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ART | DESIGN | ARCHITECTURE | FASHION | LOS ANGELES

ED RUSCHA LOOKS AT LA (INTERVIEW) MORONO KIANG GALLERY: PORTAL TO NEW CHINESE ART DIY ART COLLECTOR: JEFF HURLOW THE ARCHITECTURAL RENDERINGS OF CARLOS DINIZ PLUS…LOS ANGELES ART GALLERY, MUSEUM AND FASHION DIRECTORIES AND EVENTS CALENDAR

OCT/NOV 2008

ISSUE No. 3 OCT/NOV 2008 $4.95


Patti Silverstein | 212.573.8540 | info@elementalphotoart.com | elementalphotoart.com


artists clockwise from top right

Todd France California Monocot #118 Rob Lang Katrina #24 Chip Forelli Tree Island Tia Magallon Golden Puzzle Stacy Valis Untitled (Water #4)

ELEMENTAL

PHOTOART F I N E A R T R E P R E S E N TAT I O N


CONTRIBUTORS MASTHEAD

APARNA BAKHLE

Publisher Chris Davies

Aparna Bakhle, a writer living in urban Los Angeles, explores the consonance and dissonance of being.

Associate Editor Peter Frank

PETER FRANK

Managing Editor Aparna Bakhle Creative Director Chris Davies Art Direction & Design Shout Design Group Paul Soady Contributing Writers Aparna Bakhle Peter Frank T.M. Hunter Jesi Khadivi Lanee Neil Nicholas Olsberg Contributing Photographers Ted VanCleave Other Contributors Shania Domingo Risa Khan Oliver O. Production Associate Sascha Escandon

Peter Frank is Senior Curator at the Riverside Art Museum and Associate Editor for Fabrik. He was born in 1950 in New York, where he served as art critic for The Village Voice and The SoHo Weekly News, and moved to Los Angeles in 1988.

T.M. HUNTER T.M. Hunter has added to a distinguished career in the arts, science and mathematics, with what he calls “the joys of observation.” He takes to a rare Los Angeles sport: Walking. We hope he will share his footprints with Fabrik’s readers on a regular basis.

JESI KHADIVI Jesi Khadivi lives in Los Angeles and writes on film, art and culture.

LANEE NEIL Lanee Neil is a Los Angeles-based writer who uses her craft to pursue her passions; travel, culture and enriching quality of life. Lanee has traveled extensively through Europe, Asia, Costa Rica and Russia and is currently working on a photojournalistic documentation of her time spent in India. As a lifestyle consultant, she is a contributing writer to Yogi Times.

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING

NICHOLAS OLSBERG

Editorial editorial@fabrikmagazine.com

Nicholas Olsberg was director of the Canadian Centre for Architecture from July 2001 to May 2004. He holds an honours degree in Modern History from Oxford University and a doctorate in American History from the University of South Carolina. Olsberg has also worked as an archivist for the Getty Center, the University of Massachusetts, Boston, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Johns Hopkins University, and the Colonial and State Records of South Carolina.

Advertising ads@fabrikmagazine.com Contact 269 S. Beverly Drive, Ste. 1234 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 T 310 360 8333 F 310 360 9194 info@fabrikmagazine.com http://www.fabrikmagazine.com

INFORMATION Fabrik is published bi-monthly by Fabrik Magazine, Inc., 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Contents cannot be reproduced in part or in full without the written permission of the copyright holder. The opinions expressed are those of the artists and writers themselves and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Fabrik Magazine, Inc. Copyright © 2008. All rights reserved.

ART | DESIGN | ARCHITECTURE | FASHION | LOS ANGELES

ON THE COVER

ED RUSCHA LOOKS AT LA (INTERVIEW) MORONO KIANG GALLERY: PORTAL TO NEW CHINESE ART DIY ART COLLECTOR: JEFF HURLOW THE ARCHITECTURAL RENDERINGS OF CARLOS DINIZ PLUS…LOS ANGELES ART GALLERY, MUSEUM AND FASHION DIRECTORIES AND EVENTS CALENDAR

PRINTED IN LOS ANGELES

OCT/NOV 2008

ISSUE No. 3 OCT/DEC 2008 $4.95

“Hollywood is a Verb” © Ed Ruscha Courtesy of Gagosian Gallery


© ED RUSCHA. HOLLYWOOD, SUNSET, SANTA MONICA, VINE. 1998. ACRYLIC ON CANVAS. 70 X 138 INCHES. GAGOSIAN GALLERY.

A conversation with and showcase of one of America’s most renowned artists, LA-based Ed Ruscha, starts on page 8

CONTENTS 8

Iconoclast: Information at the Signal — A Conversation with Ed Ruscha

20

LA Threads: Matrushka Construction — Size is Relative

23

LA Collector: Jeff Hurlow — “The Collector”

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LA Story: Happy

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Hot & Cool LA: Sunset Junction

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Artful Affairs: Morono Kiang Gallery — Portal To New Chinese Art

40

Design Critic: Tanzore Restaurant — Design Divo Reveals an Extreme Makeover

42

Through the Lens: Visualizing A New Los Angeles, 1962-81 — The Architectural Renderings of Carlos Diniz

52

Los Angeles Art Events Calendar

53

Los Angeles Art Walks

54

Los Angeles Fashion Guide

59

Los Angeles Art & Design Directory

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Artist Showcases


CALLING ALL ARTISTS SKYLARK MEDIA GROUP & FABRIK MAGAZINE ANNOUNCES THE 2008/2009 COMPETITION FOR THE

SKYLARK PRIZE The Skylark Prize will be awarded to an artist whose work has proven to be innovative, while consistent in quality for a period of at least ten years. The Skylark Prize Award winner will receive: 1.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Fellowship: An exclusive 6 week fully paid Fellowship (including trips to Beijing and Shanghai), at the prestigious Sias International University, in Zhengzhou, China Cash: Cash prize of $2,000 Exhibit: A solo exhibition at Skylark Fine Art Gallery in Los Angeles Catalog: A catalog produced for the artist by Skylark Press Editorial: Skylark's media sponsor Fabrik Magazine will run an editorial on the artist's work.

Additonal Prizes • • •

Fellowship: Two additional six week Fellowships at Sias International University will be awarded. Group Show: The work of five additional artists will be chosen for a group show at Skylark Fine Art Gallery. Catalog & Editorial: A separate catalog will be produced for the group show artists. Fabrik Magazine will run editorial on these artists' work.

POSTMARK DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES: DECEMBER 1, 2008. Download information from www.skylarkprize.com

SPONSORS

Skylark Media Group Assisting Artists in Building Their Careers


ICONOCLAST WORDS JESI KHADIVI

INFORMATION AT THE SIGNAL

A Conversation With Ed Ruscha

E D RU S C H A is as much a part of LA as its sunsets, free-

ways, wildfires, and beaches. Lest we limit him as a regionalist, let us remember that California itself is a slippery character, an idea as much as a place. As the artist incisively observed in one of his late 70s pastels, “Hollywood is a verb.” Ruscha moved to LA from Oklahoma to attend Chouinard Art Institute in 1956. While a student there he fell in with what he jokingly refers to as the “wrong crowd”: artists like Billy Al Bengston and Robert Irwin, pioneers of LA Pop and the Finish Fetish movement, which appropriated the seductive sheen of Southern California topography, car culture, and surf culture. Ruscha and his colleagues were key progenitors of California cool. Working in relative isolation compared to New York, the contemporary art center of the 60s and 70s, Ruscha is a prolific producer of paintings, drawings, photographs, and books that draw directly and indirectly from LA as a subject, and have played a critical role in creating its cultural mystique today. He spoke to Fabrik about the germinal days of the LA art scene and his evolving relationship with the city. »

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FA B R I K


© Ed Ruscha. The Back of Hollywood. 1977. Oil on Canvas. 22 x 80 inches. Edward Ruscha Studio.

© Ed Ruscha. Hollywood. 1982. Oil on Canvas. 22 x 80 inches. Gagosian Gallery.

© Ed Ruscha. Hollywood, Sunset, Santa Monica, Vine. 1998. Acrylic on Canvas. 70 x 138 inches. Gagosian Gallery.


Š Edward Ruscha. The Mighty Ones. 1993. Acrylic on Lunette-Shaped Canvas. 66 x 137 inches. Edward Ruscha Studio.


Š Ed Ruscha. Annie, Poured from Maple Syrup. 1966. Oil on Canvas. 55 x 59 inches. Gagosian Gallery.


Fabrik: Did you feel like LA was an outpost when you started working here? Like there was a small group of artists, intellectuals, filmmakers, and writers that were in on some sort of secret? Ruscha: LA is such a huge megalopolis that I need to centralize my thinking about it. I am out in Venice now, but I “grew up” in Silver Lake, Echo Park, and Downtown. My deeper feelings are centered in Echo Park and Hollywood. It was a much smaller art world in a much slower city back in the 60s. I went to art school for about four years thinking I would be a sign painter or work in advertising, but I set off into fine art instead. The pendulum swung to the other side and I never really looked back. LA was like the Australia of the art world, it was way out there. But there were some key people here that were connected to the art world at large. One was Walter Hopps, the former director of Pasadena Art Museum. He created the first major show of Marcel Duchamp's work. The artistic activity back then is only magnified today. It’s a much bigger art world and a much bigger museum world. We only had a very limited LA County Museum and no MoCA. Fabrik: In the contemporary art world it seems like where an artist is based is loaded with meaning. Was there any cache in being an LA artist in the 60s and 70s? Ruscha: It seemed like your area code was all important. 212 was it and 213 was Australia! While Willem de Kooning and Jasper Johns were artists, I was an LA Artist. It’s much broader now, but back then there was a little tag that was tied to your toe when you worked out here. You were a regionalist. Fabrik: Are there any current LA artists or art venues that you find compelling? Ruscha: There are so many art galleries that come and go. The Museum of Jurassic Technology is a great place. And the Center For Land Use Interpretation, right next door. I think those two places are some of the diamonds in the rough as far as LA. But things pop up all the time that I don't even know about, but I've got my ear to the ground. Fabrik: The art critic Peter Plagens once said that while other Los Angeles based artists had the LA look, you “look at LA.” What is it about LA that you find so compelling to look at? Ruscha: I tend to borrow things from LA. Some of these ugly buildings I see in LA are really food for thought. Some of the simplest things in the world help me view and understand LA. When the sun is shining here there is this remote tie in with glamour that other cities don’t have. This place doesn’t seem to have anywhere to look up to. It’s totally open ended… But I think it goes back to simple things like orange trees, the sun shining, freeways, and Chicano car stylings. Chicano car styling is one of the most treasured cultural icons of Los Angeles. You can’t transpose that anywhere else. »

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Š Ed Ruscha. Sin - Without. 1991. Acrylic and Oil on Canvas. 70 x 138 inches. Edward Ruscha Studio.


© Ed Ruscha. They Called Her Styrene. 1977. Pastel on Paper. 22 5/8 x 28 5/8 inches. Edward Ruscha Studio.

© Edward Ruscha. Blue Collar Tool & Die. 1992. Acrylic on Canvas. 52 x 116 inches. Gagosian Gallery.


© Ed Ruscha. Large Trademark with Eight Spotlights. 1962. Oil on Canvas. 66 3/4 x 133 1/4 inches. Edward Ruscha Studio.

© Ed Ruscha. Talk Radio. 1987. Acrylic on Canvas. 58 x 58 inches. Gagosian Gallery.


Fabrik: Do you feel like your work is influenced by LA’s cultural fabric? Is any particular field a conscious inspiration for your work? Ruscha: It’s a back door influence. It’s not something visible where one could say “Ah ha! These lines that he makes refer to early 20th Century Craftsman housing!” It doesn't happen that way with me. I'm more influenced by dreamy things. In a lot of ways I am disconnected from LA, but in many ways I've got my basic thoughts and desires about where I am living and they are still solid. Fabrik: It's interesting that you mention dreams. Your work has an intimate relationship with film, an evocative quality that is equally nostalgic and playful. Ruscha: When I first went to New York at about age 20 I felt like I was in a familiar land. Movies laid out the carpet that I would walk down to see the city. It was kind of like going to Oz. The same thing happened with LA. It seemed like movies initiated me to new lands. I can’t be exactly specific, but I’m inspired by the clichéd activities in films. For example, in movies from the 40s there was always a train that was depicted as a little spot in the lower right hand corner of the screen and it would always emerge with all of its whistles and steam in the upper left hand side of the frame. It was a bridge between plot action when people were moving from one place to another. It had a powerful, cinematic suggestion to me that directly came into my work as an artist. I still dig the diagonal (laughs). Fabrik: You've said in the past that you make work unburdened by art history. Is this still the case? Ruscha: I might have been a little aggressive saying something like that. There is nothing that I’ve looked at before that hasn't somehow had an influence on me. Even the junk I hate has a molding effect. I’m incredibly burdened in some ways, but I also have a way of tossing that off when I am working and making things fluid. I don't work with a feeling of anguish. Fabrik: At one point you said that your work was tied to the decadence and frustration of city life. I was wondering if you could elaborate on that a little bit and tell me if that is still the case. Ruscha: It probably is. I look at the unfortunate things: misfortunes, underbellies, sadness. The things that go on not just in a city, but everywhere. The weight of history and all these things can be looked at negatively, but they also can be looked at positively. I see a lot when I drive here. Sometimes I’ll just be driving along and I’ll see a building that just assaults me and insults my intelligence. And the entire thing is so nasty its like having someone spit lemon juice in your face, but there is some effect there that makes me roll on and continue and make something of it. These negative things do work in my favor. They influence me to take motion on things. And that’s where I think my art comes from. Story Links: Ed Ruscha: http://www.edruscha.com Museum of Jurassic Technology: http://www.mjt.org Center For Land Use Interpretation: http://www.clui.org

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© Edward Ruscha. Norm’s - La Cienega, On Fire. 1964. Oil on Canvas. 64 1/4 x 124 1/2 inches. Edward Ruscha Studio.

© Edward Ruscha. The End #27. 2003. Acrylic & Ink on Paper. 24 x 30 inches. Gagosian Gallery.


SIZE IS RELATIVE


LATHREADS WORDS APARNA BAKHLE

ARTIST AND DESIGNER Laura S. Howe sews “Size is Relative” onto some of the labels identifying her clothing line. The practice informing this admirable flexibility can be experienced through her clothing store, Matrushka Construction. Every single one of the garments showcased in Howe’s airy and intimate Silverlake atelier is made by hand, on site, usually during store hours. New clothes appear weekly, if not daily. And although one might expect this constant production to create a bustling environment, the space is distinctly serene. Imbued with sensible irony, the clothes Howe creates embrace different shapes and many sizes. She even offers on-the-spot alteration to ensure a perfect fit. Her trademark stretchy fabrics invoke vintage looks while deconstructing classic cuts, often with a touch of wryness. As the collections on hand are always evolving, with no two items being exactly alike, customers feel compelled to return. This savvy strategy helps sustain Howe's business and creativity. Utilizing an industrial sewing machine, Howe and primary designer Lake Sharp “build” garments with inside out fabrics and multiple layers that playfully expose seams while integrating numerous loose threads that remain as purposeful traces of the designers' handicraft. Howe's political sensibility and environmental awareness (she's on the board of WildPlaces, a nonprofit committed to ecological restoration, land use advocacy and education) is reinforced by her use of “remainder” fabrics from L.A.'s Garment District, upon which she silkscreens birds, trees, and other curiosities from the natural world, occasionally with slogans exhorting us to “Plant A Tree” or “Consume Less, Share More.” Howe’s motto for Matrushka Construction is “fashion for the people” and she envisions an intelligent, self-aware and involved proletariat. Howe’s singular vision, enriched by her experience and training in sculpture, reveals a transparency of process found more often in nature than fashion. Although she references the urban energy of goth, punk and street styles, Howe grounds herself by running daily in Griffith Park and spending time whenever possible in Huntington Gardens. Her commitment to preserving the urban wilderness of Griffith Park has resulted in a laudable stewardship. » FA B R I K

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Recently, Howe campaigned for and was elected to the board of the Greater Griffith Park Neighborhood Council (GGPNG). In her role as representative, she advocates tirelessly on our behalf to protect the park from politicians and developers seeking to monetize this sanctuary into a developed facility. Howe is working with the board as well as other preservationists to obtain Historic-Cultural Monument status for Griffith Park. Although influenced by early Soviet Constructivist ideals of objects being more than commodities, and art as a practice directed towards social purposes, Matrushka clearly resonates with Silverlake denizens as evidenced by the popularity of well-attended events, on-going performance pieces and rotating art exhibits held in the space. Opening September 20th, Matrushka presents the work of artist and curator Steve Wong. Having found a way to infuse fashion with meaning, Howe also makes it fun. Music playing in the store often finds expression in what she sews. Some local bands she loves listening to include Silversun Pickups, Radar Bros., and The Bird and the Bee. With Matrushka, Howe effectively erases the anonymous character of shopping for clothes and replaces it with the authentic and sustainable community we're hard-pressed to find in densely populated urban environments, and perhaps especially Los Angeles. Store Hours: Monday – Friday 12 p.m. - 7 p.m., Saturday – Sunday 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Location: 3822 West Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90026 Contact: Fax & Phone: 323-665-4513 • http://www.matrushka.com


LACOLLECTOR WORDS APARNA BAKHLE PHOTOGRAPHY TED VANCLEAVE

J E F F H U R LOW

“THE COLLECTOR”

ONE OF THE FIRST things I bought that I considered art was a Robert Rauschenberg poster I saw advertised in Playboy back around 1990. It’s a bit embarrassing to admit I was actually reading it for the art. I don’t necessarily look at what I do as collecting art. It seems more like art gathering. As a child I’ve always collected things… Star Wars figures, comic books, grass hoppers… anything that caught my eye. In college I studied art, so most of the earliest pieces I picked up were through trades and favors. I also remember distinctly thinking, “I have no desire to do this for a living.” To me, the gallery system seemed like a game with the odds stacked against you. There were few options for young artists, and I knew I didn't want to wait tables or have a “day job” to support my art.

