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hear from women who were looking for a platform rather than a mission. “Some were trying to tell God what to do,” she said. “Some weren’t even serving women in their own local church. “The women I knew and worked with never set out to be the next big thing,” Adams says. “They were just doing what God called them to do.” Leaders must spend time getting to know people they could potentially develop, she says. “We can’t be good at recruiting without knowing who would steward their leadership well.” Lack of succession planning is a prevalent problem among ministry leaders, says Nieuwhof. “There’s no success without a successor,” he says. “In my late 40s I asked myself, ‘Is what started with me going to end with me?’ I wanted the answer to be ‘no.’ I didn’t want things to just run; I wanted them to grow.” One way Nieuwhof says leaders sabotage their recruiting and developing efforts is an unwillingness to push other people into the spotlight. “They hang on because there’s nothing greater ahead of them,” he says. “They fear if they allow someone else to lead, their moment is over. And if we look at that in daylight, it shows up as a spiritual problem. Leaders have to trust God for their future and get over the insecurity—be more openhanded with their leadership. When they grip their roles too tightly, it keeps a lot of other leaders off the platform and out of the seats they should be in.”

The goal should not be to train people for what we have for them but for what God has for them. We need to train and equip people in here, so Christ can be magnified out there. In this way, the church should be an incubator.” —Kevin Peck committed to the people you are investing in. That’s a fairly self-obvious thing to assert; it’s another thing to actually do it.” Many years later and many miles apart, Peck and Wussow still maintain their relationship, and Peck continues to encourage and mentor Wussow from a distance. “I don’t think I would have had the courage to take the big career risks I’ve taken if I didn’t have that sense of confidence Kevin spoke into me over time. He encouraged me to think broadly about my impact on earth,” Wussow says. “I’m not doing anything remotely close to what I thought I would be doing. And I wouldn’t trade it for anything.” JOY ALLMOND (@JoyAllmond) is managing editor of Facts & Trends.

Wear out your welcome For leaders who develop others, it’s easy to see a mentorship as a “project” with start and end dates. But investing in people requires a long-term commitment. “I can’t think of a time or single instance when (Peck) canceled our group meetings for any reason,” says Wussow. “We always met. You have to have a total commitment to your people. They’re going to flake on you—people will come and go—but you have to be consistent and FACTSANDTRENDS.NET/SOAR

DIG DEEPER • Designed to Lead by Eric Geiger and Kevin Peck •P  ipeline: Recruit. Develop. Repeat. Visit myleadershippipeline.com Available at LifeWay Christian Stores and LifeWay.com

Facts & Trends • 17

Facts & Trends -Spring 2018 - SOAR  

Facts & Trends is designed to help pastors and other Christian leaders navigate the issues and trends impacting the church by providing info...

Facts & Trends -Spring 2018 - SOAR  

Facts & Trends is designed to help pastors and other Christian leaders navigate the issues and trends impacting the church by providing info...