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magazine Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery

Fall Fashion

Southern comfort meets city living

A decaying abode for paranormal activity

Thanksgiving dinner guide

Give thanks and indulge without quitting your diet cold turkey

Thankful for all things fall issue 9 Oct/Nov 2011


The

Facets Founders answer: What are you thankful for?

Brittany Abeijon Shot caller and sanity keeper

For awhile, the number of family members around my table during the holidays grew smaller each year. While their absences are so dearly missed, I’m thankful for the few wonderful people who are present not just at my table, but in my life. This year was a great year for me. I dove into my dream headfirst, and I found an amazingly talented group of people to help me do so. Together we created Facets, and I’m grateful for those people and their passion for this magazine every single day. I reached my mid-twenties. I began living with my boyfriend. I surprised myself with courage by braving the dentist nine times. Do I love wine and shoes and pumpkin coffee? Yes, oh yes, I do. But I’m not thankful for any of those things. I’m thankful for what I experienced so far this year and for the people who supported me through it all.

In addition to being thankful for my family and friends for being the most wonderful parts of my life, every day I am awed by the world’s ability to adapt to changing circumstances. During my recent trip to China, I visited a rural community in the Northwestern part of the country. Resting on the outskirts of the Kunlun Mountains, people in this part of the world have lives completely different from Western society. They live in a cold climate. Fruit and vegetables are scarce. Very few people own a car, and most clothing and grocery stores are hours away, accessible only by two-lane highways that wind through the mountains. This experience really made me understand how lucky I am to have lived in cities where just about anything is steps away. As we approach the holiday season and move past one of the most horrific attacks against New York and citizens of the entire world, we should appreciate our amazing ability to adapt to our surroundings. Whether you live in one of the world’s biggest cities or most remote villages, I think everyone can be thankful for our ability to adapt to the conditions of our continuously evolving world.

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Tom Salek Protector of AP Style and grammar


So many incredible things have happened to me in the last year that I don’t think I could even scratch the surface with one paragraph. If life is a series of moments and if life is short, there is not a moment to waste to be thankful for each one of them and live in them completely. I think part of being thankful is when you realize you’re not really that great to begin with, but great things happen to you anyway. These moments, people and experiences come to you and no matter how sorry of a human being you are, they stick around to support, love and encourage. You might not have realized it, or have had anything to give back in return, except to appreciate that moment. I am thankful for the chance to live and be that moment to other people. Through my faith, my loving and encouraging spouse, my supportive friends and family and my creative outlets (Facets being a key one!), I get to live every second of my days in constant gratitude and genuine appreciation of the world around me. I couldn’t ask for more!

Jay Fubler Harvey Director of deez nuts and bolts

Rachel Kosmal Catcher and releaser of beautiful things

When it comes to this season, there’s always the usual list of friends and family for whom to give thanks. Hopefully we’re all giving thanks to them on a regular basis. They are your core. Your heart. Life would be so difficult without them. In addition to my core, I always like to include others: fledgling musicians playing on the edge, practitioners of critical thinking, those who will sing in public just because, anyone who appreciates the true powers of laughter, non-profit organizations that truly are helping the world, those who are willing to agree to disagree (and those who realize that ‘agreeing to disagree’ isn’t always enough), those who live their lives deep within their passion, the vibrant souls to which we get drawn, those who share their voice and minds freely, those who give a damn, and those who love without reservation.

This has been an ever-changing year for me both personally and professionally. Some awesome things and some not so awesome. But I firmly believe things happen for a reason, and it is this belief that keeps me going. No matter what changes or obstacles I am facing, my family and friends have always remained constant in my life. For this, I will always be thankful. Thank you for understanding me and my odd ways, and I’ll be forever grateful for your support, no matter how crazy the dream or idea is. Also, with the recent 10-year anniversary of 9/11, I have to take this opportunity to say thank you to the first responders and armed forces. Thank you for making our country safe and putting your own lives on the line to do so.

Lynn W. Conway Lady behind the lens volume 2

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C ntributors Tony Calderala Beer connoisseur Belvidere, Ill. Writer

Jasmine Myers Health food junkie and blogatarian Portland, Ore. Writer

Keith Kosmal Snap happy Chicago Photographer

Melissa Griffin Layouts, typography and borders, oh my! Syracuse, N.Y. Lead Graphic Designer

Bridget Maiellaro Five-year vet of the magazine industry Chicago Contributing Editor

? Do you want to work for us? email:

jobs@thefacetsmag.com

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Branden & Jenn Johnson The king and queen of costumes Oak Forest, Ill. Writers

Renee Mailhiot Mastering the art of "professional" tweeting Frankfort, Ill. Writer

Kathy Khazanova Not so fresh off the boat Northbrook, Ill. Writer

Haley Beenenga Fashion enthusiast, landlord of ad space Chicago Advertising Coordinator

Jessica Schanberg Adores Garamond Chicago Graphic Designer

Ashley Johnston Virtual stylist and graphic guru Westborough, Mass. Graphic Designer

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Contents Editor’s note An ode to pumpkin-flavored everything

Facets Feedback You spoke, and we blushed

Party Pics Photos from the Facets Launch Party in Chicago

FASHION Southern comfort meets city living Two Chicagoans who hail from the South show off trendy looks for fall

Here’s the trick to creating a contest-winning costume

October / November 2011 THANKFUL FOR ALL THINGS FALL issue

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Treat yourself to a unique DIY costume that works for any Halloween celebration

The art of thrift The thrill of searching for impossibly good deals at your local thrift and consignment shops

FOOD Facets’ guide to Thanksgiving dinner Give thanks and indulge without quitting your diet cold turkey

Pass the peas, please A mother’s journey to educating the world on animal-free eating

HEALTH/FITNESS Nine around-the-kitchen workouts Put your rear in gear while preparing, cooking, cleaning up 6

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LIFE/TRAVEL Did I just eat chicken feet? Tales from a culture-shocked American touring China

Life before coming to America Recollections from my family’s life in the Soviet Union

Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery, a decaying abode for paranormal activity

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Hidden from view, this Chicagoland graveyard is regarded as one of the most haunted places in the U.S.

ENTERTAINMENT Raise your glass to celebrate beer this fall

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Beer tastings like Rockford’s Screw City Beer Festival let locals sample seasonal brews

Ax the traditional Halloween movies and take a stab at these

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Seven spooky titles to scream to your friends about

DATING/RELATIONSHIPS What’s age got to do with it? A look at whether similarity in age is more important than other factors in romantic relationships

TECHNOLOGY ‘If my boss ever figures out how to print in landscape, I might be out of a job’ via Twitter, 1 minute ago

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Simple social media rules for the blurred lines between personal and professional

Founders’ favorites What we’re loving this fall

Social media fridge Socialize with us!

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One woman’s love for pumpkin-flavored everything

A

ugust hurriedly passes each year, leaving our mouths filled with the fresh taste of summer. But I happily forget the sweaty afternoons and humid hairdos in anticipation of the day that officiates the cooler, crisper season. The day pumpkin coffee surfaces in all its fall-flavored glory. Last year, I made an unequivocal realization regarding my pumpkin obsession: I uncovered something better than the widely adored Pumpkin Spice Latte. Starbucks’ seasonal drink designates the beginning of fall to many, but to me it grew to represent hidden calories and wasted dollars. After learning Dunkin’ Donuts sells pumpkin-flavored coffee, I decided to try out their version of liquefied fall. It was love at first sip. A healthier and cheaper option, DD’s medium pumpkin coffee (with light cream) has about 200 fewer calories and is $2 cheaper than Starbucks. But it’s not just coffee, you see. I am forever thankful for pumpkinflavored everything. Each year, September stirs up rich pumpkin cravings within me—pumpkin muffins, pumpkin and chocolate chip bread, pumpkin spice ice cream, pumpkin ravioli in a brown butter sauce, and one of my personal favorites, pumpkin beer. A beautiful experience for all your senses, I’m no stranger to hoarding pumpkinscented candles or buying tiny pumpkins to litter my apartment. I even find joy in just looking at them. Sometimes I’ll get a little too excited and tack a “g” on the end of the word so it reads pumpking. Be it muscle memory or Freudian slip, I can’t be alone in frequenting this typo. I’ll usually hesitate a moment, thinking maybe it’s more fitting spelled that way, confident in its superior reign over other seasonal flavors. If you’re anything like me in your obvious respect for all things fall, flip to our “Guide to Thanksgiving dinner” on page 30. This 16-page spread presents several traditional dishes along with their healthy counterparts to let you decide if you’re going to mind your mouthfuls or let yourself indulge during the food-fixated holiday. I’ll give you one apparent guess as to what my least favorite day is each year. It’s the day when pumpkin’s seasonal neighbor moves in for the winter months—the day the peppermint mocha rears its choco-minty head and sends my pumpking packing. Until next year, pumpkin-flavored everything. I’ll miss you. Pumpkin’s biggest fan, Photography by Lynn W. Conway Illustration by Rachel Kosmal

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Facets Feedback You spoke, and we blushed. Through Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr or email, here’s how you responded to our August/September issue.

“1,000 props to the amazing team over at @facetsmag - check out their premier issue!” @Booth25Events via Twitter “Happiness is sitting in my window seat, drinking coffee, and reading @facetsmag before going out and seizing the day. #carpediem” @marykatenorton via Twitter

“I loved your first issue. Very ‘real’ content and a fun read! Kudos to you all!” kimbaland via Tumblr

“Congratulations on the launch!! As much as I love the interior design and fashion based online magazines, it’s refreshing to see one that focuses on other topics as well and is so budget friendly! I’m really looking forward to seeing more from the Facets team.” littlelg via Tumblr

“Great Job!! You should all be very proud!!” Laura Norkute McCormack via Facebook

“Amazing first issue— LOVE it!!” Paige Westerberg via Facebook

“Every morning that I have an extra bit of time, I love taking a minute to click through your magazine! I LOVE the model Q&A; it makes the articles so much more interesting! Also obsessed with the fact that this is a mag both le hubs and I can enjoy. (i.e. he will look like Paul McCartney and I will channel Bianca Jagger!) Can’t wait to see all of the fun stuff I’m sure will be in the next issue!” ambitionsmag via Tumblr

“I love it! Lots of variety, great photos, nice layout. Nice work, friends!!!” Betsy Tijerina via Facebook

“Honestly, I expected Facets to be good—but I wasn’t prepared for this! I was blown away by the quality of the content and the technology (still amazing to me). Absolutely beautiful. I’ll Twitter, e-mail and Facebook this as far and wide as my range reaches and encourage everyone I contact to do the same.” Robert Hays via email

“I’m so impressed and can’t wait to see what is to come. Just wanted to say great job and thanks for inspiring me to pursue what I dream of.” Lisa Lee via email

Love us? Have a way to make us better? We want to know! info@thefacetsmag.com volume 2

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Thank you to everyone who came out for the Facets Launch Party at District Bar in Chicago! Photography by: Keith Kosmal

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Ĺ” FASHION Ĺ”

Southern comfort meets city living Two Chicagoans who hail from the South show off trendy looks for fall

#Z#SJUUBOZ"CFJKPOĹ—1IPUPHSBQIZCZ-ZOO8$POXBZ

Facets prefers trendsetters over trend followers, favors rule breakers instead of safe dressers and gravitates toward individuals who march to the beat of their own fashionable drum. While searching for a few stylish locals, we found two Southerners who now call the second city their home. Here we showcase them in their own clothing and accessories as they give us their style rundown in a fashion Q&A. Read on to see who loves the 70s feel of flared jeans, who has a weakness for a great bow tie, and who proudly sports cowboy boots no matter what season it is. volume 2

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FASHION

Maura Lawson, 26, Corporate Relations Consultant Old Town, Chicago, Ill.

Q&A: 1. How would you describe your personal style? I would define my style as southern, soft and delicate. Being from Charleston, S.C., I grew up in sundresses and rainbow flip flops. 2. What is your favorite fall trend this season? My favorite fall trend this season: flared/bootlegged jeans making a come back! 3. Where are your favorite places to shop? I love to shop at cute boutiques in Chicago and Charleston, S.C. Love Handle with Care on Wells Street in Old Town Chicago and Teal in the Mount Pleasant Town Center in SC as well as Anthropology and Urban Outfitters. Oh, and I’m excited to go to the new Top Shop that just opened on Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 4. Where do you get style inspiration? I love reading fashion magazines like InStyle to see what all the new fuss is about. I also love looking at new makeup and hair ideas to go with your look. 5. What fashion rules do you love to break? White after Labor Day. Who doesn’t love winter white? Come on, people! 6. What fashion trend would you like to see make a comeback? I love the vintage/worn look from time to time... looks so comfy and soft. I wish my mom had kept some of her old clothes from when she was in her 20s how fun would that be to play around with? 7. What advice do you have for others on creating their own style? I feel like an outfit can look totally different on someone from day to day depending on their confidence level. You’ve got to own your look! 16

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FASHION

Wearing: Ŕ'MPSBMTDBSGŊCharming Charlie Ŕ-BDFESFTTŊZara Ŕ#MBDLUJHIUTŊBanana Republic Ŕ#MBDLCPPUJFTŊUrban Outfitters Ŕ#MBDLDMVUDIXJUIUBTTMFŊH&M Ŕ#SPO[FXSBQCSBDFMFUŊM2 Boutique in Chicago Ŕ(SBZEJBNPOEPWBMSJOHŊBanana Republic

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Matt Hemberger, 26, Architectural Designer Lakeview/Wrigleyville, Chicago, Ill.

