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Nucleus

A Faculty Commons Quarterly Volume 5

Summer 2014

NUCLEUS: A FACULTY COMMONS QUARTERLY

Volume 5 | Summer 2014

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N EW YOR K CIT Y COLLEGE OF T ECH NOLOG Y of the City University of New York

Russell K. Hotzler President

A Center for Teaching, Learning, Scholarship and Service

Bonne August Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Julia Jordan, Acting Director Avril Miller, College Assistant

Miguel Cairol Vice President for Administration and Finance

Assessment and Institutional Research Tammie Cumming, Director Raymond Moncada, Assistant Director Rachel Ng, Assessment Analyst Yi Chen, Institutional Analyst Olga Batyr, Survey Services Liaison Albert Li, Research Assistant

Faculty Commons

Marcela Katz Armoza Vice President for Enrollment and Student Affairs Gilen Chan Special Counsel/Legal Affairs Designee Compliance and Diversity Officer

Office of Sponsored Programs Barbara Burke, Director Patty Barba Gorkhover, Associate Director Eleanor Bergonzo, Assistant Director

Stephen M. Soiffer Special Assistant to the President/ Institutional Advancement

Grants Outreach Coordinator 2013-2014 Professor Pa Her

Pamela Brown Associate Provost

US Department of Education Title V A Living Laboratory Charlie Edwards, Project Manager

Karl Botchway Dean, School of Arts and Sciences

National Science Foundation I3 Cinda Scott, Project Manager Coordinator of Integrated STEM Projects

Kevin Hom Dean, School of Technology and Design David Smith Interim Dean, School of Professional Studies Carol Sonnenblick Dean, Division of Continuing Education

Design Team Professor Anita Giraldo, Artistic Director Kevin Rajaram, Web Master Angelica Corrao, Matthew Joseph, Mandy Mei, Dorian Valentine, Eva Zelarayan, Designers

Professional Development Advisory Council (PDAC)

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Isaac Barjis Ian Beilin Nadia Benakli

Lynda Dias Mary Sue Donsky Aida Egues

Pa Her Louise Hoffman Neil Katz

John McCullough Djafar Mynbaev Susan Phillip

Denise Whethers Gail Williams Adrianne Wortzel

Karen Bonsignore Candido Cabo Sanjoy Chakraborty Gwen Cohen-Brown Susan Davide

Boris Gelman Maria Giuliani Karen Goodlad Joel Greenstein George Guida

Paul King Darya Krym Janet Liou-Mark Karen Lundstrem Zory Marantz

Estela Rojas Walied Samarrai Ryoya Terao Shauna Vey Debbie Waksbaum

Farrukh Zia Pamela Brown, Chair

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Contents

Summer 14

“ Shooting at the

04 Intersecting Circles

Bonne August

‘magic hour,’ the

05 Introducing So Lan Liang

hour after sunset,

Julia Jordan

06 Perkins

Patty Barba Gorkhover

08 Comparative Perspectives on Health, Illness, and Healing Mary Sue Donsky 10 Faculty Commons Design Team

Julia Jordan and Barbara Burke

11 2014 PSC CUNY Research Awardees

I have used the color of the light to make the waterfront look as artificial as it is while also showing the peace and beauty to be found there.” Robin Michals Advertising Design and Graphic Arts Department

Summer Nights Sunset Park Cover– Photograph by Robin Michals

E d itors, Barbara Burke and Julia Jordan | Desig ner, Matthew Joseph | Pr i nt i ng, Digital Imaging Cente r at Cit y Tech NUCLEUS: A FACULTY COMMONS QUARTERLY

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Intersecting Circles Public Private Partnerships Foster Real-world Learning Bonne August

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hen I speak to groups of faculty, I often refer to the many intersecting circles that surround and inform our work at City Tech—among them are the disciplines that our faculty represent; the industry and community partners who advise degree programs, help nurture students through internships and clinical placements, and eventually employ City Tech graduates; the government agencies and philanthropic organizations that provide funds to support improvements to current programs, as well as new ventures; and of course, the City University of New York and our sister colleges. This issue of Nucleus highlights a selection of these vital circles. Academic disciplines and professional fields of the faculty will be enriched through the work of forty-six full-time faculty members awarded PSC-CUNY grants this year for research and scholarship in their areas, announced on page 11. Over fifty civic and community partners will host the one hundred-plus CUNY Service Corps members representing City Tech this year; program manager So Lan Liang is featured on page 5. As described beginning on page 6, funding from the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins IV) provides City Tech with nearly $1 million annually in federal noncompetitive postsecondary funding via the New York State Education Department (NYSED) for program and institutional efforts focused on associate degree students. Several grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), like the one described on page 8, have enabled faculty in technical and professional fields to work with their colleagues 4