I decided to go into graphic design by accident and fortunately began having some success. I felt a little guilty about the money I was making, especially because so many friends were struggling to get their work noticed (and pay rent). So I would spend as much as I could on their art, which by my early salary was not much. Even with a limited budget, I felt at times like a patron… a not so wealthy one, but a loyal one. I've been slowly adding new pieces to the collection for almost 20 years. In the early days, I would spend a lot of time making the rounds at galleries. San Francisco was miserable because everything was so far away, Los Angeles was a little better with clusters of galleries like Bergamot Station, and of course New York was the easiest. But the things that I remember most about that time were that gallery people are fucking snobs, I could afford virtually nothing and I liked about 5% of what was being shown. That being said, I still managed to find some great pieces and the collection slowly started covering any free wall space in our home. Some favorites from that time period include a bunch of drawings by Marcel Dzama from his first show at Richard Heller’s gallery, an amazing woven photograph from friend, Dinh Q. Lê for designing his exhibition catalogue, several folk art paintings from “Big Al” Taplett while visit- » FA B R I K

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ing New Orleans, a Jeff Koons Balloon Dog and sculptures by friends Art Domantay and Alan Valencia. During those early days, the collection was pretty eclectic, including sculptures, drawings, paintings, photography, prints, and small installations. Rather than any specific theme or concept, what really tied them together was location. I would only acquire a piece if I personally knew the artist, happened to walk into a gallery with their work or purchased something while traveling. Today I approach collecting work in a fairly different manner. A large factor for this change is that I’ve reached a point where I know exactly what I want. I know what interests me and what work I find compelling. In the earlier days, it was more experimental so the collection was a little haphazard. The other factor is that my method for searching for work has completely changed. I’ve been working on the web for the last 7 or 8 years and I see it as the future of art collecting. I’ve now moved from art gatherer to art prospector. I'm addicted to sites like ffffound and Flickr and I end up trolling these sites for hours, searching for that right piece. Once I find a piece I love, I figure out how to contact the artist and do so immediately. Judging from the responses I typically get from artists, I believe this is still an unorthodox approach.

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I find this to be the most bizarre thing about the current gallery system. Collectors and artists are purposefully kept at an arm’s length from one another. I personally like the idea of being able to talk to an artist directly about their work and why they made certain decisions. I like the idea that there is a natural connection between the two, and that the work becomes more valuable and interesting through dialogue. Another critical component of this relationship is that it inherently makes the work more affordable and therefore collectible by more people. Typically galleries collect a 50% commission on work sold. For artists to make any money to maintain a living, this cost must be passed along to the collector. Because of this higher price tag, many collectors are priced out and fewer pieces are sold. In my experience, I've always paid less for work, but the artists have actually made more because they are not paying a middleman. For me, galleries are like travel agents, they're great if you're loaded and don't want to do any work, but a complete waste of money if you know how to find things on your own. The downside of mining through basically anything available on the web is that there’s a ton of crap to wade through… but I’m a patient man. Again, knowing exactly what I’m looking for makes this much easier. My personal interests lie in drawings. It's probably because that's what I like to do so it appeals to me on an aesthetic level. I'm also very interested in the idea of relationships and how different artist tackle this theme in their pieces. Again, it’s an idea I find myself exploring over and over again in my work, so I’m naturally drawn to that subject. The other day I was talking to a friend about art. He was talking about how he wanted art to challenge him and that he liked the idea of it not necessarily even appearing to be art at first. While I think that's a noble and contemporary approach


to art, I don’t think I share it. I love to see the pieces on the wall and I love when they’re aesthetically pleasing. That doesn’t mean I’m looking for something pretty to match the drapes, but they’re things that I end up living with for a very long time, and frankly I want to be able to look at them over and over again. Looking at the last half dozen pieces I’ve acquired, they all feel like they come from the same family. As time goes on, I find myself taking less and less of an academic approach to art and more of a gut level approach. I either like it or I don’t. In the past month, I’ve added 4 new pieces to the collection by stumbling upon the work of Sidney Pink (www. sidneypink.com), Sarah Ferone (www. sarahferone.com), Lisa Hanawalt (www. lisahanawalt.com), and Matt Furie (www. mattfurie.com). For me collecting is an

intensely personal experience. I don’t go into it thinking about how it will look with my furniture or whether or not it’ll be a good investment. In a way, they’re like the boxes in my garage filled with comic books, old toys and other scraps of my childhood. Jeff Hurlow studied Art Studio at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has designed and art directed movie posters, print ads and websites for the likes of Warner Brothers, Sony Pictures, Disney, Columbia Pictures, Universal, First Look Pictures and Napster, and until recently the Director of User Experience Design for Yahoo!. Jeff ’s drawings have been the subject of solo exhibitions in New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. His online home is Dosmasks.com. FA B R I K

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LASTORY WORDS T.M. HUNTER

A L L O W M E T O S TA RT O F F with a few hypotheticals. Say your mind is buzzing with new ideas and you’re looking for ways to make your creativity the foundation for a thriving and successful career. You decide you want to purchase a computer that will help you extend your mind; an assistant, who will clarify and magnify your ideas.

Happy. You go to the store, buy the beautiful machine, come home, unpack it, connect the wires, and flip the switch… Unfortunately, what you find is not an empty machine, with an operating system ready for you to input your ideas and help shape your world based on your own vision…The factory has stuffed so many preset programs in your Apple or PC that you have trouble utilizing it in the way you had envisioned. Say that some eighty percent of the hard drive has been programmed in such a way that every time you type in a word, bells go off and synonymous terms come up, only these are not synonymous at all, they are interpretations, put in by a programmer who was born and raised in a very different culture and a different time, with very different notions of value, opportunity, danger, and risk assessment. As a result, every time you think of ways to expand your creative mind or business, and you type in words linked to that idea, (words like ‘expansion’, ‘money’, ‘power’, ‘love’, ‘abundance’), warning lights come on, and the functioning of your computer is dramatically impaired. Wouldn’t you get so frustrated that you’d be tempted to smash this beautiful and powerful computer against the wall? Or, would you instead start paying attention to the information that pops up on your screen, and slowly but surely, begin adapting your own thoughts and actions to all these warning signs? You may never have looked at your brain as a malfunctioning computer, plagued by many insidious viruses, like a paralyzed television watcher who has no ability to discern the difference between objective news and an infomercial. But the data that science has 26

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turned out over the last ten years show that our brain doesn’t just function like a computer, it is a computer. The most significant information that shapes our perception of the world, of its opportunities or its dangers, in other words, our impulse to go for expansion or for protection, was formed and hard wired in our brain while we were still in the womb. Nature had a very good and intelligent reason for doing this…In case something happened to the mother, and she could not personally teach us survival skills, our defense mechanisms would already have been activated. The thing is, the human animal is not just an animal. It is not just about survival. The human animal has the potential to be a creative being, with its own unique operating system, able to shape new worlds, new ideas, new inventions, new chairs, paintings, buildings, clothes. In these uncertain times, and period of great upheaval, it is tempting for the brain to get confused by the sounds of deconstruction. It is very appealing to walk back, deep into the cave of the ancient hard-wired survival brain. And huddled around the fire with some other cave people, one may find a vague sense of comfort. But creativity won’t be found in this place. Any sense of safety will be short-lived and very thin. So, for the creative entrepreneur, the fashion or furniture designer, the composer, the writer, or the artist, these are challenging but rewarding times. If we can look at the turmoil in the world as nothing more than a remodeling project, and if we peak over our shoulder into history, and understand that every period of turbulence is always followed by a time of opportunity and expansion, you will find that it is not panic and survival instinct that save the day; but the courage to stay present, look at life as a journey and trust that somehow, mysteriously, everything will, in the end, work out for the better. It may be helpful to conclude this investigation by asking: “When was I ever not taken care of ?” Granted, we may sometimes receive less than what we asked for. The words of the great philosopher Mick Jagger come to mind, who sang that while one cannot always get what one wants, if one tries sometime, one may get what one needs. For anyone who is reading this, and these words would, logically, be directed to that very person, chances are, you are alive. That is a good start, and a fundamentally different state from not being alive. We may not be happy with the position of the life we are in, we may be stressed, feel we don’t have enough time, or too much time, or not enough capital. All these sensations are indicators, warning lights on the dashboard, signals to alert us that the true engine behind our lives, the creative heart, needs to be heard. If we can muster up the courage to bypass all the old panicked voices and listen, it will guide us into new, exciting territories. And we may end up getting more than what we ever asked for. FA B R I K

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HOT&COOLLA

SUNSETJUNCTION WORDS LANEE NEIL PHOTOGRAPHY TED VANCLEAVE

PAZZO GELATO

THE GOOD LUCK BAR

Crazy for Coco-Pops? Sure, why not. Crazy for gelato? Oh yes, most definitely. Pazzo (crazy in Italian) Gelato serves up hoards of people in the Sunset Junction everyday that can't get enough of their creative gourmet concoctions. Flavors like lavender white chocolate, strawberry basil, pineapple cardamom, mimosa and chocolate martini (made with Valrhona chocolate and infused with Grey Goose vodka) draw locals and tourists alike to line up. Made fresh daily and depending what is in season at the farmer's market, the flavors of sorbet and gelato change like colors of a prism.

Your fortune will be looking up after a visit to the Good Luck bar, a long time staple of Sunset Junction nightlife. The Good Luck is a red cacophony of Chinese artifacts and paper lanterns (fitting as red is the color of luck in Chinese culture). The bar opens up to opium den-like-lounge where hipsters, artists, and locals of all ages gather around low wooden tables. Carved dragon covered ceilings and red and black velour wallpaper reflect the candlelight creating a glowing atmosphere — or wait, is that the cocktails doing their magic?

Pazzo, a family owned operation, offers an inviting outdoor patio with metallic furniture to enjoy the summer air, the scene and now famous gelato. It was voted LA's best gelato by LA Weekly. Their mission is fresh with a flair at a reasonable price. A small cup of two flavors is about $4. The staff is happy to let you sample away until you settle on just what your palate desires. Warning: just one serving may impair your sanity. Open Sun–Thu from 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Fri and Sat until midnight. 3827 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 662-1410 www.pazzogelato.net 28

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Ask for Ricardo, an older Chinese bartender with a half-toothed grin who makes jokes about loving Lucy too. Ricardo will guide you through the 'fu-fu' cocktail menu giving recommends on what to try and what to avoid based on your tastes. Order the Bruce Lee inspired cocktail, 'Fist of Fury' or the ‘Good Luck’ house special, a frothy blend of amaretto, Midori, milk and fruit juice served with a plastic dragon stir stick. If you want double your trouble via double shots, order your drink Siamese twin style. Traditionalists can opt for a mug of Chinese herb whiskey called Ng Ka Py. Beware, if you don't like crowds and long waits for drinks, avoid going on weekends. Open daily till 2 a.m. 1514 Hillhurst Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 666-3524


INTELLIGENTSIA

BAR KEEPER

Just when you think you’ve mastered Starbuck coffee lingo, Sunset Junction’s Intelligentsia coffee shop introduces a graduate level of vocabulary including words like chemex, single-origin Clover brews and ristretto. A Chicago based company, Intelligentsia prides itself on using only coffee beans in season (just like your local farmers’ market produce), on-site roasting and boycotting drip-brewed coffee. It may take a few minutes more for your cup of java in the morning, but the space-age Clover brewing system that makes each cup fresh with a stream of hot water and a precisely machined inverse plunger is worth the lesson in patience.

When out with my seventy-eight year old grandfather, I used to be embarrassed when he would send his martini to be remade not once, not twice but sometimes three times to get the perfectly chilled concoction of the gods. After an afternoon at Bar Keeper in Sunset Junction with owner Joe Keeper, I have seen the light in the art of cocktail mastery. My grandpa is of the Rat Pack generation and this is exactly the kind of ‘spirit’ Bar Keeper offers to the new generation and the ‘old’ pro with vintage glassware, shakers, cocktail recipe books, campy drinking games and even absinthe supplies.

The light, whimsical space, designed by local architect Barbara Bestor reflects its Silver Lake neighborhood, with casual yet hip décor. The coffee beans are not the only thing Intelligentsia imports. For the opening of their store, they imported baristas from around the country to relocate to Los Angeles to work with their custom-built Synesso espresso machine.

Joe sends out scouts to thrift stores and retirement communities hoping to score the perfect highball glasses, snifters, flasks or anything from the era gone by that revered the social cocktail hour as religious ceremony. He offers classes once a month where he invites a mixologist in and screens old drinking movies where you learn from Betty Davis or Clark Gable how to glamorously hold your martini glass without spilling its contents.

Try their signature Black Cat espresso blend or choose a coffee drink from the shockingly stark menu. With Forbes naming Intelligentsia the Best Boutique Coffee House in the U.S., they are surely here to stay, elevating our coffee intelligence one sacred cup at time.

So the next time you’re invited to a party that may be serving mixed drinks in red plastic tumblers, bring the host a set of vintage bar glasses from Bar Keeper to subtly impress the message that it's not just what's on the inside that counts…not when it comes to the glory of cocktails at least.

Open from 6 a.m.–11 p.m. 3922 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029 www.intelligentsiacoffee.com

3910 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 669-1675 www.barkeepersilverlake.com FA B R I K

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PULL MY DAISY

DEAN STORE

Seven years running and the one of oldest stores in Sunset Junction, Pull My Daisy boutique offers playful, couture punk fashion for men and women. Owner Sarah Dale, spotlights local designers and artists, complete with a sex toy section. All jewelry and t-shirts are made locally. Currently, she’s selling two female artists' taxidermy plushies, (imagine adult beanie babies with a sadistic touch). Every month, she is the hostess of Vrouw, a trunk show “for the regular sized female,” where nothing is under size 12.

When is the last time you ran into a cool leather shop? Leather shops bring to mind either a haven for bikers or a generic leather store found in the local mall. Dean, a Sunset Junction boutique sells creative and colorful purses, belts, messenger bags, watch bands and more — all of which your grandpa or your fashionista self would delight in wearing.

Her vision for her shop and Sunset Junction is to keep it ‘home-grown’ and community minded with no aspirations to be the next Melrose. It’s working because last year she expanded to double the store’s size. Pull My Daisy seems to be the pulse of Sunset Junction as she knows everyone that comes in and her casual free-spirited vibe warms even the most ice cube personality. If you want an original outfit for your next soiree or just want to take a photo in the old-fashioned photo booth with your pals, Sarah Dale welcomes all. She may even ask you to watch the store as she goes out to move her car. 3908 W Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 663-0608

In 1999, Dean was the leather child of LA artisan Danny Dean Davis when he sought to find a wide leather watch band that had both vintage and modern sensibilities. As they say, necessity is the mother of invention and it spurred Davis on to creating an entire line of leather goods using construction techniques like the whip stitch band of the past and melding them with fashion forward design and color. Another thing that sets Davis’ shop a pasture apart from other leather shops is Dean hand makes everything on site and even has a solution for those that have environmental issues buying leather. An entire section of Davis’ creations are made from those outdated leather jackets from thrift stores you wouldn't be caught dead wearing now. You can find Dean at Barney’s too, but the shop is a worth a visit for the full sensory experience: leather aroma, tactile suede, and rich colors for the eye to behold. 3918 S. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 665-2766 www.deanaccessories.com

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ARTFULAFFAIRS WORDS PETER FRANK

Morono Kiang Gallery: Portal To New Chinese Art E V E N A F T E R T H E O LY M P I C S , eyes remain fixed on China – that is, on the Chinese art scene. Over the past several years the floodgates have opened, and even as the international art world keeps penetrating this potentially vast, recently affluent market, a concomitant rush of new art is making its way out of the once-closed society. Chinese artists have actually been striving for decades to catch up with and participate in the world's artistic discourse; finally, the world has been reciprocating, with mounting - and sometimes irrational – enthusiasm. Chinese artists now rattle the cages of the art world the way British artists did in the 90s: everybody wants a piece of them, although not everybody is sure what pieces to want. Oddly, new Chinese art has less of a presence in Los Angeles than in almost any other international art center. One can surmise why, but that’s the facts. There have been few exhibitions, commercial or institutional, of Chinese work in these parts. Marc Richards was the first gallerist to introduce the work here, as part of his dealing in all forms of Chinese art; but he has chosen to merchandise rather than program contemporary Chinese art (except when working with IKON Gallery in Bergamot Station – which happens to have a show of Chinese print editions, “China Wakes,” on view through October). Only two contemporary galleries 32

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LI JIN, ABSINTH INK AND COLOR ON PAPER 71 X 38.5 INCHES, 2007 MORONO KIANG GALLERY

in town specialize in exhibiting Chinese artists. Happily, the two present complementary programs, DF2 in West Hollywood specializing in more established, more imagistic work and Morono Kiang downtown oriented more to younger artists and con-


LI JIN, EAT, DRINK, MAN, WOMAN INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, 21 X 94 INCHES, 2008 MORONO KIANG GALLERY

ceptual modalities. DF2 has a branch in Beijing; Morono Kiang has only a residence there – one which long preceded the gallery’s existence. In fact, when Karen Morono and Eliot Kiang moved to Beijing from Los Angeles in August 2001, knowing pretty much no one there, they had no intention of creating a gallery, or doing anything but checking out the art scene in their newly adopted home.

