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LA’S MAGAZINE ON ART, DESIGN, ARCHITECTURE & FASHION

ISSUE 7

ART ISSUE: LOS ANGELES ART SHOW • BOB POE’S HAPPY ACCIDENT • DESIGNING HOPE IN SKID ROW • PAINTER, SHELDON FIGOTEN • MILLINERY CONFECTIONS


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CONTRIBUTORS MASTHEAD Publisher Chris Davies Associate Editor Peter Frank Managing Editor Aparna Bakhle-Ellis Creative Director Chris Davies Art Direction & Design Shout Design Group Paul Soady Contributing Writers Jacki Apple Peter Frank Jesi Khadivi Lanee Neil Craig Stephens Susan Stroh Fashion Editor Anyes Galleani

JACKI APPLE Jacki Apple is a Los Angeles-based visual, performance, and media artist, designer, writer, composer, and producer whose work has been presented internationally. Her writings have been featured in numerous publications including THE Magazine LA, The Drama Review, Art Journal, and High Performance. She is a professor at Art Center College of Design.

PETER FRANK Peter Frank is Senior Curator at the Riverside Art Museum, Associate Editor for Fabrik and is also the Associate Editor for THE Magazine LA. He was born in 1950 in New York, where he served as art critic for The Village Voice and The SoHo Weekly News, and moved to Los Angeles in 1988.

JESI KHADIVI After graduating from Eugene Lang College with a BA in art history and critical theory, Jesi Khadivi served time as a gallerina in New York City. Now she writes about contemporary art and cinema from Los Angeles and Berlin for Dazed and Confused and SOMA, among other fine publications.

LANEE NEIL Contributing Photographer Ted VanCleave Account Executive Renee Smith Production Associate Sascha Escandon Distribution Allem Ramirez

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING Editorial editorial@fabrikmagazine.com Advertising ads@fabrikmagazine.com Contact 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 Tel 310 360 8333 info@fabrikmagazine.com http://www.fabrikmagazine.com

INFORMATION Fabrik is published bi-monthly by Fabrik Magazine, Inc., 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Contents cannot be reproduced in part or in full without the written permission of the copyright holder. The opinions expressed are those of the artists and writers themselves and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Fabrik Magazine, Inc. Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved. PRINTED IN LOS ANGELES

Lanee Neil is a Los Angeles-based writer who uses her craft to pursue her passions; travel, culture and enriching quality of life. Lanee has traveled extensively through Europe, Asia, Costa Rica and Russia and is currently working on a photojournalistic documentation of her time spent in India. As a lifestyle consultant, she is a contributing writer to Yogi Times.

CRAIG STEPHENS Craig Stephens is an Australian born freelance writer who has lived in the U.S. (LA &NYC) since Jan. 2000. He has written for an absurd cross section of titles from Playboy to Personal Computer, Elle to Tokyo Journal, Dart International, Artweek, Adweek, Malibu Magazine, LA Weekly, Loaded and many more, from stints in London, Tokyo, Berlin and NYC. More about him at www.craig-stephens.com

SUSAN STROH Biographer, memoirist and award-winning screen and short story writer, Susan Stroh, freelances as a journalist and coaches/collaborates with clients on their books. Daughter of a musician and painter, Susan’s been an artist all her life: dancer, actor, director and for the last decade, writer/editor/coach. www.susanstroh.com

LA’S MAGAZINE ON ART, DESIGN, ARCHITECTURE & FASHION

ISSUE 7

ART ISSUE: LOS ANGELES ART SHOW • BOB POE’S HAPPY ACCIDENT • PAINTER, SHELDON FIGOTEN • DESIGNING HOPE IN SKID ROW • MILLINERY CONFECTIONS

ON THE COVER Photo by Bob Poe. ‘Crystal,’ 2009, 35x50 inches, archival pigment print on canvas.


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CONTENTS 8

Profile: Bob Poe’s Happy Accident

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IconocLAst: Sheldon Figoten, Painter

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Downtown Hub: Designing Hope in Skid Row

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Through the Lens: Looking at LA

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Fashion: Millinery Confections

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Hot & Cool LA: Downtown LA

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Artful Affairs: This is Your FADA’s Fair

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Artful Affairs: Design Loves Art — The Pacific Design Center as a Vertical Gallery “Neighborhood”

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Los Angeles Art & Design Directory

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Art About Town: Peter Frank’s Exhibit Highlights

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Artist and Gallery Showcases


'COVER', 2009 54 X 90 INCHES, IPHONE PHOTOGRAPH, ARCHIVAL PIGMENT ON CANVAS

BOB POE’S HAPPY


ACCIDENT

WORDS CRAIG STEPHENS IMAGES COURTESY OF BOB POE


PROFILE

FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHER Bob Poe is an anomaly on numerous levels in today’s art world. After purchasing a first generation Apple iPhone two years ago, Poe, an autodidactic and successful entrepreneur, made the intrepid move to embrace a full-time career as a fine arts photographer, opening his own gallery – Bob Poe Photography – at Santa Monica's salubrious Bergamot Station after strolling in one afternoon on a whim to find a vacant space. Now a recognizable figure in the increasingly legitimate genre of cell-phone art photography, Poe's entry to the world of fine art is as miraculous as his near overnight realization. The process began after he accidentally shot several photographs on his new iPhone. While he says he was initially inclined to delete them, he later decided they were of artistic value. This, in turn, inspired him to devote all his time to his new craft and seek out a suitable venue to display his blossoming portfolio. Poe, a business development manager with a thriving telecommunications company, was so inspired by the photographic process, and a certainty he could nurture a successful art career, that he decided opening his own gallery wasn't such a premature thing, more something that would ensure he pursued his new creative outlet. “My entry into fine art photography was entirely happenstance. A couple of years ago I purchased an iPhone the very day it came on the market and just started snapping away. I simply started playing and came up with some interesting images. I took a picture with very blurry types of images and rather than delete them, I decided they were very artistic. At first I was going to delete them because they really weren't up to scratch, then I decided to keep them and tinker with them. I ended up with several abstract works and from there I decided this could be a really great thing to do as an artist overall.” Bob says his happy accident then became increasingly sophisticated. “Initially I started printing on paper, then I opted for canvas. I like the way printing on canvas offers a real painterly quality. I tried a number of surfaces including plexiglass, though nothing offered the warmth and organic quality of canvas. I'm settled on it now, as I like the way the colors are, and the way the images reproduce.” Asked about his work's evolution, and his stylistic and thematic progression, he reveals, “My work reflects a painterly vision of everyday subjects that exceed the original intention of the photograph. I currently employ the use of an iPhone camera, both for its accessibility and ease of use. What was initially viewed as a benign collection of subjects and locations has become an instrument that allows me to discover, and allows an audience to discover, the complexities that lay just beneath their surface.” “The spontaneous nature of the iPhone lets me capture images that, when viewed at length, display curious juxtapositions, symbolism and humor. As each photograph unfolds, it offers viewers an opportunity to apply their own personal, artistic and philosophical interpretation. Unintentional visual distortions resulting from the iPhone’s inherent limitations provide a playful temperament to much of my work, and add ambiguity to otherwise straightforward images.” 10

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'SAIL', 32 X 24 INCHES, IPHONE PHOTOGRAPH, ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT ON CANVAS


'LIGHT BIRDS', 2009, 66 X 48 INCHES, IPHONE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT ON CANVAS


ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT ON CANVAS


Poe says his subject matter includes anything that strikes him as unusual, quirky, or that can evoke multiple interpretations. “I haven't actually had any formal arts training apart from some assignments with black and white photography during high school. The majority of my work is improvisational, as the iPhone allows me to take quick and impulsive photographs. The absence of a heavy camera and equipment is liberating, and permits me to capture a moment in its authentic form.” “I work in large-scale reproductions of my photographs because I believe this format displays each piece's subtleties, richness and depth. The canvas also provides a dramatic backdrop for an image that is usually viewed on a very small device.” “My most recent work explores the role of discovery in the artistic process. Specifically, how the iPhone's lack of shutter speed and aperture control” - which frustrates many of its users – or “an accidental finger over its lens, can create powerful and beautiful images.” In terms of his broader creative vision Bob claims he ultimately wants to encourage his audience to pursue their own artistic endeavors, “for pure enjoyment or for further discovery of the artist within themselves.” 14

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‘REFLECTION,’ 2009, 54X90 INCHES, ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT ON CANVAS

This is a stark contrast to his former high ranking corporate career where Poe spent over 20 years in the broadcast industry, developing pioneering media initiatives for a variety of clients. He was the Director of Broadcasting for the Orlando Magic, and cultivated a strong fan base for the team when it was founded in 1989. Most notably, he was General Manager of WMMO, a breakthrough radio station in Florida that provided quality, uninterrupted music programming for adult listeners. His efforts earned him the prestigious Radio Wayne Award for General Manager of the Year and earned WMMO the Radio Station of the Year award from Billboard. Shot throughout the Los Angeles and Santa Monica area, Bob Poe’s latest show, titled “Illumination,” investigates the effect of light and movement on his subjects. L.A. artist Lisa Adams curated the exhibit. Bob Poe Gallery Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave., Gallery G8A, Santa Monica, CA 90404 http://www.bobpoephotography.com Web fabrikmagazine.com

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ICONOCLAST WORDS SUSAN STROH IMAGES COURTESY OF SHELDON FIGOTEN

Sheldon Figoten PAINTER

It is certainly pleasant to step into Sheldon Figoten’s 1920’s upstairs studio in Mid-Wilshire and be bathed in light flooding in through windows on two sides, but it’s more than exciting to view paintings which emit a powerful light of their own— paintings using pure color and forms created by oil paint poured on stretched canvas rolled with acrylic emulsion. Figoten has honed his own painterly vision to an elegant minimalism. As a dedicated abstract painter for 39 years, Sheldon Figoten’s knowledge of the LA art scene is encyclopedic. He studied art at UCLA and The Art Institute in San Francisco. And when he met Ed Moses of the Ferus Group, he was persuaded to move to Los Angeles where he has created a huge body of work. Intrigued by his work and history, I wanted to talk further with Sheldon and we met at his home in Venice to find out about his journey as an artist: including key influences and how his painting challenges the viewer. 16

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FABRIK: What inspired you to become an artist and when? Sheldon Figoten (SF): My parents were working class, Jewish immigrants from Latvia and Russia, so we had no library and they weren’t interested in art. But I had a friend in high school who was taking a correspondence course in commercial and fine art. He invited me to his house one day, where his parents had allowed him to convert a porch into his studio. I stepped into that studio and was hooked—loving the smell, the atmosphere. My friend gave me a few tubes of paint and away I went. As an undergraduate student at UCLA, I took art history courses, marking the beginning of a lifelong study. I was awestruck attending a retrospective of Henri Matisse—stunned by the crudeness, the directness, the expressiveness. It didn’t look like anything I thought painting should be—it was sophisticated and primitive at the same time. “The Dance,” from MOMA knocked me out! Another of his paintings, the more abstract “Open Window, Collioure” was a framed black rectangle and had very few references in the painting. I think that particular painting even scared Matisse, but it left a deep impression on me. Kurt Von Meir, an art critic for a New York art magazine, came to the West Coast to teach a modern art class at UCLA. Excited about the LA art scene, he insisted we go out and see it. We used Art Forum Magazine for one of our class texts. I visited the Nicholas Wilder Gallery and The Irving Blum Gallery. At these two galleries you could see the best of New York and Los Angeles art. Those two venues, especially, provided an immense education.

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ICONOCLAST

FABRIK: What did you learn about the difference between East and West Coast artists? SF: In New York, the abstract painters were traditional and formalistic—paint on canvas. In LA, there were two schools of modern art: the classicists, who were the older, erudite easel painters who did hard-edged planar abstractions. They were the gentlemen. The Ferus group were the Venice guys—hip, experimental and into new processes and materials. I became intrigued by those possibilities, some of which were seen in John McCracken planks, Larry Bell boxes, and Ron Davis fiberglass paintings. FABRIK: What did you do after studying art in college? SF: I wound up going to dental school in San Francisco 1966 to1970, taking classes at the Art Institute and painting every spare minute. But when I graduated I knew painting was what I wanted to do. Practicing dentistry would allow me the time, means and freedom to continue to paint. I left town and set up a studio in Weaverville, Northern California and started to paint abstract painting full time. European painters traditionally go to The Louvre and copy the masters but I thought I’d copy a Frank Stella painting. Of course, it didn’t wind up like his and I was off on my first group of paintings using commercial Rustoleum black and metallic paints—a lot slicker than Frank Stella’s work! I was drawn to people using new materials and processes, inventing new forms and structures—all part of the legacy of the Ferus group. Then I saw this show in SF, called “California, The Modern Era” and for the first time I saw a group of paintings by John McLaughlin and was ready to understand and connect with them. I wanted to learn more about McLaughlin and that led me to The Archives of American Art housed in The De Young Museum (now housed in The Huntington). They had received his papers from his estate and I was lucky enough to go over them before interviewing his wife, Florence, in his house and studio. So in 1980, I wrote and published an article about him which led to more writing and reviewing. As a consequence of my interest in McLaughlin, I was introduced to Ed Moses by art dealer Daniel Weinberg, who had helped open doors for me in my research on McLaughlin. Ed came up to San Francisco preparing for a show. I happened to bring in a couple of paintings to show Dan. Dan said, ‘I’ve been telling you about this young guy inspired by McLaughlin, come take a look at his stuff.’


Ed looked at my poured and irregular, not hard-edged vocabulary and said ‘I like that pecker track right there!’ (Laughs) (Meaning a visceral mark, organic, not refined!) That was the start of our friendship. Interviewing Ed for The American Archives and getting to know him opened my window to the Ferus artists. He told me stories about each one. Ed and I have followed each other’s work for 28 years. He has influenced me most importantly in his attitude towards change, openness and freedom. Not many painters are as fluid as Ed—he’s


ICONOCLAST

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one of the great ones. He’s been enormously generous in his attention and I’ve been lucky enough to travel with him. In 1990, he had a show in Japan and took me along. Ed knew how much Japanese pottery meant to me and we both were able to see wonderful local pottery villages and museums. My work has been strongly influenced by Japanese pottery. The old stuff is the best—natural, unforced, unselfconscious, it moves me tremendously. There were scholar potters, but I loved the tradition of the farmer potters who learned century after century how to make the shapes and had to make their water storage jars and bowls during the winter. The attitudes inherent in those pieces have seeped into my paintings and freed me. FABRIK: In what way? SF: There’s a direct action when you pour paint—you don’t mess with it, whatever happens, there’s the acceptance of what the paint does and wants to do, how it runs and where it runs. I make abstract paintings in as clear and direct and truthful a fashion as I can. FABRIK: What effect do you want your paintings to have? SF: I hope to engage the viewer through this immediate sensory experience, not to please or entertain or to make something simply beautiful, but to create an imbalance, to challenge the viewer’s perceptual sense, throwing people off a little to put them into a state of active contemplation. I hope the paintings provide a stimulus that is about questions, not answers. The freedom in abstract painting is that the viewer can provide his or her own meaning, own sense of order, if need be. McLaughlin said, “I don’t want to tell the viewer who I am but want to let the viewer find out who the viewer is.” I agree. FABRIK: And what do you hope for in the future? SF: Most importantly, I look forward to continuing to work, to show and sell my work more than I have in the past—giving me greater personal freedom.

