is just another opportunity for students to get involved and make a difference,” Swanson said. In the fall, she offers a workshop for students in grades 10-12. “They learn about leadership and what it means to serve others and all the opportunities there are to engage with youth and seniors. They can find out ways to make a difference in our school and in the community,” Swanson said. About 70 to 80 students are able to participate in different programs each year, and everyone has a chance to take part by the time they graduate. Some of the programs include peer tutoring and peer mentoring, which is similar to a Big Brother/ Big Sister program that takes place before or after school, or during study hall. Blue Earth Area also has a D.A.R.E. program run in the sixth grade class, with older students given the opportunity to be role model and teach lessons. There is a Seeds program in PEERS

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Photo courtesy Blue Earth Area Schools

Above: Several Blue Earth Area students help younger students with a craft project.

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Page 10 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Program delivers meals, caring By CHRISTINE RUPP Sentinel Correspondent

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Fairmont

ometimes one meal can make a big difference. At least, that has been Karen Toupal’s experience. Toupal, contact person for Hot Meals on Wheels in Fairmont, said she sees a real need for the organization’s services in Fairmont. Hot Meals on Wheels, which was started in 1973 by Elie Anderson and Mary Gronholz, delivers a midday meal to its clients six days per week. With a number of those clients being elderly shut-ins, Toupal says many of them would not be able to continue living in their own homes without the service. Some even take their noon meal and split it into two so they have an evening meal as well. “There is a need,” Toupal said. “There is a true need.” She became involved with the program in November 2017. There was an ad in the paper saying that unless somebody stepped up to help run the program it would be discontinued. Toupal attended a meeting about Hot Meals on Wheels along with Erin Maidl and JoAnn Rehling. The three now run the program, with

Maidl in charge of the routes and Rehling handling the finances. Toupal, who was a public health nurse before retiring, knows the value of a service like this. “We have a lot of people that if they didn’t get a good meal they wouldn’t be able to stay at home,” she said. “So it’s something I saw value in, most definitely.” Fairmont’s Hot Meals on Wheels is a private program and not to be confused with the national Meals on Wheels program. The founding women of Fairmont’s program looked into the criteria to be part of the national program, Toupal said, but decided to run it privately instead. Since its inception in 1973, Hot Meals on Wheels has run on volunteer labor both for the organizers and the drivers, “which is amazing,” Toupal said. Last year, volunteers delivered about 9,000 meals. The program can handle up to 32 clients at a time. There are no age or income requirements to receive meals, but clients must live alone and have a need. “As long as we have a spot and there is a need then we can get them MEALS

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Christine Rupp

Above: Gayle Larkin, right, a volunteer for Hot Meals on Wheels, delivers a meal to client Charles Roatch recently in Fairmont. Roatch said getting a meal delivered to his home helps him so he doesnʼt have to try to cook a noon meal.

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Hometown Giving 2019

MEALS Continued from Page 10

in.” There are times when the client roster is full, and there’s a waiting list, Toupal said, though the number of clients can change at any given time. Some clients, Toupal said, are elderly shut-ins who find it difficult to cook meals and might use the program for years until they move into a care facility. Other clients need help for a few weeks or a few months after surgery but then discontinue services once they’re able to fend for themselves again. Still others use the program’s services only during the winter months when it isn’t as safe to be out and about, Toupal said. Meals are provided by Lakeview Methodist Health Services in Fairmont. Clients receive the same meal being served that day at Lakeview,

and all of the meals are overseen by a dietitian. “So, in other words, they produce a nutritious meal,” said Toupal, adding that the meals can be adjusted for specific dietary needs. Menus for the following week are delivered every Friday with the meals, and some clients have their favorites, for which they request larger portions. “For the most part they (Lakeview) get a lot of compliments on their meals,” Toupal said, “so they do a great job with that.” Clients pay just $5 — with a $100 deposit — for their meals. The deposit helps ensure payment, Toupal said, and is applied to the clients’ meals so there is no additional cost CLIENTS Continued on Page 12

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Above: Gayle Larkin, right, a volunteer for Hot Meals on Wheels, delivers a meal to client Marjorie McFarland recently in Fairmont. McFarland said she likes the food, which is made at Lakeview Methodist Health Services in Fairmont.

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Hometown Giving 2019

CLIENTS Continued from Page 11

for the first 20 meals. If a short-term client no longer needs the service before the initial deposit is used up, then the client receives a refund of what remains, she said. And clients don’t have to get a meal every day, she added. Some clients request meals Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Others might ask not to receive a meal if they plan to have company for the day. All the money paid by the clients goes to Lakeview, Toupal said. Any private donations the program receives go toward things like coolers to transport the meals and office supplies. Several groups within the community, such as community service groups, businesses and churches, sign up for two-week blocks throughout the year to deliver the

meals 11 a.m. to noon Monday through Saturday. There are four routes mapped out for the volunteer delivery drivers, with a maximum of eight stops per route. Aside from Sundays, the only other days volunteers don’t deliver meals are Thanksgiving, Christmas and any day when the weather is severe enough for the schools to close. “We figure if it’s not safe for people to go to school then it’s not safe to drive around the community and deliver meals,” Toupal said. That happened several times this past winter, she said, and the extreme cold also made things difficult. The volunteers, though, put forth a great effort, and there was only one day the meals had to be canceled due to the cold. “Most people want to deliver the

PEERS Continued from Page 9

which older students go into preschool classrooms and teach lessons about trees, but it is also about interactions between the students. “Kids look up to older kids,” Swanson pointed out. Students can volunteer to be an orientation guide for new students to be a friendly face for them, eat lunch with them and give them a tour around the school and help them meet new people. Blue Earth Area also has Project Trust, along with students from Fairmont High School. It is a peer education program, and 10 students can be involved every other year. Students need to volunteer and interview to be in it. New this year was a BUC Pride recognition program that took place about once per month. “It’s to recognize students that

were nominated by teachers or their peers. It’s cool because it highlights kids that are making a difference and exemplifying what BUC Pride means,” Swanson said. Swanson explained that BUC Pride is an acronym standing for perseverance, respect, integrity, dependability and empathy. “They’re the core values that we hope our students embrace,” she said. Swanson said BUC Pride serves as a mentality throughout the school. It’s not all about students getting good grades, but having characteristics that the school and community believe in. “The kids get way more out of it than any time they put into it. Through these opportunities the kids are receiving just as much as they’re giving,” Swanson said.

meals, and so they try their very best to do it,” Toupal added. The program’s leaders — and its clients — appreciate all the volunteers who give of their time to deliver the meals. Toupal said the people associated with the program receive a lot of calls thanking them and saying how blessed the community is to have this service. “They’re so appreciative,” she said of the clients. And for some, the volunteers provide more than a meal; they provide communication. “They (the volunteers) might be the only contact they (the clients) have had all day as far as seeing people,” said Toupal, adding that a client’s face will often light up when they hear that friendly voice or see that friendly face.