Wearing: Ŕ4IJSUPolo Ŕ4XFBUFSMacy’s Ŕ#MB[FSHermes Ŕ8BUDIBreitling for Bentley Ŕ+FBOTSeven Ŕ#FMUHarvest Leather Designs - Aspen, Colo. Ŕ$PXCPZ#PPUTOrvis 18

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Q&A:

FASHION

1. How would you describe your personal style? I would define my style as refined equestrian. My family has been in the horse racing business for several years and having gone to school at the University of Kentucky, Keeneland Race Course was in our backyard. My two favorite times of the year are opening day at Keeneland and the Kentucky Derby. 2. What is your favorite fall trend this season? My favorite fall trend this season is my Barbour quilted jacket. It has both comfort and style. Perfect for fall days or even those cold winter nights. 3. Where are your favorite places to shop? A couple of my favorite places to shop include J. Crew and Ralph Lauren. They always have great new designs at reasonable prices. 4. Where do you get style inspiration? I would say I get my inspiration from the horse track. There are such a wide variety of styles there. Whether it’s just a polo button down and a pair of jeans or a new sports coat and a bow tie, you will always look stylish. 5. What fashion rules do you love to break? Wearing my cowboy boots. Doesn’t matter if I pair them with jeans or casual khakis, they are always with me. 6. What fashion trend would you like to see make a comeback? Bow ties. I think they are the perfect addition to any wardrobe and a great way to add some sophistication. 7. What advice do you have for others on creating their own style? Wear things that you like and are comfortable, not the newest or latest trend. Because if you feel good and are confident, then it doesn’t matter how much you paid for it or if it is “in style.” Your confidence will show. 9

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FASHION

Unfortunately, fall never sticks around for too long because winter always steps on its very fashionable coattails. In our next issue, we’ll bring you the latest winter fashion trends to stay warm and look hot. volume 2

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FASHION

Here’s the trick to creating a contest-winning costume Treat yourself to a unique DIY costume that works for any Halloween celebration By Branden and Jennifer Johnson

H

So you want to win a costume contest

alloween only comes once a year, so make it count. You can only dress up as a sexy nurse, a sexy stewardess, or a sexy vampire so many times before you find yourself labeled a one-trick pony. But putting together your own unique Halloween costume can be intimidating. That’s why we’re here.

The key to a great homemade costume is finding the right materials and the time to make it happen. This type of costume will probably take you the longest of the three to put together, but the payoff for your hard work will be worth it.

Each year, my wife Jennifer and I aspire to create our own costumes. There’s a costume for every occasion, and it can often be made on the cheap with things you have around the house. Let us offer some tips on putting together your perfect Halloween costume on a budget.

First, study the character you want to portray. Look at various photos of your subject matter and become familiar with all the details. You don’t want to pour your heart and soul into a costume only to have no one “get it.” These details include things like hairstyle, makeup and accessories.

The way we see it, there are three major types of costumes. They are:

Next, hit your closet (and your friends’ and family’s closets) to find any pieces that could function in your costume in a major way. For example, that bridesmaid dress you only wore once could come back from the dead as a zombie ball gown.

The “I want to win a costume contest” costume is elaborate and detailed, and your friends will marvel when they see you stride in wearing it. The “Outside of the box” costume may not be straightforward at all, and your friends might stare at you like you’re crazy; that is, until they make the connection. Then suddenly they’re praising you for how clever you are. The “I have to wear a costume to this work thing” costume. Ah, the workplace. For the sake of building camaraderie, managers often put together office parties during Halloween and may expect employees to dress in costume. But you don’t want to sit at your desk all day in a ball gown or stare at your computer screen through the silicone face of a former president, right? Let’s examine each of these in more detail. 22

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If you can’t find what you’re looking for through good-natured closet raiding, hit your local thrift store. They are never short on puffy shirts that make perfect pirate costumes. And you won’t feel bad cutting up or otherwise altering a shirt you spent $3 on. Once you have the essential items, you can begin the alteration phase. Lay out what you have and look for a way to make it work for your costume. For the zombie ball gown, you’ll need to take your scissors to it and create some tasteful tears. To achieve the proper appearance of filthiness, rub dark-colored powdered makeup into the fabric. Intentionally stain it with tea or coffee. For best results, do not wear the costume during this step, unless you’re willing to suffer real wounds for an extra level of believability.


FASHION

TIP “If you can’t find what you’re looking for through good-natured closet raiding, hit your local thrift store. They are never short on puffy shirts.”

It’s a good idea to keep some items on hand, a sort of Costume-Maker’s Toolkit: Ŕ Hot-glue gun Ŕ Velcro Ŕ Scissors Ŕ Ribbon/string Ŕ Small sewing kit Ŕ Safety pins

Here’s another example. Two years ago, Jennifer decided to go as Queen Elizabeth I. First, she SFTFBSDIFE2VFFO&MJ[BCFUIŊJOUIJTDBTF TIF spent a bit of time on Google Image search. Then she hit the closet. She already had a corset from a previous costume. She also found a long, white skirt that would work perfectly. Next, she traveled to Goodwill, where she found a choir robe, which provided her with a large enough canvas of fabric to create the necessary gown. She also purchased an old lacy tablecloth to wrap around the skirt to give it that extra bit of fancy. To round things off, she purchased a pair of long white gloves from a women’s accessory store in the mall. She sewed lace onto the cuffs and edges of the choir robe. Then she bent a pair of Dollar Store fairy wings into a structured Elizabethan collar. She was feeling extra ambitious that year, so she even made her own crown out of pipe cleaners and buttons, and her own jewelry out of beads from a craft store and jewelry wire. Finally, to complete the package, she powdered her face until even Snow White would have conceded the “Fairest of Them All” title to her with grace, and she curled her hair into two tightly fitted buns. The results are as you can see here. Yes, she won the contest that year.

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TIP Some additional tips for making your prize-winning costume: Ŕ Use hot glue, safety pins and Velcro to cut down on time spent sewing (or lack of sewing ability). Ŕ Once you’ve made your elaborate costume, save key items in your closet so you can access them again next year.

Think outside the box Not all good costume design requires that level of detail or that amount of work. Sometimes, a clever or funny concept will be more than enough to make you stand out. With this style, you’re more often dressing up as a thing or idea, rather than a character. We’ve seen some good ones over the years. Wrap yourself in tinfoil and say you’re going as leftovers. Cut some holes in a suitcase, stick your head and arms through, and suddenly you’re luggage. Take squares of cardboard, string and a bit of paint, and become your favorite Adobe computer application. As far as materials go, your best bet is to look at what you have around the house. Or make a trip out to the thrift store if you have an idea that goes beyond what you keep at home. The CostumeMaker’s Toolkit mentioned above will be your friend here, too, so keep it well stocked.

Quick and easy, or “I have to wear a costume to this work thing ” To be realistic, there are only a small handful of places in the world where wearing a costume is appropriate. Sometimes, we find ourselves encouraged to dress up in places we may not 24 OCT/NOV 2011 | thefacetsmag.com

“Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, representin.’”


FASHION

normally feel comfortable. The work Halloween party is a classic example. But since you’re going to be working all day, you’re going to need a costume that is equal parts super cool and super comfortable. For maximum effectiveness, it will help to have some of the outside-the-box thinking skills we discussed earlier. Just as an example: Say you work an office job. What better character to dress as than one from the hit NBC show The Office?

bought on the cheap at a costume shop, you’re a hardworking lady one minute and a butterfly the next. Men, all you need to do is bring along a black ski mask and maybe a tinfoil throwing star or two. Even try wrapping your tie around your head or waist. Suddenly, you’re no longer a mild-mannered BDDPVOUBOUXJUIBOPWFSCJUFŊZPVōSFBNBTUFS assassin with an overbite.

A nice shirt, a cardigan, some white Keds, and suddenly you’re Pam. A shirt, tie, mussed-up hair and snarky facial expression, and you’re Jim!

Like the idea of being a little more exotic, but unwilling to board the train dressed as Glinda the Good Witch? Here are some ways to transform your everyday outfit into a costume with only a few accessories. These can be applied easily once you’re at work. Solid-colored clothes are your best friends in these examples, because they create a backdrop for your accessories. A plain black dress or dress shirt and pants can become a butterfly, cat or ninja with very little work. Take the butterfly, for example. By adding leggings and a black jacket to your black dress, along with a pair of homemade antennae (a headband with a couple of pipe cleaners glued on) and wings

Be yourself, and have fun Remember, as fun as it is to win costume contests and receive praise from your friends and coworkers, Halloween is really just about having a good time. Still, with these tips and a little effort, there’s no reason you can’t dress to impress. Make sure you go with a style you’re comfortable with, in whatever works best for you. Just because all the cool kids are going as Lady Gaga, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t go as Madonna, just to fit in. 9

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"The main thing, is to keep the main thing, the main thing."

Main Thing Events Lindsay Hartshorn

Coordinator. Consultant. Confidante.

(760) 505-9081 lindsay@mainthingevents.com mainthingevents.com San Diego, CA

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The art of thrift The thrill of searching for impossibly good deals at your local thrift and consignment shops. By Rachel Kosmal

Photography by Lynn W. Conway

It’s the thrill of the hunt.

The way you feel as your eyes take in every detail. Every color. Every smell. The anticipation. The heightened sense of awareness. The chance to hold that perfect, priceless treasure in your own hands. It’s almost like a perfect drug. A sense of euphoria overcomes you and you feel like you’re an explorer on a mission. But instead of searching the Caribbean for treasure, you look around and realize, you’re just at a Goodwill off the interstate. And it’s not a priceless treasure, it’s a Banana Republic sweater for three bucks. Or a vintage record player for a few dollars—even more if you want one with the needle still on it. That’s right, I’m talking about thrifting, and why it’s the best damn hobby you can have. Now, before we go any further, I should make a distinction between thrift stores and consignment shops because we’ll be covering both. Thrift stores (or charity shops) are stores where merchandise is freely donated by the public and is available for resale. The price of each

item is usually low, but includes a nominal amount to keep the store running and to cover any lost cost. Usually these kinds of shops are connected to a charity or an organization that supports other charitable causes, such as a church or community group. A consignment store on the other hand will generally pay the seller a fraction of the original price for an item, and then resell it for slightly more to make a profit. True consignment stores won’t pay you until the item sells, but there are some (of which will be discussed in this article) that will pay you outright for your goods based on current trends. It’s a great way to refund your new wardrobe by using your old one. In September, I decided to venture out on a thrifting quest, using three local stores I’m familiar with. These nationwide chains may be available in your area, so check them out.

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FASHION

Salvation Army You’ll know it by: The widely recognized emblem

They help: Adult Rehabilitation

The Hunt

Salvation Army thrift stores are for the very hearty thrift seeker. Clothes are usually organized in giant racks by sleeve length (i.e. going from long-sleeve to tank tops), then by color. The ones closer to major cities have literally thousands of items, because anything of value can bring in a little cash. My friends and I have found brand new and barely used items with brand names from Target to Saks Fifth Avenue, all for less than $5. The only catch is that you have to really, really look. I’m talking a good hour of standing on your feet and sifting through clothes. But when you finally find that one thing? That perfect cardigan or a set of vintage dishes that someone was just going to throw away? You get that huff of wonderful thrifting goodness and it’s enough to keep you powering through.

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I always leave a Salvo with either nothing or too much, but I never spend more than I intended. The best part about these places is your purchases help people who had a bit of hard luck get back on their feet. The Salvation Army donates 100 percent of the proceeds to giving the homeless the chance to work, learn a vocation and live their lives with dignity and new skills. A worthy cause for an almost too reasonable price.

consignment stores You’ll know it by: The in-style, high-end brand names

They help: You!

The Between-Payday Splurge Consignment stores are everywhere, and in every shape and style. Some sell furniture; some sell clothes; some sell electronics. They’re like really organized pawn shops, only with everyday items. We’ll take the brand name consignment store of Plato’s Closet as an example. The premise is simple: Bring in your brandname clothing and accessories, and if it’s in style and in good condition, you can receive cash or store credit. Because these are hand-chosen items that have good resale value, the price is a bit higher than a thrift store, but you’re sure to find a deal!


FASHION

Goodwill You’ll know it by: The open stores and the recognizable logo They help: People who are looking for work or better jobs to provide for their families

Thrifting is a great way to use your imagination and make your own style for cheap, not to mention recycle and cut down on waste. So get out there and join me in the hunt! 9

The Everyday Thrifter I feel like Goodwill and I are close friends. We share clothing and rainy days together, and have a great time on a thin dime. I’ve been taking my old clothes, furniture, electronics and household goods to a local Goodwill my entire life, and it’s always the same in each location. Like Salvation Army, Goodwill takes donations and resells them to help individuals in the community. Last year, the Goodwill Industries helped 2.4 million people in need and helped 170,000 find jobs. In addition to racks of clothing, you can find furniture, accessories, toys, home decor items and shoes for very low prices. To boost sales, Goodwill has an online auction site that helps to promote high-end items in demand, but I’ve never left a location without a new piece for either my home or my wardrobe.

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Facets’ guide to Thanksgiving dinner Ŕ FOOD Ŕ

Take time to give thanks and indulge without quitting your diet cold turkey

By Brittany Abeijon, Bridget Maiellaro and Tom Salek Photography by Lynn W. Conway Illustrations by Rachel Kosmal

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FOOD

Fall means changing weather, changing colors and for some a change in diet as we approach the biggest food-centric holiday of the year, Thanksgiving. Turkey is the obvious centerpiece at almost every Thanksgiving meal, but we’re not here to change your family recipe. Instead, we’ll give you a few traditional side dishes along with their healthy counterparts so you can choose whether or not you’re going to mind your mouthfuls or let yourself indulge during the food-fixated holiday.

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FOOD

Dinnerware and furniture provided by Tablescapes Party Rental, Chicago, Ill. 32

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S E T

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T H E

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Ŕ Ŕ Ŕ Ŕ Ŕ Ŕ Ŕ

Spiked Apple Cider

1/2 gallon apple cider 1 750ml bottle of spiced rum 4 cinnamon sticks to cook, extra for garnish 1 orange 1 green apple 2 tsp pumpkin pie spice 1 tsp ground cloves

1 Pour apple cider into a Dutch oven or other large pot.

Add apple and orange slices to cider and heat on stove on medium heat for 10 minutes.

heat on low, then add rum, pumpkin pie spice and 2 Turn ground cloves. mixture warm (about three minutes) and serve in 3 Let mugs. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.