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DESIGNING HOPE WORDS LANEE NEIL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SKID ROW HOUSING TRUST


IN SKID ROW Although Los Angeles has the highest homeless population in the U.S, the non-profit organization Skid Row Housing Trust is a major reason why homelessness is on the decline in our city. Skid Row Housing Trust (SRHT) has tirelessly endeavored for twenty years to provide permanent supportive housing to homeless people in downtown Los Angeles by remodeling older hotels and building contemporary apartment buildings. By hiring some of Los Angeles’ most prestigious architecture firms like Koning Eizenberg, Michael Maltzan, Killefer Flammang and Lorcan O'Herlihy, they are transforming the fabric of Skid Row, one life at a time, to a functioning community living in well-designed, visually pleasing housing with access to on-site services like social workers and health care professionals. Fabrik Magazine talked with SRHT and architect Michael Maltzan about their recently completed downtown housing project at the corner of Hope Street and 17th, the six-story 95-unit Carver Apartment building.

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DOWNTOWN HUB

SKID ROW TRUST INTERVIEW: FABRIK: Why did you choose Michael Maltzan as the architect for the Carver Apartments?

Skid Row Housing Trust (SRHT): The Trust chose Michael Maltzan Architecture (MMA) as the architect on the new Carver Apartments as a contemporary solution to a challenging site located in a challenging location. The site was irregularly shaped, on a lonely street, sat next to freeway and lastly, the site was on top of a methane zone. Michael Maltzan was clearly challenged by the site, but achieved success in being able to provide a balance between contemporary design, density and open space, while simultaneously mitigating noise and pollution and connecting the building to the exterior environment. The New Carver Apartments is the second building the Trust commissioned Michael Maltzan Architecture todesign for us. FABRIK: What were his guidelines and budget?

SRHT: MMA’s first and foremost guideline was to design a building that would provide as many new homes for homeless individuals as possible, while also seamlessly integrating into the neighborhood context. MMA was flexible in their guidelines as the project had to undergo a significantly burdensome entitlement process that also had to integrate design guidelines from the Community Redevelopment Agency of the City of Los Angeles. Also, to a great extent, MMA had become familiar with the Trust's housing model from our previous partnership with MMA, the Rainbow Apartments. MMA built on the lessons learned from the

CARVER APARTMENTS

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Rainbow, and pushed the envelope of supportive housing further with the New Carver. The design budget for the New Carver was $750k. FABRIK: How many housing developments has Skid Row done in downtown?

SRHT: The New Carver Apartments are the 22nd apartment building developed by Skid Row Housing Trust. For the past twenty years the Trust has been rehabilitating existing historic residential hotels and building new permanent supportive housing developments for homeless men and women downtown. Since the organization was founded, we have been dedicated to providing stable homes for the most vulnerable men and women in our community. Our model is called permanent supportive housing because we combine affordable residential buildings where our residents can live as long as they need to with on-site supportive services and healthcare to restore our residents’ lives. FABRIK: How does the application process work for the tenants? How do you chose them and based on what?

SRHT: The Trust screens in, rather than screens out. We target the most vulnerable men and women living on the streets, who are individuals who have often spent years living on the streets and suffer from multiple disabling conditions. We target those individuals because we want our permanent supportive housing to have the greatest positive impact on our community. We know that we have the greatest impact both on our residents’ lives and our community when we reach out to the men and women who would be homeless but for the homes and support we provide. Residents moving into the New Carver will only be able to qualify if they are homeless, extremely low-income, and suffer from a physical disability, chronic disease, and/or mental illness. FABRIK: Is it rent free or low rent?

SRHT: The apartments at the New Carver include a rental subsidy provided by HUD’s Section 8 program. Residents will be asked to pay between 30 to 40% of their monthly income in rent. For example, many of our residents survive on General Relief benefits provided by the County of Los Angeles of $221 a month, which means they pay approximately $58 a month in rent for their apartment. FABRIK: When will they be moving in?

SRHT: We began accepting applications on Monday, October 5th. We hope that the first residents will move in by the end of October. FABRIK: Do you provide furniture/household items too?

SRHT: The apartments come furnished and with very basic household items. FABRIK: How do you think Skid Row Housing is changing or affecting the fabric of LA?

SRHT: Skid Row Housing Trust is committed to ending chronic homelessness by providing Web fabrikmagazine.com

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DOWNTOWN HUB

stable homes and support to the most vulnerable men and women on the streets. Our work both benefits our residents, but also the communities we work in. Downtown LA is a better community because there are fewer people on the streets because of our work and because we are improving blighted properties by building beautiful buildings. Additionally, by targeting the most vulnerable men and women on the streets we inspire others in our community to reach out by proving that no one is beyond help. FABRIK: What new projects do you have in the pipeline?

SRHT: The Trust will open the Charles Cobb Apartments in January 2010. The Cobb is designed by Kivotos Montenegro Partners and will provide 76 apartments for chronically homeless men and women. The Trust is scheduled to break ground on the New Genesis Apartments in November. The New Genesis is designed by Killefer Flammang Architects and will provide 106 apartments in the historic core of downtown. In addition to the New Genesis, we’re in pre-development on the Star Apartments with Michael Maltzan and the New Pershing with Killefer Flammang. The Trust is now working on a 3rd development with MMA, the Star Apartments, which will contain among other things, “prefab going up”. It will be the first time, in the City of Los Angeles, where prefabricated modular housing units will be stacked, up to 4 levels, and will sit on top of an existing concrete shell. The existing building is a shopping center on the ground floor with parking on the top. The development will reduce the impact to the environment by maintaining the majority of the structure and then utilizing prefab construction for additional stories. The Star is at the end of its design development phase and the Trust expects to begin construction by the end of 2010. FABRIK: How can an individual help out with Skid Row Housing?

SRHT: People can get involved in our work by visiting www.skidrow.org. There they can watch our residents’ stories, sign up for a tour, and learn about volunteer opportunities. They can also donate! Here are examples of how important donations are to our work: – $100 enables a formerly homeless person to receive healthcare for a month. – $300 provides case management for two months. – $500 brings two months of substance abuse recovery groups to Trust residents. – $800 delivers six months of mental health care to a formerly homeless person. – $1,000 allows a chronically homeless person to have daily access to a nurse. – $5,000 gives a homeless person a home for a year. FABRIK: Anything else you'd like to highlight about the Carver?

SRHT: One cool fact about the Carver is that it was supported by President Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funds both supported construction jobs and provided homes for the most vulnerable.


MICHAEL MALTZAN INTERVIEW: FABRIK: How do you think the Carver Apartment building has changed the landscape of downtown LA?

Michael Maltzan (MM): Once the building is occupied by tenants, we expect that the residential density will dramatically increase the amount of pedestrian traffic and street life in this particular section of downtown Los Angeles. One of the fundamental design concepts for the ground floor, courtyard and public spaces in the building involves weaving urban conditions and street views through the interior spaces – essentially connecting the life of the street and the life of the building. The residents are formerly homeless; experience suggests that when they lived on the streets, they tended to block out the urban experience, leading very private, inner lives out of survival necessity. Once these residents have a home, they have their own truly private spaces and can begin to reshape their public lives and re-enter a collective experience. As such, it's fundamentally important that the building foster a sense of urban liveliness, and that the design expresses this by connecting visually and perceptually to the local landscape at multiples scales. Conversely, the awakening of 95 new voices in the neighborhood has a tremendous potential to shift the character of life within the local community. FABRIK: How did designing a building that sits a few feet from the I-10 West freeway influence your design and how do you think it will affect the residents?

MM: We’re fortunate to have a site located directly along the I-10 West. While designing adjacent to the freeway meant that we had to deal with atypical acoustic requirements and undertake a significant amount of noise mitigation, the freeway also made it possible to create urban connections in unexpected ways. Residents engage the street life not only from within the ground floor public spaces. They have a courtyard with a grand stair connected to the street; they have dramatic views of the downtown skyline from the 6th level roof terrace; and they sit eye to eye with the freeway traffic when watching television or doing laundry at the level 3 community room. These connections not only embrace the dramatic urban qualities of the site, they bring a strong individual presence to a block that previously lacked human scale. FABRIK: One of the goals of Skid Row Trust is to bring a once hidden population into the public by integrating them into the community. How did that play into your design of the building?

MM: Formally, the building has tremendous potential to inflect the landscape of downtown LA. Viewed from the freeway and from afar, the faceted form articulates the scale of individual units within, and expresses a dynamic relationship between an urban fabric composed of individual lives, the texture of our collective experience, and the speed of the freeway. In dealing with such an underserved and often-neglected population, it’s intentional that we provide an architecture which embraces the urban landscape and brings visibility to its population.


DOWNTOWN HUB

FABRIK: It really is a striking building on par with other for-profit condo/apartment projects of downtown LA, how did you stay within the $750k budget and still make it look desirable, modern and artistic?

MM: Budget is always a challenge in any project. As the designers, it’s significant to have a client who understands that their project needs a strong visual presence as well as a strong functional design, and is willing to embark on building a design with unique formal characteristics. Through experience with multiple projects for this developer, we’ve learned the parameters, and continue to refine our sense of how to work within the ambitions of the budget. Understanding the rules of the typology allows us to push the vocabulary of the building in meaningful and ambitious ways. Given the constraints of this type of budget, we do rely substantially on the form of the building and the character of its spatial relationships to distinguish the design. FABRIK: What challenges did you face designing for the Skid Row Trust rather than for a client of a typical house or hotel?

MM: We always design with the client; in this case, the client is a not-for-profit developer who undertakes construction of multi-million dollar buildings serving a formally homeless population. In many ways, working with this type of developer is similar to working with an institution - we receive a program and work to build an understanding of the needs of the organization. Because the Housing Trust is both the developer of these projects and the long-term property manager, they are a direct conduit to our understanding the evolving needs and hopes of the tenants. We embrace the opportunity to address these specific needs, as well as to formalize the maturing ambitions of the service providers who serve the residents, through development of the common areas. FABRIK: Despite the challenges, do you feel rewarded as well by doing your part to alter a person’s life through your design?

MM: Our effort is to create a building - to give form and shape, and to organize a coherent sequence of program relationships - that serves the goal of the client. In this type of project, one of the fundamental challenges is to understand the way that the building is operated. In doing so, we have the ability to respond to the client's needs, and as such, the opportunity to shape the interactions between the building's different occupants. In many ways, the building serves as a place where residents can reassemble their lives and social relationships. Therefore, in addition to creating individual living spaces - homes - for these tenants, there is real challenge and reward in creating spaces where the residents can interact with each other and the world in meaningful and new ways.

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“The Du Barry”, 30" x 40" Archival Pigment Print © 2007 Jim McHugh

The Photographs of Jim McHugh L.A. Art Show January 20 - 24, 2010 Los Angeles Convention Center • Booth - G190 www.YargerFineArt.com

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THROUGH THE LENS WORDS JESI KHADIVI

LOOKING @ LA

LOS ANGELES OCCUPIES A DISTINCTIVE POSITION

IN THE AMERICAN CULTURAL IMAGINATION. UNSURPRISINGLY, THE CITY’S DRAMATIC HILLS, CANYONS AND BEACHES ARE A PRIME LOCATION FOR THE PROJECTION (AND PRODUCTION) OF AMERICA’S FANTASIES. THE CITY’S RICHLY VARIED LANDSCAPE COUPLED WITH ITS FILM, ART AND MUSIC INDUSTRY ARE JUST A FEW REASONS WHY SO MANY EYES AROUND THE WORLD ARE FIXED ON WHAT ANGELENOS WILL DO NEXT. STILL, THERE ARE LESS OBVIOUS REASONS THAT LOS ANGELES IS SUCH AN ENGAGING CITY. LA HOLDS A PARTICULAR FASCINATION FOR ANYONE INTERESTED IN THINKING DEEPLY ABOUT CONTEMPORARY CULTURE. ITS IDENTITY HAS BEEN MORE FIERCELY DEBATED AND CRITICALLY DISSECTED THAN ANY OTHER AMERICAN CITY, SPAWNING COUNTLESS BOOKS, FILMS AND ARTWORKS DEALING WITH THE CITY’S LEGACY.

» THE FOLLOWING PROFILES DON’T COVER OUTSTAND-

ING CIVIC ACHIEVEMENTS, RATHER THEY HONOR BOTH WELLKNOWN AND LESSER-KNOWN FIGURES IN LOS ANGELES’ CULTURAL FABRIC THAT ENGAGE THOROUGHLY WITH THE CITY AND, MOST IMPORTANTLY, HAVE PLAYED A PIVOTAL ROLE IN SHAPING PERCEPTIONS OF THE SOUTHLAND FROM WITHOUT AND WITHIN. 38

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WALTER HOPPS Walter Hopps was clearly a visionary. The self-taught curator’s 2005 obituary in the Washington Post aptly observed: “Go back through his record, and it’s like a pounding drumbeat, first, first, first, first.” The former director of the Ferus Gallery and the Pasadena Museum of Art made great strides in promoting Los Angeles’ burgeoning art scene in the late 1950s and 60s. Famous for his laid back sense of time (the curator was notoriously late and given to disappearing for days at a time), Hopps was an “artist’s curator,” widely respected for his inventive thinking and lasting relationships with many of the artists whose work he promoted. Just as Hunter S. Thompson changed what it means to be a journalist, this so-called “gonzo curator” played a vital role in shaping the taste of the latter part of the twentieth century, presenting the first career retrospective of Marcel Duchamp at the Pasadena Museum in 1963 and introducing the work of Ed Ruscha, Barnett Newman, Joseph Cornell and R. Crumb to the American public.