Gayle Larkin, a volunteer from Immanuel Lutheran Church in Fairmont, has been volunteering with Hot Meals on Wheels for about 20 years. While she is the first to admit there are people who help out more often than she does, she said she enjoys delivering the meals. “I feel blessed that I’m able to do it, and I can help someone,” Larkin said. Linda Graf, also a volunteer with Immanuel Lutheran Church, teamed up with Larkin recently to deliver meals. Graf has been helping deliver meals for several years and sees value in volunteering. “You can contribute to doing something, to helping other people,” she said. To inquire about the program’s services or to volunteer, call Toupal at (507) 236-8781.

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Page 13 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

? ADVERTISING ADMFG, INC. 100 N. State St. Suite D............ ...................................238-1243 ALTERATIONS ALTERATIONS & SEW ON 983 220th Ave ...........235-6235 ANIMAL NUTURITION DEVENISH NUTRITION 2222 Lake Ave...........235-5116 APARTMENTS COUNTRYSIDE TOWNHOUSES 1317 Johnson Street................. ...................................238-4978

APPRAISAL SERVICES APPRAISAL SERVICES OF FAIRMONT Brandon Scott, 123 West Blue Earth Ave.......... ...................................238-4354 MAHONEY APPRAISAL 1014 Day Street.........236-5375 MahoneyAppraisals@gmail.com WEDEL APPRAISAL LCC Doug Wedel 1625 120th Street, Welcome ...................................235-9023

ART STUDIO BLUE SPRUCE ART STUDIO Dianne Bittenbinder, Owner 650 Embassy Road .................. ...................................238-2805

? ASSISTED LIVING INGLESIDE 2811 Roland Ave. ......238-9654 WOODLAND MANOR 610 Summit Drive ......235-6606

ATTORNEYS EDMAN & EDMAN ATTORNEYS AT LAW John A. Edman, Paul C. Edman, & Michael P. Edman 53 Downtown Plaza .................. ...................................238-4333 ERICKSON, ZIERKE, KUDERER & MADSEN, P.A. 114 West 2nd Street ................. ...................................238-4711

AUTOMOBILE DEALERS, USED VEHICLES

AUTOMOBILE REPAIR & SERVICE

FAIRMONT FORD 700 East Blue Earth Ave........... ...................................235-6681

RICHARD’S AUTO REPAIR & TOWING Richard & Betty Wiederhoeft, Owners, 410 East Blue Earth Ave........... ...................................235-5800

HAWKINS CHEVROLET 1304 E. Blue Earth Ave.. .......... ...................................238-4786 WELCOME MOTOR CO. David Welcome, Owner, 1310 N. State Street ................. ...................................235-3447

AUTOMOBILE PARTS & SUPPLIES ADVANCE AUTO PARTS 1403 North State Street ...................................235-6626

AUCTIONEERS AUCTIONEER ALLEY, INC. OF AUCTION AMERICA 117 North Main ..........238-4318

AUTOMOBILE PARTS & SUPPLIES

ROONEY AUCTION CO. 725 Leone Lane Jack Rooney.......712-260-9694

NAPA AUTO PARTS OF FAIRMONT 1225 East Blue Earth Ave......... ...................................235-3388

AUDIO, VIDEO MIDWEST AUDIO, VIDEO 822 Blue Earth Ave. .................. ...................................238-2233 AUTO BODY/ COLLISION REPAIR FAIRMONT BODY SHOP 1013 Winnebago Ave ............... ...................................238-2529

AUTOMOBILE REPAIR & SERVICE BULFER’S AUTO REPAIR, Mark Bulfer, Owner, 827 East 1st Street ....235-3313 D & R REPAIR Duane Tenney, Owner 1000 North State Street. ........... ...................................238-1055

AWARDS D & S TROPHIES & EMBROIDERY 119 Downtown Plaza ................ ...................................235-5026 BANKS BANK MIDWEST 301 S State 24 Hour Banking Service .......... 1-800-914-6027 or 235-3327 FIRST FARMERS & MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK Andrew C. Noll, President, 114 South Park Street .............. ...................................235-5556 www.ffmbank.com U.S. BANK 103 North Park 24 Hour Banking Service .......... 238-8300 or 1-800-872-2657

BEAUTY SALONS ASPIRE SALON & SPA 1017 Highway 15 South ...................................238-2534 BUNTJER’S SALON 107 Downtown Plaza.235-5010


Page 14 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Pride 2019

? BEAUTY SALONS SERENITY SALON 800 E. Blue Earth Ave. ...................................235-5333

BOOK DEALERS-RETAIL GOOD NEWS BOOK STORE 114 East 3rd Street ................... 238-2656 or 1-888-238-2656 BOWLING THE BOWLMOR Dave & Nancy Pederson, Owners, 617 South State .........235-5719 CABINETS & WOODWORKING CARSTENSEN CABINETRY & WOODWORKING 1045 Shoreacres Drive ............. ...................................238-2729 CABINETS & WOODWORKING GREG’S WOODWORKING Greg Borowski, Owner, 701 South Bixby Road .............. ...................................238-2154 CARPET/FLOORING CARPET PLUS 400 S State Five Lakes Centre .....238-4554 CARPET/FLOORING/ WALLPAPER/PAINT & WINDOW TREATMENT DOOLITTLE’S CARPET & PAINTS, INC. Jack Doolittle, Owner 1225 Hwy. 15 South ................. ...................................238-1155

? CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING/ PROFESSIONAL CLEANRITE CHEM/DRY......... ............................507-236-0713

COINS KUEHL’S COIN SHOP Gold & Silver Bought & Sold 310 North State Street .............. ...................................235-3886