Although the perfect concoction for a preThanksgiving feast cocktail with the family, spiked apple cider also makes a good a hand warmer for a chilly November tailgate.

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Pumpkin Beer

FOOD

D R I N K S

1. Available September through November, Blue Moon’s Harvest Moon Pumpkin Ale boasts a blend of sweet and spicy. An amber-colored ale, brewed with fall flavors like vine-ripened pumpkin, allspice, cloves and nutmeg, Blue Moon suggests pairing this beer with beef dishes and seasonal soups. 2. Like pumpkin pie in a bottle, O’Fallon’s Pumpkin Beer was made with 136 pounds of real pumpkin and then seasoned with cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. 3. One of the only classic fall seasonals that comes in a can, Wild Onion’s Pumpkin Ale, sold exclusively in the Chicagoland area, has a crisp malt flavor blended smoothly with a hint of spicy pumpkin.

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FOOD

Mashed cauliflower

1 1/2 pounds cauliflower, cut into large florets (about 8 cups) 3 garlic cloves, peeled 2 (14-ounce) cans low-sodium chicken broth Salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

1. In a large saucepan, combine cauliflower, garlic and broth. If cauliflower is not completely covered by broth, add water to just cover. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until cauliflower is tender, about 12 minutes. 2. Reserve 2 tablespoons of the cooking liquid, then drain cauliflower and garlic. 3. Transfer cauliflower and garlic to the bowl of a food processor and process until smooth, pulsing in some or all of the reserved cooking liquid, if necessary, to moisten mixture. 4. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Just before serving, stir in chives. Serve warm. Nutritional information: Serves four; 80 calories per cup

Looking to give the cauliflower a lift? Try adding turkey bacon or low-fat cheese to add texture and flavor.

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FOOD

Mashed potatoes 2 ½ pounds of Yukon Gold Potatoes ½ cup milk half stick of butter cut into pieces 8 ounces of plain cream cheese cut into pieces Salt and pepper to taste 1. Boil potatoes until tender. When potatoes are tender, drain them and return them to the hot pot or put in mixing bowl. 2. Mash potatoes (either by hand or blender) with milk and butter. 3. Add in cream cheese and mash until all ingredients are mixed and texture is to your liking. 4. Add salt and paper to your taste.

S I D E S

Nutritional information: Serves six; 237 calories per cup

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Stove Top stuffing (or boxed stuffing of your choice) No recipe; prepare from directions on box.

Nutritional information: 214 calories per cup

Notice the calorie difference is not vastly different here between stuffing options—but the quality of ingredients is. Starting with great ingredients ensures you’ll end up with a great product. So remember, it’s not always about the number.

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FOOD

Herbed whole-grain bread stuffing with mushrooms and sausage 1 whole-grain artisanal bread loaf 1 lb turkey Italian sausage ½ lb cremini mushrooms, quartered ½ sweet white onion, chopped 2 celery stalks, chopped 2 tbs butter 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth 2 eggs Fresh parsley, to taste Fresh sage, to taste Fresh thyme, to taste Salt, to taste Pepper, to taste 1. Cut bread loaf in 1-1/2-inch cubes. Toast cubes in oven for 10 minutes at 400°F, then set aside in a mixing bowl. 2. Brown turkey Italian sausage on medium-high in skillet for 10 minutes. After sausages are browned, cut into thin slices. Add to bread cubes. 3. Add butter to skillet and saute mushrooms on medium-high for four minutes. Then add to bread cubes and sausage. 4. Spray skillet with cooking spray and saute onion and celery for five minutes. Then add in fresh herbs and pepper and stir. Add mixture to bowl with bread, sausage and mushrooms. 5. Mix eggs and chicken broth, then pour in bowl with other ingredients. Toss everything together. 6. Pour into 9x13-in baking dish and bake at 350°F for 45 minutes.

Nutritional information: Serves eight; 208 calories per serving

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FOOD

Steamed green beans Ziploc Zip ’n Steam Microwave Cooking bags 1 pound fresh green beans Sliced squash for garnish

Check out this issue’s Founders’ Favorites as Lynn W. Conway professes her love for these Ziploc baggies.

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FOOD

Broccoli, cheese and rice casserole 1 bag frozen chopped broccoli 1 jar Cheese Whiz 1 can cheddar cheese soup 2 cups rice 2 cans french fried onions 1. Heat broccoli in pan over stove with two tablespoons water until thawed. 2. Cook rice according to box. 3. Mix all ingredients—minus one can fried onions—together in casserole pan. 4. Cover top of casserole with other can of onions. 5. Bake at 350°F for 25 minutes.

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FOOD

Hungry Girl’s Healthy Pumpkin Pie

Crust: 2 cups Fiber One bran cereal (original) 1/4 cup light whipped butter or light buttery spread (like Brummel and Brown); melted and mixed with 1 oz. water 3 tbsp. Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, granulated 1 tsp. cinnamon

Filling One 15-oz. can pure pumpkin (NOT pumpkin pie filling) One 12-oz. can evaporated fat-free milk 3/4 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, granulated 1/2 cup fat-free liquid egg substitute (like Egg Beaters) 1/4 cup sugar-free maple syrup 1 tbsp. pumpkin pie spice 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/8 tsp. salt Optional Topping: Fat Free Reddi-wip 1. Preheat oven to 350°F. 2. In a blender or food processor, grind Fiber One to a breadcrumb-like consistency. Combine crumbs with all other crust ingredients. Stir until mixed well. 3. In an oven-safe, 9-inch pie dish sprayed lightly with nonstick spray, evenly distribute mixture using your hands or a flat utensil to firmly press and form the crust. Press it into the edges and up along the sides of the dish. Set aside. 4. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients for the filling. Mix well. Pour mixture into pie crust. (Filling may be taller than the crust) 5. Bake pie in the oven for 45 minutes, and then remove it and allow to cool. Chill in the fridge for several hours (for best results, chill overnight). If you like, top with Reddi-wip before serving.

Nutritional information: Serves eight; 133 calories per slice

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If you have a dessert cr want to overdo it, stay with double crusts, whi anything a la mode. Inste based pies with a crumb low-fat ingredients, like whipped topping, w


raving but don’t away from pies ipped cream, or ead opt for fruitble topping or use cream cheese or while baking.

FOOD

French Silk Pie

1 sheet refrigerated pie pastry 2/3 cup sugar 2 eggs 2 ounces unsweetened chocolate, melted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/3 cup butter, softened 2/3 cup heavy whipping cream 2 teaspoons confectioners’ sugar Whipped cream and chocolate curls, optional 1. Cut pastry sheet in half. Repackage and refrigerate one half for another use. On a lightly floured surface, roll out remaining half into an 8-in. circle. Transfer to a 7-in. pie plate; flute edges. 2. Line shell with a double thickness of heavy-duty foil. Bake at 450°F for four minutes. Remove foil; bake two minutes longer or until crust is golden brown. Cool on a wire rack. 3. In a small saucepan, combine sugar and eggs until well blended. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture reaches 160°F and coats the back of a metal spoon. Remove from the heat. Stir in chocolate and vanilla until smooth. Cool to lukewarm (90°F), stirring occasionally. 4. In a small bowl, cream butter until light and fluffy. Add cooled chocolate mixture; beat on high speed for five minutes or until light and fluffy. 5. In another large bowl, beat cream until it begins to thicken. Add confectioners’ sugar; beat until stiff peaks form. Fold into chocolate mixture. 6. Pour into crust. Chill for at least six hours before serving. Garnish with whipped cream and chocolate curls if desired. Refrigerate leftovers.

Nutritional information: Serves six; 450 calories per slice (calculated without whipped cream and chocolate curls)

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FOOD

Did you know?

The U.S. is not the only country to obser north, Canada, also celebrates with a fam year – just not in November. Their versio the country’s harvest, occurs on the seco with Columbus Day in the States. This ye Columbus Day) fall on Monday, Oct. 10.

"OEUIBUĹ?TOPUBMM8IJMFUIFZEPOĹ?USFGFS other countries that hold food-centric h

Ŕ Germany – Erntedankfest takes place Ŕ Israel – Sukkot features prayer servic starting in late September. Ŕ Korea – Chuseok occurs near the Aut and day 15 of the lunar calendar. 9

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A R O U N D

FOOD

rve Thanksgiving. Our neighbor to the mily meal, football and parades each on, formed in 1957 to give thanks to ond Monday of October, coinciding ear, Canadian Thanksgiving (and

UPJUBT5IBOLTHJWJOH IFSFBSFTPNF holidays each year.

e the first Sunday in October. ces and meals for seven days, typically

tumn Equinox; it falls on month eight

T H E

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FOOD

Don’t miss out! Check out our social media vehicles between issues for sneak peeks, behind-the-scenes photos and inside information.

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Pass the peas, please

FOOD

A mother’s journey to educating the world on animal-free eating By Jasmine Myers

They say starting a family changes a lot. But for Sarah Matheny, having children changed everything — from her career aspirations to the way she cooks, eats and even thinks about food. Matheny may seem to have it all living and loving her life as a dedicated mother to two daughters, a devout vegan, a Portland, Ore.-based food blogger and a New York Times best-selling author—but it wasn’t always this way. It began shortly after Matheny gave birth to her first daughter, Gigi, in 2005. Matheny, a former attorney, decided to leave her career to focus on what she considered the most important job in her life: being a mom. As she grew into the role, Matheny vowed to raise a healthy family by creating an atmosphere of health and wellness in her home. Yet as she fed her daughter fruits and vegetables, she still opted for sodas and snack mix. Matheny quickly realized that in order to find balance, she had to start with herself. It was then that she began to question the ethics and sustainability of the foods she and her family

were consuming. She wanted a change, and began by eliminating processed foods out of her diet and adding more fruits and vegetables into her family’s meals. Yet somehow, this still wasn’t enough. After the birth of her second child, Lulu, in 2007, she also took a hard look at her consumption of animal products. “Having a child brings up a lot of questions. They are curious. They want to know why. Why we do this, why we do that,” Matheny said. “We take our children to visit farms and local petting zoos. Rarely do we stop to consider that these beautiful animals become food on our plates, but kids do think about these things. They open our eyes.” It was a breakthrough. And soon after, Matheny began experimenting with vegetarianism. At first, it was just a personal choice that she applied only to her diet. “It was hard,” she admitted. “I was cooking a steak for my husband, chicken nuggets for the kids, and tofu for me. I was trying to satisfy everyone, and that’s a tough job.” Ironically, this dinner-time turmoil was exactly the challenge she needed to spur one of the most volume 2

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FOOD unexpected forks in the road yet. In 2009, Matheny launched her blog, Peas and Thank You, under the quirky pen name, “Mama Pea.” On the blog, Matheny chronicled her journey to finding vegetarian recipes that would suit the tastes of the entire family. Though she never put out a mandate for husband, Chris, to adopt her lifestyle, he was moved by the changes Matheny was making and decided to make the switch, too. And, with the approval of their daughters’ pediatrician, the couple transitioned their two daughters to a vegetarian diet as well. “We never looked back,” Matheny said. Shortly after the whole family cut out meat, Matheny became a vegan, removing all animal foods from her diet, though the rest of “Pea Clan,” as they are dubbed on her blog, consumes a mix of vegan and vegetarian foods. Through innovative recipes, helpful lifestyle tips, updates on the Pea clan (which now consists of Matheny’s husband dubbed “Pea Daddy,” sixyear-old Gigi and three-year-old Lulu), interactive giveaways and more, Peas and Thank You obtained unexpected success in a very short time. After just two years, the website receives nearly 40,000 page views per day, attracting readers from all over the world. “The blog has been an incredible resource for me to test recipes and show my readers that living a plant-

based lifestyle with kids is not only possible, but a whole lot of fun,” Matheny said. In fact, the ever-expanding blog following led Matheny to author her own cookbook which arrived on newsstands July 26, and shortly after made The New York Times bestseller list. Named after the blog, Peas and Thank You is a tome of more than 85 new recipes dedicated to the animal-free eating philosophy upon which Matheny and her family have built a successful following. Like the blog, the book offers sweet stories and hilarious anecdotes about the Matheny family and serves as a reminder that a healthy, plant-centric lifestyle never has to be boring. Matheny attributes the success of Peas and Thank You more to the nature of her zany family than any changes they’ve made to their diet or lifestyle. Through leading by example, the Mathenys have inspired thousands to learn about healthier dishes and try a few meatless meals. “We’re just regular people,” she said. “Our lives aren’t only about what we eat or what we don’t eat. We don’t eat animals, true, but ultimately, we’re just the family next door and that’s why readers relate to us.” 9

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FOOD

One of the unique aspects to Mama Pea’s recipes is that they can be tailored to a vegan or vegetarian lifestlye. This delicious enchiladas recipe is filling enough to suit even a meat-eater’s tastes, yet it can be made entirely free of animal products. Mouth-watering recipe from Mama Pea’s new book: Green and red lentil enchiladas Ŕ One 30-ounce can prepared green enchilada sauce, divided Ŕ 1 1/2 cups water Ŕ 1 cup red lentils, rinsed and drained Ŕ 1/4 cup chopped onion Ŕ 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro Ŕ 8 to 10 corn tortillas Ŕ 2 cups non-dairy (i.e. Daiya) or organic cheese Ŕ One 4-ounce can sliced olives, drained Ŕ 1 jalapeño, seeded and chopped (optional) Ŕ Trimmings: non-dairy or organic sour cream, chopped cilantro, shredded lettuce and diced fresh tomatoes or salsa

For more recipes click here.