They were in China to be in China, nothing more or less. Within two years they had worked on a book documenting the building at the heart of the local art scene, “Beijing 798,” an abandoned factory with a fascinating back story that had filled up with artists, and then galleries. The book helped stave off imminent demolition, partly by diverting the increasing stream of Beijing’s art visitors into 798’s doors. From that point on, Kiang and Morono were fixtures in the local art world, »

MORONO KIANG GALLERY

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HONG HAO, ABOUT HIM NO. 1 TYPE-C PRINT, 39 X 78 INCHES, 2005 MORONO KIANG GALLERY

and made sure their connections kept leading them to smart, gifted younger artists – the ones being overlooked by the high rollers from New York and Berlin. Morono and Kiang went bi-continental in 2006, returning to Los Angeles without giving up their Beijing flat. They opened their gallery in May of last year, after one of their more devoted clients revealed himself the owner of several buildings in the emerging Old Bank arts district. One of these is the Bradbury Building, a landmark famed for its elaborate interior. Morono Kiang’s storefront space on 3rd Street doesn't provide access to the building’s fabled lobby, but it does situate the gallery in a handsome, high-ceilinged space near the epicenter of the quickly artsifying neighborhood. In their first year and 34

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change, Morono Kiang have presented a tightly curated sequence of solo and thematic group shows, revealing a cerebral generation of Chinese artists – most from Beijing and the new-media center of Hangzhou – responsive to social and even political events, ideas about language and image, and the relationship of traditional artistic practice to our newly mediated world. “The thing that struck me about contemporary Chinese art when I first started looking at it,” muses gallery co-owner Eliot Kiang, “was how un-Chinese it was.” This was not what they expected to find when they moved to Beijing. Instead of so many traditional scroll painters and calligraphers and leftover Socialist Realists, offset by a small cadre of post-neo-expressionists maintaining a beach-


head of partly understood internationalism, they found a lively and complex discourse maintaining on many levels, with groups of artists constantly taking on new ideas and new topics. “A new generation of artists,” Kiang observes, “emerges every five years.” What unites these generations, whose experiences in such a fast changing society are notably different from one another, is their awareness of and responsivity to international ideas and to recent western art history – and their urgent need to make themselves part of that history and those ideas while making those ideas and that history their own. By “un-Chinese” Kiang doesn’t mean anonymously international, but liberated from the constraints of national tradition and cliché.

Of course, that tradition is still available, allowing an artist such as Liu Qinghe to expand upon Chinese watercolor technique and still seem contemporary. Hong Hao’s use of old maps and textbook pages is also redolent of a past that goes back beyond the years under Mao. But Hao’s project is also intellectually hip in its investigation of language and identity, and the majority of Morono Kiang’s artists are as likely to resort to a camera as to a brush (or scissors) to conduct similar investigations. The gallery in effect has put its best foot forward this month, not in its own space but out in Riverside, where UC Riverside’s downtown Sweeney Gallery has a carefully selected display of Morono Kiang artists called “Absurd Recreation”. The selection is heavy on the »

HONG HAO, BOTTOM NO. 1 67 X 114 INCHES, COLLECTED BY MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, 2008 MORONO KIANG GALLERY

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HONG HAO, ABOUT HIM NO. 1 TYPE-C PRINT, 39 X 78 INCHES, 2005 MORONO KIANG GALLERY

photo- and video-documentation, often of situations set up by the artists themselves; Chen Wei’s Countless Unpredictable Stands, for instance, posit the lone individual in absurd urban situations. Some of the most striking work is sculptural or painterly, notably Xu Ruotao’s dense linear webs rendered in acrylic, seemingly abstract but clearly derived from some sort of digital input. Nine artists comprise the roster of “Absurd Recreation.” Kiang, Morono, and their gallery director Sonia Mak will be the first to tell you that the selection shows but a sliver off the tip of the iceberg, even of the kind of heady, socially aware Chinese art their gallery champions. But it’s a good place to start. UCLA’s Hammer Museum sometimes shows projects by new Chinese artists, so it’s 36

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a good idea to keep tabs on their program over in Westwood. And hopefully the San Francisco gallery Limn will mount yet another of its own group shows of Chinese art down here (around the time of the January art fairs, if patterns persist). Finally, however, until the local market broadens and/or more curators get with the program, repeated visits to Morono Kiang, counterbalanced with equally regular check-ins at DF2, will keep you in touch with the real McCoy, not just the reproductions and breathless prose of the art magazines and sites. A whole new world - art world and world of thought – is looking at us out of China, and we really should look right back.


HONG HAO, BOTTOM NO. 1 67 X 114 INCHES, COLLECTED BY MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, 2008 MORONO KIANG GALLERY

XU RUOTAO, RED OIL ON CANVAS 83 X 70 INCHES, 2007 MORONO KIANG GALLERY


September 20 - November 1, 2008

Volume 2 Number 3

Quotidian Truths: Paintings by Xia Xing Also in this Volume

Chemical materials bleach “fresh lotus chips� In the Hebei province the Hygienic Control Department found out that a company in Yuanshi county added illegal chemical materials to their fresh lotus chips. Around 40 tons of products and 20 bags of chemical materials were found and sealed. The owner of the company announced that the products were sold to many places all over the country.

MKG is proud to present the second installment of the Quotidian Truths series, featuring new works that recount the pain and pageantry of contemporary life as seen through the news media. Xia Xing’s almost-daily ritual practice of painting front-page newspaper photographs from The Beijing News is a brilliant interrogation of the nature of collective memory and the complex manner by which information shapes knowledge. Consisting of more than four-dozen paintings, Xia’s annual painting series examines how seemingly random people, places, and events presented through the lens of a government sanctioned news outlet become the substance of history-in-the-making. On Display 9/20/08 to 11/1/08

Xia Xing, 06.02.26, oil on canvas, 70 x 100 cm, 2007

Man riding the bus took hostages Hostages were taken on Dec 26 in Guiyang city. A man, armed with knives and a nail gun, confronted the police and jumped on a public bus hijacking a female passenger. Snipers shot the suspect and took control of the situation while a fePDOHSROLFHRI½FHUHQWHUHGWKHEXVWR negotiate the exchange of hostages. The suspect was suffering from a intermittent mental illness. Xia Xing, 06.12.28, oil on canvas, 70 x 100 cm, 2007

Fireworks for the First Time in Ten Years $JLUOLQWKH)DQJ]KXDQJ'LVWULFWVSLQVLJQLWHGKDQGKHOG½UHZRUNV 7KH6SULQJ)HVWLYDOZDV%HLMLQJ¾V½UVW6SULQJ)HVWLYDODIWHUWKH OLIWLQJRIDEDQRQ½UHZRUNVLQWKHFLW\7KHVRXQGRI½UHZRUNVZDV KHDUGLQVLGHWKHWK5LQJ5RDGIRUWKH½UVWWLPHLQWHQ\HDUV Xia Xing, 06.01.29, oil on canvas, 70 x 100 cm, 2007

(Continued at Morono Kiang Gallery)

Bradbury Building Xia Xing Fabrik Ad.indd 1

218 West 3rd Street

Los Angeles CA 90013

213.628.8208 tel

www.moronokiang.com 9/2/2008 4:57:30 PM


DESIGNCRITIC WORDS OLIVER O.

Tanzore Restaurant Design Divo reveals an extreme makeover Remember Gaylords, the only ‘fine dining’ Indian restaurant in Los Angeles for years on La Cienega? Same owners, but Tanzore is an ultimate frog-turned-prince makeover worthy of any reality show fodder. Ignoring the uninviting dark window exterior, I enter and am enveloped by an oceanic turquoise lounge, complete with transitional striped furniture, inviting pink throw pillows and blooming orchids. I have a strange urge to break out into Indian dance as I am mesmerized by larger-than-life screens showing couture cat walk fashion shows and Bollywood movies. Check out 333 Fridays, where the lounge gets some action as Indian and nonIndian DJ’s spin tunes and the bar sells $3 dollar Indian themed cocktails like Bombay Fever or Delhi Heat. If you are lucky enough, you may catch the general manager Paul (a white east coaster guy) showing off his expert Indian dance moves. As I pull myself away from the blue lagoon lounge, a towering glass wine case transitions the lounge from the main dining room. The colors dramatically shift from cool to warm, reminding me of the spices found in Indian dishes like cinnamon and saffron. It’s a gay-sian delight: golden cubed lighting, an undulating wooden wall, flowery-striped wallpaper, burgundy ceilings and a central stone fountain. Even the private 40

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party room is fit for a king with textured, pearly walls, candle light and a massive antique haveli wooden door. Very similar to the plate presentation of the tandoori sea bass, the dining room is over-decorated with its Cost Plus looking knick knacks placed in any available space. I don't like to be challenged by the décor when I dine and these relic vases and pots are ‘things that make you go, huh?’ Between the fake floral arrangements and over knick-knackiness, it makes me reminisce of my Aunt Dora's living room. Overall, Tanzore redefines Indian fine dining sure to please the foodie or the fashionista in LA style and surely worth your time to explore, even if you are forced to watch TV as you visit the men’s urinal. Tanzore 50 N. La Cienega Blvd, Beverly Hills, CA 90211 310.652.3894 • www.tanzore.com

Delights: Homemade Chai, Extensive Wine List, Creative Fusion Menu, Helpful Manager, Paul Doozies: Fussy decor, Needs more guests (too quiet)


THROUGHTHELENS WORDS NICHOLAS OLSBERG DRAWINGS EDWARD CELLA GALLERY

VISUALIZING A NEW LOS ANGELES, 1962-81:

The Architectural Renderings of Carlos Diniz This portfolio is drawn from an exhibition at the Edward Cella Gallery in Santa Barbara that explores – through the drawings of one of the most important architectural illustrators of his time – the transformation of Los Angeles as it matured from a loose conurbation into the more self-conscious, consolidated, and monumental metropolis we know today.

CARLOS DINIZ Carlos Diniz grew up in Los Angeles, studied Industrial Design at Art Center College and then joined Victor Gruen as part of a team developing promotional materials for the largescale planning and shopping center schemes that Gruen pioneered in the Fifties. He left the firm six years later to found his own studio, collaborating with Art Krebs and other printmakers to produce the often elaborate visual documents employed to propose and promote new projects. With his work for the giant firms of SOM San Francisco, HOK St Louis and Minoru Yamasaki (whose World Trade Center Diniz portrayed in 1961), his practice rapidly expanded to a national level. He was soon providing promotional renderings for mega-projects throughout the world. By the 1980s, his picturesque approach to the downtown ‘festival place’ projects of the Rouse Company and to historicizing and humanizing massive schemes for London, Chicago and Boston made an enormous contribution to defining the urban aesthetic and sensibility that has marked the booming development of the last thirty years.

DRAWING THE FUTURE Commissioned to portray sometimes quite rudimentary planning schemes as they might appear in final form Diniz proposed how their densities, siting and choreography would be perceived; and how their social patterns of occupancy and interaction might work. Precisely fleshing out a more or less exact architectural framework, his pen and ink drawings-made in preparation for the final prints or painted panels that would seduce investors, 42

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planning agencies, and public into backing the schemes – are magnificently fluid, using movement, shadow, a touch of color, and the peopling of space to animate a static design. From the vast archive of Diniz’s practice, the exhibition selects examples of these perspective drawings, showing how they worked with architects and planners to establish the greatcity aspirations of Los Angeles from the final plan of Century City in 1962 – when the downtown core moved out – to the Grand Avenue schemes of 1980 – when after many false starts it began to move back in. Los Angeles in these years sputtered through successive phases of growth and decay, expansion and constraint, but we can see the city steadily moving away from the unabashedly vast panoramas, open plazas, and soaring scales of the Space Age toward the busy arcades, articulated layers, and street-like settings of the end of century.

STANDING APART Screen prints from the Krebs studio shows Diniz’s work early in the Sixties when, with the Hollywood studio system in free-fall and the city's major industries beginning to drift away, new projects began looking toward a denser city at a different level and with further aspirations toward metropolitan style and grandeur. Minoru Yamasaki's enormous Century Plaza hotel (1961-66) was conceived at an entirely modern scale, anchoring the western edge of Century City, a vast new office park on the back-lots of a major studio. There, in Welton Becket’s master plan, clustered high-rises, set above a huge mound of garage space, sat within a rectangular platform of their own, defying the 50-foot street front of the main arterial boulevards that had prevailed for over 40 years. »

CENTURY PLAZA HOTEL — LOWER LEVEL VIEW, 1964 MINORU YAMASAKI, ARCHITECT


THE HOLLYWOOD — COURTYARD VIEW, 1961 PAUL R. WILLIAMS AND DAVID JACOBSON, ARCHITECTS

The Hollywood (c.1960) was an un-built housing and office complex designed primarily by Paul R. Williams. Oriented away from the street into an interior courtyard, the three 31 storey towers created a controlled envelope within a dense commercial grid. Marked by outdoor mezzanines and sunken plazas, a heliport, 5000 car garage, air terminal, hotel, theaters, restaurants and shopping center, it was to have been the largest single complex on the West Coast. In setting up a balanced fusion of metropolitan living with entertainment, meeting, tourist, business and retail spaces – a city center within a city – the project also anticipates, though in a much more persuasive language, the new live-in malls of the present day.