CEMETERIES FAIRVIEW MEMORIAL PARK 2301 Memorial Park Drive ........ ...................................235-9105

COMMODITY BROKERS INVESTORS COMMODITY SERVICES 218 Lake Ave.............235-8282

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

CONCRETE CONTRACTORS COLE CONSTRUCTION, INC. Kevin Cole, Owner, 402 N. Valley Vue Ct.. .............. ...................................235-6377

PIERCE ACCOUNTING AND TAX SERVICES 51 Downtown Plaza .................. ...................................238-4304 Fax.............................238-4305 www.pierceaccountingservices.com

CHIROPRACTORS-DC ALIGN CHIROPRACTIC 204 Lake Ave. Suite 203, Dr. Zephanie Cole alignchiropracticfmt.com ...................................235-8485 BURTIS CHIROPRACTIC CENTER Dr. Scott Burtis, 112 North State Street. ............. ...................................235-5551 www.burtischiropractic.com LUND CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC Dr. John Lund, Owner, 118 West 2nd Street ................. ...................................235-3331 OPTIMAL HEALTH & CHIROPRACTIC 115 1/2 W. Blue Earth Ave. ...... ...................................235-5505

CONSTRUCTIONSCONTRACTORS KEN REIMAN 600 Lair Road ............235-5983

COUNSELING KRISMA COUNSELING 117 Downtown Plaza ................ ...................................399-2149 DANCE INSTRUCTION DANCIN’ PLUS Tammy Armstrong, Owner/Instructor 101 W 1st Street .......235-6114 www.dancin-plus.com

DENTISTRY BIRCH STREET DENTISTRY Dr. Jeff Fordice 1120 Birch Street .......238-4276

DENTISTRY CARLSON DENTAL OFFICE P.A. Paul F. Carlson, DDS Fred D. Carlson, DDS 717 South State Street ............. ...................................238-1883 FAIRMONT FAMILY DENTISTRY, P.A. Dr. Jon Erickson, 1950 Center Creek Dr., Suite 200 ...................238-2812 GETHMAN FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Reed Gethman 221 East 1st Street ................... ...................................235-3813 REITER DENTAL P.A. Mark E. Reiter, DMD 717 South State Street Suite 500 ...................235-6254

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS DEWAR ELECTRIC 724 East Blue Earth Ave........... ...................................235-6677 K & W ELECTRIC, INC. Wayne Wannarka, 800 N. Armstrong Drive ............ ...................................235-6571 KAHLER ELECTRIC CO. 517 Winnebago Ave. ................ ...................................235-6334

ELECTRIC MOTOR CONTROLS KAHLER AUTOMATION 808 Timberlake Road. .............. ...................................235-6648


Page 15 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

? EMBROIDERY D&S TROPHIES & EMBROIDERY 119 Downtown Plaza ................ ...................................235-5026 EXTERMINATION SERVICE AMERICAN PEST CONTROL .................................. 238-4562 FINANCIAL SERVICES DAVID JOHNSON FINANCIAL SERVICES 111 E 2nd Street.......235-3433

FINANCING GREAT PLAINS TRANSPORTATION SERVICE, INC. 923 North State Street Ste 120 ...................................238-0220 Fax.............................235-3456 PARTNERS FUNDING INC. 923 North State Street Ste 120 ...................................238-0220 Fax.............................235-3456

FLORAL HY-VEE FLORAL 907 South State Street ...................................238-4331 FLORAL & DESIGNS DEE’S FLORAL 107 Downtown Plaza ...................................235-9856

? FURNITURE DEALERS RETAIL DENNY’S HOME FURNISHING Troy Denny, Owner 206 N. State Street ....235-9257 SLUMBERLAND FURNITURE 807 S. State Street ...................................235-5533

GENERAL CONTRACTOR HERTZKE CONSTRUCTION & MILLWORKS, INC. 1533 Albion Ave ........238-2711 GREENHOUSES JANZEN’S GREENHOUSE 2401 Albion Ave. .......235-6733 GREENHOUSES SMITH’S GREENHOUSE Linda & Chuck Smith, Owners, 407 East 12th Street. ................ ...................................235-6986 GROCERIES-RETAIL HY-VEE FOOD STORE 907 South State Street ............. ...................................238-4323 www.hy-vee.com FAREWAY STORES, INC. 500 South State Street Grocery ......................238-4737 Meat...........................238-4673 www.fareway.com

HARDWARE-RETAIL FLEET & FARM/ ACE HARDWARE 1300 North State .......238-1823

HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING COOLING & REFRIGERATION CRESS REFRIGERATION ...................................236-3060 www.cressref.com

ICE CREAM TREATS DAIRY FREEZE 1506 Albion Ave ........238-4908 INDUSTRY 3M 710 North State .........235-3391

INSURANCE DAVID BAIR INSURANCE LIFE & HEALTH & MEDICARE 230 W. 10th Street.....238-2126 FAIRMONT FARMERS MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 118 Downtown Plaza ................ ...................................235-9476 KENNETH O. CARLSON CLU/ChFC, 226 West Anna .........235-5326 NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE 208 West 2nd Joel Anderson............235-9519 PETERS INSURANCE AGENCY 206 North State......................... 238-2882 or 1-800-328-9322 STATE FARM INSURANCE John Korsmo, Owner 403 South State Street ............. ...................................235-3397

LABORATORIES INTERNATIONAL AG LABS, INC. 800 West Lake Ave................... ...................................235-6909 LAWN CARE LANDSCAPING PLUS, INC. Kevin & Leon Schleininger, Owners, 513 Albion Ave. .........238-1345 Shop Phone ...............238-5437 LICENSE SERVICE MARTIN COUNTY LICENSE CENTER, INC. Patti Krumholz, Owner, 204 Lake Ave.............235-3335 LIQUOR STORE FAIRMONT LIQUOR STORE 1755 Center Creek Drive ...................................238-2269 LOCKS & LOCKSMITHS FOTY LOCK & SAFE Michael Foty, CPL, ARL, PLT, Owner, FotyLock.com License # TSC 01322 619 East Blue Earth Ave........... ...................................238-1703 MASSAGE THERAPIST PAST TENSE MASSAGE Jeannie C. Borowski, NCTMB 1130 Spruce Street in Cutting Edge ..............236-9570 jeannie.borowski@hotmail.com


Page 16 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

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?