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. In a medium saucepan, combine enchilada sauce and water, and bring to a boil. Add lentils, onion and jalapeño, and cook approximately 15 to 20 minutes. Liquid should absorb completely, and lentils should be tender. Stir in chopped cilantro and set aside. 2. 8SBQŊUPSUJMMBTJOEBNQQBQFSUPXFMT  and microwave for approximately 30–45 seconds. 3. Pour one-third of the green enchilada sauce in the bottom of a 13 × 9-inch baking dish. 4. Put several spoonfuls of lentil mixture into each tortilla and roll, placing the tortillas seam side down in the dish. 5. Pour remaining green enchilada sauce on tortillas. Top with cheese and sliced olives. 6. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until cheese is melted. Pass trimmings at the table. volume 2

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Ŕ HEALTH/FITNESS Ŕ

Nine around-the-kitchen workouts

Put your rear in gear while preparing, cooking, cleaning up By Bridget Maiellaro

DURING THE PREP Turkey twist Ŋ'PSCJHHFS ingredients, such as a turkey, pumpkin or ham, start with your feet shoulder-width apart. Hold one ingredient with both hands in front of your body, with your elbows bent at 90 degrees. Lunge forward with your right foot so it’s also at a 90 degree angle and your left knee is inches away from the floor. While in the lunge position, twist your body to the right, reaching across with the ingredient in your hands. Twist back across your body and return to the starting position. Step forward with your left foot and twist your body to the left for one complete rotation. Do two to three sets of 10 reps.

Canned good curls - As you gather your ingredients, use all canned and boxed goods as you would dumbbells. Holding one item in each hand, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Then, keeping your back straight, curl the canned or boxed goods 50

OCT/NOV 2011 | thefacetsmag.com

by flexing your biceps until the ingredients are at your chin. Do two to three sets of 10 reps. Oven squatsŊ&WFSZUJNFZPVHP to open or close the oven, keep your feet shoulder-width apart and begin to lower your body as though you are going to sit in a chair. Pulling your belly button to your spine, hold the position for about three to five seconds and return to starting position. Do two to three sets of 10 reps.

WHILE IT COOKS Chair stepsŊ4UFQPOUPBLJUDIFO chair, starting with your right foot. Return to the ground, again starting with your right foot. Then repeat same steps with left foot for one complete rotation. Do three sets of 10 reps.

Butt crunchesŊ*OTUFBEPGJEMZ sitting on the couch or at the kitchen table waiting for the food to finish cooking, work your

glutes. While seated or standing, squeeze your butt muscles for 10 seconds and release. Do three sets of 10 reps. Heel raisesŊ8IJMFTUBOEJOHXJUI your feet about one inch apart, lift your heels so you’re only on your toes. Hold for 10 seconds and release. Do three sets of 10 reps.

AS YOU CLEAN UP Dishes marchŊ8IJMFXBTIJOH the dishes, walk in place, bringing your knees to a 90 degree angle with each step. Sweep shuffleŊ/PTFUSPVUJOF here. Simply turn on your favorite song and dance as you sweep your floors. Push-ups at the counterŊ"GUFS wiping off your cooking space, stand about two feet away from the kitchen counter. Place your hands on the edge of the counter, slightly more than shoulder-width apart, and inhale as you lower your chest to the counter. Then, exhale as you push yourself back up. Do three sets of 10 reps. 9


Ŕ LIFE/TRAVEL Ŕ

Did I just eat chicken feet? Tales from a culture-shocked American touring China By Tom Salek

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Chicken feet, the crunchiest, toughest food dish I’ve ever had

Yes. It’s true. I ate chicken feet. And let me tell you, it was the crunchiest, toughest meat I’ve ever encountered. Did I enjoy it? No. Can I say it was the strangest food I encountered during my trip? Not at all! Throughout the course of my trip, I was offered, but quickly passed on having a chamber of duck heart. I also turned down the offer to gnaw meat off a roasted duck head. Before I continue, I should admit I’m not the most adventurous eater. In fact, I’m probably one of the pickiest, most stubborn eaters out there. However, in my eightday adventure in China, I impressed myself, trying a wide-variety of foods—granted, most of the time, I didn’t know what I was eating until after the fact. While new—and sometimes strange—food was a major part my journey, I experienced culture shock far more than I anticipated. I went into my trip with an open mind and willingness to be adventuresome. Yet, I discovered that simple things, like getting off an airplane, using a restroom or even crossing the street were vastly different. This realization isn’t in hindsight at all. In fact, the moment I walked off the plane in Beijing, I quickly realized my trip would be challenging and unlike anything I’d ever experienced before. 52 OCT/NOV 2011 | thefacetsmag.com

A quiet garden in the middle of Beijing

Traveling China Beijing Lanzhou Xi’an

I thought New York City was crowded, but it’s got nothing on Chinese cities After the 13-hour flight, I was ready to get off the malodorous aircraft. I was cold. My neck hurt. And most importantly, I just wanted to stretch my legs. The 747 jet pulled into the gate at Beijing Capital International Airport, and the captain turned the fasten seat belt sign off. I jumped out of my seat, anxious to exit. But even this wasn’t quite fast enough. With lightening speed, people from the back of the plane rushed forward. I went to step into the aisle to open the overhead bin, but was pushed aside by the


LIFE/TRAVEL

Crowds are everywhere, especially at tourist attractions like Summer Palace, Beijing

Bell Tower, Xi’an

stampede. I had flashbacks to The Lion King, feeling like Simba trapped on a tree branch, trying not to get trampled by a pack of rushing wildebeests. I stood there in amazement, watching as these individuals pushed their way off the plane, ignoring any and everyone in front of them. After a few minutes, the commotion slowed down, and I was able to safely escape. I was completely baffled. I knew I wanted to get off the plane, but, seriously, these people were in a mad rush. Even living in New York City and taking the subway at rush hour didn’t prepare me for that kind of intensity and impatience. Eventually, I calmed myself down. It was a long flight, and I thought maybe there were biological reasons these 70 or so people had to get off the plane. Immediately. Walking around the airport felt great. Sitting in a confined chair for more than half a day is not comfortable at all. I decided to avoid every moving walkway and escalator, and enjoy feeling my leg muscles stretch out. I made it through customs and went to pick up my suitcase. When I finally reached the baggage claim area, I discovered the stampede on

The 2,000-year-old Terracotta Warriors, Xi’an volume 2

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LIFE/TRAVEL

Summer Palace, Beijing

the plane wasn’t unusual. Nor was it particularly bad. This was absolute chaos. People surrounded the baggage carousel, protecting their spot like infantrymen on the front lines. I saw my suitcase circling and pushed my way through. After getting a series of angry looks and a few shoves back, I reached for the handle. Pulling my bag off the carousel, I turned to put it on the ground and slammed into a boy who couldn’t have been more than 10 years old. He flew to the ground. “I’m sorry, “ I exclaimed. But the boy just stood up, 54

OCT/NOV 2011 | thefacetsmag.com

looked at me and went right back to standing near the baggage carousel. I looked around, and while I didn’t see anyone else knocking over innocent children, there were plenty of other people fighting each other as they reclaimed their luggage. After talking with a few English-speaking Chinese people, I was told, in China, personal space doesn’t really exist in public settings. In a country of 1.3 billion people, etiquette in public places is every person for themselves. While there may be lines, these are more of a suggestion. For example, when


LIFE/TRAVEL

trying to buy a ticket to see the nearly 700 year old Bell Tower in Xi’an, I stood patiently behind a family at the ticket counter. After they moved away, I stepped forward but was pushed aside. I wasn’t quite quick enough to act. It took a few days, but I channeled my inner New Yorker and began to be bold in public. Instead of being rude, I discovered how to politely push your way through crowded tourist attractions. It was less about physically pushing people and more about confidently moving forward. You don’t hesitate.

Once you can, you quickly advance forward. When visiting the Terracotta Army at the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor, it was this newly learned skill that allowed me to push my way to the front of a balcony to snap a few pictures of the ancient, life-sized statues of warriors and horses. And throughout the rest of my trip, I made sure to be quick and bold, while trying to remain as polite as possible.

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LIFE/TRAVEL Traveling: A great way to face my germaphobia I fear germs. Anyone who knows me, knows this. Whenever possible, I wash my hands with soap and water. If water isn’t available, I have a backup hand sanitizer. In addition to trying lots of different foods during my trip, I also subjected myself to hotels, bathrooms and restaurants that, in any other place, I’d be sprinting away from. I should point out that I understand there are dirty bathrooms, hotels, restaurants, etc. everywhere. In fact, I’ve witnessed several vile establishments in New York and Chicago. Yet, as a whole, the sanitation conditions in most of the public locations I visited were very different than what I, and most Americans, are used to. Perhaps the biggest dilemma for any germaphobe is the cleanliness of public bathrooms. Whenever possible, I try to avoid them. But when traveling, it’s an unfortunate fact that sometimes you need to brave them and hope for the best. Let me be frank, during this adventure, I visited some real and literal shitholes.

A filthy bathroom that was literally hanging off the side of a mountain

There were hundreds of steps to reach the top of Xinglong Shan and Qiyun Shan

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I was tempted to steal photographic evidence. But usually, I was far too disgusted to visually capture the horror. Suffice to say, I’ll try to recreate the essence in words. First and foremost, in just about every public bathroom, I had a difficult time finding paper towels, toilet paper and soap. In fact, rarely did I ever see someone actually wash their hands upon exiting. But I can understand when there’s no disinfectant to wash your hands with, nothing to dry your hands with and signs posted everywhere warning that the water is dangerous to ingest. Perhaps the biggest bathroom shock came as I was climbing hundreds of stairs to get to the top of Xinglong Shan and Qiyun Shan, two mountains about 45 km southeast of Lanzhou. At first, I encountered spectacular views of nature and a number of Buddhist temples. Cool, clean air completely unlike the polluted air in large urban areas. But I also saw one particularly interesting bathroom. It was perched on the side of a mountain. The foundation appeared to be hanging off the side. I couldn’t resist taking a look inside to see how this worked. To my horror, it was a large, open room. I won’t even describe the filth of the floor, and I’ll only briefly mention the fetid smell. There were no toilets, urinals or sinks. This austere bathroom was just five large holes in the ground, no barrier between them. Each had about a 40-foot drop to the ground. While you’d have to be creative to fall into a hole to the ground, you wouldn’t want to lose your balance and fall over. Trust me. It would be disgusting. While the overall sanitation was


LIFE/TRAVEL something to be desired, I have to admit, it was sort of cool to see a bathroom that was hanging off the side of a cliff. While this is an extreme example of the kinds of bathrooms in China, I encountered a number of establishments with holes in the ground, instead of Western style toilets. Even more foreign to Westerners is not having toilet paper in the bathroom stall. Instead, many Chinese restrooms have toilet paper located near the entrance of the bathroom. An important tip that’s not in a lot of travel booklets is to scope things out before entering a bathroom stall and make sure you plan ahead. In addition to unsanitary bathrooms, one other unfortunate reality in China is the extremely polluted air in major cities. I visited Beijing, Lanzhou and Xi’an, and all were so polluted there was a constant haze upon the horizon. There were even a few days you could see soot collect on your clothes, and even more disgusting, you could feel dirt on your teeth. Despite encountering a few unsanitary elements in China, I was able to face my fear of germs. I should mention that more often than not, there were also incredibly clean, sanitary restaurants, hotels and public places. But because the cleanliness of places was hit or miss, I protected myself with two small bottles of hand sanitizer no matter where I went.

Traffic from hell, and the troubles of getting around It’s a good thing I like the video game Frogger. The skills I learned dodging traffic as a frog were indispensable throughout my trip. Like the overall crowdedness of public places and the lack of queuing, traffic laws are more of a suggestion. To be blunt, vehicles have the right of way so long as they deem it necessary (i.e. steer in front of traffic, pedestrians, bikes, etc., assuming all will get out of their way). As I walked the streets of Beijing, Lanzhou and Xi’an, I actually feared for my life. I’ve never been afraid of crossing the street until going to China. In one particularly frightening experience, I tried to make it across an intersection in Lanzhou. I politely waited for the pedestrian walk sign to turn green. I looked both ways, stepped into the street and, before I knew it, a truck came barreling through a red light passing inches in front of me. I thought to myself,

Traffic is a nightmare in urban cities like Xi’an

“the hell with this,” turned back to the sidewalk and walked a quarter of a mile out of my way to take a pedestrian overpass. Similar to the difficulties of walking, driving in China is sort of like a video game or amusement park ride. You don’t quite hit other cars, you can veer into oncoming traffic only to quickly turn into your lane at the last minute, and it’s paramount to honk your horn whenever the opportunity arises. On the four-hour bus ride from Lanzhou to the Labrang Monastery, I witnessed some very creative driving. Let me set the scene. It was raining. Instead of a multi-lane highway, many of the roads were rural two-lane passes. The Tibetan monastery sits at the foot of the Phoenix Mountain, and the highway passes through several large mountains. For my sake, the bus driver took a very restrained approach to driving. Everyone else on the road acted as if they were a stunt driver in an action film. Never before in my life have I seen a three-car pass on a two-lane highway. Sound confused? Here’s what I mean. Picture a bus in the right hand lane. One car pulls into oncoming traffic to pass. Then, another car—driving faster—pulls out even further into oncoming traffic and passes both the other volume 2 57


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car and bus. All the while, everyone honks their car horns. Meanwhile, there are still cars coming from the opposite direction about 300 meters away. I can’t say I wasn’t sad I didn’t get a chance to drive.

The 300-year-old Tibetan Labrang Monastery is still very lively

In addition to this crazy driving style, I encountered some of the worst bumper-to-bumper traffic I’ve ever seen. Traffic in major U.S. cities is pretty bad. I’ve spent countless hours sitting in traffic on the highway. But I can say without a doubt, traffic in China is far worse. Westerners are used to people switching between lanes in bumper-to-bumper traffic in an attempt to move forward faster. In China, lanes cease to exist at rush hour. If 10 cars can fit across on a five-lane highway, it will happen. In fact, I’m pretty sure I saw something close to that in Beijing. Did I mention, people like to honk their horns? It seems horns are used for pretty much everything: to pass, thank someone, change lanes, tell other cars to get out of the way, etc. In China, there’s no shortage of horn usage. They are used just as often as the brakes. If you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m trying to say that getting around in China can be painstakingly slow and difficult. But it’s an adventure in itself.