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in the humanities to make important connections for their students between study in their majors and the tools provided by the humanities to frame and address the big questions that govern how their work will be done and what its impact will be. Each of these ventures echoes others in process at City Tech. Our great and essential challenge as college and university educators lies in forging meaningful connections among these disparate circles and weaving them together to create an integrated whole. As we end one academic year and launch the next, I want to offer a valedictory, a heartfelt message of congratulation and farewell, to several people who have made significant contributions to the

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Faculty Commons and to City Tech, and are now moving on to the next stages of their careers: The members of the Faculty Commons Design Team who have earned their BTech degrees, whose work is acknowledged on p. 10 in this issue: Kevin Rajaram, Matthew Joseph, Angelica Corrao, and Eva Zelarayan. Raymond Moncada, Analyst on the AIR team and City Tech alum, who has taken a position in industry. Dr. Cinda Scott, project manager for the National Science Foundation (NSF) I-cubed grant, who has moved on to an exciting new position, directing the School for Field Studies site in Panama.


PHOTO BY KEVIN R A JAR AM

Introducing So Lan Liang Program Manager of CUNY Service Corps at City Tech

S

o Lan Liang is the Program Manager for City Tech’s CUNY Service Corps program, which aims to promote a culture of civic engagement by mobilizing students to work on projects that have a strong social impact on the community. While making a meaningful difference through service, students also gain realworld work experience and increase their transferable skills in leadership, confidence building, knowledge of social issues, and the landscape of community-based organizations. So Lan Liang has served as program director for more than a decade for award-winning programs that promoted the social well-being of our most vulnerable and underserved populations including the unemployed and underemployed, minority entrepreneurs, new immigrants, the ill and at-risk families in NYC. Her work has received recognition of excellence from the NYC Department of Health

and Mental Hygiene, the American Red Cross and the US Census Bureau. She also provided social work field supervision for undergraduate and graduate students from universities including Columbia University, CUNY, National Taiwan University and Macau University of Science and Technology. She received her BA from Yale College and her MSW from Columbia University School of Social Work. So Lan is an active member of the Board of Directors for the Association of Asian American Yale Alumni. As a licensed social worker, So Lan is inspired by the cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead who said, “If we are to achieve a richer culture, rich in contrasting values, we must recognize the whole gamut of human potentialities, and so weave a less arbitrary social fabric, one in which each diverse human gift will find a fitting place.”

City Tech Faculty Selected to Lead Service Projects Alexander Aptekar Architectural Technology Department Creating the DURA Dwelling USDOE Solar Decathlon Soyeon Cho Health & Human Services Department Research and Field Study on the Impact of the Affordable Care Act: Facilitating Access to Healthcare for Low-Income Elderly Minority Sean O’Brien Construction Management and Civil Engineering Technology Department PassiveHouse for a Sustainable NYC Diana Samaroo Chemistry Department and Melanie Villatoro Construction Management and Civil Engineering Technology Department STEM Education Outreach Program

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Perkins

A faculty resource for enhancing the technical skills of associate-level students. Patty Barba Gorkhover The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins IV) provides federal non-competitive postsecondary funding via the New York State Education Department (NYSED). City Tech receives approximately $1M annually to support career and technical education (CTE) for associate degree students. Perkins IV aims to improve students’ technical skills, credential, certificate, and degree attainment, retention, transfer, career placement, and non-traditional participation. The Perkins guidelines specifically mandate support of Workforce Development Programs and support to address the needs of students with disabilities.

The Perkins Process

Early each May I receive phone calls from faculty asking about submitting a Perkins proposal. Unfortunately it’s too late, I say, I’m finalizing the full proposal now. Then I explain the “Perkins process.” Provost Bonne August sets the deadlines each year in consultation with the deans. Deans 6

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direct department chairs to request ideas or pre-proposals from faculty, who submit them in early March. The Provost and deans review the projects and decide which ones will be included in the final proposal.