KATHLEEN KUDERER SCHMID CMT CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST 135 Hodgman Ave .....238-2605

OFFICE PARK ARTHUR ANDREWS PROPERTIES LLC 923 North State Street Ste 120 ...................................238-0220 Fax: ...........................235-3456

THERAPEUTIC & STRESS REDUCTION MASSAGE With Erin Howk NCTMB ........... ...................................235-8226 tsrmassage.com

ORGANIZATION FAIRMONT EAGLES AERIE #3394 1228 LAKE AVE ...................... ...................................238-2555

MONUMENTS FOSNESS MONUMENT & CEMETERY WORKS 1230 Lake Ave...........235-3236

PAINTING CONTRACTORS KOTEWA PAINTING . .............848-5987 or 238-1892

MASSAGE THERAPIST

MOVING/SERVICES QUIST MOVING & STORAGE LLC ...................................238-2263 NEWSPAPERS PHOTO PRESS Jeff Hagen, Manager Sherman Kumba, Editor, Circulation Randy Chirpich, Advertising 112 East 1st St ..........238-9456 www.fairmontphotopress.com SENTINEL Gary Andersen, General Manager, 64 Downtown Plaza...235-3303

NURSING HOME LAKEVIEW METHODIST HEALTH CARE CENTER 610 Summit Dr...........235-6606

PET SALON GROOMINGDALES 107 W Blue Earth Ave ....................................238-1881 PHARMACY HY-VEE 907 South Street ...................................238-2880

PRINTING

RESTAURANTS

PHOTO PRESS Jeff Hagen, Manager Sherman Kumba, Editor, Circulation Randy Chirpich, Advertising 112 East 1st St ..........238-9456 www.fairmontphotopress.com

BLAZER BAR 106 E. 1st ..................238-2349

REAL ESTATE

EL AGAVE MEXICAN RESTAURANT 62 Downtown Plaza .................. ...................................235-8835

CAVERS REALTY 1140 Torgerson Dr. ...238-4496 CENTURY 21/NORTHLAND REALTY 1010 E. 4th ST...........238-4796 KRUEGER REALTY, INC. Ken Krueger, Broker, 323 East Blue Earth Ave........... ...................................235-9060 LAND SERVICES & ASSOCIATES Allen Kahler, Broker 117 N. Main Fairmont.....................238-4318

PSYCHOLOGIST

REHABILITATION & EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

DR. JOSEPH SWITRAS Licensed Psychologist 208 West 2nd Street ..235-5651

MRCI/ FAIRMONT 701 Cory Lane ...........238-4388

PLUMBING, HEATING & COOLING CONTRACTORS

RENTAL-REAL ESTATE KRUEGER 323 East Blue Earth Ave ...................................235-9621

DAY PLUMBING, HEATING, & COOLING 1410 E. Blue Earth Ave. ...................................235-9009 TOTAL COMFORT SYSTEMS 300 Downtown Plaza ................ ...................................235-5278

RESTAURANTS BEANTOWN GRILL 1400 North State Street ...................................238-1326

EDIE’S RESTAURANT Dalton Martinson, Owner, 110 West 1st Street ...................................235-5700

JAKE’S PIZZA 211 Downtown Plaza ................ ...................................238-4725 THE PIZZA RANCH 1101 North State Street ............ ...................................235-8822 THE RANCH RESTAURANT “Your Family Restaurant” 1/2 mile south of I-90 on Hwy 15.......................235-3044 TAMI’S ON THE AVE 2710 Albion Ave. .......235-8979

RETAIL PAINTINGS & CONTRACTORS WHITEMORE PAINTING & MORE 420 Downtown Plaza................. ....................................235-5581

SANITATION SERVICE HOMETOWN SANITATION SERVICES, LLC 1031 Fairview Ave. ....235-5665 www.hometownsan.com


Page 17 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

?

?

SCHOOL BUS SERVICE RESTAURANTS

SURVEYORS-LAND

TRAILER RENTALS

MINNESOTA MOTOR BUS 820 Winnebago Ave ................ ...................................238-6300

MADSEN LAND SURVEYING, INC. John Madsen, Registered Land Surveyor, 318 East Blue Earth Ave........... ...................................235-3780

MIKE’S TRAILER RENTAL 810 Adams. ...............848-4575

SENIOR HOUSING MAPLEWOOD RESIDENCE 620 Summit Drive ......235-3443 ...................................235-9272

SIDING/WINDOWS BORDERLINE SIDING & WINDOWS ...................................235-3474

SIGNS RICK DEBOER LETTERING & SIGNS Custom Hand Lettering, 1321 North Elm..........235-6303

TAX PREPARATION AGENCY TAX SERVICE Stew Murfield 112 West 1st Street ...238-2054 H & R BLOCK Tammy Hill, Owner, 406 North State Street .............. ...................................238-9016

TRAILER MANUFACTURING REDI HAUL TRAILERS 1205 North Dewey St................ ...................................238-4231

Thank you ads starting at $15.00.

Rummage Sales 3 days, 5 Lines Plus Website $20.55 7 lines-$24.85

TREE & AERIAL SERVICE KIMMET FAMILY BEST VALUE TREE SERVICE 937 170th Ave Dave ...................507-848-7633 Mike ....................507-238-1724

WINDOW CLEANING THE SQUEEGEE BROS. INC. 651 Pioneer Dr. ........236-5207

THATE’S TREE SERVICE 418 West Margaret Street ISA Certified Arborist ................ ...................................235-3467 WATER CONDITIONING CULLIGAN WATER CONDITIONING OF FAIRMONT, INC. 1030 North State Street ............ 238-4451 or 1-800-722-0598 www.culligan.com

r JOB Looking fo the check out Daily Classifieds

s HappyAd $30 2x3

WATER CONDITIONING GARLICK’S WATER CONDITIONING....................... 507-526-3616 or 1-800-722-1282 www.garlickswater.com We pump septics

Merchandise For Sale 6 days-5 Lines-$5 $200 or Less

Sentinel Classifieds jschomberg@fairmontsentinel.com Call 235-3303 or Fax 235-3718


Page 18 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

AREA CHURCHES FAITH AND GIVING 507 280th Ave., Granada, MN www.eastchain.com Eric Hoehn Lead Pastor Alex Andrews-Youth Pastor Linda Goraczkowski-Children’s Director

Small Groups for Adults

119 E 2nd St. • Fairmont 507-235-5579 • www.umcfairmont.org

“Resounding God’s Grace”

110 E. 4th St. N., Truman, MN Rev. Nathan J. Rusert Principal-Mr. Marty Miller 507-776-6541

319 Downtown Plaza, Fairmont 507-235-5382 www.Fairmontucc.org Rev. Cory Germain Sunday Service 10:30 am Sept-May, 9:30 am June -Aug.