EVE BABITZ Friend to Neil Young and Gram Parsons, former lover of Jim Morrison, goddaughter of Stravinsky…Eve Babitz knew everyone in LA in the 1960s and 70s and purchased Steve Martin his signature white suit to boot. She may be best known popularly for playing a game of chess nude with Marcel Duchamp during his retrospective at the Pasadena Museum of Art, but her legacy should belong to her writing. Babitz’s breathless, yet incisive roman a clefs possess a Proustian potency. No one explicates the significance of 1960s and 70s Los Angeles counterculture as brilliantly as she does. Her candid insights into LA living in Slow Times, Fast Company: The World, The Flesh and LA and Eve’s Hollywood place her in the ranks of great California writers like Joan Didion, Nathanael West and John Fante. And if her taut, moving prose isn't enough, the woman is cool. In the tradition of the best observer-participants, Babitz lives what she writes about and shares her stories with unabashed candor.

MIKE DAVIS Though his detractors have called him a “city-hating socialist,” Mike Davis has stayed in Los Angeles, despite the earthquakes, floods, riots and wildfires he describes in Ecology of Fear and Dead Cities, making vital contributions to academic life in Southern California through his teaching positions at Southern California Institute of Architecture; University of California, Irvine; and University of California, Riverside. The Fontana born former meat-cutter and selfproclaimed Marxist-Environmentalist became an academic sensation Web fabrikmagazine.com

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THROUGH THE LENS

in the early 90s for his astute application of Marxist theory to issues in Los Angeles’ social policy, architecture and race relations. His book City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles has become a corner stone of urban studies and kindled international interest in studying Los Angeles as a quintessentially post-modern city.

JACK GOLDSTEIN Other than Las Vegas and Dubai, few cities are as spectacular as Los Angeles. It is only natural that the “Pictures Generation,” a group of young artists in the 70s and 80s working at the intersection of conceptualism and pop, began in Los Angeles. The Canadian-born, Los Angeles-bred Jack Goldstein worked at the forefront of this movement, which included art super-stars like Richard Longo, Cindy Sherman, Barbara Krueger and David Salle. Goldstein was a veteran of John Baldessari’s post-studio art MFA program at CalArts, which is largely credited for coaxing the nascent movement into existence with his emphasis on found photographs and mixed media experimentation. Goldstein’s influential work experienced a boom in the 1980s, only to be followed by years of relative obscurity until his death in 2005. Early works, like the film Metro-Goldwyn Mayer, which loops the MGM lions roar over a bright red background, distill images to their very essence. Goldstein’s diverse oeuvre, which includes performances, films, painting, photographs, form a coherent inquiry into the seductive power of the image and the nature of spectacle.

DAVID LYNCH David Lynch takes Bunker Hill’s noirish tales of women in trouble, young starlets and physical brutality and transports them to a nightmarish present in which dreams and reality collide in the canyons and flatlands of contemporary Los Angeles. Few can rival the free -floating, dreamlike malaise Lynch conjures in his films. The influence of his movies has extended far beyond the film industry. With Lynchmob, an exhibition of 30 international, emerging artists, Berlin based curators Emilie Trice and Christopher David sought to “‘invoke in the viewer the same psychological and emotional response as Lynch’s films.” It seems that Lynch himself is not above making work inspired by others. He created original photographs to accompany Danger Mouse’s album Dark Night of the Soul. 40

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RICHARD NEUTRA British architectural critic/LA Enthusiast, Reyner Banham, aptly noted in his seminal book on Los Angeles that architect Richard Neutra’s buildings possessed a “Californianated” version of the “creative angst” of European modernism. Together with his longtime friend, Rudolph Schindler, Neutra is responsible for the architectural style casually known as California Modernism. His design aesthetic, which he deemed “nature-near” was a striking combination of geometric forms in glass and wood which emphasized surrounding natural elements, incorporating prototypically Californian concerns such as health and the fluidity between indoor and outdoor space. An exhibition of Neutra’s drawings and architectural sketches is on view at the central branch of the Los Angeles public library until September. Originally founded in 1926, his architectural practice has been presided over since 1970 by son and partner, architect Dion Neutra. This year, the firm celebrates its 83rd year in practice.

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Millinery Confections HAT DESIGNS BY LOUISE GREEN WORDS BY JACKI APPLE PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALYSSA LAVINE

THIS PAGE: MODEL: LISA MARIE • DRESS: VINTAGE SONIA RYKIEL


FASHION

T H E R E WA S A T I M E , way back in the 20th century, when a hat was de rigueur for any cosmopolitan woman or man, not merely for special occasions, but as an essential part of one’s wardrobe. In recent decades, real hats seemed to have been superseded by the handbag as the primary accessory. But hats are back with a different signification and status. (We’re not talking here about baseball caps, or those dreadful knit things, pulled down over greasy hair, that can only be called head coverings.) Hats are sexy! Unlike a bag, a hat frames the face. It can broadcast taste, style, glamour, confidence, originality, personality, wit, imagination. It can suggest courage or conformity, be playful or serious, flirtatious, seductive, bold or bashful. A hat is expressive. It sends a message, and in the dressed-down, anything goes, flip-flop and t-shirt uniformity of contemporary Los Angeles, designer and milliner Louise Green knows that a hat can make a statement that distinguishes you and sets you apart. And so do her legions of customers. From the celebrities who come to her for custom designed chapeaus, to the young and old fashionistas who flock to her sample sales, to the men who know a good fedora can set off a suit, or jeans, and turn heads. For Hollywood stylists, hip musicians, museum council ladies that lunch, and especially African-American Sunday church women, because nobody knows hats better, or wears them with greater panache than they do! When the British-born Green came to Los Angeles in the 1980s, she had the good fortune to fall under the tutelage of two women who were masters of custom-made fashion headwear – Mrs. King, and the late Wilma Rey Gordon who held hat-making gatherings in her View Park home. There, Green honed the high level of craft that is the foundation of her art. Green’s esthetic is romantic, elegant and witty. Vintage-inspired cloches and picture hats with shaped brims dominate her collections. But it is the imaginative combinations of color and materials in her trimmings – custommade silk flowers in an array of patterns and textures, leaves, grosgrains, embroidered ribbons, laces, feathers, touches of beading, or veiling – that distinguish her handmade couture designs. They make each hat an individual personal statement and conjure up just the right amount of cinematic fantasy. 50

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A stroll through the aisles of Green’s workroom reveals her vast collection of new and vintage textiles and accessories, and hat blocks from the 20s, 30s, and 40s. It reminded me of the back streets of the old Les Halles market neighborhood in Paris with its little shops housing dusty boxes of velvet flowers, antique ribbons, and exotic feathers, before it was bulldozed in the early 1970s. Green’s “fascinator” hats are an assemblage of trimmings atop a little clip-on headband that sits perched flirtatiously at a cocky angle. A must-have accessory, they add glamour or sassy sophistication to well-styled hair, like a unique piece of jewelry on a simple black dress. Or, like Billie Holiday’s gardenia, a customized Green “fascinator” can easily become a personal signature. For Spring 2010, Green has added a delicious new confection called the Doll Hat that was inspired by Impressionist paintings. Think of those miniature brimmed hats worn by Renoir, Manet, and Cassett’s fashionable Parisian women, with a contemporary twist. We can also look forward to a light airy collection of sheer textures, lacy sisal, shades of vanilla, ivory and cream, a cloche in a new ribbon weave jute, big soft brims. and one of my favorites, an exquisite shallow crowned hat with flowers under the brim beside the face rather than above. And for something a bit more tailored, there are the very chic black and white combinations, while soft metallics of pale silvers and coppers add dressier luster. The Spring Collection also features sporty fedoras, and even a couple of bowlers for the guys! Style is all about attitude. Whether you want to attract admiring glances, or just perk up your day, try a Green chapeau. Instead of another short-lived electronic device, invest in a hat. Be alluringly elegant, coquettish, or a noir femme fatale. Be fabulous. A sampling of the collection is on view on the following pages. Photography: Alyssa Lavine / http://www.alyssalavinephotography.com Photo Assistant: Jedediah Johnson / http://jedediahjohnson.com/icontact.html Make-up and Hair: Veronica Lane / http://www.veronicalane.com Styling and Art Direction: Jacki Apple / http://www.jackiapple.com Models: Lisa Marie, Aline Rock, Banke (Models International) Louise Green Millinery Co. 1616 Cotner Avenue (1/2 block north of Santa Monica Blvd @ 405 Freeway) West Los Angeles, CA 90025 • (310) 479-1881 • http://www.louisegreen.com Web fabrikmagazine.com

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THIS PAGE: MODEL: ALINE ROCK OPPOSITE PAGE: MODEL: ALINE ROCK • SILK BLOUSE: J. CREW


THIS PAGE: MODEL: ALINE ROCK • COTTON T-SHIRT: J. CREW OPPOSITE PAGE: MODEL: BANKE • CREPE DE CHINE DRESS: JACKI APPLE


HOT & COOL LA

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DOWNTOWN

BOLT BARBERS

BOTTEGA LOUIE

By shearing, shaving and shining one head or shoe at a time, owner Matt Berman (or otherwise affectionately known as “Mohawk Matt”) believes Bolt Barbers can help reignite a solid community in downtown LA once again. Berman, formerly a successful marketing executive, opened the old fashioned barbershop with a modern edge in the abandoned Owl Drugs of the Rowan Building in hopes of not only giving well-crafted haircuts but creating a club of sorts for guys of all social backgrounds to bond.

In most urban cities like Los Angeles, restaurants are small due to limited space and high dollar bythe-square-foot rent. Bottega Louie didn’t let that stop them. The 10,000 square feet white wonderland of the former Brooks Brothers’ retail store is a restaurant, bar, patisserie, and boutique market all rolled into one gargantuan space you can easily wheel in your hummer size stroller or even park your R.V. in. (To give you an idea of the size, they serve 800 guests on a Saturday night.)

Although the iconic barbershop is almost as extinct as the dinosaur, Berman explains why LA needs them more than ever. “It’s a backbone of community. It’s not just a place to get a haircut, it’s a gathering spot.” Expect to shoot the breeze with all types of men from artists to executives as you get your mohawk, military cut or straight edge razor shave. Berman might even offer you a cold beer in a frosty mug to coax you to hang out a little longer. Open until midnight Thursday – Saturday. Bolt Barbers 460 S. Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 (310) 594-3150 www.boltbarbers.com 56

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The gourmet Italian themed menu is fairly priced and has small plates to choose from as well as pastas, pizzas and main courses of chicken, beef and fish. The Portobello fries, burrata appetizer and Branzino fish entrée are some of Bottega’s favorites. Have a pan au chocolate in the patisserie, a gimlet at the bar, or pick up some housemade marinara sauce in the market and revel in the grandiosity of the one-stop shop dedicated to the joys of elegant eating. Bottega Louie 700 S. Grand Ave. (Cnr 7th & Grand) Los Angeles, CA 90017 6:30 am – 11 pm (213) 802-1470 www.bottegalouie.com

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CORKBAR

RIVERA

Soaring ceilings, wine bottle decorated walls, and a glossy wraparound bar make Corkbar the Saks Fifth Avenue of wine bars in downtown LA. Corkbar’s appearance, while sleek and sophisticated on first impression, quickly softens as the helpful ‘wine’tenders guide you through their staggering forty California wines by the glass. Chef Albert Aviles, formerly from Chateau Marmont, also warms the mood by coming out with a glass of wine in hand to chat and happily explain the intricacies of his well-crafted farmers’ market menu creations.

Since Chef Rivera Sedlar, one of the original creators of Southwest cuisine, opened his futuristic Rivera restaurant a year ago, his restaurant has become the darling of LA’s fiercest food critics. No surprise, as Rivera’s menu reflects decades of Sedlar’s quest of Latin culinary history by refining and heightening familiar foods like tamales, mole, ceviche, feijoadas, fideos and jamones representing regional Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean, the American Southwest, Spain and Portugal. Sedler explains his vision excitedly, “Latin food is deeply earthy. It’s soulful, rustic, robust. We offer platos pequeños, our small plates, bursting with big, bold, hearty flavors, as well as platos fuertes, our main dishes, such as Prime Gaucho Steak and Crab Cartagena.”

Corkbar offers a decent happy hour (but not cheap) on weekdays from 4- 7 pm and also after 11 pm with $8 glasses of specific wine, $4 pints of artisan beers, and half-off appetizers like cheese gougeres (cheese puffs), pork bruschetta and Pasilla chile mac n’ cheese. On Tuesdays at 5:30 pm, you can be Chef Aviles’ taste testing guinea pig as he tries out new, market driven dishes not on the menu for $2. And Sundays are an excellent pairing - local jazz artists perform from 5 -9 pm while you sip on wine and food specials. Yet another place to facilitate community in downtown LA as they open at 11:30 AM and stay open until whenever the fun stops or the liquor laws dictate. Corkbar 403 W. 12th Street Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 746-0050 www.corkbar.com

The cocktails are equally as inventive, whimsical and balanced as Sedlar’s dishes with an obvious focus on exotic tequilas. Try the Barbacoa, a zippy ginger tequila cocktail garnished with beef jerky or if you’re really feeling adventurous – the Donaji, a citrus pomegranate mescal cocktail dusted with bug salt (crickets to be precise). If you’d rather keep it simple, try their ‘Tequila on Tap’ infused with flavors that change weekly like mango, vanilla or basil. Rivera 1050 S. Flower St. #102 Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 749-1460 www.riverarestaurant.com

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THE STORE Designer bargain shoppers no longer have to wait until the last Friday of the month for the Cooper Design Space’s sample sales. Simply named, ‘The Store’ is a permanent retail space open to the public every week on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. The Store offers a more upscale, boutique-like place for tenants of the Cooper Design Space to sell their extra inventory, samples and slightly irregular pieces.

SKINGRAFT If you were ever torn between wanting to dress as a cowboy, rock star or fighter pilot, Skingraft has the solution to your seemingly contradictory clothing dilemma. Aiming to unleashing the beast within us, LA based Skingraft designs are shocking the fashion world with their unabashed use of leather harnesses, gun holsters, and corset vests all daringly highlighted with animalinspired details and silver studs. Designers Jonny Cota and Katie Kay weren’t always in the fashion world, but their quirky background as stilt performers taught them how to dazzle and entertain. As they made their costumes for their street and party performances, they were inspired to bring that world of fantasy costumes to street wear reality and Skingraft was born. Cota and Kay’s expertise lies in transforming traditional clothing to pieces of ethereal wearable art by accenting with ruffles, feathers, fur and straps. Pop music artists, like Beyonce, Fergie, and Adam Lambert have been seen embracing their animal within by sporting Skingraft leather harnesses and holsters. Ready to dress on your wild side too? Cota and Kay can help, they even do custom wedding gowns.

