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I began in Genesis and didn’t stop until I read to the end. As I read, I began to notice a difference between the sermons I heard and what I saw in the Scriptures themselves, a difference between how the psalmists spoke and the songs we sang each week. Every week, I heard only about things I had to do. But the Bible also kept telling me what God had already done. My books and the sermons I heard focused on my need to be brave, be committed, seek justice, and do good. All those things are in the Bible. The Bible, however, also kept showing me how God was rescuing, redeeming, restoring, and doing good on my behalf. Scripture said He would empower me to do what I could never do in my own strength. The problem was that I believed the lie of moralism—the belief that the chief implication of the gospel is behavior modification.

I was hearing the Bible taught as a collection of disconnected stories and principles to help me live as a good person—but not as a changed one.” —Aaron Armstrong, brand manager of The Gospel Project I was hearing the Bible taught as a collection of disconnected stories and principles to help me live as a good person—but not as a changed one. I was trying to earn God’s love instead of obeying Him because of His love for me in Christ (1 John 4:9-11). I thought I could work up enough willpower to obey instead of trusting in Christ’s finished work and the Spirit’s power. I was told to slay my giants with a

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Facts & Trends • 37

Facts & Trends -Spring 2018 - SOAR  

Facts & Trends is designed to help pastors and other Christian leaders navigate the issues and trends impacting the church by providing info...

Facts & Trends -Spring 2018 - SOAR  

Facts & Trends is designed to help pastors and other Christian leaders navigate the issues and trends impacting the church by providing info...