Our Accredited school serves Preschool-8th grade. All are welcome!

301 N. Main St., Fairmont • 507-235-3500 Pastor Richard W. Abel

901 Woodland • Fairmont 507-235-6407 www.fairmontcovenant.com Senior Pastor Dan Wheeler


Page 19 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

AREA CHURCHES FAITH AND GIVING THE CHURCH OF

JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS

425 Johnson Street, Fairmont, MN 238-1651 David Greer, Presiding Elder 507-525-8984

“VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME TO ALL MEETINGS”

75

300 South Grant, Fairmont 507-238-4418 www.gracelutheranchurch.org Ministers Steve Berkeland, John Heille, Russ Steele Amy Engel-Duong, Worship Director Nicki Kueker, Christian Ed. Director

1200 North North Ave. • Fairmont 507-238-1387 immanuel_fairmont@yahoo.com www.immanuel-fairmont.org Making Jesus Known...Knowing Jesus Better! Pastors: Rev. Wade Daul and Rev Adam Carnehl

1329 S. Ramsey St., Blue Earth, MN 507-526-2396 Rev. Reid Ellis

1125 South State St., Fairmont, MN • Lead Pastor Seth Watson ° Associate Pastor Jim Fleming Youth Pastor Intern Peter Erickson

Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. Sunday School: (Connections Hours) 9:30 a.m. Hispanic class 9:30 a.m. - Hispanic Service (Lower level) 11:00 a.m.) Wednesday: Prayer Meeting (year round) AWANA (school year) 6:30 p.m.(JH youth-school year) 6:30 p.m. (SH youth-school year) 8 p.m.

211 Budd Street • Fairmont Rev. Thomas E. Fast & Rev. Anthony T. Bertram

Summer Sunday service Times from Memorial day weekend through Labor Day weekend 9:00 am only.


Page 20 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

AREA CHURCHES Faith and Giving 2481 50th Street Fairmont, MN 56031 • 507-235-5535 Father Andrew Beerman

901 South Prairie • Fairmont 507-235-5535 www.sjvhf.org Father Andrew Beerman

First Baptist Church of Winnebago

205 Cleveland Ave. Winnebago Pastor: Daren Lee Barnett 507-525-8630 cell 507-893-4215 www.winnebagofbc.org Saturday-5:15pm on 1560AM “Digging Deep” Radio Broadcast Sunday-9:00am Christian Education and Discipleship Class 10:00 Worship Service 11:15am Fellowship Time Wednesday-Bible Study and Youth Group @ 7pm Every 4th Sunday of the Month @ 6pm-Movie Night

102 N. 7th Ave. E.

Truman, MN 56088 Pastor Krista Strum

10:30 a.m.

(Sept-May) Visit us online at www.trinitytruman.org or visit our facebook page “Trinity Lutheran Church-Truman” Follow us on Instagram: Instagram.com/ trinitytruman.mn

323 E. First Street, Fairmont • 507-238-9663 Pastor Jason Zuehlke

625 Johnson St. • Fairmont 236-6338 Pastor Glen Davis


Hometown Giving 2019

Page 21 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Group: We’re all people first Minnesota coordinator for Arc. The group is geared toward helping its members learn leaderFairmont ship skills, how to meet chalonathon Wolner was in belenges, and how to ask for what tween jobs in northern Min- they want. It also has a monthly nesota when he made the meeting when it sometimes hosts decision to move to Fairmont, guest speakers. where he had family. The members of the group, and Wolner eventually became part not the allies, hold all the officer of a group called People First and positions and “run the show,” Eris now the organization’s presiickson said. It’s “one of the few dent. He ran for president of the groups where you have more than group because “I really was hoping one person running for office. to help the community to see that Sometimes you have eight!” people with disabilities are just as At meetings, members also learn good as everybody else in the about upcoming opportunities to community,” and he does not want attend community events or learnLiz Wheeler others to see those with disabilities ing and advocacy events. Above: The officers of People First. From left: Pat Kietzer, ally; as “a threat” or to be afraid of “This coming June, we’ll be Jodi Cloud, secretary; Susie Henry, treasurer; Erin Ebert, vice presthem. working at the Bloodmobile when ident; Jonathon Wolner, president. The group’s name comes from a the Red Cross comes,” Wolner quote that goes something like said. In the past, group members “people look at my disability, but have “gotten people juice and enI’m a person first,” according to couraged people to eat snacks so Lee Ann Erickson. Erickson is rethey aren’t weak going out the gional executive director of Arc of door and don’t pass out.” Minnesota for the southwest reThey also ring the Salvation gion, the umbrella organization for Army bell during Christmas and People First and a 501(c)3 nonsometimes help with the St. Marprofit that provides programs and tin’s Episcopal Church’s soup services to people with intellectual lunches. And members also help and developmental disabilities and with the group’s largest fundraiser their families. of the year, the silent auction held People First, which began by the Knights of Columbus at St. around 2000, provides a place for John Vianney Church and School. those with disabilities to learn how “They just love standing up to self-advocate and for others to there holding the live auctions connect with those who have disitems up,” Erickson said. abilities. People First members also are “For the longest time, I knew I involved with many of Arc’s other had a voice but I didn’t think it activities, such as the Aktion Club mattered a whole lot,” Wolner Theatre, which holds drama pracsaid. “I’ve been learning through tices with Kiwanis and will perLee Ann and Pat [Kietzer]; they 507.238.4796 form at the county fair in August; have told me that my voice counts the Friday night bowling league at Fairmont, MN for something.” Century21NorthlandRealty.com Kietzer is an ally with People PEOPLE FIRST Independently owned and operated. First and the regional southwest Continued on Page 23 By LIZ WHEELER

Sentinel Correspondent

J

DON’T SETTLE FOR AVERAGE


Page 22 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Ypro connects people, gives back By JASON SORENSEN Sentinel Staff Writer

U

Fairmont

Jason Sorensen

Above: Jarod Mathiason, left, and Dustin Tino organized the Young Professionals Group in Fairmont.