Owners Mona Sangkala and Jill Galloway say they try to keep prices in The Store well below wholesale. Most pieces are under $100, jewelry under $25. The merchandise changes constantly and organized by type (i.e. work, evening, casual, menswear). The space contains pieces from Rich and Skinny, Odd Molly, Shari Bodell, Park Vogel, Jenny Han, Corey Lynn Calter, and Lotta Stensson to name drop a few. While the showroom monthly sample sales are still going strong, The Store facilitates scoring a sweet designer deal a little more often. The Store 721 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 Thurs-Sat, 10am-5pm (213) 243-5834 www.cooperdesignspace.blogspot.com

Skingraft 125 W. 4th St., #102 Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 626-2662 www.skingraftdesigns.com 58

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FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID A KNUDSEN

INSPIRATION THROUGH VISUAL STIMULATION With a truly unique perspective of our everyday surroundings, beauty can be discovered from the most unexpected view! David A Knudsen (aka DAK) produces his photographs on large gallery-wrapped canvases, using no computer manipulation in the process. Specializing in meeting the needs of Interior Designers and Art Consultants, to provide the perfect decor for any space, we offer custom prints of any size and quantity on a variety of fine art media.

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ARTFUL AFFAIRS WORDS PETER FRANK

THIS IS YOUR FADA’S FAIR FOR THE PAST several years, the world’s

art year has begun in Los Angeles with three art fairs (almost four, but that’s another story). Last year, the largest and most eclectic of these fairs, the Los Angeles Art Show, grew big enough to move into the downtown Convention Center, filling that yawning space with a dizzying variety of art. This year, the fill will be similar – if not more dizzying. Art fairs have become the new ground zero for the art world, attracting buyers and lookers alike who take the pulse of their milieu while indulging their need – okay, addiction – to see and know and talk about art. The LA Art Show, organized by the Fine Art Dealers’ Association (FADA), is not one of the world’s biggest such affairs, posing no threat to the immense confabulations (and countless satellites) taking place in Miami, Basel, Cologne, New York, Paris, and other venues. (Rumors that the big daddy of them all, Art Basel Miami Beach, would move west to LA have so far proven unfounded.) But, with over a hundred galleries participating in its 15th iteration, the LAAS does provide a cross-sectional flavor. When it moved into the Convention Center last year, the LAAS finally had room enough to sponsor specially organized exhibitions under its roof. This year, one of those exhibitions heralds the fair’s newest annual program, featuring new work from one particular country. Interestingly, Uruguay was chosen as the inaugural focus – a clever choice, as the little country is 62

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wedged between South America’s two largest, most artistically active lands, Argentina and Brazil, and is as cosmopolitan as either. By highlighting this junior member of an elite cohort, the Art Show seems to declare itself a junior member in full standing of the international art-fair circuit. Other special exhibitions featured at the Art Show include “Signs,” a survey of contemporary Middle Eastern art; “Snapshot”; “Vox Humana”; a show of art from LA’s various sister cities; and “An Intimate View of Los Angeles.” As it has in past years, the fair will also offer satellite symposia, panels, lectures, after-show mixers, and a VIP program for industry insiders and collectors. (See www.laartshow.com for details.) One factor expanding the Art Show’s girth is its incorporation of the Los Angeles Print Fair. Organized separately by the International Fine Print Dealers’ Association (and older than the Art Show by a decade), the LAPF provides the LAAS’s most intimate, and some of its most vibrant, moments. While the galleries in the main part of the Art Show occupy grand, airy booths and fill them with paintings, sculpture, and objects of all shapes and sizes, Print Fair participants huddle together intimately, displaying work on paper in ways that bring you up close to the image and the material. In a digital era, such work on paper – even when produced itself with the computer – draws us back into the pleasure of information, of texture, and of the picture.

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But, then, so does ‘most any artwork.’ And this is the real thrill of an art fair – the sense of being up close with things that individuals imagined urgently and lovingly and laboriously fabricated out of various substances, close enough not just to study them, but to buy them and bring them home for even closer inspection. The art fair is the midpoint between the museum and the home, an aggregation of galleries that brings together myriad examples of unique invenWeb fabrikmagazine.com

tion for a brief moment – with the express purpose not of convincing you to take home a souvenir, but of persuading you to participate in the revelatory adventure we call art.

SHOW INFORMATION January 20-24, 2010 at the Los Angeles Convention Center www.laartshow.com

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ARTFUL AFFAIRS WORDS PETER FRANK

DESIGN LOVES ART —

THE PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER AS A VERTICAL GALLERY “NEIGHBORHOOD” SOMETHING CURIOUS HAPPENED – or, perhaps, emerged – over the last year. A new neighborhood for art galleries popped up in Los Angeles, seemingly out of nowhere. Actually, that’s not quite right; in general, such neighborhoods already exist, and it's the galleries that pop up – but in this case, at least, the “neighborhood,” a single immense structure, was already profoundly conspicuous, and the galleries, in turn, were, or had been, conspicuous by their absence. The Pacific Design Center stands cheek by jowl with a stretch of Melrose Avenue (and nearby Robertson Boulevard) noted for its world-class galleries as well as design and antique outlets. But, while such outlets fill the PDC’s several pavilions and several floors, nary a commercial art gallery could be found in its intimate maze as of a year ago. The out-building across PDC’s yawning plaza has long been the Museum of Contemporary Art’s one non-downtown venue (fittingly featuring programming in architecture and design); but fine art was otherwise an incidental presence at best, not just a non-entity, but a non-issue in what was in fact a logical milieu for it. Out of adversity comes innovation. The Great Recession swung its scythe no less thoroughly through the art and design worlds than through the rest of the nation, and, of course, nobody bailed out the galleries or museums. (Well, somebody did bail out at least a few museums, but that's another story…) The tribulations of several Los Angeles galleries proved complementary to 64

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those suffered by the Pacific Design Center, and mutual loss led to mutual survival. About a year ago, galleries that had more or less suddenly disappeared off the LA art map started, just as suddenly, to turn up in the “storefronts” lining the PDC’s corridors. What was afoot? Turns out, the folks at the Design Center – prompted by curator Helen Varola – were making such erstwhile stalwarts of the mid-Wilshire, Culver City, and Santa Monica gallery scenes as Carl Berg, d.e.n. contemporary, and See Line, a leasing offer they couldn't refuse: free rent. In the current (non-)market the PDC was faced with a rash of derelict spaces, and realized that allowing hip galleries to “homestead” in those spaces with minimal overhead creates a win-win situation. The PDC is graced, quite appropriately, with art indeed, hot art – the provocative galleries showing the art stay in the fray with vastly reduced risk (handing over a mere 10% of sales to their host), artists get more outlets for their work, collectors and viewers have a convenient single venue to visit, the PDC's “normal” denizens benefit more than obliquely from the increased traffic, and everybody is happier than they thought they could possibly be at this fraught moment in economic history. When the roster of PDC galleries expanded over last summer – coming to include artists' initiatives, secondary outposts of still-open galleries from around the city, and one-off, putatively non-profit situations the PDC gallery scene became that much richer, more varied, and more exciting.

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Most cities around the world, from Berlin to Beijing, are used to stacking a lot of galleries under one roof. That’s not been quite LA’s style until now, with the miniexception of 6150 Wilshire and the maxi-variant of Bergamot Station. The abundance of storefronts in this town makes galleries less likely to share a staircase than to cluster in proximity – as they do in Culver City, Chinatown, the Old Bank District, and even in the shadow the PDC casts across West Hollywood. Cramming galleries into a single building, as happens in downtown San Francisco, for instance, or all over New York, just isn't done here; obviously, there simply isn't the vertical real estate there is in other cities, nor is there the impetus to climb stairs or hazard elevators. (That's what gyms and parking garages are for.) So this configures LA people's gallery-going experience in a whole new way, a way that we once thought we had to go abroad to find. This past fall, the Design Center’s galleries began holding their own “art walks,” upping the local ante on one-building gallerygoing. The roster of galleries is now nearing 20, and ranges from established spaces such as Paul Kopeikin, Sam Lee, and Christopher Grimes to initiatives that border on the museological, most notably the international video-art round-ups hosted by critic-curator Paul Young. All seems pretty cozy… There are catches to rentless gallerizing. For one thing, the PDC keeps weekday hours; weekend access has until now been limited (although the PDC folks are reportedly open to considering modifications). For another, everyone’s lease is up in March, and the whole experiment may come to a screeching halt (although so far so good, as both galleries and Design Center people aver). Perhaps most uncomfortably, at any time, a paying occupant – a design firm or furniture outlet or something else Web fabrikmagazine.com

typical of the PDC’s population – can displace a gallery, even in the middle of a show’s announced run. The gallery doesn’t disappear, it just moves into another vacant space. So far, no gallery has been forced to move off the second floor of the PDC’s southern (blue) pavilion, where pretty much all of them (with the exception of Grimes, one of Berg’s spaces, and an annex to Young's show) have clustered.

Later this month, however, the lot of them will be forced upstairs – temporarily – when nearly fifty more galleries from around the world and around the block take up brief residence on PDC’s prime art real estate. Smelling a built-in cachet of hipness (and, doubtless, a low rental fee and alreadyinstalled lighting), ART LOS ANGELES CONTEMPORARY, the last in a month-long parade of LA art fairs, has forsaken both the downtown Convention Center and the Santa Monica Airport's Barker Hangar for this midcity locus. Engaging the young architectural firm Layer LA to help fit the fair’s participants into the storefronts (several to a space, depending on size), Art Los Angeles Contemporary – despite its own rather awkward moniker – promises a graceful tour through the world’s cutting edge. But when you go, don’t forget to ascend to the fifth floor to see more galleries – Los Angeles galleries, in their new native habitat.

SHOW INFORMATION January 28-31, 2010 Pacific Design Center West Hollywood

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Los Angeles

ART & DESIGN DIRECTORY Pacific Design Center Showrooms

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Art About Town by Peter Frank

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Art Gallery & Museum Directory

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Artist & Gallery Showcase

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PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER SHOWROOMS 8687 MELROSE AVENUE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069

A. RUDIN G172 310-659-2388 arudin.com

COWTAN & TOUT B647 310-659-1423 cowtan.com

FORT STREET STUDIO B213 310-855-9832 fortstreetstudio.com

ALMAR CARPETS INTERNATIONAL G277 310-859-1200 almarcarpets.com

CREATIVE ENVIRONMENTS B103 310-652-3713

GIATI DESIGNS B122 310-659-9924 giati.com

ARC-COM FABRICS, INC. B260 310-659-0376 arc-com.com ART CATALOGUES @ MOCA PLAZA 310-289-5223 artbook.com/artcaatmo.html

CREST SIGNATURE LEATHER M33 310-854-0294 crestleather.com D' ESCOTO WEST, INC. M34 310-657-0562 descotowest.com DAKOTA JACKSON G170 310-659-7424 dakotajackson.com

ASHBURY HIDES B605 310-854-5499 ashburyhides.com

DAN MARTY DESIGN B380 310-652-6928 danmartydesign.com

AST B409 310-659-9970 astfabrics.com

DAVID SUTHERLAND SHOWROOM B182 310-360-1777 davidsutherlandshowroom.com

ATELIER LAPCHI G176 310-967-0087 lapchi.com AUDIO VIDEO INTERIORS (TEATRO) G280 310-657-0104 avinterior.com BAKER KNAPP & TUBBS B525 310-652-7252 bakerfurniture.com BERNHARDT DESIGN B230 310-854-7204 bernhardtdesign.com

DE BENEDICTIS/LA B173 310-657-3938 DESIGN BATH & HARDWARE B444 310-358-9669 designbath-hardware.com DESIGN SPEC FLOOR COVERINGS B418 310-859-8861 DESIGNTEX B309 310-855-9550 designtex.com

BROWN JORDAN B445 310-659-0771 brownjordan.com BRUNSCHWIG ET FILS B653 310-659-9800 brunschwig.com CBS SHOWROOM B450/B464 310-652-9180 CENTURY DESIGNER SHOWROOMS B425 310-652-5176 centuryfurniture.com CHOW'S ORIENTAL ARTS, INC. B129 310-659-6208

DONGHIA G196 310-657-6060 donghia.com DURALEE FABRICS B601 310-360-0778 duraleefabrics.com EBANISTA INC. G190 310-246-9170 ebanista.com ECCOLA B211 310-360-5959 eccolaimports.com

CJ MATSUMOTO M48 310-659-6343

EDELMAN LEATHER G158 310-855-9355 edelmanleather.com

COOPER DESIGN GROUP G273 310-659-8222 cooperla.com

ESPASSO B433 310-657-0020 espasso.com

COOPER-PACIFIC KITCHENS G299 310-659-6147 cooperpacific.com

EUROCONCEPTS BATH B119 310-652-3472 euroconcepts.com

CORAGGIO TEXTILES B633 310-659-4295 coraggio.com

EUROCONCEPTS KITCHEN G288 310-657-5391 euroconcepts.com

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GREAGORY GREENWOOD CONSTRUCTION M54 310-360-6173 gregorygreenwood.com H.L. HINSON & COMPANY B690 310-659-7075 HAGAN FLYNN, INC. B435 310-659-2614 haganflynn.com HANASSAB ORIENTAL RUG IMPORTS B159 310-657-3674 HBF FURNITURE / HBF TEXTILES B270 310-652-5344 hbf.com HERITAGE BOOK SHOP M46 310-659-3674 HOKANSON CARPET B613 310-657-8026 hokansoncarpet.com HOLLY HUNT B377 310-657-3776 hollyhunt.com INNOVATIONS M20 310-289-0100 innovationsusa.com INTERNATIONAL DOWN & LINEN B368 310-657-8243 internationaldownandlinen.com J.H. MINASSIAN & CO. B139/B147 310-657-7000 jhminassian.com JANUS ET CIE B146/B193 310-652-7090 janusetcie.com JEFFREY STEVENS @ PDC B404/B406 310-652-3050 jeffreystevens.com JULIA GRAY, LTD. B355 310-360-9457 juliagrayltd.com KENRO LIGHT, INC. B228 310-659-6510 kenrolight.com KITSON G692 310-882-6316 KNEEDLER_FAUCHÈRE B600 310-855-1313

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PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER SHOWROOMS 8687 MELROSE AVENUE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069

KNEEDLER_FAUCHÈRE CORP. M3 310-855-0402

PANACHE DESIGNS B504 310-659-1700 panachedesigns.com

KRAVET B624 310-659-7100 kravet.com

PASTON/RAWLEIGH/EVERETT M9 310-652-4060 seating-restaurant.com

LARUSSA AUDIO/VIDEO M50 800-741-0123 larussa.net LEE JOFA B639 310-659-7777 leejofa.com LIVING EDGE B275 310-358-5556 livingedgeinc.com