LANDMARKS Strategies for development in the years from 1962 looked toward concentrating its energies in more intense spaces, and to making their presence bolder and more conspicuous, scattering on the loose framework of Los Angeles the elements of a monumental city. Since the mid-fifties, the city's once-absent cultural buildings had been promoted as a means not only to service art, music, theater and design but to punctuate the city's wide horizon with symbols of a new sophistication. Such are Welton Becket’s un-built Theme Building for Century City (1962), which its developers actually described as ‘both cultural center and landmark’ and which Diniz therefore depicts as a shining beacon of light. » 44

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THE HOLLYWOOD SUITE — FRONT VIEW WITH TEXT, 1961 PAUL R. WILLIAMS AND DAVID JACOBSON, ARCHITECTS


THEME BUILDING — CENTURY CITY, 1963 WELTON BECKET, ARCHITECT

The boldest of these projects unites the central features of the ‘redevelopment’ era, Cesar Pelli and Tony Lumsden’s 1968 project, with DMJM, for Santa Monica Bay. Here a string of enclosed structures with different functions and expressions – from dwelling to work to culture – would actually stretch under the ocean to rise again in a transparent cylindrical tower. It is a set of discrete dense units organized into a campus, climaxing in a monumental landmark that celebrates the bay, which Diniz emphasizes through the Giacometti-like figures that give it scale. Diniz shows Pelli’s huge ‘blue whale’ – the first phase of his Pacific Design Center (designed 1972-1974) – with heightened perspective, capturing the impression of a skyscraper on its side, its horizontal lines anchoring a great plaza that sets it off from the street; while Craig Elwood’s Art Center College – an entire campus folded into a single covered bridge – is drawn like as a great line across the hills, at once a testament to the persistent horizontality of Los Angeles and a landmark, like the blue whale, to the city’s new sense of its self as a generator of innovative arts rather than a repository of the old ones. » 46

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SANTA MONICA BAY VILLAGE — WATER LEVEL VIEW, 1968 CESAR PELLI AND TONY LUMSDEN FOR DANIEL, MANN, JOHNSON & MENDENHALL, ARCHITECTS

ART CENTER CAMPUS — PERSPECTIVE VIEW, 1968 CRAIG ELLWOOD, ARCHITECT

ART CENTER CAMPUS — PERSPECTIVE VIEW, 1968 CRAIG ELLWOOD & ASSOCIATES WITH JAMES TYLER AND STEPHEN WOOLLEY, ARCHITECTS


SANTA MONICA PLACE — INTERIOR ATRIUM VIEW FINAL, 1972 FRANK O. GEHRY, ARCHITECT

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GRAND AVENUE COMPETITION — OVERALL VIEW, 1980 MAGUIRE PARTNERS WITH HARRY PERLOFF, BARTON MYERS, EDGARDO CONTINI, CHARLES MOORE, LAWRENCE HALPRIN, CESAR PELLI, HARDY HOLZMAN PFEIFFER, RICARDO LEGORETTA, FRANK GEHRY, SUSSMAN PREJZA, AND ROBERT KENNARD

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PROMENADES In the face of the energy crisis and the urban panic that marked the late sixties and early 70s, the strategy for center city revitalization dwelt on dense, massy, secure-able envelopes organized as walled super-blocks, largely blind to the street. As at the Bonaventure, space, energy and freedom were enclosed within, and the city presented only high above street level as a distant panorama. Charles Luckman’s Broadway Plaza (now Macy’s Plaza) of 1973 is compressed into a tight stack of barely differentiated brick clad forms. The city appears only in the revolving restaurant on top; yet the wide descending interior streetscape is a powerful one – a sort of Piranesian crystal palace whose glass falls only at street-side, Diniz’s vignette of the interior showing how its constructive geometries animated the space below them. Gehry and Gruen’s Santa Monica Place, designed with the Rouse Company from 1973-80, reached across a number of busy city blocks in an effort to give density to a depressed zone near the pier. Setting up a mix of buildings and uses, streets and pedestrian plazas, it conveyed that sense of intensely animated outdoor space that marked James Rouse’s urban thinking. Only the enclosed shopping center – a set of high, arcaded promenades that spoke to a more traditional, almost Milanese sense of the streetscape – was built. But the idea that a highly articulated, colorful and varied parade of street-fronts might bring the city back to life persisted in the rejected proposition of the ‘All-Star’ team for Bunker Hill’s Grand Avenue (1980). This visionary promenade, its streetscape designed by Charles Moore and Lawrence Halprin, failed; but it fit Los Angeles perfectly – a festival place in the Rouse tradition, but devoid of historical reference, sentiment and reassurance, stretched out in a horizontal line and fusing as if by chance a confrontational mélange of buildings and materials at different scale. It is perhaps the last great imaginative flourish in a generation's symphony of dreams for a city with a sense of grandeur.

SANTA MONICA PLACE - PRELIMINARY SKETCH 3RD STREET ENTRANCE, 1972 FRANK O. GEHRY, ARCHITECT

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BROADWAY PLAZA — HOTEL LOBBY, 1973 CHARLES LUCKMAN + ASSOCIATES, ARCHITECTS

BROADWAY PLAZA — OVERALL VIEW OF HOTEL, 1973 CHARLES LUCKMAN + ASSOCIATES, ARCHITECTS

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LOS ANGELES ART EVENTS CALENDAR FOWLER MUSEUM AT UCLA La Tinta Grita/The Ink Shouts: The Art of Social Resistance in Oaxaca, Mexico NOW TILL DEC 7, 2008

The 2006 uprisings in Oaxaca, Mexico, inspired a group of artists to use the city walls as a blank slate to express their political anger. This group show presents some 30 woodblock prints and stencils created by the Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca. 308 Charles E. Young Dr North, Los Angeles, CA 90095 For more info: http://www.fowler.ucla.edu

THE GETTY Bernini and the Birth of Baroque Portrait Sculpture NOW TILL OCTOBER 26, 2008

Gian Lorenzo Bernini (Italian, 1598–1680) and his contemporaries in Rome transformed the portrait bust into a groundbreaking art form. With dazzling virtuosity, these artists were able to coax the living presence and personality of their sitters—creating a "speaking likeness"—from the intractable medium of stone. Bernini is frequently credited with inventing Baroque art and, throughout his long life, remained its greatest exponent. Celebrating Baroque sculpture, paintings, and drawings, this major international loan exhibition brings together nearly 60 works from both public and private collections, and is the first important exhibition on Bernini in North America. 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles, California 90049 For more info: (310) 440-7300; http://www.getty.edu

THE GETTY VILLA Jim Dine: Poet Singing (The Flowering Sheets) OCT. 30, 2008 — FEB. 9, 2009

This exhibition presents new works and poetry by Jim Dine based on ancient Greek sculptures in the Museum’s collection. The first contemporary art project at the Getty Villa, this installation illustrates the continuing influence of antiquity on living artists. Admission: Free with parking fee. 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades, CA 90265. For more info: (310) 440-7300; http://www.getty.edu

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART (LACMA) Vanity Fair Portraits: Photographs 1913–2008 OCTOBER 26, 2008 — MARCH 1, 2009 HAMMER BUILDING

Vanity Fair Portraits: Photographs 1913–2008 is the first major exhibition to bring together the magazine's historic archive of rare vintage prints with its contemporary photographs. The exhibition explores the ways in which photography and celebrity have interacted and changed, with portraits from the magazine's early period (1913–1936) displayed in conjunction with works from the contemporary Vanity Fair (1983–present). The Los Angeles presentation, which is sponsored by Burberry, will be the only U.S. stop on the exhibition's international tour. Photographers to be represented include Cecil Beaton, Harry Benson, Julian Broad, Imogen Cunningham, Annie Leibovitz, Man Ray, Mary Ellen Mark, Steven Meisel, Helmut Newton, Herb Ritts, Edward Steichen, Mario Testino, and Bruce Weber. 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles CA 90036 For more info: (323) 857-6000; http://www.lacma.org

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (MoCA) MARTIN KIPPENBERGER THE PROBLEM PERSPECTIVE NOW TILL JAN. 5, 2009

One of the most significant and influential artists of our time, German artist Martin Kippenberger (1953–97) produced a complex and richly varied body of work from the mid-1970s until his untimely death in 1997 at the age of 44. The first major retrospective exhibition to be mounted in the United States, Martin Kippenberger: The Problem Perspective includes key selections and bodies of work from Kippenbergerís entire career: paintings, sculpture, works on paper, installations, multiples, photographs, posters, announcement cards, and books. 250 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012 For more info: (213) 626-6222; http://www.moca.org

NORTON SIMON MUSEUM OF ART Marcel Duchamp Redux NOW TILL DEC. 8, 2008

INDIE COLLECTIVE GALLERY Danny Mansmith Exhibit SAT. SEP. 6 — FRI. OCT. 24, 2008

Indie Collective Gallery for Art & Fashion presents Danny Mansmith exhibit - instead of drawing he sews... amazing! The intimate space, named after designer Gülbin Yavuz’s Indie Collective line, is located in the heart of Culver City’s arts district. 6039a Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232 For more info: (310) 837-7714; http://scrap-dannymansmith.squarespace.com http://www.indiecollective.com 52

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45 years ago, a little venue in Pasadena opened their doors and thrust a retrospective exhibition of Marcel Duchamp into the faces of an unsuspecting Southern California audience. To mark that anniversary, the little venue, now called the Norton Simon Museum, is taking a look back at the iconic French artist who, like Damien Hirst, Andy Warhol and the countless other pop artists that followed him, made mountains from unexpected molehills. No one, for sure, could look at a public toilet in the same way again. 411 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 For more info: (626) 449-6840; http://www.nortonsimon.org


LOS ANGELES ART WALKS BREWERY ART WALK

LAGUNA BEACH ART WALK

NOVEMBER 1-2

FIRST THURSDAY, 6-9 PM

The Brewery Art Walk is a twice annual open studio weekend at the worlds largest art colony. Each artwalk, over 100 resident artists participate. During this event, you will have the opportunity to see new works, discover new favorites, speak with the artists and purchase artworks directly from the artists at studio prices. Admission is free and so is parking. Come support LA’s finest artists, take home some great works and and dine at the onsite restaurant. http://www.breweryartwalk.com/generalinfo.html

Laguna Beach is known for its arts community and summer-long arts festival. The Galleries on South PCH start about 5 blocks from those in north and central Laguna Beach, so free shuttles run from 6:15 - 8:45 pm, departing from Laguna Art Museum (corner PCH and Cliff Dr.) and Bluebird Center (1590 S. Coast Highway). www.firstthursdaysartwalk.com

CLAREMONT FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK FIRST FRIDAYS, 5 PM - 9 PM

Art displays, demos, authors’ booksignings and live music. Galleries and shops in the downtown village area from Indian Hill to College Ave and 1st Street to Bonita. Parking and maps at each venue. www.claremontartwalk.org

SAN PEDRO ART WALK FIRST THURSDAYS, 6 PM - 9 PM SOME VENUES LATER

Galleries and artists studios, craft vendors and live music. Street parking and pay lots. 7th Street to 4th St., Pacific Ave to Palo Verde St., San Pedro, CA www.1stthursday.com

TOPANGA CANYON GALLERY STUDIO TOUR SECOND WEEKEND IN JUNE SAT 10 AM - 6 PM, SUN 11 AM - 5 PM

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES Downtown Art Walk SECOND THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH 12 PM - 9 PM

The Downtown Art Walk is a free, self-guided tour of the many art exhibition venues in Downtown Los Angeles — commercial art galleries, museums, and non-profit arts venues. Public information and a printable map of the Downtown Art Walk are available at www.downtownartwalk.com. The FREE Art Walk DASH shuttle loops throughout Gallery Row on Art Walk nights from 7-10 pm, with the last bus leaving at 9:45 pm. LOS FELIZ ART WALK FIRST FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH

The Los Feliz First Friday Art Walk is a monthly art walk for the 9 galleries in Los Feliz within walking distance of the Red Line. The event is free and open to the public from 7-10 pm on the first Friday of every month. More information and a map can be found at http://www.ceart.com/artwalk or www.laluzdejesus.com/artwalk.html

NORTH EAST LA ART— HIGHLAND PARK/EAGLE ROCK SECOND SATURDAYS, 7 PM - 10 PM

This is more of an art drive than a walk. There are several clusters of galleries at different locations. For map and official website: www.nelaart.com

Self-guided tour to over twenty artist studios in Topanga Canyon. Purchase tickets and pick up tour map at Topanga Canyon Gallery. Pine Tree Circle, 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 109, Topanga, CA 90290. Start with a full tank of gas. There’s no gas station in the Canyon. (310) 455-7909; www.topangacanyongallery.com

VALLEY ARTIST STUDIO TOUR 1ST OR 2ND WEEKEND OF OCTOBER

A driving tour of the studios of 45 San Fernando Valley fine artists within the city limits of Los Angeles. Tickets good for both days, $20 advance, $25 day of event, 10:00am to 5:00pm on Saturday and 10:00am to 5:00pm on Sunday Ticket purchasers get a map along with a wrist band. There is also an artist reception Saturday night for the ticket holders. Exhibitions of Tour artists’ work at the Madrid Theatre and the Canoga Park Youth Art Center are open to the public. San Fernando Valley Arts Council, c/o VAST Tickets P.O. Box 571476, Tarzana, CA 91357. (818) 572-3150; www.sfvartscouncil.com

GOT NEWS? If you have exhibits and events and would like to be considered for editorial or be included in our email newsletter, please email us: events@fabrikmagazine.com.

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LAFASHION 7 FOR ALL MANKIND

ALPHA

BALENCIAGA

Men, Women, Children, Accessories 100 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 385-9540 http://www.7forallmankind.com

Men, Accessories 8625 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 855-0775 http://www.alpha-man.com

Women, Accessories 8670 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 854-0557 http://www.balenciaga.com

ADIDAS ORIGINALS

ANTIK DENIM STORE

Shoes 8009 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 658-6091 http://www.adidas.com

Men, Women 8013 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 782-8333 http://www.antikdenim.com

ADRIANO GOLDSCHMIED

ANYA HINDMARCH

Men, Women 107 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 247-3222 http://www.agjeans.com

Women, Accessories 118 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 271-9707 http://www.anyahindmarch.com

AGNES B.

ARIANE

Men, Women 100 N. Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 271-9643 http://www.agnesb.com

Accessories 8121 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 951-9929 http://www.ariane-millinery.com

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

ATOS LOMBARDINI

Men, Women, Accessories 8379 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 782-4983 http://www.alexandermcqueen.com

ALICE + OLIVIA Women 134 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 247-0120 http://www.aliceandolivia.com

Women 314 N. Robertson Blvd. "A" West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 659-1414 http://www.atoslombardini.com

AVANT GARDE Jewelry 7918 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 655-5592

BAPE STORE LA Men, Women, Children, Accessories 8001 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 658-8622 http://www.bape.com

BCBG MAXAZRIA Women 154 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 860-9690 http://www.bcbg.com

BCBG MAXAZRIA Women, Accessories 8400 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 782-0238 http://www.bcbg.com

BECKLEY Women, Accessories 8620 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-3500 http://www.beckleyla.com

BETSEY JOHNSON Women, Accessories 8050 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 852-1534 http://www.betseyjohnson.com

BURTON SNOWBOARDS & CHANNEL ISLANDS SURFBOARDS STORE Sports 8175 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 370-1777 http://www.store.burton.com

CAROLINA HERRERA

ATOS LOMBARDINI ON ROBERTSON

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FA B R I K

Women, Accessories 8441 Melrose Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 782-9090 http://www.carolinaherrera.com


LOS ANGELES FASHION GUIDE CHANEL

DIAVOLINA

Women 125 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 278-5505 http://www.chanel.com

Women, Accessories 156 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 550-1341 http://www.shopdiavolina.com

CHARLENE

DIESEL

Swimwear 8109 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 655-0355

Men, Women, Accessories 8401 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (866) 479-8355 http://www.diesel.com

CITY OF ANGELS EYEWEAR COMPANY

DOLCE VITA

Eyewear 7928 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 951-9740 http://www.cityofangelseyewear.com

Women, Accessories 8481 Melrose Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 782-9739 http://www.shopdolcevita.com

COCO-23

FOLEY + CORINNA

Women 8109 Melrose Ave. Long Beach, CA 90046 (323) 653-2323

CREATURES OF COMFORT Women, Accessories 7971 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 655-7855 http://www.creaturesofcomfort.us

DC SHOES, INC

Women, Accessories 8117 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 944-0169 http://www.foleyandcorinna.com

FORNARINA Women, Accessories 8000 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 782-7901 http://www.fornarina.com

BURTON ON MELROSE

INTERMIX Women, Accessories 110 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 860-0113 http://www.intermixonline.com

J.GERARD PEACE GALLERY Women, Accessories 8575 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (3100 657-3336 http://www.jgerarddesignstudio.com

G-STAR

JOHN VARVATOS

Men, Women 7966 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 658-6028 http://www.g-star.com

Men, Accessories 8800 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 859-2791 http://www.johnvarvatos.com

DIABLESS

HENRY BEGUELIN

KIDROBOT

Women 8406 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 9323) 651-4300 http://www.myspace.com/diablessboutique

Men, Women, Accessories 8627 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 659-9320 http://www.henrybeguelin.com

Men, Women, Accessories 7972 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 782-1411 http://www.kidrobot.com

Men, Women, Children 8025 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 944-0041 http://www.dcshoes.com

KIRA PLASTININA Women, Accessories 116 Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 385-0957 http://www.kiraplastinina.com

KITSON Men, Women, Children, Accessories 115 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 859-2652 http://www.shopkitson.com

KITSON KIDS ON THE PLAZA

CITY OF ANGELS EYEWEAR COMPANY ON MELROSE

Children 116 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 310-246-3829 http://www.shopkitson.com FA B R I K

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LOS ANGELES FASHION GUIDE KITSON MEN

LURE

MAX & CO

Men, Accessories 146 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 310-358-9550 http://www.shopkitson.com

Women, Accessories 9003 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 858-9003

Women, Accessories 8422 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (323) 297-0165 http://www.maxandco.com

KITSON STUDIO Women, Accessories 142 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 360-0051 http://www.shopkitson.com

LAMBERTSON TRUEX Accessories 8459 Melrose Place Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 951-9622 http://www.lambertsontruex.com

LESPORTSAC Accessories 8414 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (323) 782-0975 http://www.lesportsac.com

MA Women 8254 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 653-8850 http://www.maternalamerica.com

MADISON Women, Accessories 8115 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 651-3662 http://www.madisonlosangeles.com

MARC JACOBS — WOMEN Women, Accessories 8400 Melrose Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 653-5100 http://www.marcjacobs.com

LF STORES

MARC JACOBS — WOMEN & MEN

Women, Accessories 106 S. Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 271-2727 http://www.LFstores.com

Men, Women, Accessories 8410 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 653- 0100 http://www.marcjacobs.com

LISA KLINE

MARNI

Men, Women, Children 136 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 246-0907 http://www.lisakline.com

Women, Accessories 8460 Melrose Place Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 782-1101 http://www.marni.com

THE LOTTA BOUTIQUE

MAX AZRIA

Women 7965 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 852-0520 http://www.lottnyc.com