Cinde Andersen Making You Feel Right At 507.399.9365 Home Is What Call Or Text 1010 East 4th Street I Do Best Realtor® GRI, ASP, CRS, ABR, SFR

nder the guidance of the Fairmont Area Chamber of Commerce, a new group of young professionals is gaining traction in the area. The group is the brainchild of Chamber members Jarod Mathiason of Supreme Lending and Dustin Tino of Minuteman Press. The group originated as a way for people in their 20s and 30s to network with each other in a more relaxed setting. With that core goal still in place, it has now expanded to include gaining exposure and giving back to the community. Mathiason explained how the concept first formed.

“We both knew each other in our younger years, and we had both recently moved back to town here in a couple of years and started businesses,” he said. “[Dustin] had been doing a bunch of my print, and we got together over lunch one time and we were saying that it’s kind of a challenge to meet people in our age-range; it’s not as easy as when we were younger. “So Dustin was commenting on how his father-in-law was saying that back when they were our age there was Elks and Lions and a lot different social groups where they knew each other and were really connected. We just don’t really have that anymore, and I said I rePROFESSIONALS Continued on Page 23

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR CELEBRATING 70 YEARS!

Design • Installation • Service

Cinde.Andersen@C21NR.com EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

Northland Realty

517 Winnebago Ave. • Fairmont, MN 56031 • (507) 235-6334

Janzen’s Greenhouse

Celebrating 66 years of Growing Open all Summer thru Sept. 24 2019

914 North State St., Fairmont, MN

507-238-1393

www.olsonrental.com

Check out current hours on our Facebook page and watch for new videos and info on Facebook.

2401 Albion, Fairmont, Mn. • 507-235-6733


Page 23 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

PROFESSIONALS Continued from Page 22

ally wish there was a young professionals group in the community, and he said he was thinking the exact same thing.” With the idea out there, the two men tabled the idea for several months before approaching the Chamber of Commerce. “We said, ‘Ned [Koppen], we’re looking at trying to figure out a Young Professionals Group,’ and he said they were about a week away from trying to find someone in the community to start a group just like that. So we kind of spearhead it and the Chamber helps facilitate.” Tino said the group is evolving to meet needs as they see them. “It’s a learning process of finding what people our age are looking for and trying to change it as we go. It started out as more a net-

working group, and now we want to have a little bit more involvement with the community. So we go to different businesses and learn about them.” Mathiason said they recently went to the Fairmont Opera House, and will soon be off to places like Rose Lake Golf Course and the Fairmont Fire Department. “Not only do we want to have the networking, but it’s also about exposing young people to Fairmont and seeing the different components of it,” Tino said. “We both grew up here and had the thought that there wasn’t much here, but now with our involvement with the Chamber and different things as business owners, you find out there is a lot here, but I don’t think people know enough about it and we’re trying to expose that.”

PEOPLE FIRST Continued from Page 21

Bowlmor; and Different Drummer dances at the Holiday Inn, which includes dancing, karaoke or live music, and dinner. In addition, they are invited to other opportunities to learn and advocate for themselves. Each year, they participate in Disability Day at the Capitol in St. Paul, attend the Arc annual meeting in the Twin Cities, and attend conferences put on by Self Advocates in Minnesota or Advocating Change Together . Attending these “show there are other people that have similar or more challenging issues than what I do. Basically, an encouragement type of thing, you know. At least that’s how I see it anyway,” Wolner said. Anybody can join People First either as a member or as an “ally.”

For allies, “it would help them to see that people with disabilities can have fun alongside everybody else. It may not always be easy to connect, but we can all learn from each other. Our worlds aren’t so different,” Wolner said. In September, the group will have a kickoff picnic for the next season, which is a great time to get involved. It’s a great opportunity to “be with other people so they don’t have to feel like they’re all alone in the world if they have a disability because nothing’s worse than feeling like you’re all alone,” Wolner said, “and learn new ideas” and be encouraged to use your voice because your voice matters. For more information on People First or other Arc programs, contact Kietzer at (507) 848-5017.

Mathiason also said the group is looking to grow and evolve, not only to help young people get together and gain exposure to Fairmont, but to give back to the area as well. “What we’re also doing is, as we’ve evolved from networking originally and now we’re focusing on exposure to different groups and facilities in Fairmont, now we’re looking at giving back. So we’re going to be looking at what groups we can partner with to help facilitate their fundraising components.” “If we can get people involved, I think there’s enough young people involved in different things that can help shed light on them and get the word out,” Tino said. “It’s been great for me,” Mathiason said. “It’s been eye-opening how many other professionals in

their 20s and 30s I didn’t know.” The group meets on the third Thursday of every month from 4-6 p.m., with a social hour from 4-5 p.m. and a more structured portion in the final hour. The men said they wanted to be cognizant of the delicate balance between family and career responsibilities, leading to the evening time slot. “We’ve had a couple of good sponsors, including Profinium and Supreme Lending, so nobody has to worry about paying membership dues to be a part of Ypro. All of the paperwork and literature comes from Minuteman Press.” For those who want to connect with the group, people can reach out to Mathiason at (507) 848-1902 or Tino at (507) 236-6728, or just show up at the next venue, which they can find out through the


Page 24 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Revived Women of Today thriving By CHRISTINE RUPP Sentinel Correspondent

W

Fairmont

ho says you can’t have fun while doing good? Certainly not the Fairmont Women of Today. “If you are passionate about giving to the community, or making friendships, or developing your personal growth, this is a great place to try,” said Sue Bay, a member and former president of the group. “We enjoy having fun, and while we’re having fun we do something good for the community.” The group’s purpose is mirrored in its slogan of “service, fellowship and growth.” The Fairmont chapter of the Minnesota Women of Today has been around for some time, but it was nearly dissolved a few years ago because the members were not active enough. Local chapter members let the state know the group would be dissolving when, strangely enough, a misconception about the group itself led to revived interest. While researching the group for a newspaper article, then local reporter Kylie Saari was surprised to hear that the age limit was 40. When she