PRUDENTIAL CALIFORNIA REALTY G271 310-855-0100 prudentialcal.com

MICHAELIAN & KOHLBERG B502 310-360-8400 michaelian.com

QUADRILLE M21/M22 310-657-6070 quadrillefabrics.com

MICUCCI B209 310-360-7323 micuccicollection.com MIMI LONDON INCORPORATED G168 310-855-2567 mimilondon.com

NANCY CORZINE B305 310-652-4859 nancycorzine.com OSBORNE & LITTLE B643 310-659-7667 osborneandlittle.com PACIFIC HIDE AND LEATHER B447 310-657-9802 pacifichide.com PAFID B408 310-855-9808 pafid.com

STEVEN HARSEY/PIERCEMARTIN B427 310-659-7820 stevenharsey.com

PROVASI COLLECTION B460 310-657-3040 provasicollection.com

MICHAEL TAYLOR DESIGNS B542 310-360-8118 michaeltaylordesigns.com

MOURA STARR B547 310-854-9100 mourastarr.com

STARK CARPET CORPORATION B629 310-657-8275 starkcarpet.com

POTTERTON BOOKS G154 310-289-1247 pottertonbooksusa.com

MENZIE INTERNATIONAL B267 310-475-2331 menzie.net

MONTANARI GROUP G281 310-659-5348 montanarigroup.com

PETER LANG SHOWROOM B407 310-652-0700 peterlangshowroom.com

POGGENPOHL U.S., INC. B188 310-289-4901 poggenpohl.de

MCGARY & CO. B420 310-659-0456 mcgaryandco.com

SOUND ENVIRONMENT M4 310-854-4473 STARK & DARIUS RUGS B466 310-289-5200

PINDLER & PINDLER, INC. B530 310-289-0200 pindler.com

MARTIN PATRICK EVAN B457 310-652-2292 martinpatrickevan.com

SOOFER GALLERY B226 310-659-3044

PAUL FERRANTE B362 310-854-4412 paulferrante.com

PIERRE DEUX G152 310-657-9400 pierredeux.com

MAGNI DESIGN, INC B273 310-623-1623 magni.com

SOCIAL VIBE B261 310-659-9900

RALPH PUCCI WEST COAST B203 310-360-9707 ralphpucci.net RAOUL TEXTILE LIBRARY G160 310-657-4931 raoultextiles.com ROBERT ALLEN_BEACON HILL B484/B499 310-659-6454 robertallendesign.com RODENBECK ASSOCIATES B200 310-659-1051 rodenbeck.com S. HARRIS/FABRICUT/VERVAIN B470 310-358-0404 fabricut.com SCHEFFEY GROUP, THE B245 310-657-8922 thescheffeygroup.com SCHUMACHER & CO./PATTERSON, FLYNN & MARTIN, ROSECORE B489 310-652-5353 fschumacher.com

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SUMMIT FURNITURE, INC. B135 310-289-1266 summitfurniture.com SUPERVISION B120 310-652-9510 supervisionav.com TAI PING CARPETS B400 310-652-3058 taipingcarpets.com TEATRO (AUDIO VIDEO INTERIORS) G280 310-657-0104 avinterior.com THEMA, LLC B300 310-659-8400 thema-llc.com THOMAS LAVIN B310 310-278-2456 thomaslavin.com TODD HASE FURNITURE B370 310-657-6768 toddhase.com TROY ADAMS DESIGN G292 310-657-1400 troyadamsdesign.com UMBRIA LIVING, INC. B233 310-691-8905 umbrialiving.org VILLA SAVOIA M6 310-860-8978 villasavoiainc.com WILDFLOWER LINEN G285 310-360-9899 wildflowerlinens.com WILLIAM HAINES DESIGNS M32 310-288-0220 williamhaines.com WILLIAM SWITZER & ASSOCIATES B515 310-855-1135 williamswitzercollection.com WOLF GORDON, INC. M5 310-652-1914 wolf-gordon.com

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ART GALLERY & MUSEUM HIGHLIGHTS

ARTABOUTTOWN WORDS PETER FRANK

GETTY MUSEUM Drawings by Rembrandt & His Pupils: Telling the Difference THRU FEBRUARY 28

Is connoisseurship dead? It seems to be out of favor as an academic topic, but it is still exercised by some of the great art-historical minds of our day. It has to be: until we invent infallible computers able to recognize and analyze every stroke of every artist's every tool, we have to rely on the exquisitely cultivated eye(s) of people who have devoted their lives to knowing what artists are likely to have made, and how they may have made them. By inference, “Drawing by Rembrandt and His Pupils: Telling the Difference” celebrates the obscured, if not endangered, craft of connoisseurship by putting in front of us a tough test for our eyes. Many of us can tell a Rembrandt from a Velazquez, but fewer can tell a Rembrandt from a Carel Fabritius. And that's only in painting. Unlike Velazquez, Fabritius was a pupil of Rembrandt's, so similarities in everything from contour to touch to subject matter are going to predominate, obscuring the differences to all but the trained eye. Work on paper by fourteen other students of the Dutch master hang alongside their teacher's in this show, and from moment to moment it can seem as if - well, as if there are far fewer than fifteen artists on view. In most cases connoisseurs have identified the works, clarifying which are by Rembrandt, which are by such estimable but secondary figures as Nicolas Maes, Govaert Flinck, Aert de Gelder, or Ferdinand Bol. Hey, they're good enough to be confused, even temporarily, with Rembrandt's. “Drawing by Rembrandt and His Pupils” not only shows us how connoisseurship works, but how Rembrandt's workshop worked, and how his way of looking at and describing the world could be inherited and reformulated by his followers. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.getty.edu

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART (LACMA) Joseph Beuys: The Multiples THRU JUNE

Part shaman, part shyster, part radical idealist, part romantic aesthete, Joseph Beuys was so uncool he was cool. And he was so full of idea and impulse, urgency and action that he practically gave off artworks like sunbeams. For Beuys art objects were 70

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physical manifestations of intricate concepts, abstract sensations, and elaborate, mythic memories. His work brims with a personal symbolism that was in a constant state of evolution, sometimes outstripping even Beuys' own perception. One way Beuys had of quieting his mind a bit and fixing idea and symbol into a concrete - if still hermetically endowed - object was to produce artworks in multiple editions. Working this way also allowed people with limited means to acquire these artworks - and, given the simplicity of so many objects, allowed people with limited training to think of themselves as artists and what they do as art (a principle of Beuys' concept of “social sculpture”). As a result, Beuys considered his multiples output perhaps the most important of his oeuvre. Not surprisingly, that output was formidable: there are nearly 600 multiples on view here, and that doesn't exhaust what Beuys produced, sometimes doing nothing more than writing on paper and having that reproduced as a poster, sometimes getting involved in an elaborate performance or street action and making sure something remains from such ephemeral effort. A lot of the time there's very little to “see,” and quite often Beuys' humor, which runs throughout, gets a bit opaque and selfindulgent. But at worst he was having a good laugh at the formalities of the art world - and at best he was combining stuff with an almost alchemical flair. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.lacma.org

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART Collection: MOCA's First Thirty Years THRU MAY 3

MOCA's collection, reaching back to 1939, is famously deep and rich. But we rarely see much of it at any one time. This celebration of the Museum's conception three decades ago, a gleam in the eye of several artists and art people in this then nascent art capital, attests to MOCA's importance as a repository for all manners of later 20th century art, from the very traditional to the impenetrably hip. This celebratory display may be organized to highlight collection strengths and reveal often surprising connections among contemporary but rarely-associated work, but it also makes the case for MOCA's collection as actually, not just hopefully, encyclopedic - you know, somewhere along the line of the Museum of

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ART GALLERY & MUSEUM HIGHLIGHTS

Modern Art. Well, MOCA can't put on a display of touchstone masterpieces the way MOMA can, but it can come damned close. Indeed, among its 1950s painters alone MOCA boasts some of the greatest work around by such as Franz Kline, Jean Fautrier, Robert Rauschenberg and Mark Rothko (to whom a whole room is devoted). Among other things, the exhibit, which occupies both MOCA buildings (post1980 work is installed over at the Geffen), gets disparate artworks talking to one another - and never gratuitously. The curators are not being cute when they position sequences of black and white photographs in crucial relation to minimalist modulations or conceptual-art documentations; the relation of mind and spirit between Diane Arbus and Robert Smithson, for example, comes at you in ways you never thought possible in art. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.moca.org

PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART Wayne Thiebaud: 70 Years of Painting THRU JANUARY 31

Is there a painter more quintessentially Californian, in his subject matter and his style, than Wayne Thiebaud? And is there a painter anywhere in America more deserving of the old-fashioned appellation “master”? Thiebaud - teacher, not incidentally,

to generations of artists, and as genial and plain-spoken a theorist as has ever mused on art-making - has long cast a fond and quizzical eye on the Golden State, its unlikely landscapes, and its sweet capitulation to (and invention of ) pop culture's insouciant banalities and offhand crafts. Thus Thiebaud's celebration of San Francisco's dizzying topographies, his extended meditation on life at the beach, his incessant re-examination of how humans - Americans, Californians - dress and comport themselves, and, most famously, his hypnotic preoccupation with food displays. It is this last fetish, in particular, that prompts people to lump Thiebaud in with Pop art. But, while he may be Warhol's and Lichtenstein's exact contemporary, Thiebaud is not their compeer so much as their complement. Even at his most restrained and self-effaced, his painting technique is rich, voluptuous, and assured, reveling in decidedly un-neutral factors such as texture, light, and tonal relations. Where Pop artists subjected their fine-art impulses to the strictures of illustration, Thiebaud, if anything, invigorates the subjects of illustration with lush fine-art treatment. Thiebaud has been painting and drawing, and printmaking - since the Second World War, and this survey of over 120 works ranges over his entire career, revealing his vision to be consistent even as his style, and his choice and understanding of subject matter, evolve. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.pmcaonline.org

TWO WOMEN WITH STILL LIFE, 1952 WILLEM DE KOONING PASTEL AND CHARCOAL ON PAPER, 22 1/4 X 18 3/4 IN., COLLECTION OF THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES, BEQUEST OF MARCIA SIMON WEISMAN, PHOTO BY BRIAN FORREST, © 2009 THE WILLEM DE KOONING FOUNDATION/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

ON VIEW AT MOCA THRU SEPTEMBER 18

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS 1301PE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 938-5822 http://www.1301pe.com

ACUNA-HANSEN GALLERY 427 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 441-1624 http://www.ahgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm

18TH STREET ARTS CENTER 1651 18th St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-3711 http://www.18thStreet.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-5pm; Saturday, 1-5pm 57 UNDERGROUND 300 C. So. Thomas St. Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-0218 http://www.57underground.com Thurs. by appointment, Fri.-Sun., 12pm-4pm A SHENERE VELT GALLERY 1525 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 552-2007 http://www.circlesocal.org A STUDIO GALLERY 4260 Lankershim Blvd. Studio City, CA 91602 (818) 980-9100 http://www.astudiogallery.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-4pm; Fri., 9am-12noon; & by app't. A+D ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN MUSEUM 5900 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 http://www.aplusd.org ABACOT GALLERY 970 N. Broadway, Suite 201 (Mandarin Plaza) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-1599 http://www.abacotgallery.com ACE GALLERY BEVERLY HILLS INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 9430 Wilshire Blvd. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 858-9090 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm ACE GALLERY LOS ANGELES INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 5514 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 935-4411 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm

ADAMSON-DUVANNES GALLERIES 484 S. San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 653-1015 http://www.justpaintings.net Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm & by app't. ALTERED SPACE GALLERY 1221 Abbot Kinney Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 452-8121 http://www.alteredspacela@aol.com AMBROGI | CASTANIER GALLERY 300-302 N. Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 652-5511 http://www.ambrogicastaniergallery.com Mon.-Sat., 10:30am-6:30pm AMERICAN MUSEUM OF CERAMIC ART 340 S. Garey Ave Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 865-3146 http://www.ceramicmuseum.org Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm It is the mission of the American Museum of Ceramic Art, a non-profit organization, to educate by presenting, collecting and preserving significant ceramic achievements of the world's cultures from ancient times to the present and through aesthetic and technical study to develop a deeper understanding of cultural values and traditions. ANDLAB 600 Moulton Ave., #303 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 222-2225 http://www.ANDLAB.com/art Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm ANDREWSHIRE GALLERY 3850 Wilshire Blvd., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 389-2601 http://www.andrewshiregallery.com ANGELS GATE CULTURAL CENTER 3601 S. Gaffey St San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 519-0936 http://angelsgateart.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-4pm

ACME 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5942 http://www.acmelosangeles.com 72

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ANGLES GALLERY 22222 & 2230 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-5019 http://www.anglesgallery.com ANGSTROM GALLERY 2622 S La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 204-3334 http://www.angstromgallery.com ANNA HELWING GALLERY 2766 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 202-2213 http://www.annahelwing.com ANOTHER YEAR IN LA 2121 N. San Fernando Rd., #13 Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 223-4000 http://www.anotheryearinla.com APPLEGATE GALLERY 3101-A Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-7600 http://www.applegallery.com ARC 2529 W. Magnolia, Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 848-9998 http://www.czappa.com Tues.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat., 9am-3pm ARMORY CENTER FOR THE ARTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 792-5101 http://www.armoryarts.org ARMSTRONG'S 150 E. Thrid St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-6464 http://www.armstronggallery.net Tues.-Sat. 9am-4:30pm, Second Saturday of month 9am-9pm ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN 1700 Lida St. Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 396-2446 http://www.artcenter.edu/williamson Tues-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., 12-9pm ART PIC 6826 Troost Ave. No. Hollywood, CA 91605 (818) 503-5999 http://www.artpic2000.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5pm ARTPEACE GALLERY 2317 W. Magnolia Blvd. Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 846-8688 http://www.artpeacegallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-5pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS ASIAN SPIRIT 8797 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-3888 http://www.asianspiritgallery.com Asian Spirit is a most unusual gallery. We specialize in museum quality antiques from China, Cambodia, Viet Nam, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, and Laos. No where else can you find a more intimate environment to view such priceless pieces. Your clients will be incredibly impressed. Call me for a private showing, Brett Richman, 818 970 2261.

BILL LOWE GALLERY 2034 Broadway Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-0184 http://www.lowegallery.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm; & by app't.

BUSCHLEN MOWATT GALLERIES 45-188 Portola Ave Palm Desert, CA 92260 (760) 837-9668 http://www.buschlenmowatt.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 11am-5pm; & by app't.