Women 8026 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 658-8083 http://www.maxazria.com

ME& RO Jewelry 8405 Melrose Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 782-1071 http://www.meandrojewelry.com

MISS SIXTY/ENERGIE Men, Women, Accessories 8070-8074 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 655-7220 http://www.sixty-usa.com

MULBERRY Accessories 8407 Melrose Place Los Angeles, CA 90069 (888) 685-6856 http://www.mulberrycom

OPTX Eyewear 123 S. Robertson Blvd. STE A Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 858-7399 http://www.myoptx.com

OSCAR DE LA RENTA Women 8446 Melrose Place Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 653-0200 http://www.odlr.com

PAIGE PREMIUM DENIM Men, Women, Children 116 N. Robertson Blvd. STE B Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 360-9888 http://www.paigepremiumdenim.com

PARASUCO Men, Women, Accessories 111 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 273-8888 http://www.parasuco.com

PARKE & RONEN Men, Accessories 8012 1/2 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 852-1635 http://www.parkeandronen.com

THE PAUL FRANK STORE Men, Women, Children, Accessories 7964 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 653-6471 http://www.paulfrank.com JOHN VARVATOS ON MELROSE

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LOS ANGELES FASHION GUIDE PAUL SMITH Men, Women, Accessories 8221 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 951-4800 http://www.paulsmith.co.uk

PORTS 1961 Women 8483 Melrose Pl. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (323) 951-9696 http://www.ports1961.com

PULL-IN UNDERWEAR Men 8012 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 951-0678 http://www.pull-in.com

SORUM NOCE ON MELROSE

REISS Men, Women, Accessories 145 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 276-0060 http://www.reiss.co.uk

RETROSPECS & CO. Eyewear 8629 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 657-4217 http://www.retrospecs.com

SHEILA Women, Accessories 8568 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 360-0033 http://www.sheilamelrose.com

SIELIAN'S VINTAGE APPAREL Women, Accessories 9013 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 246-9595 http://www.sieliansvintageapparel.com

SKY Women 120 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 274-7929

SORUM NOCE Men, Accessories 8568 1/4 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 358-0451 http://www.sorumnoce.com

STELLA PAGE DESIGN Handbags 8576 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 289-9494 http://www.stellapage.com

SURLY GIRL

VINCE

Accessories 116 N. Robertson Blvd. Ste A Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 659-1391 http://www.shopsurlygirl.com

Men, Women 112 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 247-8299 http://www.vinceusa.com

TARINA TARANTINO

VIONNET

Accessories 7957 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 651-5155 http://www.tarinatarantino.com

TED BAKER Men, Women, Children, Accessories 131 Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 550-7855 http://www.tedbaker.com

THEORY Men, Women, Accessories 8428 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (323) 782-0163 http://www.theory.com

THREAD Women 8572 1/2 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 360-5943 http://www.threaddesign.com

TORY BURCH Women, Accessories 142 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 248-2612 http://www.toryburch.com

Women, Accessories 158 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 289-9202 http://www.vionnetla.blogspot.com

VISIONARY ECO-CHIC BOUTIQUE Men, Women, Children, Accessories 8568 1/2 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 659-1177 http://www.visionaryboutique.com

WESC Men, Women, Accessories 144 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 385-9315 http://www.wesc.com

XIN Women 8064 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (323) 653-2188 http://www.xinboutique.com

YELLOWMAN Men, Women 110 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 271-4177 http://www.yellowman.com

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Los Angeles

ART & DESIGN DIRECTORY Pacific Design Center Showrooms

60

Curated Art Exhibit Highlights

62

Art Gallery & Museum Directory

64

Artists Showcase

78


PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER SHOWROOMS 8687 MELROSE AVENUE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069

A.M. COLLECTIONS LOS ANGELES B257 323-882-6875 amcollections.com A. RUDIN G172 310-659-2388 arudin.com A. SOMMER TEXTILES (A.S.T.) B409 310-659-9970 ast-fabrics.com ALMAR CARPETS INT’L G277 310-859-1200 almarcarpets.com ARC-COM FABRICS INC. B260 310-659-0376 arc-com.com ASID CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES CHAPTER B241 310-659-4716 asidla.org ASHBURY HIDES B605 310-854-54991 ashburyhides.com ATELIER LAPCHI G176 310-967-0087 lapchi.com THE AVENUES OF ART AND DESIGN M38 310-289-2534 avenuesartdesign.com BAKER KNAPP & TUBBS B525 310-652-7252 bakerfurniture.com BECKMANN MOOREYAKI STUDIO B366 310-855-7878 beckmannmooreyakistudio.com BERNHARDT DESIGN B230 310-854-7204 bernhardtdesign.com BROWN JORDAN B445 310-359-0771 brownjordan.com BRUNSCHWIG & FILS B653 310-659-9800 brunschwig.com CARDUCCI INTERIORS B411 310-289-0073 carducciinteriors.com CADD PRODUCTION RESOURCE M32 310-652-0333 caadpr.com CBS SHOWROOM B450/B464 310-652-9180 cbsshowroom@mpowercom.net CENTURY DESIGNER SHOWROOMS G670 310-652-5176 centuryfurniture.com CHARLES JACOBSEN INC. G679 310-652-1188 charlesjacobsen.com CHELSEA CARPET B466 310-289-5200 chelseacarpets.com 60

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CHOW’S ORIENTIAL ARTS INC. B129 310-659-6208 CJ MATSUMOTO M48 310-659-6343 cjmatsumoto.com CLEAN FIRE (Coming Soon) B455 CLOSET FACTORY B408 310-652-0778 closetfactory.com COOPER DESIGN GROUP G273 310-659-8222 cooperia.com COOPER-PACIFIC KITCHENS G299 310-659-6147 cooperpacific.com CORAGGIO TEXTILES B633 310-659-4295 coraggio.com COWTAN & TOUT B647 310-659-1423 cowtan.com CREATIVE ENVIRONMENTS B103 310-652-3713 DAKOTA JACKSON G170 310-659-7424 dakotajackson.com DAN MARTY DESIGN B315 310-652-6928 danmartydesign.com DASSIN GALLERY B131 310-652-0203 DAVID SUTHERLAND SHOWROOM B182 310-360-1777 davidsutherlandshowroom.com DE BENEDICTIS LA B173 310-657-3938 debenla.com D’ESCOTO WEST M34/M30 310-657-0562 descotowest.com DESIGN BATH & HARDWARE B444 310-358-9669 designbath-hardware.com DESIGN SPEC FLOOR COVERINGS B418 310-859-8861 DESIGNTEX B309 310-855-9550 designtex.com DONGHIA G196 310-657-6060 donghia.com DURALEE FABRIC B601 310-360-0778 duraleefabrics.com EBANISTA INC. G190 310-246-9170 ebanista.com ECCOLA B211 310-360-5959 eccolaimports.com ESPASSO B433 310-657-0020 espasso.com

EUROCONCEPTS BATH B119 310-652-3472 euroconcepts.com EUROCONCEPTS KITCHEN G288 310-657-5391 euroconcepts.com FORT STREET STUDIO B213 310-855-9832 fortstreetstudio.com GIATI DESIGNS INC. G197 310-659-9924 giati.com GREGORY GREENWOOD CONSTRUCTION M54 310-360-6173 gregorygreenwood.com HAGAN FLYNN INC. B435 310-659-2614 haganflynn.com HANASSAB ORIENTIAL RUG IMPORTS B149 310-657-5777 HBF FURNITURE/HBF TEXTILES B270 310-652-5344 hbf.com H.L. HINSON & COMPANY B690 310-659-1400 HOKANSON B613 310-657-8026 hokansoncarpet.com HOLLY HUNT B377 310-659-3776 hollyhunt.com HOULE’S U.S.A. INC. B540 310-289-2435 houles.com INNOVATIONS M20 310-289-0100 innovationsusa.com INTERNATIONAL DOWN AND LINEN B368 310-657-8243 JANUS ET CIE B193 310-652-7090 janusetcie.com JEFFREY STEVENS @ PDC B430 310-652-3050 jeffreystevens.com J.H. MINASSIAN & CO. B139/B147 310-657-7000 jhminassian.com JULIA GRAY LTD. B355 310-360-9457 juliagrayltd.com KENRO LIGHT INC. B228 310-659-6510 kenrolight.com KIM3 B324 310-360-9829 kim3.com KNEEDLER L FAUCHERE B600 310-255-1313 kneedlerfauchere.com


PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER SHOWROOMS 8687 MELROSE AVENUE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069

KRAVET B624 310-659-7100 kravet.com L.A. CLOSET DESIGN B255 310-289-1311 laclosetdesign.com LARUSSA AUDIO/VISUAL M46/50 800-741-0123 larussa.net LEE JOFA B639 310-659-7777 leejofa.com LE COIN FURNITURE B466 310-659-6190 lecoin-furniture.com LIVING EDGE INC. B275 310-358-0723 livingedgeinc.com LOPRESTI ARCHITECTURIAL ELEMENTS B239 310-230-7770 loprestigallery.com LOUIS & COMPANY B266 310-652-1800 louiscodesign.com MARTIN PATRICK EVAN (Coming Soon) B457 martinpatrickevan.com MAGNI DESIGN INC. B273 310-623-1621 magni.com MCGARY & CO. INC. B420 310-659-0456 mcgaryandco.com MENZIE INTERNATIONAL B267 310-475-2331 menzie.net MICHAEL TAYLOR DESIGNS B542 310-360-8118 michaeltaylordesigns.com MICHAELIAN & KOHLBERG G671 310-360-8400 michaelian.com MICUCCI B209 310-360-7323 micuccicollection.com MIMI LONDON G168 310-855-2567 mimilondon.com MONTANARI GROUP G281 310-659-5348 montanarigroup.com MOURA STARR B547 310-854-9100 mourastarr.com THE MUSUEM OF COMTEMPORARY ART (MOCA) Pacifc Design Plaza 310-289-5223 moca.org NAOS FORGE B609 310-854-7262 naosforge.com

NIERMANN WEEKS B305 310-659-6876 niermannweeks.com OSBORNE & LITTLE B643 310-659-7667 osborneandlittle.com PACIFIC HIDE AND LEATHER B447 310-657-9802 pacifichide.com PAFID B408 310-855-9808 PANACHE DESIGNS B504 310-659-1700 panachedesigns.com PASTON/RAWLEIGH/EVERETT M9 310-652-4060 seating-restaurant.com PAUL FERRANTE B362 310-854-4412 paulferrante.com PETER LANG SHOWROOM B407310-6520700 peterlangshowroom.com PIERRE DEUX G152 310-657-9400 pierredeux.com PINDLER & PINDLER B530 310-289-0200 pindler.com POGGENPOHL U.S. INC. B188 310-289-4901 poggenpohlusa.com POTTERTON BOOKS G154 310-289-1247 pottertonbooks@sbcglobal.net PROVASI COLLECTION B460 310-657-3040 provasicollection.com PRUDENTIAL CALIFORNIA REALTY G271 310-855-0100 prula.com QUADRILLE M21/22 310-657-7995 quadrille-la@sbcglobal.net RAOUL TEXTILE LIBRARY G160 310-657-4931 raoultextiles.com RALPH PUCCI WEST COAST B203 310-360-9707 ralphpucci.net RANDOLPH & HEIN B528 310-855-1222 randolphhein.com ROBERT ALLEN - BEACON HILL B484 & B499 310-659-6454 robertallendesign.com RODENBECK ASSOCIATES B200 310-659-1051 rodenbeck.com S. HARRIS/FABRICUT/VERVAIN B470 310-358-0404 fabricut.com SCALAMANDRE INC. B617 310-657-8154 scalamandre.com

SCHEFFEY GROUP B245 310-657-8922 thescheffeygroup.com SCHUMACHER & CO./PATTERSON FLYNN & MARTIN ROSECORE B489 310-652-5353fschumacher.com SOOFER GALLERY B121 310-659-3044 SOUND ENVIRONMENT M4 310-854-4473 maisonchic.com STARK CARPET CORP. B629 310-657-8275 starkcarpet.com STEVEN HARSEY/PIERCEMARTIN B427 310-659-7820 stevenharsey.com SUMMIT FURNITURE INC. B135 310-289-1266 summitfurniture.com SUPERVISION B120 310-652-9510 supervision.com SYLKAN M33 310-855-0622 sylkan@pacbell.net TAI PING CARPETS B400 310-652-3058 taipingcarpets.com TEATRO G280 310-487-3381 teatroav.com TENANGO INC. B538 310-360-0800 tenangoinc.com THEMA B300 310-659-8400 thema-llc.com THOMAS LAVIN B310 310-278-2456 thomaslavin.com TODD HASE FURNITURE B370 310-657-6768 toddhase.com TROY ADAMS DESIGN G292 310-659-1400 troyadamsdesign.com WEST HOLLYWOOD MARKETING AND VISITORS BUREAU M38 310-289-2525 visitwesthollywood.com WILDFLOWER LINEN G285 310-360-9899 wildflowerlinens.com WILLIAM SWITZER B515 310-855-1135 williamswitzercollection.com WOLF-GORDON M5 310-652-1898 wolf-gordon.com ZUBICK DESIGN M28 323-663-6660 FA B R I K

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

HIGHLIGHTS WORDS PETER FRANK

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY NORTHRIDGE ART GALLERIES AND JACK RUTBERG GALLERY Hans Burkhardt CSU NORTHRIDGE, THRU OCT. 11; JACK RUTBERG GALLERY, SEPT. 20 – DEC. 24

CSUN Art Galleries 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 For more info: (818) 677-2156 http://www.csun.edu/~hfart009/ Jack Rutberg Gallery 357 N. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90036 For more info: (323) 938-5222 http://www.jackrutbergfinearts.com

CRAFT AND FOLK ART MUSEUM AND GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY Josh Dorman CRAFT AND FOLK ART MUSEUM, THRU JAN. 11; GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY, OCT. 7 – NOV. 15

WANDERING SOULS, 1967 HANS BURKHARDT (1904-1994) OIL ON CANVAS, 40” X 50”

Born in Switzerland, Hans Burkhardt brought the seeds of abstract expressionism from New York to California when — after befriending the likes of Arshile Gorky and Willem De Kooning — he moved to Los Angeles in the late 1930s. The prominent and prolific painter, draughtsman and printmaker moved freely between abstraction and figuration, but he always remained powerfully, often angrily, committed to humanist concerns. Burkhardt taught for many years at California State University Northridge, and donated nearly a thousand artworks to the school. The retrospective mounted at Northridge samples this bounty, touching on his various phases and series and revealing his many stylistic and emotional facets, from tender naturalism to angular modernism to the fierce expressionism — non-objective and representational alike — for which he is best known. The 1960s proved a particularly fecund time for Burkhardt, who responded readily to the decade's pervasive sense of hope, outrage, and upheaval. He also responded to the emergence of “cool” tendencies such as Pop and minimalism with some of his most expansive and exciting abstract expressionist works, declaring in this manner that the spirit of that once-dominant movement had not been superseded. Jack Rutberg, Burkhardt’s longtime representative, has some of his best works from that era on view. 62

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The New York-based artist Josh Dorman is a map freak’s map freak. Employing pre-World War II topographical maps, Dorman paints, draws, collages, and visits all sorts of other media, and mediating circumstances, on what had once been simple visual descriptions of the “lay of the land.” Some of his images refer to the lands and worlds the maps themselves refer to; but at least as often, the meandering lines and coded markings inspire Dorman to flights of unpredictable fancy. Understandably, landscapes predominate in Dorman's output, but they are landscapes unlike any you're likely to have visited. Part surrealist, part medieval manuscript illuminator, part children’s-book fantasist, and part cartographer

THE ELEVATED, 2008 JOSH DORMAN INK, ACRYLIC, ANTIQUE PAPER ON PANEL, 19” X 27”

himself, Dorman peoples his places with creatures large and small, machines friendly and menacing, buildings likely and unlikely, and humans bemused and/or overwhelmed by everything around them. While Dorman cops many of his most potent images from sources like textbooks and old-fashioned engravings, he is quite


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS adept at rendering these fanciful concatenations by hand. In fact, he's at his best when he pastes something in and then amplifies it with his drawing - and mapping - skills.