The Proposal

What is ultimately included in the final proposal is usually much different from what a faculty member has submitted. The full Perkins IV proposal is a collection of assurances, plans, lists, amounts and projects. The heart of the Perkins proposal consists of major efforts. City Tech currently has six major efforts, and there is a major effort for each of our three schools. Each school’s effort often contains at least four projects. Each annual Perkins proposal consists of about twenty separate projects. A faculty member may submit a two or three page preproposal or follow a template form but a single major effort with four projects will be three pages long. I condense

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and combine multiple projects to create most final major efforts. The elements of a Perkins major effort are the core items that should be considered in any grant proposal. Each project must identify a student need, define objectives aligned with Perkins aims, include activities and a timeline to achieve these objectives, and present evaluation measures with baselines and outcomes. For example, in our 2013-2014 proposal Computer Systems Technology indicated that student retention rates were quite low (40% – demonstrated need) and that students in CST 1100 and 1101 would be better prepared if provided with tutoring and mentoring activities. The objective was to increase retention, and the outcome was to have at least 45% retention rate for participating students.

Our Projects

Perkins IV funding has supplemented many initiatives at City Tech; some have been very specific, reaching a relatively small number of students such as a clinical tutoring for Dental Hygiene students, and some have a larger scope such as math tutoring provided by the Learning Center.


A Blueprint for Transforming Career and Technical Education which proposed changes to reauthorize the Perkins act based on four core principles: Alignment: To shift basis of funding allocation on future market labor needs. Collaboration: Require stronger partnerships between industry, secondary and post-secondary educational institutions. Accountability: Improvement and alignment of measurable outcomes Innovation: Reform at state level to ensure success at local level http://http://goo.gl/uKkRU At the state level, NYSED Perkins guidelines did not change for 2014-2015 though this is considered a renewal year. They anticipate changes next year from US Department of Education once federal legislation is passed. FACULT Y AT WORK. PHOTO BY EVA ZEL AR AYAN

For several years Perkins has helped the Nursing Department maintain an up-to-date Simulation Lab. Nursing students can practice administering care on simulated people (robots) that are programmed with various medical conditions. Perkins funding is currently supporting the use of standardized patients or actors in the Simulation Lab. Actors are used as patients and family members to improve student communication skills and faculty have a baseline for assessing student skills in handling live situations. Advertising Design and Graphic Arts used Perkins funding to subscribe to Lynda.com, a website that provides instructional videos on a variety of software programs. Students are unable to learn all the nuances of a software program in the classroom and access allows students to learn at their own pace. Perkins funding purchased licenses for student use and its initial success resulted in the College continuing to provide students with access to the website. For several years Professor Satyanand Singh of the Mathematics Department has been leading a drop-in lab with

two student experts available to tutor associate degree Computer Science students. It began as a one day a week lab on Fridays and has expanded to having four students work five days a week during the semester. Student pass rates in Pre-Calculus, Calculus I and II, and Statistics increased aproximately 9% compared to students who met with student experts in 2012-2013. Professor Janet Liou-Mark noted that “support for second-year students has resulted in more students passing Pre-Calculus and Calculus and more positive attitudinal changes towards mathematics.” She has coordinated group peer-led tutoring which has “helped undergraduates to empower their peers in foundational mathematics courses necessary to succeed in STEM fields”.

Legislative Status of Perkins

The federal Perkins IV legislation enacted in 2006 required each institution to write a five-year plan in anticipation that the legislation would be reauthorized. We are currently in the seventh year of our Perkins five-year plan and the federal Perkins legislation has not been reauthorized. In 2012, the US Department of Education released a report, Investing in America’s Future

I have been monitoring the latest news at the Association for Career and Technical Education website www. acteonline.org on the Perkins legislation as I write this article. On June 11, 2014 the Full Senate Appropriations Committee was to review and amend the funding bill that included Perkins since it had been approved by the subcommittee. On June 16, 2014 it was reported that the bill has been “indefinitely postponed for consideration for Fiscal Year 2015.” If Perkins legislation is reauthorized for Fiscal Year 2016, then we could see significant changes for funding for fall semester 2016 or later. Since the state fiscal year is July 1st to June 30th and the federal fiscal year is October 1st to September 30th, the effects will be slow. It will also take time for the US Department of Education to amend guidelines for the states and then more time for NYSED to interpret federal legislation and guidelines into state guidelines and align them with statewide education plans.