An amazing journey in one of the most picturesque and historic countries Monks still reside at and give tours of the Monastery to tourists

After eight days of traveling between three cities in China, I was ready to jump on a plane and fly back to Chicago. I survived the massive traffic jams and learned how to politely push my way through crowds in public. I used hand sanitizer (and a lot of it) to deal with the dirty bathrooms. And most impressively, I tried several foods I normally would turn my nose against. Aside from these initial culture shocks, I began to appreciate and embrace some of China’s foods and norms by the end of my trip. This journey was one of the most unique and satisfying travel experiences I’ve ever had. I had the chance to visit a Tibetan temple. I saw historic relics that were more than 2,000 years old. Amidst all of this history was one of the most picturesque landscapes my eyes have ever seen. While I wanted to get back to America and

Locals from the area come to the monastery to worship

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have a feast of greasy American foods, I was sad to leave. There was so much to see, and I was only in China for such a short amount of time. As I look back at my photos and type out these last words, I can’t say I’m craving another plate of chicken feet. But if that’s the cost of visiting China again, well then pass me another. I’m ready for some more.

A guardhouse on Xi’an’s city wall

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Tips for traveling in China

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Chances are, if you’re like me, you cannot speak, understand or read Chinese. While there are many English speakers in China, you should still be prepared with a number of key phrases. My suggestion is to buy and carry around a small book of basic Chinese phrases. I found the book Me No Speak: China ($9.95) particularly helpful when at restaurants or asking for the nearest bathroom.

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Although I’m a big fan of my iPhone and all smartphones, in a place like China, it can be a costly expense. Be careful about using data on your phone. On my network it was $19.95 per MB of data. While I wanted to use a number of language and map apps to help guide my travels, these were utterly useless because I turned off the network data function to avoid costly cell phone fees.

3

Bring a computer or iPad to help plan your trip and learn more about places you just visited. You can also use your smartphone if you have a wireless Internet connection. Also, remember that a lot of social media sites, like Facebook and Twitter, won’t work in China. If you want to share pictures or travel stories, rely on Skype, Apple’s FaceTime or simply email.

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Before you arrive, have a list of places you want to visit. You can find out lots of information online for free. If you want maps and other tips, you can purchase a number of paperback travel guides. Make sure to bring flip-flops for the shower. While many hotels are clean, you may want to have a pair in case there is mold or dirt caked on the floor of the shower or bathtub. If you expect a Western style hotel, stay at a Western hotel. Chinese-owned hotels are hit or miss. Plenty are nice, but you might encounter one with a bathroom, shower or bed that’s different from what you’d expect. Expect to spend a lot of time traveling. No matter how early or late you go somewhere, chances are it will be crowded.

If you want to be adventuresome with food: eat first, ask questions later. The less you know about what you’re eating, the more willing you are to try something new. You never know, maybe you’ll end up loving chicken feet. Have a great time and accept the different culture. If you feel uncomfortable with the cleanliness, food or language barrier, you’re not alone. China is a very different place and culture. Instead of judging these differences, try to put them in context. 9

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Life before coming to

America

Recollections from my family’s life in the Soviet Union

By Kathy Khazanova

I

was only 2 years old when my family immigrated to America from the Soviet Union in 1990. I don’t remember much about my former country or what life was like. Instead, my memories have been constructed from the countless stories my parents and grandparents tell me time and time again. While I can’t recall these stories personally, I’ve been heavily influenced by the web of experiences in my family’s collective memory. Just hearing about living conditions in the Soviet Union, and what my life could have been growing up if we never left, has had a lasting effect on my personality and values. My paternal grandmother, Lina, was the first to tell me stories about life in the Soviet Union. I’ve heard these tales so

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many times that I’m able to talk as if I were there alongside the rest of my family. While I can’t quite recreate the tone and inflections of my parents and grandparents, I’d like to share some of their stories about their lives in Moscow.

Life in a communal apartment in Moscow Once my grandparents were married in 1956, they moved in with my grandpa’s mother. The three of them, and eventually four when my dad was born, resided in a communal apartment. When the building was first constructed, each apartment was meant to house one family. The building was re-purposed in 1917 after the Bolshevik Revolution. As a result, the apartment complex, and many others like it, consisted of one long hallway with one-room living spaces for each family. To say these were close quarters is an understatement. My grandparents, great-grandmother and father


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shared a small room that was used for sleeping, eating and living. The kitchen (which also was used as a laundry room) and the bathroom were shared with more than 10 other families living in the same apartment complex. It was crowded, but came with a few perks. Lucky for my grandparents, their building had built-in babysitters, also known as neighbors. While these were just the living conditions of my grandparents, it’s a fair to say that this was common for many families in Moscow at that time. The apartments belonged to the government, like all other property in the Soviet Union. The idea of renting a better or bigger apartment didn’t really exist. While most people didn’t even have the money to pay for a better living arrangement, even if you did have extra cash it would be difficult to find better housing because it was highly controlled by the government.

Anti-Semitism flowed like vodka in the USSR A common theme in the stories my family has told me is the anti-Semitism. For example, at school, my mother, Natasha, recalls how she was called “kike” nearly every day simply because she looked Jewish. Ironically, now in America, everyone thinks she looks Hispanic. Even though her mother was a teacher at the same school, the verbal tirades did not stop. I can’t say I’m an expert on Soviet culture, but judging by the recollections of my family, anti-Semitism

was built directly into the system. In an effort to control the placement of Jews and non-Russian nationalities (i.e. Ukranian) in strategic government, military and industrial positions, the Soviet government required everyone to have their ethnicity or nationality marked in their passport (Jewish was considered an ethnicity/nationality by the Soviet Union, whereas religion was not recognized). Many work places and higher education institutions were unofficially out of reach for Jews and some nonRussians. A lot of people tried to get out of the classification system if they were only half Jewish, claiming their Russian parent’s nationality. But even then, people still knew who was Jewish.

“I’ll have the Cheese” The most unbelievable stories, at least for me, are the ones about trying to buy food and clothes in the Soviet Union. When my dad was younger, he said stores were well-stocked for the most part. Later on in the 80s, the Soviet economy got worse due to military spending, a drop in oil prices and the Cold War arms race. For the most part, stores were filled with empty shelves. Unlike the deli counters here, you were lucky if you could get a portion of just one nondescript “cheese.” Going to the store was replaced by a more archaic practice. Once a massive shipment of a particular item was available, people would travel in droves and wait in line to receive the item. What’s especially interesting about this practice is that most of the time, people didn’t even know what they were getting in line for! But, no matter what, when they volume 2 63


LIFE/TRAVEL got to the front of the line, they bought it. And in large quantities. My mom always says that in the Soviet Union, the fact that a pair of shoes was too small was never a reason not to buy them. In Russian, the word dostat means “to get,” as in off a shelf. More often than not, it used to mean to get something with great difficulty and, in some cases, using great skill and cunning. That’s how my family would get most of the quality things we had. My grandpa dostal[ed] a baby winter jumper for me while on a business trip in Hungary. It became incredibly useful when I took my outdoor naps in very cold weather. Sounds brutal, but it wasn’t child abuse. It was a Russian mother-approved sleeping strategy.

Even vodka was sometimes hard to dostat because the Soviet government was constantly putting restrictions on alcohol to manage the population’s drinking problem. My dad told me that unlike the U.S., where people stock up on wine and keep a handle of vodka in the freezer, in the Soviet Union every drop of vodka was consumed in one sitting. Civilized folk enjoyed vodka with zakuska, a food chaser usually taken in the form of a salted pickle or piece of herring. I still see this customary use of vodka at family gatherings today. Although, my dad and his friends now feel comfortable leaving some in the bottle for next time.

Soviet hospitals were not a place for a baby Many of the stories about me in the Soviet Union revolve around how I was sick. After I was born, I contracted a staph infection, or a bacterial infection of the skin. My mom said that many of the maternity hospital rooms in the USSR had staph bacteria, but they were never closed down to be cleaned up. Obviously, as a result, many babies contracted it. A month after I was born, I was sent back to the hospital for a week. Because family was not allowed to visit patients, my mother offered to mop on the floor where I was being treated so she could look after me. She said I made baby noises at the heart monitor because I wanted someone to talk to.

I think dostat is how all Russians managed a full spread on the table for holidays. Author Elena Gorokhova, known for her memoir A Mountain of Crumbs, wrote in her blog that dostat is why Russian people love shopping at TJMaxx—the thrill of finding a gem among the unorganized racks feels just like “the day you saw a truck with French sheepskin coats pull up to the back door of a Leningrad department store, and you ran and elbowed your way to reach the precise moment to be the first one in line.”

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I was sick several other instances as a baby. Although the Soviet medical system was free, the quality was very poor. To get me the medical help I needed, my family had to bribe their way to a good doctor. But often the diagnosis was inconclusive, or the doctor seemed unwilling to help. But there was one successful experience with a medical practitioner to note. Once while I was sick, my maternal grandmother, Galina, heard of a spiritual healer who lived in a high-rise apartment building on the outskirts of Moscow. To help heal me, my grandmother and parents took me to this woman’s apartment. She waved her hands around me, as if gathering all the bad spirits to a central point above my head. At that point, the woman proceeded to bite the air near my forehead. Then, she spit into a clean towel that my family had brought with and told them to throw it away on their way out. Surprisingly, a few weeks later, I was better.


LIFE/TRAVEL After this experience with the Soviet Union medical system, my parents decided they could not raise another child there. My dad was 32 and my mom was 23 when they applied to immigrate to the U.S. After looking at our documents and interviewing us, the American embassy in Moscow gave us refugee status, allowing us to enter the U.S. Within a few months, my mom’s parents, her brother, my dad, my mom and I were all able to immigrate to America.

Immigrating to America from the Soviet Union Our flight into America arrived at JFK Airport in New York City in early November of 1990. We had to stop there before our flight to Chicago in order to go through the immigration process. After getting our luggage, we were supposed to go into a secure room to receive American documentation. My family had already given up their Soviet passports, so at this point they had no identification papers. This minor detail didn’t seem to bother my grandma. She was more concerned that her bag didn’t show up on the baggage carousel. She told my mom that she was going to go find it. Thirty minutes passed. Then one hour. My grandma had not returned. My mom was worried and de-

cided to search for her. She left me with my dad and walked out of the baggage claim into the great abyss of JFK Airport—without any identification. The first thing she saw when she exited the room was a large sign that said “Lost Baggage.” My grandma was nowhere in sight. My mother started crying. A security guard finally approached her, asking if he could help. She was taken aback. According to my mother, “In the Soviet Union, you could be dead on the street and no one would think twice about stepping over you.” Here, a stranger was asking if he could help. With her English degree coming in handy, my mother told him her story, and he helped announce my grandma’s name over the intercom system. My grandma said she heard my mom’s voice (which I imagined to be one of those divine intervention occasions where light shines through the parted clouds) and said to a nearby employee, “That’s my daughter! Take me to her!” After a successful reunion, both mom and grandma were able to join the rest of the family. My grandma calls this story, “how Natasha saved me.” Finally after a long journey, we made it to Chicago where we rented a small, two-bedroom apartment in Rogers Park—then a prominently Jewish neigh-

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borhood. We came with only $500 and a $1,000 loan from the Jewish United Fund. My mom started working at Wolfy’s, a hot dog shop on Peterson Avenue while she was getting a degree to become an ultrasound technician. Within a few months, my dad got a job as a mechanical engineer at a pump manufacturing company. He had already had work experience in the pump industry back in Moscow, and his higher education credits transferred as well. Not long after our arrival, my dad bought tickets to bring the rest of his family here.

Our first American holiday We left Moscow on Nov. 8, ironically a national holiday celebrating the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917— the start of the communist era. Our first holiday in America was therefore Thanksgiving. A family in our neighborhood invited us over for dinner to celebrate. Upon entering their split level home, my mom was amazed at the splendor before her eyes. Thick, white shag carpeting lined the floor of their three bedroom home. These were riches my family had never seen before. Even more amazing, the turkey on the table was the biggest bird my parents had ever seen.

Twenty years and counting And now, like most Americans, my family hosts Thanksgiving dinner at our house every year. Last November we celebrated 20 years in America. Each year at this time, I naturally think about how thankful I am that my parents and grandparents left their friends and careers so that we could come live in America. It’s sometimes strange to think about growing up in the Soviet Union with next to nothing. Now, my family lives in a house where we each have our own room. It’s even more strange to think that my brother and I have a choice to embrace our Jewish heritage without anyone batting an eye or calling us a name. And to top it off, who would have thought that 20-plus years later, I could go to the store and have the choice of more than one nondescript kind of cheese. 9

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Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery, a decaying abode for paranormal activity

Hidden from view, this Chicagoland graveyard is regarded as one of the most haunted places in the U.S.

By Brittany Abeijon and Tom Salek Photography by Keith Kosmal

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eer cans, cigarette butts and a muddy toy doll litter the ground near an austere gravestone that simply reads ‘Infant Daughter.’ Resting on the ledge of a larger, nearby family gravestone are other small items—a pen, snack food bag, freshly picked flowers and a key chain. Offerings like these are commonly placed on this vandalized monument in Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery, home to more than 100 documented reports of paranormal activity and considered one of the most haunted places in the U.S. Located across from Rubio Woods Forest Preserve in the Chicago suburb Midlothian, Bachelor’s Grove visitors have encountered supernatural hauntings ranging from glowing balls of light to full apparitions of cars, people and animals. While the cemetery used to rest along the old Midlothian Turnpike,

since the 1960s when the highway was moved, it has become a secluded abode visited more by ghost hunters and vandals than family members of the dead that lie beneath the ground. Accessible only through a beat-up asphalt path, the remnants of the old highway, visitors encounter a decaying resting ground where you have to look twice to locate even a handful of the nearly 125 remaining graves. Overgrown grass and weeds cover the nearly two dozen remaining gravestones—all others have been thrown into a nearby pond, smashed by vandals or stolen. Like the rest of the graveyard, a barbed wired fence that once protected the cemetery is in a state of decay, several holes, some small and others gaping, break up the barrier meant to keep mischief out.