Armory Center for the Arts 145 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, CA 91103 For more info: (626) 792-5101 http://www.armoryarts.org

Craft and Folk Art Museum 5814 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036 For more info: (323) 937-4230 http://www.cafam.org

Frank Lloyd Gallery Bergamont Station 2525 Michigan Ave., B5b, Santa Monica, CA 90404 For more info: (310) 264-3866 http://www.franklloyd.com

George Billis Gallery 2716 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90034 For more info: (310) 838-3685 http://www.georgebillis.com

ARMORY CENTER FOR THE ARTS AND FRANK LLOYD GALLERY

MUSEUM OF DESIGN ART & ARCHITECTURE Liquid Light THRU OCT. 20

Craig Kauffman ARMORY CENTER, SEPT. 20 – NOV. 16; FRANK LLOYD GALLERY, SEPT. 13 – OCT. 18

Craig Kauffman is one of the central figures in the postwar emergence of Los Angeles as a self-defined art center. Beginning as an abstract expressionist in the mid1950s, Kauffman quickly evolved his own geometric look, and adopted new materials — specifically various forms of plastic, including vacuum formed acrylic — to produce radically shaped, highly simplified wall-hung objects that attracted worldwide acclaim in the 1960s and ‘70s. Since then, Kauffman has gone back and forth MUSEUM OF DESIGN ART & ARCHITECTURE

BUBBLES, DONUTS, DISHES: A SURVEY OF RECENT WALL RELIEF SCULPTURE CRAIG KAUFFMAN

between these sculptural reliefs and straight-ahead painting, compiling a formidable oeuvre that at once brims with formal variety and exhibits a remarkable consistency of sensibility. Kauffman’s drawings are probably his least known works, but they constitute in themselves an overview of his evolution, so the Armory Center’s drawing retrospective is especially engaging, and particularly welcome. At Frank Lloyd’s Bergamot Station gallery, Kauffman shows recent wall relief pieces, whose repertory of forms he summarizes as “bubbles, donuts, dishes.” But things are both more and less than they appear…

Light & Space Art — one of the distinct directions California art took in great part under Craig Kauffman's influence - has endured in local practice since the 1960s, and it can now claim several generations of painters, sculptors, thing-makers, and even room-makers who have worked with industrial materials, reflective and elusive surfaces, simple but tricky shapes, and, yes, light and space to argue, in a sense, with the viewer’s eye. What you see in these works may not be what you see. It's all in the perception. A cross section of latter-day light-and-spatialists constitutes “Liquid Light,” a show of paintings that don’t seem to be painted so much as suspended in some sort of medium — even in air. Participating artists include Dawn Arrowsmith, Suzan Woodruff, Jimi Gleason, Sharon Weiner, Roland Reiss, Michel Tabori, Lita Albuquerque, Andy Moses, Alexander Couwenberg, and special guest artist from the Bay Area, Gregg Renfrow. Museum of Design Art & Architecture 8609 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232 For more info: (310) 558-0902; http://www.modaagallery.com

Also, see Peter Frank’s other Recommended Exhibits ( FABRIK RECOMMENDED ) in the Art Gallery & Museums Directory listings, beginning on the next page.

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS 1301PE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 938-5822 http://www.1301pe.com 18TH STREET ARTS CENTER 1651 18th St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-3711 http://www.18thStreet.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-5pm; Saturday, 1-5pm

t FABRIK RECOMMENDED The Future of Nations exhibition series of political art in a political year continues with Citizen Artists Making Emphatic Arguments, whose artists view the problems immediately at hand - civic issues, ecological issues, economic issues - as no less urgent than those on the country and worldwide levels. Then comes War as a Way of Life, the last of the series, looking at how war affects not only the warriors and the victims, but all of us, opening Sept. 27 and running through Dec. 19. 57 UNDERGROUND 300 C. So. Thomas St. Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-0218 http://www.57underground.com Thurs. by appointment, Fri.-Sun., 12pm-4pm A SHENERE VELT GALLERY 1525 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 552-2007 http://www.circlesocal.org A STUDIO GALLERY 4260 Lankershim Blvd. Studio City, CA 91602 (818) 980-9100 http://www.astudiogallery.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-4pm; Fri., 9am-12noon; & by app't. A+D ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN MUSEUM 5900 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 http://www.aplusd.org ABACOT GALLERY 970 N. Broadway, Suite 201 (Mandarin Plaza) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-1599 http://www.abacotgallery.com

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ACE GALLERY BEVERLY HILLS INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 9430 Wilshire Blvd. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 858-9090 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm ACE GALLERY LOS ANGELES INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 5514 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 935-4411 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm ACME 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5942 http://www.acmelosangeles.com ACUNA-HANSEN GALLERY 427 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 441-1624 http://www.ahgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm ADAMSON-DUVANNES GALLERIES 484 S. San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 653-1015 http://www.justpaintings.net Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm & by app't. ALTERED SPACE GALLERY 1221 Abbot Kinney Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 452-8121 http://www.alteredspacela@aol.com AMBROGI | CASTANIER GALLERY 300-302 N. Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 652-5511 http://www.ambrogicastaniergallery.com Mon.-Sat., 10:30am-6:30pm AMERICAN MUSEUM OF CERAMIC ART 340 S. Garey Ave Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 865-3146 http://www.ceramicmuseum.org Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm It is the mission of the American Museum of Ceramic Art, a non-profit organization, to educate by presenting, collecting and preserving significant ceramic achievements of the world's cultures from ancient times to the present and through aesthetic and technical study to develop a deeper understanding of cultural values and traditions.

ANDLAB 600 Moulton Ave., #303 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 222-2225 http://www.ANDLAB.com/art Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm ANDREWSHIRE GALLERY 3850 Wilshire Blvd., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 389-2601 http://www.andrewshiregallery.com ANGELS GATE CULTURAL CENTER 3601 S. Gaffey St San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 519-0936 http://angelsgateart.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-4pm ANGLES GALLERY 22222 & 2230 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-5019 http://www.anglesgallery.com ANNA HELWING GALLERY 2766 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 202-2213 http://www.annahelwing.com ANOTHER YEAR IN LA 2121 N. San Fernando Rd., #13 Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 223-4000 http://www.anotheryearinla.com APPLEGATE GALLERY 3101-A Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-7600 http://www.applegallery.com ARC 2529 W. Magnolia, Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 848-9998 http://www.czappa.com Tues.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat., 9am-3pm ARMORY CENTER FOR THE ARTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 792-5101 http://www.armoryarts.org ARMSTRONG'S 150 E. Thrid St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-6464 http://www.armstronggallery.net Tues.-Sat. 9am-4:30pm, Second Saturday of month 9am-9pm


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN 1700 Lida St. Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 396-2446 http://www.artcenter.edu/williamson Tues-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., 12-9pm ART MURMUR 129 E. 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 623-2332 http://www.artmurmur.com Weds.-Fri., 12-7pm; Sat., 12-5pm ART PIC 6826 Troost Ave. No. Hollywood, CA 91605 (818) 503-5999 http://www.artpic2000.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5pm ARTPEACE GALLERY 2317 W. Magnolia Blvd. Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 846-8688 http://www.artpeacegallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-5pm ASIAN SPIRIT 8797 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-3888 http://www.asianspiritgallery.com Asian Spirit is a most unusual gallery. We specialize in museum quality antiques from China, Cambodia, Viet Nam, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, and Laos. No where else can you find a more intimate environment to view such priceless pieces. Your clients will be incredibly impressed. Call me for a private showing, Brett Richman, 818 970 2261. ASTO GALLERY 923 E. 3rd St., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 972-0995 http://www.astomoa.org AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER:MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST 4700 Western Heritage Way (in Griffith Park adjacent to L.A. Zoo) Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 667-2000 http://www.autrynationalcenter.org AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER: SOUTHWEST MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN Corner of Marmion Way and Museum Dr Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 221-2164 http://www.southwestmuseum.org

AVENUE 50 STUDIO 131 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 258-1435 http://www.avenue50studio.com

BLUM & POE GALLERY 2754 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-2062 http://www.blumandpoe.com

AZTEC/NIGHT OWL ART GALLERIES 311 and 305 W. Foothill Blvd. Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 574-0503 Weds-Sun., 1:30-5:30pm; Night Owl hours, 11am-1am

BOBBIE GREENFIELD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-0640 http://www.bobbiegreenfieldgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

BANDINI ART 2635 S. Fairfax Ave. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-6230 http://bandiniart.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm; & by app't.

BONELLI GALLERY 936 Mei Ling Way Los Angeles, CA 90012

BANK 125 W. 4th St., Suite 103. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 621-4055 http://www.bank-art.com BARNSDALL ART PARK EXHIBITIONS 4800 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 644-6275 Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; first Fridays, 12-9pm BILL LOWE GALLERY 2034 Broadway Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-0184 http://www.lowegallery.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm; & by app't. BILLY SHIRE FINE ARTS 5790 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 297-0600 http://www.billyshirefinearts.com BLACK MARIA GALLERY 3137 Glendale Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 660-9393 http://blackmariagallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm BLK/MRKT GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-1989 http://www.blkmrktgallery.com Tues.-Fri., 11am-6pm; Sat., 12-6pm

BOWERS MUSEUM 2002 N. Main St Santa Ana, CA 92706 (714) 567-3643 http://www.bowers.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-4pm; fourth Thursday of each month, 10am-8pm BRAND LIBRARY ART GALLERY 1601 West Mountain St. Glendale, CA 91201 (818) 548-2051 http://www.brandlibrary.org Tues. & Thurs., 12-9pm; Weds., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-5pm BUSCHLEN MOWATT GALLERIES 45-188 Portola Ave Palm Desert, CA 92260 (760) 837-9668 http://www.buschlenmowatt.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 11am-5pm; & by app't. CAL POLY POMONA DOWNTOWN CENTER 300 W. Second St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-0080 http://www.class.csupomona.edu/downtowncenter Tues.-Sat., 11am-8pm; 2nd Sats., 1-9pm CAL POLY POMONA KEITH & JANET KELLOGG 3801 W. Temple Ave Pomona, CA 91768 (909) 869-4302 http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery Tues.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Sat., 12-4pm

BLUEBIRD ART HOUSE 6747 Bright Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 696-9493 http://www.bluebirdarthouse.com FA B R I K

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS CAL STATE L.A.--LUCKMAN GALLERY 5151 State University Dr Los Angeles, CA 90032 (323) 343-6604 http://www.luckmanfineartscomplex.org Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 12-5pm

t FABRIK RECOMMENDED Desertshore, to Oct. 18, brings together 13 artists and one artist-duo in a multimedia exploration of the American southwest, specifically our neck of the woods as a place of progress, decay, culture, topography, and metaphor, visual and otherwise. Among the artists are John Divola, Stanya Kahn & Harry Dodge, Sterling Ruby, Brad Spence, Amir Zaki, and Andrea Zittel. CALIFORNIA HERITAGE MUSEUM 2612 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8537 http://www.californiaheritagemuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-4pm CANVAS BOUTIQUE AND GALLERY 23410 Civic Center Way Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 317-9895 http://www.canvassneakersandgallery.com Sun.-Thurs., 11am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 11am-7pm CARL BERG GALLERY 6018 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-6060 http://www.carlberggallery.com CARMICHAEL GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART 1257 N. La Brea Ave West Hollywood, CA 90038 (323) 969-0600 http://www.carmichaelgallery.com Weds.-Sun., 2-7pm CENTER FOR THE ARTS, EAGLE ROCK 2225 Colorado Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90041 (323) 226-0949 http://www.centerartseaglerock.org CHERRY AND MARTIN 12611 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 398-7404 http://www.cherryandmartin.com CHINA ART OBJECTS GALLERIES 933 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0384 http://www.chinaartobjects.com

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CHINESE AMERICAN MUSEUM 125 Paseo de la Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-5240 CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 916 Colorado Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 587-3373 http://www.cgrimes.com CHUNG KING PROJECT 936 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1802 http://www.chungkingproject.com CIRCUS GALLERY 7065 Lexington Ave Los Angeles, CA 90038 (323) 962-8506 http://www.circus-gallery.com CIRRUS GALLERY 542 S. Alameda Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 680-3473 http://www.cirrusgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm

t FABRIK RECOMMENDED Cosmos Factory, opening Sept. 13 and running to Nov. 8, presents seven emerging LA-area and Bay Area artists who find galactic complexities revealed in mundane existence, zooming back and forth between micro- and macrocosm. The universe in a grain of sand. Among the artists are Joshua Callaghan, Amy Maloof, Tran Truong, and Dani Tull. CITY OF BREA GALLERY #1 Civic Center Circle Brea, CA 92821 (714) 990-7730 http://www.breagallery.com Weds., Thurs., Sun., 12-5pm, Fri., Sat., 12-8pm

COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS ART GALLERY 26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd Santa Clarita, CA 91355 (661) 362-3612 http://www.canyons.edu/offices/artgallery Tues.-Thurs., 11am-3pm; Sat., 10am-2pm COMMISSARY ARTS 68 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 990-9914 http://www.commissaryarts.com Thursday & Friday 12-5pm; Saturday 12-6pm; and by appointment Commissary Arts is a new gallery space in Venice providing a platform for emerging and mid-career artists based in Southern California to present new works in all media through and active program of group and solo exhibitions. Commissary Arts encourages collaborative art projects and new creative voices by inviting curators and artists to assemble intimate exhibitions addressing contemporary issues and emerging trends in artistic discourse. COPRO/NASON GALLERY 2525 Michingan Ave., T-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 398-2643 http://www.copronason.com COREY HELFORD GALLERY 8522 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 287-2340 http://www.coreyhelfordgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm CRAIG GALLERY 5723 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90019 (323) 939-0351 http://www.craiggallery.com Fri., Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't.

CLAREMONT GRADUATE 251 E. 10th St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8071

CRAIG KRULL GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6410 http:// www.artnet.com/ckrull.html Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART The Packing House, 536 W. First St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-3200 http://www.claremontmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-7pm

CREATIVE ARTS CENTER GALLERY 1100 W. Clark Ave Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 238-5397 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-8pm; Fri., 9am-4pm; Sat., hours vary

CLASSIC ARTFORMS 9009 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 273-6306

CREATIVE GALLERIES 3210 Helms Ave Culver City, CA 90034 (310) 837-4531 Mon.-Fri., 10am-7pm; Sat., Sun., 10am-6pm


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS CROSSROADS SCHOOL FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES 1714 21st St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't. CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS ART GALLERY 92 Palm Dr. Camarillo, CA 93010 (805) 437-8863 http://art.csuci.edu/gallery Mon.-Fri., 10am-4pm CSU FULLERTON ART GALLERY 800 N. State College Blvd. Fullerton, CA 92634 (714) 278-3262 http://www.arts.fullerton.edu/events Tues.-Fri., 12-4pm; Sat., 12-2pm CSU LONG BEACH UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90840 (562) 985-5761 http://www.csulb.edu/uam Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm, Thurs., 12-8pm CSU NORTHRIDGE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY 18111 Nordhoff St. Northridge, CA 91330 (818) 677-2156 http://www.csun.edu/artgalleries/ Mon.-Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-8pm D & D GALLERY 311 W. Seventh St. San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 831-2940 http://www.dandgallery.com Daily, noon-6pm D.E.N. CONTEMPORARY ART 6023 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 559-3023 http://www.dencontemporaryart.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5:30pm DA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 252 D S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-9716 http://www.dacenter.org DANGEROUS CURVE 1020 E. Fourth Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 617-8483 http://www.dangerouscurve.org

DANIEL CLAYTON GALLERY 513 N Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-5310 DANIEL HUG GALLERY 510 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 221-0016 http://www.danielhug.com DANIEL SAXON GALLERY 552 Norwich Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-6033 DANIEL WEINBERG GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 954-8425 http://www.danielweinberggallery.com DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY 510 Bernard St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 222-1482 http://www.davidkordanskygallery.com DAVID PATTON LOS ANGELES 5006 1/2 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 478-1966 http://www.davidpattonlosangeles.com DAVID SALOW GALLERY 977 N. Hill St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 620-0240 http://www.davidsalowgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm DAWSON COLE FINE ART 313 N. Beverly Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 275-6060 http://www.dawsoncolefineart.com DBA256 GALLERY 256 S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-7600 http://www.dba256.com Mon.-Thurs., 8am-10pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-midnight DCA FINE ART 3107 Pico Blvd Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-8565 http://www.dcafineart.com