Patty Barba Gorkhover, Associate Director of Sponsored Programs, has coordinated the Perkins process for the past seven years.

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Comparative Perspectives on Health, Illness, and Healing NEH funding has enabled faculty to explore medicine and the healing arts as expressions of cultural beliefs and value systems that have varied widely among world cultures over the course of history. Mary Sue Donsky

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n spring semester 2013, twelve City Tech Faculty Fellows embarked on a remarkable eighteen month exploration of Comparative Perspectives on Health, Illness and Healing supported by a Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic Serving Institutions grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Unusually, the grant had been sought by faculty in allied health care professions (rather than Humanities) who aimed to collaborate with faculty in the Humanities to examine ways to enhance students’ understanding of cultural differences among patients and clients. The seminars were organized around five topics each facilitated by different Fellows who were responsible for choosing readings, leading discussions, and inviting external scholars to speak. The topics included: • Introduction to the Tools of the Humanities •

Systems of Medical Knowledge

Portrayals of Illness in World Art

Cultural Interpretations of Addiction

Religious, Ethical, and Legal Meanings of Death across Cultures

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Every other week the Fellows met to conduct seminars on Eastern and Western approaches to health, disease, healing, and death with the goal of enabling them and thus their students to become more thoughtful, culturally competent, and ethically aware practitioners. In February 2013, the entire City Tech community was invited to an inaugural event featuring a keynote address by world- renowned physician, Dr. Rita Charon, a founding scholar in the field of Narrative Medicine . The Fellows later studied the technique of close reading as described in Dr. Charon’s seminal text, Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. Fortunately, one of the Fellows, Professor Roxana Delbene Grossi, studies under Dr. Charon at Columbia University, so she was able to provide expert guidance in close reading techniques. Other highlights included: • A seminar led by the poets Jim Stubenrauch and Joy Jacobson (co-founders of a program in Narrative Writing for Health Care Professionals at Hunter College) on healing through reflective writing. They asked the Fellows to write and read aloud about personal matters.

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RITA CHARON, FOUNDER AND E XECUTIVE DIREC TOR , THE NARR ATIVE MEDICINE PROGR AM

Through those exercises, the Fellows gained an understanding of the intense learning and healing that can emerge from sharing stories in supportive situations. •

Lively discussions of The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Ann Fadiman, a phenomenal account of a Hmong family and their worldview.

An examination of the history and laws on the right to die. Not only did the Fellows read the world famous Quinlan case, they also learned how to “brief” a case, with a legal method related to Dr. Charon’s system of close reading. The Fellows also explored The Death of Ivan Illych by Leo Tolstoy using the wonderful Readers Guide and Teachers Guide materials from NEH’s The Big Read website.


PHOTO BY DORIAN VALENTINE PHOTOGR APHER SHANNON TAGGART PRESENTS IMAGES OF A VODOU CEREMONY IN BROOKLYN.

Two tours of New York City museums—a tour led by Professor Mary Sue Donsky, project director, of the Metropolitan Museum of Art entitled “Honoring Decedents in Art Across Time and Cultures” during which Fellows viewed objects created to dispose of, commemorate, mourn, and connect with the dead and a tour led by external scholar, Harry Einhorn of the Rubin Museum of Art, to study art of the Himalayas related to health, illness, healing, and death. A fascinating presentation by external scholar, Dr. Bert Hansen, on photographic portrayals of medically-related topics over the history of Life Magazine, and a discussion of Dr. Hansen’s book, Picturing Medical Professionals from Pastuer to Polio: A History of Mass Media Images and Popular Attitudes as well as other images provided by Faculty Fellow Sandra Cheng. An examination of Ayurvedic medicine and a listening session devoted to rock songs related to addiction and death.