Photo courtesy Fairmont Women of Today

Above: Members of the Fairmont Women of Today pose recently at the baby feeding center at the Martin County Fair in Fairmont. Creating the center where women can comfortably breastfeed or bottle feed their babies at the fair was the first major community service project of the revived chapter, and it has since grown in popularity and in size. questioned representatives about the need for an age limit, she was told that it was an old rule and had been removed, opening membership to any women 18 and older. Digging a little more into the pur-

pose and goals of the organization, Saari and her sister decided to bring the group back to life. Bay and Joanna Borkenhagen, who recently began her term as the group’s president, were some of the

first members to sign up to help reach the minimum of 10 participants needed to be considered a viWOMEN OF TODAY Continued on Page 25

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Page 25 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

WOMEN OF TODAY Continued from Page 24

able chapter. “So before it ever was officially closed in the state’s books, it was revamped,” Bay explained. That was about three and a half years ago, and since then the group has been active in the community. It began its community involvement with a baby feeding center at the Martin County Fair. “So that was the very first big project,” Bay said, “and it’s free. It’s just a service that we provide for our community.” Fairmont Women of Today members created a quiet, comfortable area where mothers could get out of the elements to breastfeed or even bottle feed their babies; a place where they could relax and unwind. Now in its fourth year, the baby feeding center continues to grow in popularity — and in size. There is now more seating, two changing tables and a refrigerator, Bay said. There are also free diapers and a toy section to help keep older children occupied while the women are busy nursing their babies. “So now it’s a whole mother/family center,” Bay added. Another big project for the group was raising funds to purchase a Cuddle Cot for the local hospital. “It was a brand new concept,” Bay said. “We had never heard about it.” A Cuddle Cot is a cooling system that’s placed in a bassinet so stillborn babies can be kept with their families longer, allowing them more time to process and grieve, Bay explains. The group’s goal was to purchase one of the devices, but they were able to afford two, so one is in Fairmont at Mayo Health System, and the other one is at United Hospital District in Blue Earth. “We purchased two Cuddle Cots

because the community helped us raise this much money,” Bay said. “It was just phenomenal.” It’s one of those things, she added, that people hope is never used but if it’s needed, they’re glad it’s there. Earlier this year, the group — as part of a Minnesota Women of Today statewide goal to purchase freezers for Minnesota Milk Bank breast milk depots — raised funds for a freezer to be used at the local depot at Human Services of Faribault and Martin Counties. When the local chapter was a little short of the necessary funds, Dan’s Appliance in Fairmont donated the remaining balance, and the project was completed in February. As a service project, the Fairmont Women of Today then made bags of items to give to breast milk donors as a way of saying thank you. Other projects have included raising funds for materials for the GriefShare program, packing backpack bags at Heaven’s Table for children in food-insecure homes, picking apples at Center Creek Orchard to donate to the food shelf, and organizing the annual Touch A Truck event at Interlaken Heritage Days. While Touch a Truck isn’t necessarily a service project, Borkenhagen likes that the group puts together a free event for families to come and enjoy. “Sometimes it’s nice when you have kids you don’t always have to pay for every little thing to do,” she said. Fairmont Women of Today will always take ideas or suggestions for service projects, Bay said. “Lead us down a path where we’re needed somewhere in the community, and we would look for a

PROJECTS

Continued on Page 28

Photo courtesy Fairmont Women of Today

Above: Several Fairmont Women of Today members are pictured donating a Cuddle Cot to staff at Mayo Clinic Health System-Fairmont. Fundraising efforts were successful enough to also purchase a second device, which was donated to UHD in Blue Earth.

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Page 26 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Kiwanis members stay busy By BROOKE WOHLRABE Sentinel Staff Writer Fairmont

K

iwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to improving the world one child and one community at a time. Fairmont’s Early Risers Kiwanis is dedicating to serving the local community through various service and fundraising projects. While the organization was established in 1915, the Fairmont Kiwanis Club formed in 1922. That club chartered others, including the Early Risers in 1978. Dennis Trushenski, a member of the Early Risers for 36 years, said it is definitely a service club. There are 33 members. The group meets every Wednesday, bright and early, at 6:45 a.m. at the Ranch Family Restaurant in Fairmont. Members often get there early to socialize, but the program starts at 6:45 and usually runs until about 7:30 a.m. The meetings are always open to the public. “You get together with people you might not rub elbows with every day. There’s people from all walks of life. There’s bankers, ministers, people in mid-level management and all different ranges. You just have to be someone who cares for kids,” said Trushenski, explaining a big theme of Kiwanis. The group has a program with a different guest speaker each week so members learn about different local businesses and organizations. The program includes a prayer, joke of the day and thought of the day. “It’s not all service; we have fun too and we learn a lot about differ-

Jason Sorenson

Above: Members of the Early Risers Kiwanis serve pancakes at Five Lakes Centre in Fairmont during their annual pancake supper in November. The supper is the clubʼs main fundraiser for its many programs. From left: Kathy Smith, Allen Core and Chuck Anderson. ent organizations,” Trushenski explained. Having been around for several decades, the Early Risers puts on a number of well-known events and has many established programs, including: Koats for Kids, Kids Fishing Contest, Dollars for Scholars, bike safety, bingo at Lakeview Methodist Health Care Center, Safe Routes to School, delivering Meals on Wheels, bell ringing for the Salvation Army, road ditch pickup and much more. The Koats for Kids program begins in October and runs through winter. Trushenski shared more

about it. “The school recommends kids that come to school underdressed for the weather. We have a budget where we can buy new coats. This is one program where we want them to have something new. Sometimes it’s the first new thing these kids have had,” he explained. They deliver the new coats to the elementary school and then they’re given to the kids, all with the permission of the parents. The club conducts the Safe Routes to School program, which has club members walk with students to school one morning a

week during the fall and spring. They also put on the bike rodeo at the Fairmont Elementary School each year. “We try to make it fun. This year we had 30 kids,” Trushenski noted. They put a team together each year for the Kids Against Hunger food pack and they get together to play bingo with residents at Lakeview once per month. The Kids Fishing Contest is a big event each year. Unfortunately, it was cancelled this year due to the KIWANIS