DE SOTO GALLERY 108 W. Second St., Suite 104 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 319-6331 http://www.gallerydesoto.com Wed.-Sat., 12pm-5pm and by appt. DEBORAH PAGE GALLERY 1028 Montana Avenue Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 458-4400 http://www.deborahpagegallery.com Tues.-Sun., 11am-6pm DEL MANO GALLERY 11981 San Vicente Blvd West Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 476-8508 http://www.delmano.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm DENENBERG FINE ARTS 417 North San Vicente Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 360-9360 http://www.denenbergfinearts.com Denenberg Fine Arts, established 1965, is a "smart source" for designers. The gallery has successfully placed works with top designers' clients for thirty years, and is careful to honor the client-designer relationship, providing informed expertise ranging from old masters to contemporary art acquisitions. Two blocks from the PDC on San Vicente! DF2 GALLERY 314 N. Crescent Heights Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 782-9404 http://www.df2gallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm DNJ GALLERY 154 1/2 N. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-1311 http://dnjgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm DOWNEY MUSEUM OF ART 10419 So. Rives Ave Downey, CA 90241 (562) 861-0419 http://www.thedmoa.org Weds., 3-7pm; Thurs.Fri., 1-5pm; DOWNTOWN ART GALLERY 1611 So. Hope St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 255-2067 http://www.downtownag.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS DRKRM. 2121 San Fernando Rd., #3 Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 223-6867 http://www.drkrm.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm Sun., 1pm-4pm and by appointment drkrm. gallery is an exhibition space dedicated to fine art and documentary photography, cutting edge and alternative photographic processes and the display and survey of popular cultural images. drkrm. is also a full service b/w photographic lab specializing in traditional, silver-gelatin printing and film processing. DUNCAN MILLER GALLERY 10959 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-2440 http://www.duncanmillergallery.com EARL MCGRATH GALLERY 454 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 657-4257 http://www.earlmcgrathgallery.com EDGEMAR CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2437 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 399-3666 http://www.edgemarcenter.org Mon.-Fri., 11am-5:30pm EDWARD CELLA ART+ARCHITECTURE 10 East Figueroa St., Suite #3 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 962-5900 http://www.edwardcella.com Tues.-Sun, 11am-5pm Edward Cella Art+Architecture (ECAA) represents significant emerging and mid-careers artists; acquires and places quality post WWII and contemporary painting and drawings; and, with a unique focus, presents drawings and projects by established West Coast architects and designers. In addition, ECAA assists and advises individuals and corporations to develop and focus their art collections through the personalized and confidential services of an independent art advisor. EL CAMINO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 16007 Crenshaw Blvd Torrance, CA 90506 (310) 660-3010 http://www.elcamino.edu/commadv/artgallery Mon., Tues., 10am-3pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-8pm; Fri., 10am-2pm ERNIE WOLFE GALLERY 1653 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 473-1645

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EXPOSITION PARK MUSEUMS 900 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 763-3515 http://www.nhm.org FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY 148 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 934-2250 http://www.faheykleingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm FARMLAB 1745 N. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1158 http://www.farmlab.org Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm FIG 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-0345 http://www.figgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-5pm FINE ART FACTORY 474 S. Raymond Ave., Suite 110 Pasadena, CA 91105 (818) 356-0474 FOUND GALLERY 1903 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027

FRESH PAINT 9355 Culver Blvd., Suite B Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-9355 http://www.freshpaintart.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-6pm; Fri., 8am-12 noon; & by app't FRINGE EXHIBITIONS 504 Chung King Ct. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0160 http://www.fringeexhibitions.com FROGTOWN GALLERY 1625 Blake Ave Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 226-0356 http://www.romerostudio.net Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; & by app't. FULLERTON COLLEGE ART GALLERY 321 E. Chapman Ave., Building 1000 Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 992-7434 http://art.fullcoll.edu Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 10am-2pm; Weds. evenings, 5-7pm FULLERTON MUSEUM CENTER 301 N. Pomona Ave Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 738-6545 http://www.cityoffullerton.com/depts/museum Tues.-Sun., 12-4; Thurs., 12-8pm

FOWLER MUSEUM AT UCLA 405 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 825-4361 http://www.fowler.ucla.edu Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm; Thurs. 12-8pm

GAGOSIAN GALLERY 456 N. Camden Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-9400 http://www.gagosian.com

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GALERIE MICHAEL 430 N. Rodeo Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 273-3377

FABRIK RECOMMENDED Antonio Pineda is one of the last surviving members of the Taxco School of modernist silversmiths. His updating of traditional Mexican silverwork and the contribution of his efforts to Mexico's modern identity are evident in this retrospective, running through March 15, 2009. FRANK LLOYD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., B5b Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-3866 http://www.franklloyd.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm FRANK PICTURES GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-0211 http://www.frankpicturesgallery.com

GALERIE MOURLOT 8763 Rosewood Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 855-9581 http://www.galeriemourlot.com GALLERY 13 8302 Melrose Ave., Unit A West Hollywood, CA 90069 (323) 951-0303 http://www.gallery13.net Tues.-Sat 10am-6pm or call for an app’t. “The Spirit of Nature” exhibition salutes the summer solstice with inspired paintings of nature and landscape by select contemporary Irish fine artists along with eco-conscious bronzes by Linda Brunker. Honoring nature in all her innovative bronze sculptures; Linda


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS Brunker uses masses of natural elements such as leaves, feathers and starfish to intricately create elegant figures in bronze. Brunker’s trademark ‘filligree’ style has a strong ecological and spiritual equality. GALLERY 33 EAST 3202 E. Broadway Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 433-1496 http://gallery33east.com Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm GALLERY 727 727 S. Spring St Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 627-9563 GALLERY AT REDCAT 631 W. Second St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 237-2800 http://www.redcat.org GALLERY C 1225 Hermosa Ave Hermosa Beach, CA 90254 (310) 798-0102 http://www.galleryc.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm GALLERY FILE 102 W. 5th St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 624-6212 Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm; 2nd Thurs., 12pm-9pm. GALLERY LUISOTTI 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0043 GALLERY NUCLEUS 30 West Main St Alhambra, CA 91801 (626) 458-7482 http://www.gallerynucleus.com GALLERY REVISITED 3204 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (626) 253-5266 http://www.galleryrevisited.com GEMINI G.E.L. 8365 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-0513 http://www.geminigel.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat. by app't.

GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY L.A. 2716 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-3685 http://www.georgebillis.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't.

GRIFFIN 2902 Nebraska Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 586-6886 http://www.griffinla.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't.

GEORGE J. DOIZAKI GALLERY 244 S. San Pedro St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-2725 http://www.jaccc.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat. & Sun., 11am-4pm

HAMILTON GALLERIES 1431 Ocean Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 451-9983 http://www.hamiltongalleries.com Tues.-Sun., 12-7pm

GEORGE STERN FINE ARTS 8920 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (800) 501-6885 http://www.sternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-6pm

HAMILTON-SELWAY FINE ART 8678 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 657-1711 http://www.hamiltonselway.com

GIDEON GALLERY LTD. 8748 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-4194 GLU GALLERY 7424 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-0510 http://www.glugallery.com Fri., 12-5pm: Sat., 11am-5pm; Sun., 12-5pm GLASS GARAGE FINE ART 414 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 659-5228 http://www.glassgaragegallery.com GLENDALE COLLEGE GALLERY 1500 Verdugo Rd Glendale, CA 91208 (818) 240-1000 http://www.glendale.edu/artgallery GR2 2062 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 445-9276 http://www.gr2.net GREY MCGEAR GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-0925 GRIER MUSSER MUSEUM 403 So. Bonnie Brae Los Angeles, CA 90057 (213) 413-1814

HANGAR 1018 1018 S. Santa Fe St. Los Angeles, CA 90021 (213) 239-9060 http://www.hangar1018.com Mon.-Weds., Fri., 12-4pm; Thurs., 6-9:30pm HAPPY LION GALLERY 963 Chung King Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1360 http://www.thehappylion.com HARVEST GALLERY 938 N. Brand Blvd. Glendale, CA 91206 (818) 546-1000 HELFEN FINE ARTS 9200 W. Olympic Blvd., Suite 200 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 (310) 273-8838 http://www.helfenfinearts.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by appt. We specialize in well-researched, historically significant and stunning Modernist works of art from the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, with a focus on California Modernism. Our paintings feature strong images with great color and composition, and our sculptures each are selected for dramatic impact and historical importance. HENKEN GALLERY 120 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-2505 http://www.thehenkengallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-10pm; Sun. by app't. HERITAGE GALLERY 1300 Chautauqua Blvd Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 230-4340 http://www.heritagegallery.com FA B R I K

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS HIGH ENERGY CONSTRUCTS – SOLWAY JONES 990 N. Hill St., #180 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-7920 http://www.highenergyconstructs.com

IKON LIMITED FINE ARTS 2525 Michigan Ave., G-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6629 http://www.ikonltd.com

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INFUSION GALLERY 719 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 683-8827 http://www.infusiongallery.com

FABRIK RECOMMENDED Two of the hippest, least predictable galleries in town have joined forces in Chinatown and celebrate their marriage with Cycling Apparati, an exploration of motion and mechanics. Included in this neo-modernist celebration of the machine, running Sept. 6-Oct. 19, is Alice Aycock, Jean-Pierre Hébert, Alan Rath, and the mechano-Dada of them all, Marcel Duchamp. HONOR FRASER 2622 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 401-0191 http://www.honorfraser.com

t FABRIK RECOMMENDED Alexandra Grant made quite a splash at MOCA last year with her word-filled paintings, and this time she works on paper, with sculpture, and in video with texts written for her by Michael Joyce. The multivalent display opens Sept. 6 and runs to Oct. 25. HOWELL GREEN FINE ART GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 107 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-3991 http://www.howellgreen.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6; & by app't. HUNTINGTON BEACH ART CENTER 538 Main Street Huntington Beach, CA 92647 (714) 374-1650 http://www.surfcity-hb.org/Visitors/art_center Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; Thurs., 12-8pm; Sun., 12-4pm HUNTINGTON LIBRARY 1151 Oxford Rd San Marino, CA 91108 (626) 405-2100 http://www.huntington.org I-5 GALLERY AT THE BREWERY ART COLONY 2100 N. Main St., #A-9 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 342-0717 http://www.breweryartwalk.com Fri.-Sat., 12-4pm; & by app't.

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ITALIAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE — SPAZIO ITALIA 1023 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 443-3250 http://www.iiclosangeles.esteri.it/IIC_Losangeles Mon.-Fri., 9:30am-5pm ITURRALDE GALLERY 116 S. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-4267 http://artscenecal.com/Iturralde.html Tues.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sat. by app't. JACK HANLEY GALLERY 9945 Sun Mun Way Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-0403 http://www.jackhanley.com JACK RUTBERG FINE ARTS 357 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-5222 http://www.jackrutbergfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 10am-5pm JAIL 965 N. Vignes St., 5A Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 621-9567 http://www.thejailgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm JAMES GRAY GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-4 (Bergamot Station) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-9502 http://www.jamesgraygallery.com JAN KESNER GALLERY 164 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-6834 http: //www.jankesnergallery.com JANCAR GALLERY 3875 Wilshire Blvd. #1308 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 384-8077 http://www.jancargallery.com Thu.-Sat 12noon-5pm and by app't.

JAPANESE AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM 369 E. 1st St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-0414 http://www.janm.org JFERRARI GALLERY 3015 Glendale Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 877-5542 http://www.jferrarigallery.com Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm JK GALLERY 2632 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-3330 http://www.jkgallery.net Wed.-Sat., 11am-6pm JONATHAN KENT GALLERY 474 N Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-5727 http://www.artkent.com JUDSON GALLERY 200 S. Avenue 66 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 255-0131 http://www. judsonstudios.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-3pm JUNC 4017 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 814-2640 http://www.juncgallery.com Fri., 1-6pm; Sat. & Sun., 12-7pm; & by app't. KANTOR ART 205 S. Beverly Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 274-6499 http://www.kantorart.com KAREN LYNNE GALLERY 216 N. Canon Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 858-8202 http://www.karenlynnegallery.com Karen Lynne Gallery provides fine art and consulting services from its new Beverly Hills location, an expansion of the 2 original locations in Boca Raton, FL. Specializing in largescale original oil on canvas works, it is Karen Lynne Gallery's mission to convey the importance of art in one's home as the central focal point of design and ongoing enjoyment.


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS KARYN LOVEGROVE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd.#8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 525-1755 http://www.karynlovegrovegallery.com

L.A. CITY COLLEGE DA VINCI ART GALLERY 855 N. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 953-4220

KINKEAD CONTEMPORARY 6029 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-7400 http://www.kinkeadcontemporary.com

L.A. COUNTY ARBORETUM 301 N. Baldwin Ave Arcadia, CA 91007 (626) 821-3232 http://www.arboretum.org

LATIN AMERICAN MASTERS 264 N. Beverly Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-4847 http://www.latinamericanmasters.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

KLAPPER GALLERY 8759 Beverly Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-6552 http://www.klappergallery.com

L.A. GAY & LESBIAN CENTER THE ADVOCATE GALLERY 1125 N. McCadden Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90038 (323) 860-7337

LATINO ART MUSEUM 281 S. Thomas St., Suite 105 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-6009 http://www.lamoa.net

KONTAINER GALLERY 6130 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-4746 http://www.kontainergallery.com

L.A. LOUVER GALLERY 45 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-4955 http://www.lalouver.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm

KOPLIN DEL RIO GALLERY 6031 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-9055 http://www.koplindelrio.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

L.A. MODERNISM SHOW 1855 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (818) 244-1126 http://www.lamodernism.com

LAWRENCE ASHER GALLERY 5820 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 935-9100 http://www.lawrenceasher.com Tues.-Thurs., 11am-6pm; Fri., 11am-7pm; Sat., 12-5pm; & by app't

t FABRIK RECOMMENDED One of America's most cogent artists addressing the African-American experience, Kerry James Marshall returns opening Sept. 6 and running until Oct. 24 - with more tough yet personable paintings of real and imaginary figures who should be part of the America we know, but until now haven't been. KRISTI ENGLE GALLERY 5002 York Ave Los Angeles, CA 90042 (213) 629-2358 http://www.kristienglegallery.com L.A. ARTCORE/ARTCORE BREWERY ANNEX 120 N. Judge John Aiso St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-3274 http://www.laartcore.org Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm L.A. ARTS OF ASIA & TRIBAL ARTS SHOW 1855 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 455-2886 http://www.caskeylees.com

L2 KONTEMPORARY 990 N. Hill St., #205 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 225-1288 http://www.L2kontemporary.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm; & by app't. LA LUZ DE JESUS 4633 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 666-7667 http://www.laluzdejesus.com LA SIERRA UNIVERSITY BRAND STATER GALLERY 4700 Pierce St Riverside, CA 92515 (951) 785-2959 http://www.lasierra.edu/art Mon.-Thurs., 9am-4pm; Sun., 2-5pm LACE 6522 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028 (323) 957-1777 http://www.welcometolace.org Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm LACMA 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-6111 http://www.lacma.org/ Mon., Tues., Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., 12-9pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-8pm

LARRY SMITH FINE ART 8642 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 360-9135

LAXART 2640 S. La Cienega Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 868-5893 http://www.laxart.org LEFT COAST GALLERIES 12324 Ventura Blvd Studio City, CA 91604 (818) 760-7010 http://www.leftcoastgalleries.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm; Sun., 12-6pm; & by appointment LESLIE SACKS FINE ART 11640 San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 820-9448 http://www.lesliesacks.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm LIGHTBOX 2656 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-1111 http://www.lightbox.tv LIONESS GALLERY 3032 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (818) 252-7168 http://www.lionessartgallery.com Sat., 12-5pm; and by app't. LITTLE BIRD GALLERY 3195 Glendale Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 662-1092 http://www.littlebirdgallery.com FA B R I K

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS LIZABETH OLIVERIA GALLERY 2712 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-1073 http://www.lizabetholiveria.com

M+B 612 N. Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 550-0050 http://www.mbfala.com

lovers a rich variety of affordable paintings and limited edition prints by a creative group of artisans from around the world. Join us each month for the First Thursday ArtWalk in historic San Pedro, CA.

LMAN GALLERY 949 Chung King Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-3883 http://www.lmangallery.com

MACHINE PROJECT 1200 D N. Alvarado Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 483-8761 http://www.machineproject.com

METRO GALLERY 1835 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 663-2787 http://www.metrogallery.org

LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 4901 E. Carson St. Long Beach, CA 90808 (562) 938-4817

MAK CENTER FOR ART AND ARCHITECTURE L.A. 835 N. Kings Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-1510 http://www.makcenter.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-6pm

MICHAEL DAWSON GALLERY 535 N. Larchmont Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90004 (323) 469-2186 http://www.michaeldawsongallery.com Weds.-Sat., 9am-5pm

MANDARIN GALLERY 970 N. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 687-4107 http://www.mandaringallery.com

MICHAEL HITTLEMAN GALLERY 8797 Beverly Blvd., #302 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 655-5364 http://www.michaelhittlemangallery.com Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sunday, 1-5pm

LONG BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 2300 E. Ocean Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 439-2119 http://www.lbma.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-5pm LORA SCHLESINGER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-1133 http://www.loraschlesinger.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm LOS ANGELES CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 107 W. Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (323) 646-9427 http://www.lacda.com Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm LOUIS STERN FINE ARTS 9002 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-0147 http://www.louissternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm

MANNY SILVERMAN GALLERY 619 Almont Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 659-8256 MARC FOXX GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5571 http://www.marcfoxx.com MARC SELWYN FINE ART 6222 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-9911 http://www.marcselwynfineart.com MARGO LEAVIN GALLERY 812 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 273-0603

LOUWE GALLERY 306 Hawthorne St. So. Pasadena, CA 91030 (626) 799-5551 http://www.louwegallery.com

MARY GOLDMAN GALLERY 932 Chung King Rd Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-8217 http://www.marygoldman.com

M. HANKS GALLERY 3008 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8820 http://mhanksgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't.