The Fellows sponsored two culminating events. The first, open to the entire

CUNY community, was entitled “End of Life Matters. Cultural Competence and Dying”. This event, facilitated by Dr. Christine Thorpe, chair of the Department of Health and Human Services, featured two prominent external scholars. Dr. Charlton McIlwain of New York University, spoke about his book, Death in Black and White: Death, Ritual and Family Ecology, which details his research into African American and European American funeral homes and mourning rituals. Shannon Taggart, a Brooklyn-based photographer, discussed her photographs of Vodou ceremonies as well as her spirit photographs. The Fellows also sponsored a Sherry Hour and Roundtable to which all faculty and staff were invited. This event featured a talk by Professor Benjamin Shepard on the importance of cultural competence to health professionals as well as a roundtable discussion where Fellows discussed ways in which the grant has informed their work. The generosity of the NEH has enabled a number of Fellows to develop course modules, activities and assignments inspired by their engagement with the grant topics. Other Fellows have written papers and book chapters

and have presented on the grant work at national conferences. Several faculty were so enthused by the grant experience that they are drafting entire new multidisciplinary courses to offer our students opportunities to become more culturally competent practitioners using the tools and methods of the Humanities. The cohort of NEH Fellows includes: Gwen Cohen Brown (Dental Hygiene), Sandra Cheng (Humanities), Mery Diaz (Health and Human Services), Mary Sue Donsky (Law and Paralegal Studies), Aida Egues (Nursing), Barbara Grumet, (Dean Emerita), Lisa Fischer (Social Science), Roxana Delbene Grossi (Humanities), Laina Karthikeyan (Biological Sciences), Elaine Leinung (Nursing), Kara Pasner (Vision Care Technology), Denise Scannell and Shauna Vey (Humanities). You may visit the NEH Fellows OpenLab site http://openlab.citytech. cuny.edu/nehhealth2013 for more information on the Fellows’ activities.

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LEFT TO RIGHT: EVA ZEL AR AYAN, ANGELIC A CORR AO, MANDY MEI, ANITA GIR ALDO, JULIA JORDAN, MAT THEW JOSEPH, DORIAN VALENTINE , AVRIL MILLER AND KEVIN R A JAR AM | JUNE 2014

Faculty Commons Design Team Julia Jordan and Barbara Burke

A

resident Faculty Commons Design Team composed of students from Computer Systems Technology (CST) and Advertising Design and Graphic Arts (ADGA) Departments was established as an innovative inhouse apprenticeship program when the Commons was founded in 2009. Successive cohorts of able students have been on the job five days a week to create original professionalquality print and web-based visual communications that announce and document faculty initiatives including Black Solidarity Day, Women in STEM, the Literary Arts Festival, and National Endowment for the Humanities sponsored seminars such as Comparative Perspectives on Health, Illness, and Healing.

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Nucleus: A Faculty Commons Quarterly, now in its fifth year, is entirely designed by students. The Design Team is fortunate to have its Artistic Director Professor Anita Giraldo (ADGA), herself a noted artist, guide their hands, refine their concepts, and train their design “eye� to become ever more subtle, individual, and imaginative. The team has produced a steady stream of striking visual materials that broaden the reach of faculty scholarship by creating wider audiences within the college community for their work. We are especially proud to recognize four members of the team for their dedicated efforts over their time at

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City Tech. They are our June 2014 BTech graduates: Kevin Rajaram, web master and designer, Matthew Joseph, web and print designer, Angelica Corrao, illustrator, and Eva Zelarayan, photographer and videographer. You have left an indelible imprint, set a high standard for future design teams, and helped give City Tech a sophisticated visual identity through your combination of technical skills and artistic imagination. We say Good Luck and Thank You for your work and for the comaradarie and joy that you have brought to those around you.


2014 PSC CUNY RESEARCH AWARDEES Awardee

Department

Title

Viviana Acquaviva Nathan Astrof Gulgun Bayaz Ozturk Ian Beilin Esteban Beita

PHYSICS BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SCIENCE LIBRARY ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY ENGLISH PHYSICS MATHEMATICS MATHEMATICS BUSINESS HUMAN SERVICES ENGLISH CHEMISTRY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS MATHEMATICS PHYSICS ENGLISH ENGLISH SOCIAL SCIENCE PHYSICS COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY ADVERTISING DESIGN/ GRAPHICS ARTS MATHEMATICS ENGLISH MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENGLISH PHYSICS MATHEMATICS SOCIAL SCIENCE COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENGLISH MATHEMATICS BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ENGLISH HUMAN SERVICES MATHEMATICS BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ADVERTISING DESIGN/ GRAPHIC ARTS HUMANITIES LIBRARY LIBRARY PHYSICS COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENTERTAINMENT TECHNOLOGY SOCIAL SCIENCE