Continued on Page 27


Page 27 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

Fire Ladies have each otherʼs backs By JUDY BRYAN Sentinel Staff Writer

I

Fairmont

t has been a year since a select group of women revived the Fairmont Fire Ladies Auxiliary. As the female partners of the city’s 32 firefighters, membership in the group is extremely limited but fiercely loyal — to each other and to their firemen. Recently, Sara Cyphers, Kacey Kasel, Tanya Hargan, Clare Mosloski, Beth Hartwig and Kristin Miller met for a meal and talked about the numerous unique challenges the spouse of a firefighter faces. Tim Miller, a 9-year member of the fire department, represented his counterparts at the gathering. One woman mentioned grocery

shopping with her husband when he had to leave immediately to go on a fire call. She was stranded at the store with a cart full of grocery and no way home. She promptly called another firefighter’s wife who came and picked up her and her groceries, no questions asked. This story prompted the other wives to share the different times and situations — and there have been many — where they have been abandoned. Church, movies, ball games, birthday parties, holiday gatherings, meals — no occasion is exempt. Some have solved the potential for desertion by driving a separate vehicle to events. They shared their tales without a hint of anger or frustration, but with a sense of pride and acceptance. Each new story elicited laughter and gener-

KIWANIS Continued from Page 26

high waters causing unsafe conditions. Trushenski said it was the first time they had to cancel in the last 15 years that he has been involved in organizing the contest. Kiwanis buys books for kindergarten and preschool classes, and members will read to the class. Trushenski said Loren Dunham heads up that program. “Our main fundraiser is our pancake supper, which is always the first Monday after Thanksgiving. That’s basically our budget,” Trushenski said. Since the group built its own pancake table, it has been able to rent it out to other organizations, taking a small cut of the profits. “We put that money to the Kiwanis Foundation so we can use it for other projects,” Trushenski said. Money the club earns is used to

pay for the many programs it runs. It also gives some money to Kinship, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and answers special requests for the betterment of kids. “We spend the money. It’s not for us to sit on. It’s to use it in the community,” Trushenski said. Members of the club are encouraged to attend the meetings each week. Most are from Fairmont, but anyone in the county can join. While the club is made up of many long-time members, several new members have joined recently. New people are assigned a sponsor to help get them started. Trushenski stressed that’s it’s all volunteerbased. “It’s a wonderful group of people. If you want anything done, this is the group to get it done,” Trushenski said.

ated yet another memory, like when Cyphers called Jim Forshee, who was then fire chief, in the wee hours of the morning to ask about her husband who was on a fire call. “Jim still talks to me so he must not have minded too much,” she said. It is obvious that the women rely on each other for much more than just an emergency ride home from the grocery store. They seek humor and sympathy, advice and support, friendship and camaraderie from someone who shares the same experiences. Before resurrecting the auxiliary after it had been dormant for 15 years, the wives usually only saw each other at the firemen’s annual Christmas party and the department’s family picnic in the summer. The realization that the women needed a

tighter, more cohesive relationship resulted from two impactful events in late 2017: the sudden death of longtime firefighter Mike Miller and the non-stop three-day battle against frigid temperatures during the Northrop elevator fire. The past two summers, the auxiliary has volunteered to run the kids’ games during Interlaken Heritage Days, seeking donations for the July 4 fireworks, which is sponsored by the fire department each year. Right now, its main mission is to each other. “The guys are all tight,” Tim Miller said of the fire department. “We’re a second family. They (wives) need that opportunity too.”

AUXILIARY

Continued on Page 28


Page 28 - Thursday, June 27, 2019 - Sentinel - Fairmont, MN

Hometown Giving 2019

AUXILIARY Continued from Page 27

Members of the Fairmont Fire Department spend a lot of time together in situations other than fire calls. In addition to the weekly drills and exercises for the firefighters, they make appearances escorting one of Fairmont High School’s sports teams on their departures for state tournaments, participating in parades during area summer festivals, and at school events and open houses at the fire hall. Sponsoring the annual July 4 fireworks display in Fairmont requires a lot of work before and during the event. “There’s a handful of guys that help every year,� Miller said. “They Lee Smith Above: Mackenzie Geiger helps her son, Thayne, 3, push a block set up the day before. They are there, while playing Jenga with family friend Jericho Ibarra, 8, all of Fair- in full gear, when the fireworks are mont, during Interlaken Heritage Days at Gomsrud Park in Fairmont set off, and then they tear down until this year. The games are offered by the Fairmont Fire Ladies Auxil- 3 a.m.� iary as a fundraiser. In addition to volunteering their

time, the department raises money to pay for the pyrotechnic display. “It costs over $20,000, and that cost goes up every year,� Miller said. “Our only real fundraiser for that is our pop can trailer at the mall.� The department receives money from the city each year to maintain a standard of safety and equipment, but it also sends out several thousand letters to Fairmont residents each year soliciting funds to purchase additional equipment. They recently purchased two new Hurst tools, otherwise known as Jaws of Life, because the department needed upgraded equipment to better cut into today’s vehicles. The fire department also contributes regularly to several youthoriented causes, such as CER sports, the post-prom party and Dollars for Scholars.

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place where we can help do good,� she said. “We’re always looking for new ideas,� Borkenhagen added. “We have a new group of people just join, so hopefully maybe they’ll bring something to the table.� Both women agree there are benefits to being involved in community service. “You get to feel good about yourself by giving back to somebody who needs your help,� Borkenhagen said. “If we don’t give back to our community, our community has nothing to give back to us,� Bay added. Another benefit to being involved in a group like the Fairmont Women of Today is making new friends. In fact, the main reason Bay joined the

group was for fellowship. “There’s no price you can put on friendship,� she said. “It’s a $50 membership fee per year, and the friends that I have made from that $50 membership by far outweigh any cost I would ever have.� It’s great to be able to meet people of different ages and from different backgrounds and to enjoy their friendship, Bay said. “I look at Joanna (Borkenhagen) and I think she’s my best friend now, and it’s like I’m so blessed because our paths would’ve never have crossed.� To contact the Fairmont Women of Today about an idea for a community service project, or to inquire about membership, visit the group’s Facebook page or send an email to FairmontWT@mnwt.org


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