A strange, troubled history While the origins of the cemetery are disputed, many believe the name, Bachelor’s Grove, comes from the family surname Batchelder, who settled in the area in the early 1800s. The small, one-acre graveyard was officially mapped out in 1864, but was already being used as a final resting place for the dead as early as 1838. Prior to its somber purpose, the area was used as a park for families to spend the day fishing, swimming and enjoying the surrounding landscape. But all that began to change in the 1920s. During prohibition, the Chicago mob was rumored to use the cemetery’s adjacent pond as a dumping ground for murder victims.

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LIFE/TRAVEL However, the cemetery’s biggest downturn began in the 1960s when a series of events caused it to quickly deteriorate into its current state. It was at this time the Midlothian Turnpike, a thoroughfare that allowed traffic to pass in front of the cemetery, closed. Bachelor’s Grove became an isolated plot of land in the middle of a forest. Along with its isolation, the area also started to become a hideout for teenagers and others looking to hide from the world. While some used the cemetery as a lover’s lane, others vandalized gravestones and littered the ground with garbage. Many gravestones were either stolen, defaced or destroyed. Among the many rumors of Bachelor’s Grove, the cemetery has also been referenced as a home to satanic rituals. It’s not uncommon to find strange inscriptions on trees and gravestones around the graveyard. People have even found the bones of small animals that were slaughtered and mutilated by occultists. Even more frightening, on three separate occasions in 1964, 1975 and 1978, graves were opened and caskets were removed.

Paranormal activity frequently reported in, around cemetery Along with the increase in destructive behavior was strange and unexplainable phenomena. While the cemetery has been abandoned for over 20 years, with the last recorded burial in 1989, there have been more than 100 documented reports from people who claim to have had spooky paranormal encounters. If you do a simple Internet search for ‘Bachelor’s Grove,’ you will find hundreds of entries about paranormal experiences at the cemetery. Here are just a few of the strange happenings occurring in and around the desolate graveyard.

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LIFE/TRAVEL * The most frequently reported strange happenings at Bachelor’s Grove are ghost lights—small glowing orbs of light that float mysteriously around the cemetery at night. The strange lights shimmer in different colors and often move very quickly before vanishing into the dark night. * Near the back of the cemetery in a mucky, algae ridden pond, there have been reports of a horse pulling a plow steered by an old man. When visitors try to approach the strange apparition, it mysteriously vanishes into the forest. An urban legend often told in conjunction to this particular tale dates back to an event in the late 1800s. On a sunny afternoon, a local farmer was out plowing his field. Something startled his horse and caused him to lose control of his plow. The frightened animal drove the plow straight into a nearby pond—the one adjacent to Bachelor’s Grove. Struggling to make it out of the mucky water, both the farmer and horse died. While their bodies were eventually pulled from the water, their presence still haunts the area surrounding the graveyard. * Hiding in the woods surrounding Bachelor’s Grove is a strange two-headed creature. While the cemetery resides in the middle of a forest, it is only a few hundred yards from 143rd Street. An unknown number of motorists have reported seeing the strange creature crawl out from the woods and into oncoming traffic on 143rd Street. Even though there have been unconfirmed reports of people hitting the creature, no evidence has been found to confirm its existence. * In the late 1990s, a few high school students went to Bachelor’s Grove to film scenes for a homemade horror movie. While preparing makeup for a particularly gruesome scene, the teenagers accidentally left their camcorder on. Sitting on a decaying family grave, the camcorder picked up a number of voices faintly calling for ‘Jane.’ * Bachelor’s Grove is only accessible through a beat-up asphalt path that used to be the Midlothian Turnpike. Walking down this dark path at night, ghost hunters have been said to have been chased down and struck by phantom cars. These unlucky individuals report that while hiking to or from the cemetery, they hear the loud sound of a sputter-

ing car engine. When they look behind them, a pair of headlights flip on and the engine accelerates toward them. Trying to jump out of the way, the apparition passes through these individuals and the taillights vanish into the woods. No injuries have been reported from these encounters. Many suspect these phantom cars are related to Al Capone and the Mafia’s use of the surrounding woods in the 1920s as a dumping ground for bodies. * While traveling to the cemetery at night, there have been people who have reportedly seen a farmhouse with its lights on in the middle of the woods. A few individuals have gone into the graveyard, and upon leaving, are surprised the farmhouse is nowhere to be found. A more frightening urban legend warns people not to venture toward the farmhouse, because if you make it inside, you’ll never return. Other tales warn if you try to approach the farmhouse by venturing into the woods, it will only get smaller and smaller the further from the path you get. The house is described as a white, two-story framed farmhouse with wooden posts and a porch swing. While always seen in different locations, the description is always the same. Currently, no such farmhouse exists anywhere near the cemetery. * Perhaps the most notorious ghost stories about Bachelor’s Grove are about the Lady Madonna of Bachelor’s Grove, otherwise known as the White Lady. There are a number of reports of people seeing the ghost of a woman buried in the cemetery who died while giving birth to her child. Their graves can be found in the back of the cemetery near the algae-ridden pond. The White Lady wanders the cemetery whenever there is a full moon. She is sometimes seen peacefully with her infant resting gently in her arms. On other nights, she frantically wanders, supposedly looking for the body of her child. Legend has it you must leave the White Lady a small token on the large family grave that sits behind the smaller foot stone of her dead infant child. Those who visit the cemetery and do not leave such an offering will be haunted by the White Lady. She will haunt their homes until she finds her unborn child or has a new host to haunt.

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Bachelor’s Grove, a spooky place purposefully left abandoned Anyone who visits Bachelor’s Grove cannot deny it is both a creepy and strange place. Whether it’s the presence of paranormal activity or the overall unkempt state of the graveyard, Bachelor’s Grove looks like it has been abandoned by the world. The sad and troubled history turned it into a place of mystery and trouble. Vandals have destroyed or desecrated most of the gravestones. Ghost hunters and interested visitors litter the cemetery with garbage. As a result of all this activity, public officials have tried to deter visitors by taking down all signage that indicates it is Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery. Moreover, forest preserve officers keep a strict

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watch over the graveyard, writing tickets to individuals who unlawfully enter after dark. But the question remains, are these public officials attempting to camouflage the cemetery to deter further reckless behavior and more harm to the cemetery? Or are they simply trying to protect people from the horrors that hide within the decaying graveyard? Editor’s note: Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery closes at dusk. It is illegal to venture into the cemetery after dark. Violators may be subject to punishment by local authorities.


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If you visit Bachelor’s Grove, make sure to leave a gift for the White Lady By The guy who forgot to leave a gift for the White Lady I was lying in bed when I first heard the creak of the floorboards. No one else was home that night except for my dog, fast asleep beside my bed. Still dazed, I didn’t know what to make of the noise. I lurched out of bed, peeked my head out the door, looking down the long flight of stairs. It was dark and I couldn’t see much. Still paranoid about what I heard earlier that night, I thought to myself why did I do it? why did I decide to visit that place? I turned back around to see if my dog had moved. Nope. He was still passed out beside my bed. A great watch dog. Creak! Creak! I heard the sound grow louder and closer. It was definitely coming from downstairs near the back porch of my house. I nervously began to tip-toe my way down the narrow staircase. My heart felt like it was going to thump out of my chest. My body was freezing, but a cold drop of sweat still dripped down my forehead. My mind was racing, it couldn’t be her. we just bought into that guy’s story. he wanted to scare us because we were in a supposedly haunted graveyard. there’s no actual proof ghosts even exist. stop being scared. Creak! Creak! The noise continued. Sccreecchh! Sccreecchh! It grew louder and more apparent as if someone—or something—was scratching on the back door of my house. As I continued to sort through my thoughts, I finally made my way down the staircase. I stole a look at the dark kitchen. Nothing. The back door was only about 150 feet away, but I was terrified to walk any further. I listened carefully for a few seconds and tilted my head back, collapsing onto the stairs. I laughed to myself for a second and mumbled, “There’s no such thing as ghosts.”

Creak! CREAK! the noise continued, but was now louder and more apparent. I squinted, but still couldn’t see anything in front of me. CREAK!! CREAK!! The noise was now only a few feet away. The air grew colder. The house, seemingly darker. CREAK!! CREAK!! All of the sudden, I saw a strange glow flicker right before my eyes. Then, a quiet voice began whispering, “My baby, my baby.” I thought to myself, this is it. she’s here. she’s come for me! I went into panic mode, the blood rushed to my head as I remembered the previous night’s events. *

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I was a freshman in college. My friends, Phil and Dave, and I decided to take a trip to Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery. I found the place in a book I bought a few months earlier. It said if you wanted to see a ghost, it was the place to go. When we arrived at the cemetery, we agreed it just looked like a boring, decrepit graveyard. While the surroundings were somewhat unimpressive, there was a strange atmosphere looming over the place.

Gravestones were knocked over. There were baby rattles resting on one grave. Even creepier, there was a single rose lying on top of a mound of dirt. The night was cold and we could see our breath in the air. The wind howled through the trees. Our feet felt like they were sinking into the wet ground. We walked around for a few minutes and the longer we stayed, the less scary the place actually seemed.

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LIFE/TRAVEL After awhile, we turned to leave. As we walked toward the exit of the graveyard, a sudden, strange bright light flashed behind us and we immediately turned around. Out of the darkness, a large figure quickly walked our way with something in its hand. It looked like a person—but I didn’t want to stay and find out. My head was telling me to run the other way, but my feet were stuck in place. We just stood there, dazed and frightened as the creature advanced toward us.

“Do you guys see that?” I whispered, my voice trembling.

The glowing object crept closer. And closer. Not making any noise. There was another gust of wind and the apparition seemed to look down at the grave with all of the rattles and baby toys on it. “It’s the White Lady!” Phil said.

I thought to myself, this is it. Suddenly there was another large flash of light and I realized, it wasn’t a ghost. It was just a random guy holding a video camera with a bright light. “What are you kids doing here?” he asked. “Just trying to see some ghosts, but this place doesn’t seem haunted at all,” Dave replied, trying to sound brave. “Some days the ghosts just don’t come out to play,” the guy replied. “But tonight, stick around for a few minutes. They’ll find their way out. It’s a full moon. That’s when the White Lady comes out for revenge. I’m actually on my way out of here. I’ve seen some freaky stuff tonight and I’ve had just about enough.” The guy started to walk away, but turned around and warned,

“Don’t forget to leave her baby a present. Otherwise she’ll follow you home and seek revenge for her infant daughter’s death.” Then he turned around and disappeared into darkness. We were all a little freaked out, but continued to walk around the graveyard, doubting the ghost story. We stayed for another half hour, but didn’t see anything. We made our way to the gate, then, all of the sudden, I felt a gust of wind that almost knocked me off my feet. I had a strange feeling and turned around. I wanted to scream, but my eyes opened widely. I tapped Phil and Dave on the shoulder. We were all stunned to see a strange white glow coming from behind a large tree. 74 OCT/NOV 2011 | thefacetsmag.com

As we stood there, the temperature began to drop. My teeth began to chatter as if it was the middle of winter. There weren’t any clouds in the sky, but it got darker and darker. Fog crept in from out of nowhere. “I think we should get out of here,” I said. We all nodded and slowly began to walk backward, out the gate and down the long dark path. We continued to look at the apparition and walk out of the cemetery. Without leaving the White Lady an offering. CRACK.


LIFE/TRAVEL One of us stepped on a branch. The apparition turned and quickly dashed toward us, and we ran the other way. After what seemed like minutes of running, I turned around. We had only made it about 20 feet down the path. It was pitch black and I couldn’t see anything except the glowing object, standing at the gate looking ominously at me. The wind howled through the trees. My breath got heavier. I kept walking backward, watching to make sure the apparition stayed far down the path. As I got farther away, the object began to dash down the path again and quickly disappeared into thin air. Without speaking, the three of us continued down the path to where our car was parked. We all drove home silently, freaked out by the whole situation. I doubted it was a ghost. Probably just a figment of my imagination. How could a thing like that be real?

She looked back at me “Where’s my baby?!” getting louder than before. “I-I-I don’t know where your baby is, but this isn’t even your house,” I stammered. “Where’s my baby?!” she screamed. I glanced around the room and noticed my dog was lying upside down on the floor. He wasn’t moving. I backed away and tried to find my cell phone. I reached around my desk. I found it and flipped it open. It was dead. “Where’s my baby?! Tell me! Now!” she yelled. “I don’t know where your baby is lady! I don’t even know you!” I yelled back. “If you don’t know who I am, then why did come into my house earlier today!” “I-I was just having a little bit of fun with my friends.”

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CREAK! CREAK! The sound was getting closer. I quickly tried to think of what to do. OK, OK, I thought to myself. I’m just going to stand here and wait for whatever is here to disappear. there is no such thing as ghosts. All of the sudden the creaking stopped and the ominous glow disappeared. Everything went silent. I walked through my kitchen to the back door of my house. I flipped on the light switch. Nothing. I took a look outside. Nothing. I chortled to myself and went back upstairs to bed. When I got back to my bedroom, I noticed my dog wasn’t next to the bed. “Buddy, where’d you go?” I said aloud. Suddenly, I felt a sudden cold rush through my body and noticed a strange white glow fill the room. I turned around and saw her, dressed in a white dress with her long, curly hair masking her face.

“Well I’m just having a little bit of fun, too.” She advanced toward me and I felt a cold grasp around my neck. I couldn’t breathe. She was choking me. “Please! I’ll do anything you want, anything!” I yelled, fearing for my life. “I just want my baby,” she replied. I didn’t know what to say, but I felt her grasp getting tighter and tighter. The room started to go black and I felt lightheaded. I fell to the ground. Early the next morning I woke up on the floor. My dog was nowhere in sight. I quickly went over to my phone and called Dave and Phil to see if they were OK. They were fine. No strange occurrences. As I flipped my phone shut, it fell out of my hands. I bent down to pick it up, and to my horror, there was a puddle of blood on the floor. And next to it, written in large, bloody letters, the White Lady left me a message to remember. Your dog for my baby.