Galaxy Classification in HETDEX using Machine Learning Quantitative Analysis of Taste Receptor Signalling Wealth Effects of Job Displacement Revisited Librarians and Resistance in Germany from Weimar to the Wall Traditional Japanese Architecture Design Principles and Their Application in Contemporary Architecture Pedagogies of Happiness: What Self-Help, Positive Psychology, and Positive Education Teach about Well-Being Bose-Einstein Condensation and Superfluidity of Cavity Photons in Molecular (or Quantum Dots) Medium Probabilistic Models in Mathematical Biology Principal Subspaces of Admissible Modules for Symplectic Affine Lie Algebras Retirement and Stock Market Evaluation Racial/Ethnic and Geographic Disparities in Mental Health Care A Usability Investigation of OpenLab Best Practices Among Faculty and Staff Users Mechanical Milling Approaches to Graphite-based Supercapacitor Electrode Materials Lie-Yamaguti Structure on the sl(3)-module V(4,4) Top quarks and other massive colored particles at the Large Hadron Collider Hilbert Coefficients and Reduction Numbers Electromagnetic Field Localization Using Graphene-based Nanoantennas Virtue at the Coffee House: Poetry and Community in Contemporary America Constellations: Formations and Reformations in American Literature Hmong American Women’s Identity and Socialization Strategies in the United States Turbulence of Exciton and Polariton Bose-Einstein Condensates in Semiconductor Heterostructures Quantum Searching Application in Search Based Software Engineering Re-Thinking Figure-Ground Compositions with Digital Technology Permutation polynomials over finite fields Pete the Cat: The Musical Assistant Size segregation of municipal solid waste during mixing processes in a waste-to-energy (WTE) combustion chamber City of Print: New York and the Periodical Press from the Antebellum Era to the Digital Age Next-to-Leading-Order Corrections to Higgs Boson Production at the Large Hadron Collider String Topology for Mapping Spaces Elderly Hungarian Women’s Reinterpretation of Post Socialist Change A Mobile Cloud Robotics Architecture for Smart Home Environments “Passports Please!,” Submission, Identity, and Globalization at Global Airports Local Cohomology and Higher Local Multiplicities Modulation of Neurodevelopment Through Cytokine Interventions in Maternal Immune Activation Model of Psychiatric Disease Principles of Applied Lexicology: A Historical Anthology Global Brooklyn Research Project Limit Points of Nathanson’s Lambda Sequences Using Genomic and Phylogenetic Approaches to Elucidate Which Came First, the Pathogenicity Island or the Phage? InsideOUT House : A Binaural Sound Installation Theatres of Absence: Seville, 1248-1550 The Usability of a Responsive Designed Library Website Library and Information Science Education in the World Community: A Comparative Study Investigations in Gauge/Gravity Duality Self-Optimization for Random Access in LTE Network Redefining Implementations of the Factor Oracle Automaton for Automatic Music Improvisation Geographies of Servitude: Black Experiences of Industrialization in Philadelphia, 1830-1880

Jill Belli Oleg Berman Mariya Bessonov Corina Calinescu Jeirong Cheng Soyeon Cho Patrick Corbett L. Jay Deiner Andrew Douglas Andrea Ferroglia Laura Ghezzi Ilya Grigorenko George Guida Caroline Hellman Pa Her German Kolmakov Xiangdong Li Joel Mason Ariane Masuda Suzanne Miller Masato Nakamura Mark Noonan Giovanni Ossola Kate Poirier Lisa Pope Fischer Jose Reyes Alamo Sean Scanlan Hans Schoutens Jeremy Seto Rebecca Shapiro Benjamin Shepard Satyanand Singh Davida Smyth Jenna Spevack Christopher Swift Junior Tidal Teresa Tobin Justin Vazquez-Poritz Yu Wang Adam Wilson Geoff Zylstra

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Nucleus Volume 5 Summer 2014  

Nucleus Volume 5 A Faculty Commons Quarterly