BILLY SHIRE FINE ARTS 5790 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 297-0600 http://www.billyshirefinearts.com

ASTO GALLERY 923 E. 3rd St., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 972-0995 http://www.astomoa.org

BLACK MARIA GALLERY 3137 Glendale Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 660-9393 http://blackmariagallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

CAL POLY POMONA DOWNTOWN CENTER 300 W. Second St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-0080 http://www.class.csupomona.edu/downtowncenter Tues.-Sat., 11am-8pm; 2nd Sats., 1-9pm

AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER:MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST 4700 Western Heritage Way (in Griffith Park adjacent to L.A. Zoo) Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 667-2000 http://www.autrynationalcenter.org

BLK/MRKT GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-1989 http://www.blkmrktgallery.com Tues.-Fri., 11am-6pm; Sat., 12-6pm BLUEBIRD ART HOUSE 6747 Bright Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 696-9493 http://www.bluebirdarthouse.com

AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER: SOUTHWEST MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN Corner of Marmion Way and Museum Dr Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 221-2164 http://www.southwestmuseum.org

BLUM & POE GALLERY 2754 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-2062 http://www.blumandpoe.com

AVENUE 50 STUDIO 131 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 258-1435 http://www.avenue50studio.com AZTEC/NIGHT OWL ART GALLERIES 311 and 305 W. Foothill Blvd. Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 574-0503 Weds-Sun., 1:30-5:30pm; Night Owl hours, 11am-1am BANDINI ART 2635 S. Fairfax Ave. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-6230 http://bandiniart.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm; & by app't. BARNSDALL ART PARK EXHIBITIONS 4800 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 644-6275 Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; first Fridays, 12-9pm BERT GREEN FINE ART 102 West 5th St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-624-6212 http://www.bgfa.us/

BOBBIE GREENFIELD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-0640 http://www.bobbiegreenfieldgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

CAL POLY POMONA KEITH & JANET KELLOGG 3801 W. Temple Ave Pomona, CA 91768 (909) 869-4302 http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery Tues.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Sat., 12-4pm CAL STATE L.A.--LUCKMAN GALLERY 5151 State University Dr Los Angeles, CA 90032 (323) 343-6604 http://www.luckmanfineartscomplex.org Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 12-5pm CALIFORNIA HERITAGE MUSEUM 2612 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8537 http://www.californiaheritagemuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-4pm CANVAS BOUTIQUE AND GALLERY 23410 Civic Center Way Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 317-9895 http://www.canvassneakersandgallery.com Sun.-Thurs., 11am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 11am-7pm

BONELLI GALLERY 936 Mei Ling Way Los Angeles, CA 90012

CARL BERG GALLERY 6018 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-6060 http://www.carlberggallery.com

BOWERS MUSEUM 2002 N. Main St Santa Ana, CA 92706 (714) 567-3643 http://www.bowers.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-4pm; fourth Thursday of each month, 10am-8pm

CARMICHAEL GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART 1257 N. La Brea Ave West Hollywood, CA 90038 (323) 969-0600 http://www.carmichaelgallery.com Weds.-Sun., 2-7pm

BRAND LIBRARY ART GALLERY 1601 West Mountain St. Glendale, CA 91201 (818) 548-2051 http://www.brandlibrary.org Tues. & Thurs., 12-9pm; Weds., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-5pm

CENTER FOR THE ARTS, EAGLE ROCK 2225 Colorado Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90041 (323) 226-0949 http://www.centerartseaglerock.org

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS CHARLIE JAMES GALLERY 975 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 687-0844 http://www.cjamesgallery.com CHERRY AND MARTIN 12611 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 398-7404 http://www.cherryandmartin.com CHINA ART OBJECTS GALLERIES 933 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0384 http://www.chinaartobjects.com CHINESE AMERICAN MUSEUM 125 Paseo de la Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-5240 CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 916 Colorado Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 587-3373 http://www.cgrimes.com CHUNG KING PROJECT 936 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1802 http://www.chungkingproject.com CIRCUS GALLERY 7065 Lexington Ave Los Angeles, CA 90038 (323) 962-8506 http://www.circus-gallery.com

CITY OF BREA GALLERY #1 Civic Center Circle Brea, CA 92821 (714) 990-7730 http://www.breagallery.com Weds., Thurs., Sun., 12-5pm, Fri., Sat., 12-8pm CLAREMONT GRADUATE 251 E. 10th St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8071 CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART The Packing House, 536 W. First St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-3200 http://www.claremontmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-7pm

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COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS ART GALLERY 26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd Santa Clarita, CA 91355 (661) 362-3612 http://www.canyons.edu/offices/artgallery Tues.-Thurs., 11am-3pm; Sat., 10am-2pm COMMISSARY ARTS 68 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 990-9914 http://www.commissaryarts.com Thursday & Friday 12-5pm; Saturday 12-6pm; and by appointment Commissary Arts is a new gallery space in Venice providing a platform for emerging and mid-career artists based in Southern California to present new works in all media through and active program of group and solo exhibitions. Commissary Arts encourages collaborative art projects and new creative voices by inviting curators and artists to assemble intimate exhibitions addressing contemporary issues and emerging trends in artistic discourse. COMPACT SPACE 105 E. 6th St Los Angeles, CA 90014 626-676-0627 http://www.compactspace.com COPRO/NASON GALLERY 2525 Michingan Ave., T-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 398-2643 http://www.copronason.com

CIRRUS GALLERY 542 S. Alameda Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 680-3473 http://www.cirrusgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm

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CLASSIC ARTFORMS 9009 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 273-6306

COREY HELFORD GALLERY 8522 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 287-2340 http://www.coreyhelfordgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm CRAIG GALLERY 5723 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90019 (323) 939-0351 http://www.craiggallery.com Fri., Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't. CRAIG KRULL GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6410 http:// www.artnet.com/ckrull.html Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

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CREATIVE ARTS CENTER GALLERY 1100 W. Clark Ave Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 238-5397 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-8pm; Fri., 9am-4pm; Sat., hours vary CREATIVE GALLERIES 3210 Helms Ave Culver City, CA 90034 (310) 837-4531 Mon.-Fri., 10am-7pm; Sat., Sun., 10am-6pm CREWEST 110 Winston Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-627-8272 info@crewest.com CROSSROADS SCHOOL FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES 1714 21st St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't. CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS ART GALLERY 92 Palm Dr. Camarillo, CA 93010 (805) 437-8863 http://art.csuci.edu/gallery Mon.-Fri., 10am-4pm CSU FULLERTON ART GALLERY 800 N. State College Blvd. Fullerton, CA 92634 (714) 278-3262 http://www.arts.fullerton.edu/events Tues.-Fri., 12-4pm; Sat., 12-2pm CSU LONG BEACH UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90840 (562) 985-5761 http://www.csulb.edu/uam Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm, Thurs., 12-8pm CSU NORTHRIDGE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY 18111 Nordhoff St. Northridge, CA 91330 (818) 677-2156 http://www.csun.edu/artgalleries/ Mon.-Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-8pm D & D GALLERY 311 W. Seventh St. San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 831-2940 http://www.dandgallery.com Daily, noon-6pm D.E.N. CONTEMPORARY ART 6023 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 559-3023 http://www.dencontemporaryart.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5:30pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS DA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 252 D S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-9716 http://www.dacenter.org DANIEL CLAYTON GALLERY 513 N Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-5310 DANIEL HUG GALLERY 510 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 221-0016 http://www.danielhug.com DANIEL SAXON GALLERY 552 Norwich Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-6033 DANIEL WEINBERG GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 954-8425 http://www.danielweinberggallery.com DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY 510 Bernard St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 222-1482 http://www.davidkordanskygallery.com DAVID PATTON LOS ANGELES 5006 1/2 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 478-1966 http://www.davidpattonlosangeles.com DAVID SALOW GALLERY 977 N. Hill St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 620-0240 http://www.davidsalowgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm DAWSON COLE FINE ART 313 N. Beverly Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 275-6060 http://www.dawsoncolefineart.com DBA256 GALLERY 256 S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-7600 http://www.dba256.com Mon.-Thurs., 8am-10pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-midnight DCA FINE ART 3107 Pico Blvd Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-8565 http://www.dcafineart.com

DE SOTO GALLERY 2635 Fairfax Avenue Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 253-2255 http://www.desotogallery.com Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm & by app't

DOWNTOWN ART GALLERY 1611 So. Hope St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 255-2067 http://www.downtownag.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm

DEBORAH MARTIN GALLERY 209 W. 5th St, Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-428-6464 http://deborahmartingallery.com/info.html

DRKRM. 2121 San Fernando Rd., #3 Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 223-6867 http://www.drkrm.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm Sun., 1pm-4pm and by appointment drkrm. gallery is an exhibition space dedicated to fine art and documentary photography, cutting edge and alternative photographic processes and the display and survey of popular cultural images. drkrm. is also a full service b/w photographic lab specializing in traditional, silver-gelatin printing and film processing.

DEBORAH PAGE GALLERY 1028 Montana Avenue Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 458-4400 http://www.deborahpagegallery.com Tues.-Sun., 11am-6pm DEL MANO GALLERY 11981 San Vicente Blvd West Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 476-8508 http://www.delmano.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm DENENBERG FINE ARTS 417 North San Vicente Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 360-9360 http://www.denenbergfinearts.com Denenberg Fine Arts, established 1965, is a "smart source" for designers. The gallery has successfully placed works with top designers' clients for thirty years, and is careful to honor the client-designer relationship, providing informed expertise ranging from old masters to contemporary art acquisitions. Two blocks from the PDC on San Vicente! DF2 GALLERY 314 N. Crescent Heights Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 782-9404 http://www.df2gallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm DNJ GALLERY 154 1/2 N. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-1311 http://dnjgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm DOWNEY MUSEUM OF ART 10419 So. Rives Ave Downey, CA 90241 (562) 861-0419 http://www.thedmoa.org Weds., 3-7pm; Thurs.Fri., 1-5pm; DOWNTOWN ART CENTER GALLERY 828 S Main Street Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-7374 http://www.dacgallery.com Web fabrikmagazine.com

DUNCAN MILLER GALLERY 10959 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-2440 http://www.duncanmillergallery.com EARL MCGRATH GALLERY 454 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 657-4257 http://www.earlmcgrathgallery.com EDGEMAR CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2437 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 399-3666 http://www.edgemarcenter.org Mon.-Fri., 11am-5:30pm EDWARD CELLA ART+ARCHITECTURE 6018 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 525-0053 http://www.edwardcella.com Tues.-Sun, 11am-5pm Edward Cella Art+Architecture (ECAA) represents significant emerging and mid-careers artists; acquires and places quality post WWII and contemporary painting and drawings; and, with a unique focus, presents drawings and projects by established West Coast architects and designers. In addition, ECAA assists and advises individuals and corporations to develop and focus their art collections through the personalized and confidential services of an independent art advisor. EL CAMINO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 16007 Crenshaw Blvd Torrance, CA 90506 (310) 660-3010 http://www.elcamino.edu/commadv/artgallery Mon., Tues., 10am-3pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-8pm; Fri., 10am-2pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS ERNIE WOLFE GALLERY 1653 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 473-1645 EXPOSITION PARK MUSEUMS 900 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 763-3515 http://www.nhm.org FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY 148 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 934-2250 http://www.faheykleingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm FARMLAB 1745 N. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1158 http://www.farmlab.org Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm

FRINGE EXHIBITIONS 504 Chung King Ct. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0160 http://www.fringeexhibitions.com

FULLERTON COLLEGE ART GALLERY 321 E. Chapman Ave., Building 1000 Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 992-7434 http://art.fullcoll.edu Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 10am-2pm; Weds, 5-7pm

FIG 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-0345 http://www.figgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-5pm

FULLERTON MUSEUM CENTER 301 N. Pomona Ave Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 738-6545 http://www.cityoffullerton.com/depts/museum Tues.-Sun., 12-4; Thurs., 12-8pm

FINE ART FACTORY 474 S. Raymond Ave., Suite 110 Pasadena, CA 91105 (818) 356-0474 FOUND GALLERY 1903 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027 FOWLER MUSEUM AT UCLA 405 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 825-4361 http://www.fowler.ucla.edu Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm; Thurs. 12-8pm FRANK LLOYD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., B5b Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-3866 http://www.franklloyd.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

GAGOSIAN GALLERY 456 N. Camden Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-9400 http://www.gagosian.com GALERIE MICHAEL 430 N. Rodeo Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 273-3377 GALERIE MOURLOT 8763 Rosewood Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 855-9581 http://www.galeriemourlot.com

FRANK PICTURES GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-0211 http://www.frankpicturesgallery.com

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FRESH PAINT 9355 Culver Blvd., Suite B Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-9355 http://www.freshpaintart.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-6pm; Fri., 8am-12 noon; & by app't

FROGTOWN GALLERY 1625 Blake Ave Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 226-0356 http://www.romerostudio.net Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; & by app't.

FEDERAL ART PROJECT 316 W. 2nd St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 http://www.dacgallery.com

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FREDERICK R. WEISMAN MUSEUM AT PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY 24255 Pacific Coast Highway Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 506-4851 http://arts.pepperdine.edu/museum

GALLERY 13: IRISH FINE ART 8302 Melrose Ave., Unit A West Hollywood, CA 90069 (323) 951-0303 http://www.gallery13.net Wed.-Sat 11am-6pm or call for an app’t. Gallery 13 shows contemporary art by new and acclaimed Irish artists. Featuring an ongoing exhibition of elegant bronzes by Linda Brunker which challenge the traditions

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of bronze figurative sculpture. Brunker’s trademark ‘filigree’ style has a strong ecological and spiritual quality. GALLERY 1927 at the Fine Arts Building 811 West Seventh St. Los Angeles, CA 90017 661-816-1136 http://www.gallery1927.com/ GALLERY 33 EAST 3202 E. Broadway Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 433-1496 http://gallery33east.com Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm G727 727 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-9563 http://www.gallery727losangeles.com GALLERY AT REDCAT 631 W. Second St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 237-2800 http://www.redcat.org GALLERY FILE 102 W. 5th St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 624-6212 Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm; 2nd Thurs., 12pm-9pm. GARY LEONARD TAKE MY PICTURE 860 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-622-2256 http://takemypicture.com GALLERY LUISOTTI 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0043 GALLERY NUCLEUS 30 West Main St Alhambra, CA 91801 (626) 458-7482 http://www.gallerynucleus.com GALLERY REVISITED 3204 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (626) 253-5266 http://www.galleryrevisited.com GEMINI G.E.L. 8365 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-0513 http://www.geminigel.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat. by app't.

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY L.A. 2716 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-3685 http://www.georgebillis.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't.

GRIFFIN 2902 Nebraska Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 586-6886 http://www.griffinla.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't.