“Where’s my baby?” she whispered. I looked at her, stunned not knowing what to say.

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Are you an amateur ghost hunter?

There’s an app for that. Check out Ghost Radar Classic, a free app for iPhone that the developers say is as effective as an electromagnetic field (EMF) detector for discovering paranormal activity. If you love the thrill of the supernatural, but get puzzled by the science behind it, we’re here to provide you with an easy guide for interpreting your readings.

How the app works According to the developers, intelligent energy can be made aware of its ability to influence the sensors of the iPhone and iPod touch. The app uses a variety of readings from the sensors on the iPhone and iPod touch to measure anomalous changes in the Quantum Flux. A large portion of the flux readings come from the background anomalies of the accelerometer. These sensor readings come in constantly and have only very minor changes. The Ghost Radar app tracks these readings and analyzes them, watching for strange behavior. Based on a multitude of different readings and historical trends, it uses a proprietary algorithm to present various visual and audible representations of the readings.

Reading the numbers The numbers represent Ghost Radar’s attempt to make certain measurement of the Quantum Flux. The three corner readings represent the raw data for three different measurements the app is taking. The constantly changing top number is a raw

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number being tracked. The bottom number represents how quickly the top number is changing. The second from bottom represents the fastest change the top number has made. Finally, the second from the top represents a sum of the changes for that reading.

Decoding the colors The colors of the blips are an indication of signal strength. Red indicates the signal is strongest. Yellow is a little weaker signal than red. Green is a little weaker signal than yellow. Finally blue indicates a very weak signal.

Let the evidence be your guide As for the app’s authenticity? That’s for you to decide. But don’t say we didn’t warn you when you open the app looking for a laugh and find yourself looking at a grid showing three red orbs advancing quickly toward you. 9


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Ŕ ENTERTAINMENT Ŕ

Raise your glass to celebrate beer this fall Beer tastings like Rockford’s Screw City Beer Festival let locals sample seasonal brews By Tony Calderala

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ENTERTAINMENT

Types of beer rhnee^g\hngm^k ZmHdmh[^k_^lmhk Zghma^k[^^kmZlmbg` Pale AleĹŠ"MJHIUUPBTUFEDBSNFM colored beer (much like a Miller or Bud Light) with a smooth malty taste and a fair amount of a citrus hop. India Pale AleĹŠ5ZQJDBMMZMJHIUFSJO color than the classic Pale Ale, it has a more bitter taste, and can often be overwhelmed with the grape-fruity hop typically used in making this beer.

8

hether it’s attending an Oktoberfest celebration or just hanging out at a local brewery, fall is a great time for beer. If you’re a beer fanatic or simply like a pint every now and then, this is the season to find a local hot spot to quench your thirst.

Amber AleĹŠ"NPEFSBUFMZDBSNFMFE color beer, with a variety of interpretations on how to brew it, it often has a range of hoppiness based where it is brewed and what flavors are brewed with it. Red AleĹŠ"GVMM SJDISFEDPMPSXJUIB strong hop flavor and a higher alcohol content than the previous styles. PorterĹŠ"MJHIUUPEBSLCSPXODPMPS brew that is rich and thick. Many are brewed with vanilla, chocolate, pumpkin and other varieties.

On Sept. 10, seven days before the official start of Oktoberfest, Rockford, Ill. was one of these hot spots. Rockford, an aging industrial town in northern Illinois that used to be the screw capital of the Midwest, brought in 25 craft breweries and more than 120 beers to sample at the first ever Screw City Beer Festival. The idea for the festival originated 10 years ago with a few local beer connoisseurs who thought Rockford would be a great place to start a beer festival and share their own home crafted beers with their neighbors.

StoutĹŠ"EBSLBMF SFMBUFEUPBQPSUFSJO its black coloring. Has a roasted, bitter taste and creamy texture.

Thirsty? I know I was when I wandered throughout the festival’s wonderful world or froth and flavor at each tent setup along one closed off block in downtown Rockford. At this particular event, there were two ways to enjoy the tasteful libations: as a regular Joe or as a VIP. The difference, only one hour and $25 extra—one hour of heaven, that is. The VIP ticket allowed me to enter the festival one hour earlier, sip from an actual glass and sample seven premium limited selection beers.

CiderŊ7BSJFUZPGDPMPSBOEŤBWPST Hard ciders have a sweet, fruity, but crisp flavor.

LagerĹŠ-JHIUHPMEFOZFMMPXDPMPS  usually served at cool temperatures. Clean and crisp taste with lower alcohol concentration, and lower amount of hops.

8IFBU"MFĹŠ$IBSBDUFSJ[FECZBDMPVEZ  golden hue, wheat beers are brewed with, you guessed it, a large amount of wheat. There are several varieties that have their own distinct flavors. volume 2

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ENTERTAINMENT

To top that list was a home brewed beer appropriately named 10 Year Old Mead, from Rockford’s very own Forest City Brew Club. It’s golden color and foam-less was something spectacular in itself, but the smooth taste of honey as it flowed past my lips, over my tongue and down my gullet is what made me ask “Where can I purchase this? In mass.” Unfortunately, it could not be purchased as it was a hand crafted beer by a local brew club. Visiting this particular tent did create a lot of buzz for home brewing. Besides simply enjoying a good brew, you can join in the fun this fall and make your very own. The rest of the breweries in attendance had beers that ranged from the smooth taste of a pale ale, to the distinguished flavors of the hop monsters. There were even a few that had the full taste of a deep 80

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rich chocolate color of a warm winters stout. Everyone has their own unique taste, and they are sure to find a flavor to appreciate here. While beer-tasting festivals are best enjoyed by beer drinkers, many feature hard ciders and other specialty brews, such as the popular pumpkin beer which is perfect for the fall, and foods that will appeal to just about everyone. At the Screw City festival, Crispin Cider hosted a table that was very popular among the crowd because their crisp, fruity flavors were a happy departure from the bold taste of many of the festival’s other brews. Be careful not to sample too many brews on an empty stomach. This festival offered many delicious foods during the event. Everything from salty fried cheese curds, to a freshly made wood oven pizza.


ENTERTAINMENT

MhgrlmhiÛo^[k^pl 1) Vanilla Cream Ale, Carlyle Brewing Co.:This was a deceptive brew. It had the light carmel color of a pale ale, but was thick like a wheat ale. It was extremely smooth, and had a nice hint of vanilla on the back end. 2) Cherry Chocolate Stout, Stone Brewing Co.: This brew was composed of a dark black color, a tint of red with a hefty amount of head on top. At first you could taste the flavors of dark chocolate, a bit of vanilla and coffee. Once it passed over your tongue, you were able to detect a rich cherry flavoring. 3) Breakfast Stout, Founders Brewing Co.:This is a beer for coffee lovers. It was black and bold just like a strong cup of Kona Coffee, which is actually used in the brewing process. It had a tan head. The first taste that hits your tongue are that of chocolate, but it finishes off with a smooth taste of coffee. 4) Pumking, Southern Tier Brewing Co.: Here is a beer that is perfect for the season. It was pumpkin colored, with a light orange head. It was very smooth, but still had a bitterness that is an acquired tasted for brew fanatics. The pumpkin flavor was very favorable and unique. 5) Honey Ale, Gray’s Brewing Co.: This was the closest beer to the 10 Year Old Mead. It was a rich golden color and very smooth. It was poured and had virtually had no head. It was slightly hopping on the front end and finished strong with a honey flavor.

Founders Brewing Co. Breakfast Stout

Southern Tier Brewing Co. Pumking

And to quench your thirst from the salty snacks, Screw City Beer Festival had a Sprecher Brewing Co. tent that offered delicious, non-alcoholic root beer free for those responsible individuals acting as designated drivers. Kick off fall with a tall pint and enjoy responsibly While this was just one event that took place near Chicago, fall is the season for Oktoberfest and beer tasting festivals all around the world. So take a look in your area and see if you can find a place to sample all the great kinds and varieties of beer. But in order to have the best time, leave the kids and dogs at home, find a designated driver, and, most importantly, be thirsty. 9 volume 2

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Ax the traditional Halloween movies and take a stab at these Seven spooky titles to scream to your friends about By Tom Salek

Hey look, it’s Michael Myers, Ghostface and Jason. Scared?

Probably not.

Rather than invoking screams and fright, these— yawn—villains are the usual suspects you’d expect to find in a Halloween horror movie lineup. While flicks like Halloween (1978), Scream (1996) and Friday the 13th (1980) provide fright, a few laughs and a large amount of gore, if you’re planning on having a Halloween horror film festival, venture outside the norm and scare your friends with something really atypical. Don’t know where to start? Here are seven picks that will surely frighten, disturb and stick with you long after Oct. 31. So, sorry Freddy, you’re going to be left in dark. And Jigsaw, don’t be puzzled if Saw (2004) isn’t playing on a screen near you.

Antichrist (2009): Released amidst controversy for its graphic violence and nudity, Lars von Trier’s controversial film delves into the psychic pain of grief, sex and violence. After the death of their toddler son, a couple ventures into the woods to deal with their loss. Charlotte Gainsbourg, playing a character known as ‘She,’ delves deep into her research on witchcraft trying to block out her grief. As her and her husband spend more time in the woods, she becomes more and more distraught until she reaches her breaking point. Exploring themes of sadism and masochism, von Trier’s film is a disturbing work you will probably never forget.

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ENTERTAINMENT

Eyes Without a Face (1960): George Franju’s terrifying tale about a mad scientist working to pioneer a skin transplant treatment to cure his facially disfigured daughter. There’s one catch, in order to test his breakthrough treatment, the scientist needs living human flesh. He lurks around Paris, kidnapping young women to use their faces to replace that of his disfigured daughter. Although Eyes Without a Face is more subtle and poetic, there is one sequence where Franju gives a glimpse of the frightening face transplant operation. While not gory by today’s standards, the subject matter in itself is enough to raise a few eyebrows.

The Fly (1986): One of the most disgusting films ever made, David Cronenberg’s The Fly is all about the decay of the human body. The movie’s plot is pretty simple, while testing out an experimental teleportation device, a scientist accidentally crosses his genes with that of a housefly. As the film moves along, the scientist’s body slowly decays, making him look less like a human and instead more like a diseased monster. Besides having excellent special effects, the film has been praised by critics as an allegory for the HIV/AIDS epidemic of the 1980s.

Peeping Tom (1960): Michael Powell’s thriller is about a disturbed cameraman who wanders around London picking up women. After luring them into a private location, he tells the women he’s an amateur filmmaker. With the camera filming, he ventures toward the women, pulling out a hidden spike from his tripod and stabbing them to death. Exploring the themes of childhood trauma, violence and voyeurism, Powell’s film was so controversial upon its initial release that it destroyed the director’s future filmmaking career.

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Repulsion (1965): A major inspiration for Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan (2010), Roman Polanski’s film explores the themes of psychosis and entrapment. A frigid, young woman’s world begins to crumble after a series of traumatic events occur while her roommate and sister are vacationing away from their London flat. Locking herself in her home, Polanski shows the young woman enduring a psychological breakdown. The surreal film includes a number of chilling sequences, including one that shows the young woman watching her apartment literally begin to crumble before her eyes, while strange arms reach out of the walls and try to grab her.

The Thing (1982): With a new prequel coming out Oct. 14, now is the perfect time to catch John Carpenter’s version of The Thing. Based on the novella Who Goes There? by John W. Campell, Jr., and a loosely-based remake of the 1952 film, The Thing from Another World, Carpenter’s flick is about an alien organism that attacks and infects researchers on an antarctic base. Filled with a number of frights and a great soundtrack, Carpenter’s film is a paranoid tale about an organism capable of causing the apocalypse. And like The Fly, Carpenter’s film has also been noted for being an allegory to the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

‘War of the Coprophages’ (1996) episode of The X-Files: This episode of the long running series The X-Files is the perfect mixture of comedy and horror. Unconnected to the series larger alien mythology, this monster of the week installment shows FBI agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully investigating the deaths of people in a small Massachusetts town, all suspected of being killed by cockroaches. The episode provides a number of chilling cockroach attacks, including one instance where a roach burrows into the arm of a victim. 9

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What’s age got to do with it? A look at whether similarity in age is more important than other factors in romantic relationships

Ŕ DATING / RELATIONSHIPS Ŕ

By Bridget Maiellaro Illustration by Rachel Kosmal

Earlier this summer, 51-year-old actor Doug Hutchison announced he had married then 16-year-old aspiring country singer and former beauty pageant queen Courtney Stodden.“True love can be ageless,” they declared in a statement released by the couple’s spokesperson, shocking Americans and causing many to question their sanity. The situation brings light to a constantly controversial topic: When it comes to relationships, is age truly just a number? Hutchinson, after all, is not the first to date or marry someone significantly younger than him— even though this particular engagement required Stodden’s mother to sign a form of consent. In fact, May-December romances, relationships where one individual is significantly older than the other, have been a common trend throughout history. Take, for instance, Woody Allen’s marriage to Soon-Yi Previn, the adopted daughter of his ex-lover Mia Farrow. The couple, also 35 years apart, married in 1997, five years after Allen and Farrow split. Or, consider Demi Moore, 48, and Ashton Kutcher, 33. Although Kutcher is closer in age to Moore’s oldest daughter, Rumor Willis, their romance is still hot in the headlines.

Decoding the term “May-December romance” This term is used to describe relationships in which one person is much older than the other. “May” refers to the younger person being in the spring of life, while “December” refers to the older individual being in the winter.

51-year-old actor Doug Hutchison married then 16-year-old aspiring country singer and former beauty pageant queen Courtney Stodden in May of this year.