GEORGE J. DOIZAKI GALLERY 244 S. San Pedro St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-2725 http://www.jaccc.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat. & Sun., 11am-4pm

HAMILTON GALLERIES 1431 Ocean Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 451-9983 http://www.hamiltongalleries.com Tues.-Sun., 12-7pm

GEORGE STERN FINE ARTS 8920 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (800) 501-6885 http://www.sternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-6pm

HAMILTON-SELWAY FINE ART 8678 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 657-1711 http://www.hamiltonselway.com

HUNTINGTON BEACH ART CENTER 538 Main Street Huntington Beach, CA 92647 (714) 374-1650 http://www.surfcity-hb.org/Visitors/art_center Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; Thurs., 12-8pm; Sun., 12-4pm

HAPPY LION GALLERY 963 Chung King Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1360 http://www.thehappylion.com

HUNTINGTON LIBRARY 1151 Oxford Rd San Marino, CA 91108 (626) 405-2100 http://www.huntington.org

HARVEST GALLERY 938 N. Brand Blvd. Glendale, CA 91206 (818) 546-1000

I-5 GALLERY AT THE BREWERY ART COLONY 2100 N. Main St., #A-9 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 342-0717 http://www.breweryartwalk.com Fri.-Sat., 12-4pm; & by app't.

GIDEON GALLERY LTD. 8748 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-4194 GLU GALLERY 7424 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-0510 http://www.glugallery.com Fri., 12-5pm: Sat., 11am-5pm; Sun., 12-5pm GLASS GARAGE FINE ART 414 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 659-5228 http://www.glassgaragegallery.com GLENDALE COLLEGE GALLERY 1500 Verdugo Rd Glendale, CA 91208 (818) 240-1000 http://www.glendale.edu/artgallery GR2 2062 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 445-9276 http://www.gr2.net GREENFIELD SACKS 2525 Michigan Ave., #B6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-0640 http://www.greenfieldsacks.com GREY MCGEAR GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-0925 GRIER MUSSER MUSEUM 403 So. Bonnie Brae Los Angeles, CA 90057 (213) 413-1814

HELFEN FINE ARTS 9200 W. Olympic Blvd., Suite 200 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 (310) 273-8838 http://www.helfenfinearts.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by appt. We specialize in well-researched, historically significant and stunning Modernist works of art from the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, with a focus on California Modernism. Our paintings feature strong images with great color and composition, and our sculptures each are selected for dramatic impact and historical importance. HENKEN GALLERY 120 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-2505 http://www.thehenkengallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-10pm; Sun. by app't. HERITAGE GALLERY 1300 Chautauqua Blvd Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 230-4340 http://www.heritagegallery.com HIGH ENERGY CONSTRUCTS – SOLWAY JONES 990 N. Hill St., #180 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-7920 http://www.highenergyconstructs.com

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HONOR FRASER 2622 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 401-0191 http://www.honorfraser.com HOWELL GREEN FINE ART GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 107 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-3991 http://www.howellgreen.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6; & by app't.

IKON LIMITED FINE ARTS 2525 Michigan Ave., G-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6629 http://www.ikonltd.com ITALIAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE — SPAZIO ITALIA 1023 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 443-3250 http://www.iiclosangeles.esteri.it/IIC_Losangeles Mon.-Fri., 9:30am-5pm ITURRALDE GALLERY 116 S. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-4267 http://artscenecal.com/Iturralde.html Tues.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sat. by app't. JACK HANLEY GALLERY 9945 Sun Mun Way Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-0403 http://www.jackhanley.com JACK RUTBERG FINE ARTS 357 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-5222 http://www.jackrutbergfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 10am-5pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS KANTOR ART 205 S. Beverly Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 274-6499 http://www.kantorart.com

JAIL 965 N. Vignes St., 5A Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 621-9567 http://www.thejailgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm JAMES GRAY GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-4 (Bergamot Station) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-9502 http://www.jamesgraygallery.com JAN KESNER GALLERY 164 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-6834 http: //www.jankesnergallery.com JANCAR GALLERY 3875 Wilshire Blvd. #1308 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 384-8077 http://www.jancargallery.com Thu.-Sat 12noon-5pm and by app't. JAPANESE AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM 369 E. 1st St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-0414 http://www.janm.org

KLAPPER GALLERY 8759 Beverly Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-6552 http://www.klappergallery.com KONTAINER GALLERY 6130 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-4746 http://www.kontainergallery.com

JK GALLERY 2632 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-3330 http://www.jkgallery.net Wed.-Sat., 11am-6pm JONATHAN KENT GALLERY 474 N Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-5727 http://www.artkent.com JUDSON GALLERY 200 S. Avenue 66 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 255-0131 http://www. judsonstudios.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-3pm JUNC 4017 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 814-2640 http://www.juncgallery.com Fri., 1-6pm; Sat. & Sun., 12-7pm; & by app't.

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KARYN LOVEGROVE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd.#8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 525-1755 http://www.karynlovegrovegallery.com KINKEAD CONTEMPORARY 6029 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-7400 http://www.kinkeadcontemporary.com

JFERRARI GALLERY 3015 Glendale Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 877-5542 http://www.jferrarigallery.com Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm

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KAREN LYNNE GALLERY 216 N. Canon Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 858-8202 http://www.karenlynnegallery.com Karen Lynne Gallery provides fine art and consulting services from its new Beverly Hills location, an expansion of the 2 original locations in Boca Raton, FL. Specializing in largescale original oil on canvas works, it is Karen Lynne Gallery's mission to convey the importance of art in one's home as the central focal point of design and ongoing enjoyment.

KOPEIKIN GALLERY 8810 Melrose Avenue West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 385-5894 http://www.kopeikingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't

L.A. ARTCORE/ARTCORE BREWERY ANNEX 120 N. Judge John Aiso St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-3274 http://www.laartcore.org Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm LA ART HOUSE 8825 Beverly Blvd., West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 205-0480 http://www.laarthouse.net Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat.-Sun. by app't L.A. ARTS OF ASIA & TRIBAL ARTS SHOW 1855 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 455-2886 http://www.caskeylees.com L.A. CITY COLLEGE DA VINCI ART GALLERY 855 N. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 953-4220 LA CONTEMPORARY 2634 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6200 http://www.lacontemporary.com L.A. COUNTY ARBORETUM 301 N. Baldwin Ave Arcadia, CA 91007 (626) 821-3232 http://www.arboretum.org L.A. GAY & LESBIAN CENTER THE ADVOCATE GALLERY 1125 N. McCadden Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90038 (323) 860-7337 L.A. LOUVER GALLERY 45 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-4955 http://www.lalouver.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm

KOPLIN DEL RIO GALLERY 6031 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-9055 http://www.koplindelrio.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

L.A. MODERNISM SHOW 1855 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (818) 244-1126 http://www.lamodernism.com

KRISTI ENGLE GALLERY 5002 York Ave Los Angeles, CA 90042 (213) 629-2358 http://www.kristienglegallery.com

L2 KONTEMPORARY 990 N. Hill St., #205 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 225-1288 http://www.L2kontemporary.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm; & by app't.

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS LA LUZ DE JESUS 4633 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 666-7667 http://www.laluzdejesus.com LA SIERRA UNIVERSITY BRAND STATER GALLERY 4700 Pierce St Riverside, CA 92515 (951) 785-2959 http://www.lasierra.edu/art Mon.-Thurs., 9am-4pm; Sun., 2-5pm LACE 6522 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028 (323) 957-1777 http://www.welcometolace.org Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm LACMA 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-6111 http://www.lacma.org/ Mon., Tues., Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., 12-9pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-8pm LARRY SMITH FINE ART 8642 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 360-9135 LATIN AMERICAN MASTERS 264 N. Beverly Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-4847 http://www.latinamericanmasters.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

LAWRENCE ASHER GALLERY 5820 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 935-9100 http://www.lawrenceasher.com Tues.-Thurs., 11am-6pm; Fri., 11am-7pm; Sat., 12-5pm; & by app't

LEFT COAST GALLERIES 12324 Ventura Blvd Studio City, CA 91604 (818) 760-7010 http://www.leftcoastgalleries.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm; Sun., 12-6pm; & by appointment

LOUIS STERN FINE ARTS 9002 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-0147 http://www.louissternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm

LIGHTBOX 2656 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-1111 http://www.lightbox.tv

LOUWE GALLERY 306 Hawthorne St. So. Pasadena, CA 91030 (626) 799-5551 http://www.louwegallery.com

LIONESS GALLERY 3032 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (818) 252-7168 http://www.lionessartgallery.com Sat., 12-5pm; and by app't.

M. HANKS GALLERY 3008 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8820 http://mhanksgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't.

LITTLE BIRD GALLERY 3195 Glendale Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 662-1092 http://www.littlebirdgallery.com

M+B 612 N. Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 550-0050 http://www.mbfala.com

LIZABETH OLIVERIA GALLERY 2712 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-1073 http://www.lizabetholiveria.com

MACHINE PROJECT 1200 D N. Alvarado Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 483-8761 http://www.machineproject.com

LMAN GALLERY 949 Chung King Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-3883 http://www.lmangallery.com

MAK CENTER FOR ART AND ARCHITECTURE L.A. 835 N. Kings Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-1510 http://www.makcenter.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-6pm

LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 4901 E. Carson St. Long Beach, CA 90808 (562) 938-4817

LATINO ART MUSEUM 281 S. Thomas St., Suite 105 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-6009 http://www.lamoa.net

LAXART 2640 S. La Cienega Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 868-5893 http://www.laxart.org

LESLIE SACKS FINE ART 11640 San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 820-9448 http://www.lesliesacks.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm

LONG BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 2300 E. Ocean Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 439-2119 http://www.lbma.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-5pm LORA SCHLESINGER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-1133 http://www.loraschlesinger.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm LOS ANGELES CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 107 W. Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (323) 646-9427 http://www.lacda.com Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm

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MANDARIN GALLERY 970 N. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 687-4107 http://www.mandaringallery.com MANNY SILVERMAN GALLERY 619 Almont Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 659-8256 MARC FOXX GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5571 http://www.marcfoxx.com MARC SELWYN FINE ART 6222 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-9911 http://www.marcselwynfineart.com MARGO LEAVIN GALLERY 812 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 273-0603

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS MARY GOLDMAN GALLERY 932 Chung King Rd Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-8217 http://www.marygoldman.com MC 6088 Comey Ave Los Angeles, CA 90034 (323) 939-3777 http://www.mckunst.com MEDEA GALLERY 445 W. 7th St., San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 833-3831 http://www.medeagallery.com Mon.-Fri.: 9am-5pm and by appt. Featuring fine contemporary art, we offer art lovers a rich variety of affordable paintings and limited edition prints by a creative group of artisans from around the world. Join us each month for the First Thursday ArtWalk in historic San Pedro, CA. METRO GALLERY 1835 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 663-2787 http://www.metrogallery.org MICHAEL DAWSON GALLERY 535 N. Larchmont Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90004 (323) 469-2186 http://www.michaeldawsongallery.com Weds.-Sat., 9am-5pm MICHAEL HITTLEMAN GALLERY 8797 Beverly Blvd., #302 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 655-5364 http://www.michaelhittlemangallery.com Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sunday, 1-5pm

handmade paper giving the printed surface a uniquely deep relief not found in etchings, lithographs or silk-screens. MLA GALLERY 2020 N. Main St., #239 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 222-3400 http://www.mlagallery.com MOCA 250 S. Grand Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 62-MOCA-2 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thursday, 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed. MOCA – THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY 152 North Central Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 621-1745 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thurs., 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed. MOCA PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 289-5223 http://www.moca.org MORONO KIANG GALLERY 218 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 628-8208 http://www.moronokiang.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm

MUSEUM OF JURASSIC TECHNOLOGY 9341 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-6131 http://www.mjt.org/ MUSEUM OF LATIN AMERICAN ART 628 Alamitos Ave Long Beach, CA 90802 (562) 437-1689 http://www.molaa.com Tues.-Sat., 11:30am-7:30pm; Sun., 12-6pm MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS 1649 El Prado San Diego, CA 92101 (619) 238-7559 http://www.mopa.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-9pm MUSEUM OF TOLERANCE 9786 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 553-8403 http://www.museumoftolerance.com NEW STONE AGE 8407 W. 3rd St Los Angeles, CA 90048 (213) 658-5969 Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm, Sun., 12-5pm NOHO GALLERY LA 5108 Landershim Blvd North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818) 761-7784 http://www.nohogalleryla.com Thurs.-Sat., 2-8pm; Sun., 1-6pm

MORYORK GALLERY 4959 York Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90042 http://www.claregraham.com/MorYork.html

NORBERTELLEN GALLERY 215 West 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 818-662-5041 http://www.norbertellengallery.com

MICHAEL KOHN GALLERY 8071 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 658-8088 http://www.kohngallery.com

MOSS 8444 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 866-5260 http://www.mossonline.com Tuesday-Saturday 11am-7pm

NORTON SIMON MUSEUM 411 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 449-6840 http://www.nortonsimon.org Weds.-Mon., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm

MILO GALLERY 6130 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 935-3662 http://www.milogallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm

MOUNT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE JOSE DRUDIS-BIADA GALLERY 12001 Chalon Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 954-4360 http://www.msmc.la.edu/pages/1897.asp Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm

MIXOGRAFIA 1419 E. Adams Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90011 (323) 232-1158 http://www.mixografia.com Mon.-Fri., 11am- 5pm; & by app't. Mixografia prints and publishes limited editions by contemporary artists. The prints are pulled from a cast copper printing plate using 80

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MUCKENTHALER CULTURAL CENTER 1201 W. Malvern Ave Fullerton, CA 92633 (714) 738-6595 http://www.muckenthaler.org

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OCMA, ORANGE LOUNGE AT SOUTH COAST PLAZA 3333 Bear St., South Coast Plaza Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (714) 662-3366 Mon.-Fri., 10am-9pm; Sat., 10am-7pm; Sun., 11:30am-6:30pm OFF-ROSE, THE SECRET 841 Flower Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 664-8977 Sat., 1-5pm; & by appt.

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS OPUS GALLERY 2824 Sepulveda Blvd Torrance, CA 90505 (310) 891-2000 http://www.opusgallery.com

PALOMAR COLLEGE, BOEHM GALLERY 1140 West Mission Rd. San Marcos, CA 92069 (760) 744-1150 Tues., 10am-4pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-7pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-2pm

ORANGE COUNTY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 117 N. Sycamore Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 667-1517 http://www.occca.org Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., Sat., 12-9pm

PALOS VERDES ART CENTER 5504 W. Crestridge Rd. Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 (310) 541-2479 http://www.pvartcenter.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Sun., 1-4pm

ORLANDO GALLERY 18376 Ventura Blvd. Tarzana, CA 91356 (818) 705-5368 http://artscenecal.com/Orlando.html Tues.-Sat., 9:30am-3pm

PAPILLON GALLERY 462 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 289-1887 http://www.papillongallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't.