While there are extreme age gaps within the relationships listed above, some age variation exists in all couples—unless, of course, two individuals who were born on the same day happen to be dating and/or married. However, those with a few months to five years apart tend not to receive as much scrutiny or attention, and, according to Dating Coach Patti Feinstein, it’s because there aren’t any generational gaps. “When there are decades between two individuals, you’re going to have different interests. You’re not going to like the same music. In fact, you’re not even going to understand it,” Feinstein said. “If an older individual marries a much younger person, there will be some problems. And, no matter what, those problems are going to manifest themselves later on.” For the last 120 years, the average age difference between married couples in the U.S. has been 2.3 years. In 2010, the estimated median age for first marriages was 28.2 for men and 26.1 for women, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Therefore, it’s volume 2

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DATING / RELATIONSHIPS no surprise that when it comes to celebrities, many consider age-defying relationships as publicity stunts—another surefire way to obtain media and blog coverage for weeks, months, or possibly years. Feinstein believes this may be the case for Hutchison and Stodden, who is now 17 years old. “This is probably making him feel macho and important, and he’s basically saying, ‘Look at my prize.’ But in a year or two, he’s gonna think she’s a fuck-up. And it’s not that she is a fuck-up. It’s that he is expecting someone with a much older mindset.” On an everyday level, there’s usually the perception that the younger party is looking for someone to take care of him/her in terms of security and finances. There’s also the idea that the younger person is naive or is being manipulated by the older individual who enjoys being awed and praised. Family issues may even be a factor. For instance, a woman who grows up without a father may be more likely to latch onto an older male as a replacement. Furthermore, when it comes to couples who are decades apart, many tend to question what interests and beliefs the pair actually have in common. “The more similar you are, the better the success rate is,” Feinstein said. “If you don’t have anything in common, what happens in the long run is that you get bored with each other. You need to have similar life values. You don’t have to have the same taste in music or the same hobbies, but you have to have something that brings you together. Outside of a great sex life, you need to enjoy being together and have something in common.” Aside from social stigmas, can age alone negatively impact a relationship? Yes, said Sven Drefahl of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. Drefahl’s 2010 study revealed the greater the age 86

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difference in a marriage, the lower the wife’s life expectancy. Meanwhile, a husband who is seven to nine years older than his wife lowers his mortality risk by 11 percent, compared to same-age couples. The study also found a man dies sooner when he is younger than his spouse, but being married in general raises the life expectancy for both men and women. Taking all factors into consideration, Feinstein argues that inevitably, compatibility and prior experience with love are key to any successful relationship. “Life is hard enough. Why make it harder than it needs to be by putting an obstacle in your relationship?” she said. “I understand people fall in love. It’s an adrenaline thing, and you can’t think clearly or make logical decisions. That ‘UGH!’ feeling is gonna pass, so make sure you’re compatible.” 9


Ĺ” TECHNOLOGY Ĺ”

‘If my boss ever figures out how to print in landscape, I might be out of a job’ via Twitter, 1 minute ago Simple social media rules for the blurred lines between personal and professional #Z3FOFF.BJMIJPUĹ”1IPUPHSBQIZCZ-ZOO8$POXBZ

As social media shifted from a means of communication to a way of life, people moved from updating their families with good news to updating the world on their bosses’ latest idiosyncrasies. Because we live in a culture of oversharing, etiquette issues often surface when people start asking themselves how much is too much? and who might see this? before posting to their blog—which, more often than not, feeds into their Twitter, which feeds into their Facebook. That is, if they even stop to ask. For the earliest adopters, the technology savvy,

younger crowd who grew up using social media, the line often blurs between what’s appropriate and what’s not when it comes to sharing their daily details. And as the younger generations invade the workforce, social media can be helpful to smart users and hindering to careless others. Recent graduates are stuck wondering how to manage their personal social media profiles—a digital space that captures the best and the worst— in pursuit of their first big job. Employers may not mind uncovering photos of a job applicant sitting around a bonfire with friends, but they may be less than thrilled to come across photo albums of the potential new hire doing keg stands or a series of tweets rating their hangover on a scale of 1-10...an 11. volume 2 87


TECHNOLOGY New grads aren’t alone in questioning their social activity on the Web. Those who have a concrete role in the workforce may also be at odds when it comes to online etiquette, especially when a superior sends the dreaded “Friend Request.” What should you do in this scenario? Let us offer a few ground rules to follow as you continue to live your life personally and professionally, and capture it through social media.

When it comes to your username, keep it simple Many struggle with what to do with their online presence while on the job hunt, and consider cleaning up their social profile or even deactivating it completely during this process. One common solution for Facebook users is to change their last name to their middle name to make it more difficult for employers to find their profile. Some people go as far as making up an entirely new name to hide personal information from potential employers. Keri, a 25-year-old high school teacher in the Chicago suburbs, changed her last name to her middle name on Facebook when she began student teaching during college to prevent both potential employers and students from looking her up. She’s kept it that way ever since. “Taking my last name off my Facebook profile helps me keep my personal and professional lives separate,” she said. “I don’t think it’s appropriate for

How do others see you? When it comes to your career, the way people perceive you—online and offline—is important. And these days, more and more entities, like Social Intelligence Corp., are looking at what current and potential employees are posting and doing on the Internet. To see what they’re seeing, do a quick Google search on yourself to reveal the top links associated with your name. You could also set up Google Alerts of your name to see what conversations and updates about you are publicized. If you don’t like what you see, it’s time to update your personal brand. students to be able to find me on Facebook.” Our advice is to keep it simple. If you feel the need to change your name, don’t choose a wild or derogatory pseudonym. Moreover, take a closer 88 OCT/NOV 2011 | thefacetsmag.com

Have you ever done a simple search for “boss” on Twitter? Check out a few recent gems from users* who mention their bosses during the work day. @EasilyDistracted:  “My  proudest   moment  at  work  is  when  my  boss   comes  by  my  desk  and  I  don’t  have  to   minimize  a  single  window.” @SmarterThanMyBoss:  “I  almost  got   ¿UHGDWZRUNIRUVOHHSLQJXQGHUP\ desk,  but  I  told  my  boss  I  was  planking   DQGQRZ,DP93RI6RFLDO0HGLD´ #&XEH/LIH5HSUHVHQW³:DQWDSUR-­ motion  at  work?  Kill  your  boss.  Boom,   position  just  opened.” @CorpAmericaSucks:  “I  am  not  a   FRQIURQWDWLRQDOSHUVRQ,FRXOGTXLW my  job  altogether  to  not  have  that  talk   with  my  boss.  #Screwed” *Twitter  handles  and  photos  have  been  changed.

look at your life. What do you have to hide? Maybe it’s best to keep your real name but carefully monitor the content of your profile instead.

How private is your profile? Although changing your profile name may mask it from quick searches, technology savvy employers can still search through a website’s cached archive and uncover deleted posts or changed profile names. So while choosing the right username is paramount to creating the proper digital profile, it’s also important to consider your privacy settings. But even with security options, it’s tough to say exactly how far your social circle expands. Let’s say you apply for a job and an industry professional conducts a background check on you. What happens if the industry professional knows one of your mutual friends with full access to your profile? What you assumed was hidden from the masses may actually be seen. Although only a fictitious example, it’s not far from reality. In June, the Federal Trade Commission


TECHNOLOGY approved Social Intelligence Corp., a background check company that screens job applicants based on their online presence. This means anything you have ever posted to Facebook, Twitter, your blog— to the Internet as a whole—may become a standard part of background checks when you apply for a job. We know employers are looking up job applicants on the Internet. So remember, even if your profile is private, there is still a chance your tweet or Facebook post could go viral. With that in mind, only post what you are willing to stand by.

Social media is the perfect place not to vent about the office Think about all of the passive-aggressive thoughts about your conniving co-worker or condescending boss that have crossed your mind at some point. These would make for hilarious tweets, right? Well, yes, but refrain from posting them anyway. Unless you check “Protect my tweets” in your Twitter account settings, which is not the default, anyone can view your tweets or begin following you at any time without your permission.

Being polite in the office is something that comes with the job. Instead of taking your rage to the Internet, talk about your frustration over the ridiculous amount of work your boss put on you or the way your supervisor treated you after a small mistake with an amicable friend at lunch or your spouse when you get home. Do not use social media to ease your anger. Five years ago, people’s social lives and work lives were much more separate. But through social media and other developing communication tools, the two have inevitably merged. It’s important to maintain your personality throughout all your social media accounts, but remember to maintain your professionalism, too. Finding the right balance may seem like a time-consuming task, but you don’t want to be remembered as the person who was fired over a tweet about how inept your boss is when it comes to printing in landscape. 9

Social media sites – plain and simple Each social media site is popular for very distinct reasons. Take a look at these quick, yet powerful tips on why and how they can each impact you as a user. Time and time again, this platform has updated its privacy settings to appease its users. These controls enable individuals to adjust who can see their profile picture, photo albums, status updates and more. But blocking others isn’t a 100 percent guarantee that employers won’t be able to see things that are still posted on the site. After all, Facebook currently has more than 750 million active users with an average user boasting 130 friends. And as the site proudly displays on its privacy settings page, “Remember: The people you share with can always share your information with others.” This is the best social network for professional networking before, during and after a job search. The majority of active users on this site are recruiters and job seekers, so be sure to sprinkle relevant keywords within your profile to ensure your profile appears in recruiter searches. On a site that’s known for its short and sweet updates (140 characters a pop, to be exact), the number one no-no is typos. Such errors could cause employers to perceive you as lazy, careless, or even dumb. Avoid them at all cost, whether you’re tweeting from your smartphone, iPad, or desktop. Google owns YouTube, so files uploaded to this video-sharing site may do wonders for your personal search engine optimization, or SEO. That said, be sure videos posted are ones you want tied to your name. Sure the video of you falling down the stairs at your favorite bar is “hilarious,” but do you want your employer to see it? volume 2

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Founders’ Favorites

What we’re loving this fall!

Brittany’s Picks:

1

I turn to Etsy whenever I’m looking for a quirky gift, one-of-a-kind handmade item, or inexpensive and unique home decor. I was recently on the hunt for a chic iPad case and found a perfect one with rich, camel-colored leather, charcoal felt and a personalized name tag. The best part? It also doubles as a clutch.

2

Loafers are everywhere this fall, and I’m a complete sucker for them. Wedge loafers, flat loafers, loafers with tassels - I want them all. I snatched up a great pair of brown wedge loafers from UrbanOG.com that are an absolute steal at only $26. I’m also loving the Steve Madden MADEE leopard loafers right now, which feature two fall trends in one great shoe.

3

You already read my ode to pumpkinflavored everything, so it should come as no surprise that one of my favorite things to drink this time of year is pumpkin beer. The perfect pumpkin ale is brewed with real pumpkin and spices, is reminiscent of a slice of pumpkin pie with hints of cinnamon and nutmeg, but is not too sweet or heavy. Check out a few of my favorites from our “Guide to Thanksgiving dinner” on page 30.

Lynn’s Picks:

1

Speaking of being thankful, I am very thankful for Caribou Coffee’s Peach Black Signature Iced Tea. I couldn’t start my day without it. Well I could, but I wouldn’t be very happy.

2

I have been in love with Ziploc Zip’n Steam Microwave Bags for over a year. It’s a super quick, easy and healthy way to steam fresh or frozen vegetables, potatoes, fish, poultry and more. I recently introduced them to the Facets crew while shooting our “Guide to Thanksgiving dinner” on page 30.

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I’m so happy that Gavin Degraw dropped his new CD Sweeter. This one is for sure in heavy rotation on my iPhone. Check out his first single from the album, “Not Over You.” I wish he would come play in Chicago again!

OCT/NOV 2011 | thefacetsmag.com


Jay’s Picks:

1

If you ever find yourself in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, check out the Flume Gorge, an 800-foot long natural gorge in between 70- to 90-foot tall granite walls. Although this geological marvel has delighted visitors for centuries, I saw it for the first time recently. It was an awesome sight and a great hike.

2

The Help is a brilliantly acted tale of 1960s Mississippi and the racial realities, tensions and dynamics that involved “The Help” and the families they worked for. Oscars are written all over this one.

3

I can’t stop listening to “Eleanor Rigby” by Aretha Franklin. What happens when a Beatles classic gets redone by The Queen of Soul? Transcendent gold!

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Tom’s Picks:

1

First of all, I love my new iPad. Second of all, The New Yorker’s iPad app is a fantastic free app that really makes great use of the technology. Rather than just serving as a digitized version of the magazine, The New Yorker’s editors added exclusive photos, video, audio and interactive charts. It’s a fantastic addition to an already spectacular publication.

2

Season two of Boardwalk Empire (Sundays, 8 p.m. CDT), HBO’s prohibition drama about gangsters, bootleggers, corrupt politicians and the equally dirty law enforcement officials, returned this fall. The show even has a free app for iPad that lets you explore the set, read script excerpts and test your knowledge of the Roaring Twenties.

3

If you didn’t catch season one of the Martin Scorsese-produced drama starring Steve Buscemi, HBO subscribers can check it out using HBO GO (also available for Android, iPhone and iPad), which has all episodes of Boardwalk Empire, as well as every other HBO show.

Rachel’s Picks:

1

As the weather gets colder, warm up on the inside with a glass of local brew. Check out CraftBeer.com to find local breweries near you and enjoy an afternoon of brewery tours, samples and great food.

2

This fall I took a quick trip to Traverse City, Mich. Not only are there amazing natural beaches and dunes, but it’s also a great place for foodies! I highly recommend conquering the Dune Climb at Sleeping Bear Dunes in early October to take in a cool breeze and a breathtaking view of Lake Michigan.

With the school year in full swing by October, we sometimes forget how much it costs for our up-incoming generation to get a good education. It’s no secret that many schools in our country are without basic supplies and in need of a little help. Through DonorsChoose.org, you can help fund projects and supply needs from teacher-submitted requests from around the country, and help make the future a little brighter. 9

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Socialize with us! Click the Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook and Google+ magnets on the Facets fridge to get inside information, behind-the-scenes photos and sneak peeks between each bimonthly issue.

Love us? Have a way to make us better? We want to know. Email all questions, comments or concerns to info@thefacetsmag.com. volume 2

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The Facets Magazine - "Thankful for all things fall" issue for October/November 2011