OTIS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN BEN MALTZ GALLERY 9045 Lincoln Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045 (310) 665-6905 http://www.otis.edu Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm; Thurs., 10am-7pm OVERDUIN AND KITE 6693 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (323) 464-3600 http://www.overduinandkite.com OVERTONES GALLERY 12703 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 915-0346 http://www.overtonesgallery.com Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm and by appointment OVERTONES is a contemporary Los Angeles art gallery whose focus is supporting emerging artists, as well as showcasing work of established artists to infuse and inspire the coming generations. We believe in beauty and social action and think the two are inextricably connected and necessary in life. OVERTONES gallery is committed to searching outside the confines of established art structures and presenting work that has the potential to engage a wide range of audiences. PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM 46 N. Los Robles Ave Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 449-2742 http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 10am-6pm PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM 101 Museum Dr Palm Springs, CA 92262 (619) 325-7186 http://www.psmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Fri., 10am-8pm

PASADENA CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 1570 E. Colorado Blvd Pasadena, CA 91106 (626) 585-3285 http://www.pasadena.edu/artgallery Mon.-Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., Sat., 12-4pm

PLATT GALLERY 15600 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90077 (310) 476-9777 Sun.-Thurs., 10am-4pm; Fri., 10am-2pm PLAZA DE LA RAZA 3540 N. Mission Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 223-2475 POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 330 N. College Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8283 http://www.pomona.edu/museum Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat., Sun., 1-5pm POUNDER-KONE ART SPACE 3407 Glendale Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 913-2247 http://www.cchpkas.com Thurs.-Sun. 1-7pm PROJECT: GALLERY LA 8545 W. Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-0200 http://www.projectgalleryla.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-6pm

PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART 490 E. Union St. Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 568-3665 http://www.pmcaonline.org

PYO GALLERY 1100 Hope St., Suite 105 Los Angeles, CA 213-405-1488 http://www.pyogalleryla.com

PATRICIA CORREIA GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building E-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-1760 http://www.correiagallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't.

RAID PROJECTS GALLERY 602 Moulton St. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 441-9593 http://www.raidprojects.com Sat., Sun., 12-5pm; & by app't.

PATRICK PAINTER, INC. 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-5988 http://www.patrickpainter.com

RED DOT GALLERY 500 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 817-6002 http://www.weeneez.com

PERES PROJECTS 2766 La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6100 http://www.peresprojects.com

REGEN PROJECTS 633 N. Almont Dr Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

PETER FETTERMAN PHOTOGRAPHIC WORKS OF ART 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-6463 http://www.peterfetterman.com

REGEN PROJECTS II 9016 Santa Monica Blvd (at Almont Drive) Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

PITZER CAMPUS GALLERIES 1050 North Mills Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 607-3143 http://www.pitzer.edu/artgalleries

RICHARD HELLER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-9191 http://www.richardhellergallery.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS RICHARD TELLES FINE ART 7380 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 965-5578 http://www.tellesfineart.com

narratives. Subtly stirring, the fragile balance between opposites and the relationships that exist between them, us, and each other is questioned and illustrated.

RIO HONDO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 3600 Workman Mill Rd., B-13 Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 908-3471 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-3pm; Mon.-Weds., 6-9pm

SAM FRANCIS GALLERY 1714 21st St Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't.

RIVERSIDE ART MUSEUM 3425 Mission Inn Ave. Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 684-7111 http://www.riversideartmuseum.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Thurs., 10am-9pm

SAM LEE GALLERY 990 N. Hill St., #190 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-0275 http://www.samleegallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

RIVERSIDE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 4800 Magnolia Ave Riverside, CA 92506 (951) 222-8358

SAMUEL FREEMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-1479 http://www.samuelfreeman.com

ROBERT BERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-5, & C-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-1937 http://www.robertbermangallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

SANDRONI REY GALLERY 2762 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 280-0111 http://www.sandronirey.com

ROBERTS & TILTON GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 549-0223 http://www.robertsandtilton.com ROSAMUND FELSEN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-8488 http://www.rosamundfelsen.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm ROSE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building G-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-8440 http://www.rosegallery.net RUTH BACHOFNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. (Bergamot Station), G-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-3300 http://www.ruthbachofnergallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm S B LONDON 3740 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (323) 668-0734 http://www.sblondon.com S B LONDON is a showroom of industrial art, showcasing works which inform, inspire, and relieve. TECHNOcraft Objects are works which are made with industrial materials and/or methods. These works make a practice of finding the commonalities between seemingly disparate elements, thereby revealing delicate 82

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SANTA FE ART COLONY 2401 S. Santa Fe Ave Los Angeles, CA 90058 (213) 587-6381 SANTA MONICA ART STUDIOS AND ARENA 1 GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7449 http://www.santamonicaartstudios.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm SANTA MONICA COLLEGE – PETE AND SUSAN BARRETT ART GALLERY 1310 11th St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 434-3434 http://events.smc.edu/art_gallery.html

SCALO/GUYE GALLERY 302 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 358-9396 http://www.scaloguye.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-7pm SCHOMBURG GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-5757 http://www.schomburggallery.com SCI-ARC GALLERY 960 E. Third St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 473-8432 SCRIBBLE THEORY 210 N. Bush St. Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 542-5928 http://www.scribbletheory.com SEA AND SPACE EXPLORATIONS 4755 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 445-4015 http://www.seaandspace.org SEE LINE GALLERY 1812 Berkeley St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-1727 http://www.seelinegallery.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't. SELF-HELP GRAPHICS & ART INC. GALERIA OTRA VEZ 3802 Avenida Cesar Chavez Los Angeles, CA 90063 (323) 881-6444 http://www.selfhelpgraphics.com Tues.-Sat., 9am-5pm SEYHOUN GALLERY 9007 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 858-5984 http://www.seyhoungallery.com

SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 586-6488 http://www.smmoa.org Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

SHERRY FRUMKIN GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave., Suite 21 Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7493 http://www.frumkingallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm

SCA PROJECT GALLERY 281 So. Thomas St., Unit 104 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-5481 http://www.scagallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-4pm

SHOSHANA WAYNE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7535 http://www.shoshanawayne.com

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SHOTGUN 2121 N. San Fernando Rd., #11 Los Angeles, CA 90065 http://www.shotgunspace.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS SIDE STREET PROJECTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 577-7774 http://www.sidestreet.org

STEPHEN COHEN GALLERY 7358 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-5525 http://www.stephencohengallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm

SILK ROADS DESIGN GALLERY 145 N. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (310) 857-5588, http://www.silkroadsgallery.com Mon.-Sun., 11am-5pm

STG (STEVE TURNER CONTEMPORARY) 6026 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (310) 271-3721 http://www.steveturnergallery.com

SISTER 437 Gin Ling Way. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-7000 http://www.sisterla.com

SULKIN/SECANT GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-8411 http://www.sulkinsecantgallery.com

SIXSPACE 5803 W. Washigton Blvd. Culver City, CA 90230 (323) 932-6200 http://www.sixspace.com

SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS 5795 W. Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 933-2117 http://www.vielmetter.com

SIXTEEN:ONE 2116-B Pico Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 450-4394 http://www.16to1.com

SYLVIA WHITE GALLERY 1783 East Main Street Ventura, CA 93001 (310) 452-4000 http://www.artadvice.com

SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-4500 http://www.skirball.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Thurs., 12-9pm; Sat., Sun., 10am-5pm

TAG, THE ARTISTS' GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., #D-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-9556 http://www.TAGtheArtistsGallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm

SOHO GALLERY 300 A. So. Thomas St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-1599 Thurs.-Sun., 11am-4pm; second Sats., 11am-10pm

TASENDE GALLERY 8808 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-8686 http://www.artnet.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm; Closed for Holidays Dec.21-Jan. 1.

SOLWAY JONES 990 N. Hill Street Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 223-0224 http://www.solwayjonesgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SPARC ART GALLERY 685 Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-9560 http://www.sparcmurals.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm (closed at noon-1pm SPONTO GALLERY 7 Dudley Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 399-2078

TAYLOR DE CORDOBA 2660 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-9156 http://www.taylordecordoba.com TEMPLE OF VISIONS 719 South Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90014 http://templeofvisions.com TERRENCE ROGERS FINE ART 1231 Fifth St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 394-4999 http://www.trogart.com Thurs-Sat., 12-5; & by app't.

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THE ACORN GALLERY 135 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 850-8655 THE BALMORAL 1522 Abbot Kinney Venice, CA 90291 (310) 392-3635 http://www.gallerybalmoral.com THE BREWERY 2100 N. Main St. at Avenue 21 Los Angeles, CA 90031 http://www.breweryart.com THE CLAYHOUSE 2909 Santa Monica Blvd. (near Yale St.) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-7071 THE CONFERENCE ROOM 325 S. Robertson Blvd. Beverly Hills, CA 90211 (310) 598-6367 http://www.theconfroom.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm THE DRAWING CLUB 3235 San Fernando Rd., #2C Los Angeles, CA 90065 (626) 303-2556 http://www.thedrawingclub.com Thurs. 7-10pm; & by app't. THE FOLK TREE 217 S. Fair Oaks Ave Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 795-8733 http://www.folktree.com Mon.-Weds., 11am-6pm; Thurs.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm THE GETTY CENTER 1200 Getty Center Dr Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Tues.-Thurs., Sun., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-9pm THE HIVE 729 S. Spring St Los Angeles, CA 90014 http://hivegallery.com/ 213-955-9091 THE GETTY VILLA 17985 Pacific Coast Highway Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Thurs.-Mon., 10am-5pm; closed Tues. Weds. and major holidays

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS THE HIVE GALLERY 729 S. Sping St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 955-9051 THE LOFT 401 S. Mesa, San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 831-5757 http://www.the-loft.net First Thursday Artwalk, 6-9pm; and by app't. THE PERFECT EXPOSURE GALLERY 3513 6th St., Los Angeles, CA 90020 (213) 381-1137 http://theperfectexposure.com THE WHOLE 9 GALLERY 6101 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-4600 http://www.thewhole9.com THINKSPACE GALLERY 4210 Santa Monica Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 913-3375 http://www.thinkspacegallery.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm TINLARK GALLERY 6671 Sunset Blvd., #1512 Hollywood, CA 90028 (323) 463-0039 http://www.tinlark.com TOBEY C. MOSS GALLERY 7321 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 933-5523 http://www.tobeycmossgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm, For the discriminating Private or Corporate Collector: Unique and Fine Original Prints, Drawings, Watercolors, Paintings; Focus on 1930s-2000 California art and artists. Jpegs are available to illustrate or make an appointment for a Viewing, with or without the Client. TOPANGA CANYON GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 109 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-7909 http://www.topangacanyongallery.com Tues.-Sun., 10am-6pm TORRANCE ART MUSEUM 3320 Civic Center Dr Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 618-6340 http://www.torranceartmuseum.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

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TRACK 16 GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building C-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-4678 http://www.track16.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm TRACY PARK GALLERY 1431 Ocean Ave Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 260-9954 http://www.tracyparkgallery.com TRIGG ISON FINE ART 511 N. Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 274-8047 http://www.triggison.com TROPICO DE NOPAL GALLERY 1665 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 481-8112 http://www.tropicodenopal.com UCR/CALIFORNIA MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY 3824 Main St Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 784-FOTO http://www.cmp.ucr.edu Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm USC FISHER GALLERY 823 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90089 (213) 740-4561 http://fishergallery.org Tues.-Sat. 12-5pm VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez Monterey Park, CA 91754 (323) 265-8841 http://elac.edu/collegeservices/vincentprice/ Mon.-Weds., Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-7pm

WESTERN PROJECT 3830 Main St., Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-0609 http://western-project.com WHITTIER MUSEUM 6755 Newlin Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (310) 945-3871 WILLIAM A. KARGES FINE ART 427 Canon Dr., Suite 101 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 276-8551 http://www.kargesfineart.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-5pm WILLIAM GRANT STILL COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER 2520 West View St Los Angeles, CA 90016 (213) 734-1164 Daily 12-5pm WILLIAM TURNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0909 http://www.williamturnergallery.com Mon.-Sat.,11am-6pm XIEM CLAY CENTER AND GALLERY 1563 N. Lake Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 794-5833 http://www.xiemclaycenter.com XIT GALLERY AT AIU LA 12655 W. Jefferson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 302-2613 Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm YOUNG ART GALLERY 747 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 344-1322 http://www.youngartgallery.com

VIVA (VALLEY INSTITUTE OF VISUAL ART) 13261 Moorpark St., Sherman Oaks, CA 91423 (818) 385-0080 Weds.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Satu., 12-4pm WATTS TOWERS ART CENTER NOAH SYLVESTER PURIFOY GALLERY 1727 E. 107th St Los Angeles, CA 90002 (213) 847-4646 Weds.-Sun., 10am-4pm

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

JAYE ALISON MOSCARIELLO Jaye Alison Moscariello's new body of work, "Chase, The Monkey" invokes the primal idea of love and fun within the spirit. She employs expressive color and sinuous line to evoke the powerful connections between/among human beings and nature. Her palette suggests the tropics without being garish, and her self-assured contour drawing reminds some viewers of Matisse, communicating a lot with just a little. Her figures chase the élan of human interaction in their colorful environs. The figures become the masters of their domain, man stripped down to his animal. They are everyone and anyone, existing in a locale where identity lies not as deeply as the desire for freedom and joy.

www.chasethemonkey.org www.jalison.com 310.581.1578 studio 310.804.5308 cell artisall@earthlink.net

Don’t Let Go

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22” x 30”

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Gouache, acrylic, pen and ink

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

CARLOS DOMENECH PHOTOGRAPHER “Natura Morta” C-Print 48” x 60” Limited Edition www.domenechfineartphotography.com • 4105 Laguna St., Coral Gables, FL 33146 • 305-442-0006

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

SUBSCRIPTION DETAILS LA’S MAGAZINE ON ART, DESIGN, ARCHITECTURE & FASHION

SUMMER 2009

NAME

PHOTOGRAPHY ISSUE: JULIUS SHULMAN • ANNENBERG SPACE FOR PHOTOGRAPHY LA PHOTOGRAPHERS • EVENTS, EXHIBITS & GALLERIES

ADDRESS CITY STATE

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PHONE EMAIL TRANSCENDING THE FRAME: JULIUS SHULMAN 1910-2009

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“The shaping of a stone is as powerful a challenge as shaping one’s own spirit.” Sculptor, painter, woman, Alisa Gabrielle is each and every one of these. Her endless passion has moved her to carve the stone and fill the canvas with the same devotion, strength and depth that she uses to sculpt and color her own spirit.

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Fabrik Magazine - Issue 7