MC 6088 Comey Ave Los Angeles, CA 90034 (323) 939-3777 http://www.mckunst.com

M.J. HIGGINS GALLERY 400 S. Main St., #103 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-1700 http://www.mjhiggins.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

MEDEA GALLERY 445 W. 7th St., San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 833-3831 http://www.medeagallery.com Mon.-Fri.: 9am-5pm and by appt. Featuring fine contemporary art, we offer art

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MICHAEL KOHN GALLERY 8071 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 658-8088 http://www.kohngallery.com MILO GALLERY 6130 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 935-3662 http://www.milogallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm MIXOGRAFIA 1419 E. Adams Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90011 (323) 232-1158 http://www.mixografia.com Mon.-Fri., 11am- 5pm; & by app't. Mixografia prints and publishes limited editions by contemporary artists. The prints are pulled from a cast copper printing plate using handmade paper giving the printed surface a uniquely deep relief not found in etchings, lithographs or silk-screens. MLA GALLERY 2020 N. Main St., #239 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 222-3400 http://www.mlagallery.com MOCA 250 S. Grand Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 62-MOCA-2 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thursday, 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed.


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS MOCA – THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY 152 North Central Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 621-1745 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thurs., 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed. MOCA PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 289-5223 http://www.moca.org MORONO KIANG GALLERY 218 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 628-8208 http://www.moronokiang.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm MORYORK GALLERY 4959 York Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90042 http://www.claregraham.com/MorYork.html MOSS 8444 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 866-5260 http://www.mossonline.com Tuesday-Saturday 11am-7pm MOUNT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE JOSE DRUDIS-BIADA GALLERY 12001 Chalon Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 954-4360 http://www.msmc.la.edu/pages/1897.asp Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm MUCKENTHALER CULTURAL CENTER 1201 W. Malvern Ave Fullerton, CA 92633 (714) 738-6595 http://www.muckenthaler.org MUSEUM OF JURASSIC TECHNOLOGY 9341 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-6131 http://www.mjt.org/ MUSEUM OF LATIN AMERICAN ART 628 Alamitos Ave Long Beach, CA 90802 (562) 437-1689 http://www.molaa.com Tues.-Sat., 11:30am-7:30pm; Sun., 12-6pm

MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS 1649 El Prado San Diego, CA 92101 (619) 238-7559 http://www.mopa.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-9pm

ORLANDO GALLERY 18376 Ventura Blvd. Tarzana, CA 91356 (818) 705-5368 http://artscenecal.com/Orlando.html Tues.-Sat., 9:30am-3pm

MUSEUM OF TOLERANCE 9786 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 553-8403 http://www.museumoftolerance.com

OTIS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN BEN MALTZ GALLERY 9045 Lincoln Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045 (310) 665-6905 http://www.otis.edu Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm; Thurs., 10am-7pm

NEW STONE AGE 8407 W. 3rd St Los Angeles, CA 90048 (213) 658-5969 Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm, Sun., 12-5pm NICHE.LA 453 S. Spring St., #443 Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 247-0002 http://www.niche.la NOHO GALLERY LA 5108 Landershim Blvd North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818) 761-7784 http://www.nohogalleryla.com Thurs.-Sat., 2-8pm; Sun., 1-6pm NORTON SIMON MUSEUM 411 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 449-6840 http://www.nortonsimon.org Weds.-Mon., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm OCMA, ORANGE LOUNGE AT SOUTH COAST PLAZA 3333 Bear St., South Coast Plaza Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (714) 662-3366 Mon.-Fri., 10am-9pm; Sat., 10am-7pm; Sun., 11:30am-6:30pm OFF-ROSE, THE SECRET 841 Flower Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 664-8977 Sat., 1-5pm; & by appt. OPUS GALLERY 2824 Sepulveda Blvd Torrance, CA 90505 (310) 891-2000 http://www.opusgallery.com ORANGE COUNTY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 117 N. Sycamore Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 667-1517 http://www.occca.org Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., Sat., 12-9pm

t FABRIK RECOMMENDED Mark Dean Veca returns to his alma mater in triumph, having enjoyed considerable success in New York for his swirling, multi-imaged painting-installations. The latest, Phantasmagoria, goes on view Oct. 11-Dec. 6. OVERDUIN AND KITE 6693 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (323) 464-3600 http://www.overduinandkite.com OVERTONES GALLERY 12703 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 915-0346 http://www.overtonesgallery.com Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm and by appointment OVERTONES is a contemporary Los Angeles art gallery whose focus is supporting emerging artists, as well as showcasing work of established artists to infuse and inspire the coming generations. We believe in beauty and social action and think the two are inextricably connected and necessary in life. OVERTONES gallery is committed to searching outside the confines of established art structures and presenting work that has the potential to engage a wide range of audiences. PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM 46 N. Los Robles Ave Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 449-2742 http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 10am-6pm PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM 101 Museum Dr Palm Springs, CA 92262 (619) 325-7186 http://www.psmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Fri., 10am-8pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS PALOMAR COLLEGE, BOEHM GALLERY 1140 West Mission Rd. San Marcos, CA 92069 (760) 744-1150 Tues., 10am-4pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-7pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-2pm PALOS VERDES ART CENTER 5504 W. Crestridge Rd. Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 (310) 541-2479 http://www.pvartcenter.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Sun., 1-4pm PAPILLON GALLERY 462 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 289-1887 http://www.papillongallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't. PASADENA CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 1570 E. Colorado Blvd Pasadena, CA 91106 (626) 585-3285 http://www.pasadena.edu/artgallery Mon.-Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., Sat., 12-4pm PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART 490 E. Union St. Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 568-3665 http://www.pmcaonline.org PATRICIA CORREIA GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building E-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-1760 http://www.correiagallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't.

t FABRIK RECOMMENDED The gallery's fall triumvirate, Sept. 6-Nov. 1, includes the latest works of street-artistturned-sophisticated-figure painter Becca, colorful abstractions by veteran Chicano artist Harry Gamboa Jr., and the intricate, delicate abstract cutouts (they've been called doilies on acid) of Leigh Salgado. PATRICIA FAURE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-1479 http://www.patriciafauregallery.com PATRICK PAINTER, INC. 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-5988 http://www.patrickpainter.com 74

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PAUL KOPEIKIN GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 937-0765 http://www.paulkopeikingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't

RAID PROJECTS GALLERY 602 Moulton St. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 441-9593 http://www.raidprojects.com Sat., Sun., 12-5pm; & by app't.

PERES PROJECTS 969 Chung King Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-1100 http://www.peres-projects.com

RED DOT GALLERY 500 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 817-6002 http://www.weeneez.com

PETER FETTERMAN PHOTOGRAPHIC WORKS OF ART 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-6463 http://www.peterfetterman.com

REGEN PROJECTS 629 N. Almont Dr Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

PHARMAKA 101 W. Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (323) 954-8499 http://www.pharmaka-art.org PITZER CAMPUS GALLERIES 1050 North Mills Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 607-3143 http://www.pitzer.edu/artgalleries PLATT GALLERY 15600 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90077 (310) 476-9777 Sun.-Thurs., 10am-4pm; Fri., 10am-2pm

RICHARD HELLER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-9191 http://www.richardhellergallery.com RICHARD TELLES FINE ART 7380 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 965-5578 http://www.tellesfineart.com RIO HONDO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 3600 Workman Mill Rd., B-13 Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 908-3471 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-3pm; Mon.-Weds., 6-9pm

PLAZA DE LA RAZA 3540 N. Mission Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 223-2475

RIVERSIDE ART MUSEUM 3425 Mission Inn Ave. Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 684-7111 http://www.riversideartmuseum.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Thurs., 10am-9pm

POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 330 N. College Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8283 http://www.pomona.edu/museum Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat., Sun., 1-5pm

RIVERSIDE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 4800 Magnolia Ave Riverside, CA 92506 (951) 222-8358

POUNDER-KONE ART SPACE 3407 Glendale Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 913-2247 http://www.cchpkas.com Thurs.-Sun. 1-7pm PROJECT: GALLERY LA 8545 W. Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-0200 http://www.projectgalleryla.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-6pm

ROBERT BERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-5, & C-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-1937 http://www.robertbermangallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm ROBERTS & TILTON GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 549-0223 http://www.robertsandtilton.com


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS ROSAMUND FELSEN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-8488 http://www.rosamundfelsen.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm ROSE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building G-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-8440 http://www.rosegallery.net RUTH BACHOFNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. (Bergamot Station), G-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-3300 http://www.ruthbachofnergallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm S B LONDON 3740 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (323) 668-0734 http://www.sblondon.com S B LONDON is a showroom of industrial art, showcasing works which inform, inspire, and relieve. TECHNOcraft Objects are works which are made with industrial materials and/or methods. These works make a practice of finding the commonalities between seemingly disparate elements, thereby revealing delicate narratives. Subtly stirring, the fragile balance between opposites and the relationships that exist between them, us, and each other is questioned and illustrated. SAM FRANCIS GALLERY 1714 21st St Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't. SAM LEE GALLERY 990 N. Hill St., #190 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-0275 http://www.samleegallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm SANDRONI REY GALLERY 2762 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 280-0111 http://www.sandronirey.com SANTA FE ART COLONY 2401 S. Santa Fe Ave Los Angeles, CA 90058 (213) 587-6381

SANTA MONICA ART STUDIOS AND ARENA 1 GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7449 http://www.santamonicaartstudios.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm SANTA MONICA COLLEGE – PETE AND SUSAN BARRETT ART GALLERY 1310 11th St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 434-3434 http://events.smc.edu/art_gallery.html

t FABRIK RECOMMENDED Emphasis Santa Monica rounds up 30 artists of various stripes, all of who live and work within the boundaries of the People's Republic By The Sea. The show, running thru October, includes John Baldessari, Astrid Preston, Don Bachardy, Frank Gehry, Eileen Cowin, Tony Berlant, and a lot of their neighbors. SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 586-6488 http://www.smmoa.org Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SCA PROJECT GALLERY 281 So. Thomas St., Unit 104 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-5481 http://www.scagallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-4pm SCALO/GUYE GALLERY 302 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 358-9396 http://www.scaloguye.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-7pm The gallery exhibits mid-century to contemporary photography with an eye on global creative trends. Opened in April 2006, SCALO|GUYE gallery has already hosted exhibitions for notable photographers, such as Robert Frank, Nan Goldin, David Armstrong, Annelies Strba, Olaf Breuning, Elinor Carucci, Seydou Keïta, Stefanie Schneider, and Jock Sturges. SCHOMBURG GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-5757 http://www.schomburggallery.com SCI-ARC GALLERY 960 E. Third St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 473-8432

SCRIBBLE THEORY 210 N. Bush St. Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 542-5928 http://www.scribbletheory.com SEA AND SPACE EXPLORATIONS 4755 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 445-4015 http://www.seaandspace.org SEE LINE GALLERY 1812 Berkeley St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-1727 http://www.seelinegallery.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't. SELF-HELP GRAPHICS & ART INC. GALERIA OTRA VEZ 3802 Avenida Cesar Chavez Los Angeles, CA 90063 (323) 881-6444 http://www.selfhelpgraphics.com Tues.-Sat., 9am-5pm SEYHOUN GALLERY 9007 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 858-5984 http://www.seyhoungallery.com SHERRY FRUMKIN GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave., Suite 21 Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7493 http://www.frumkingallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm SHOSHANA WAYNE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7535 http://www.shoshanawayne.com SHOTGUN 2121 N. San Fernando Rd., #11 Los Angeles, CA 90065 http://www.shotgunspace.com SIDE STREET PROJECTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 577-7774 http://www.sidestreet.org SILK ROADS DESIGN GALLERY 145 N. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (310) 857-5588, http://www.silkroadsgallery.com Mon.-Sun., 11am-5pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS SISTER 437 Gin Ling Way. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-7000 http://www.sisterla.com SIXSPACE 5803 W. Washigton Blvd. Culver City, CA 90230 (323) 932-6200 http://www.sixspace.com SIXTEEN:ONE 2116-B Pico Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 450-4394 http://www.16to1.com SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-4500 http://www.skirball.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Thurs., 12-9pm; Sat., Sun., 10am-5pm SKYLARK FINE ART GALLERY 8576-A Melrose Avenue West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-0324 http://www.skylarkfineartgallery.com SOHO GALLERY 300 A. So. Thomas St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-1599 Thurs.-Sun., 11am-4pm; second Sats., 11am-10pm SOLWAY JONES 5377 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-7354 http://www.solwayjonesgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SPARC ART GALLERY 685 Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-9560 http://www.sparcmurals.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm (closed at noon-1pm SPONTO GALLERY 7 Dudley Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 399-2078 STEPHEN COHEN GALLERY 7358 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-5525 http://www.stephencohengallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm

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STG (STEVE TURNER CONTEMPORARY) 6026 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (310) 271-3721 http://www.steveturnergallery.com SULKIN/SECANT GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-8411 http://www.sulkinsecantgallery.com SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS 5795 W. Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 933-2117 http://www.vielmetter.com SYLVIA WHITE GALLERY 1783 East Main Street Ventura, CA 93001 (310) 452-4000 http://www.artadvice.com TAG, THE ARTISTS' GALLERY 2903 Santa Monica Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-9556 http://www.TAGtheArtistsGallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm TASENDE GALLERY 8808 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-8686 http://www.artnet.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm; Closed for Holidays Dec.21-Jan. 1.

THE BREWERY 2100 N. Main St. at Avenue 21 Los Angeles, CA 90031 http://www.breweryart.com THE CLAYHOUSE 2909 Santa Monica Blvd. (near Yale St.) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-7071 THE CONFERENCE ROOM 325 S. Robertson Blvd. Beverly Hills, CA 90211 (310) 598-6367 http://www.theconfroom.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm THE DRAWING CLUB 3235 San Fernando Rd., #2C Los Angeles, CA 90065 (626) 303-2556 http://www.thedrawingclub.com Thurs. 7-10pm; & by app't. THE FOLK TREE 217 S. Fair Oaks Ave Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 795-8733 http://www.folktree.com Mon.-Weds., 11am-6pm; Thurs.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm THE GETTY CENTER 1200 Getty Center Dr Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Tues.-Thurs., Sun., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-9pm

TAYLOR DE CORDOBA 2660 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-9156 http://www.taylordecordoba.com

THE GETTY VILLA 17985 Pacific Coast Highway Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Thurs.-Mon., 10am-5pm; closed Tues. Weds. and major holidays

TERRENCE ROGERS FINE ART 1231 Fifth St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 394-4999 http://www.trogart.com Thurs-Sat., 12-5; & by app't.

THE HIVE GALLERY 729 S. Sping St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 955-9051

THE ACORN GALLERY 135 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 850-8655

THE LOFT 401 S. Mesa, San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 831-5757 http://www.the-loft.net First Thursday Artwalk, 6-9pm; and by app't.

THE BALMORAL 1522 Abbot Kinney Venice, CA 90291 (310) 392-3635 http://www.gallerybalmoral.com

THE PERFECT EXPOSURE GALLERY 3513 6th St., Los Angeles, CA 90020 (213) 381-1137 http://theperfectexposure.com


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS THE WHOLE 9 GALLERY 6101 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-4600 http://www.thewhole9.com

TRACY PARK GALLERY 1431 Ocean Ave Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 260-9954 http://www.tracyparkgallery.com

THINKSPACE GALLERY 4210 Santa Monica Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 913-3375 http://www.thinkspacegallery.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm

TRIGG ISON FINE ART 511 N. Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 274-8047 http://www.triggison.com

TINLARK GALLERY 6671 Sunset Blvd., #1512 Hollywood, CA 90028 (323) 463-0039 http://www.tinlark.com TOBEY C. MOSS GALLERY 7321 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 933-5523 http://www.tobeycmossgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm, For the discriminating Private or Corporate Collector: Unique and Fine Original Prints, Drawings, Watercolors, Paintings; Focus on 1930s-2000 California art and artists. Jpegs are available to illustrate or make an appointment for a Viewing, with or without the Client. TOPANGA CANYON GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 109 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-7909 http://www.topangacanyongallery.com Tues.-Sun., 10am-6pm TORRANCE ART MUSEUM 3320 Civic Center Dr Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 618-6340 http://www.torranceartmuseum.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm TRACK 16 GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building C-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-4678 http://www.track16.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

TROPICO DE NOPAL GALLERY ART SPACE 1665 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 481-8112 http://www.tropicodenopal.com UCR/CALIFORNIA MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY 3824 Main St Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 784-FOTO http://www.cmp.ucr.edu Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm USC FISHER GALLERY 823 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90089 (213) 740-4561 http://fishergallery.org Tues.-Sat. 12-5pm VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez Monterey Park, CA 91754 (323) 265-8841 http://elac.edu/collegeservices/vincentprice/ index.htm Mon.-Weds., Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-7pm VIVA (VALLEY INSTITUTE OF VISUAL ART) 13261 Moorpark St., Sherman Oaks, CA 91423 (818) 385-0080 Weds.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Satu., 12-4pm WATTS TOWERS ART CENTER NOAH SYLVESTER PURIFOY GALLERY 1727 E. 107th St

Los Angeles, CA 90002 (213) 847-4646 Weds.-Sun., 10am-4pm WESTERN PROJECT 3830 Main St., Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-0609 http://western-project.com WHITTIER MUSEUM 6755 Newlin Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (310) 945-3871 WILLIAM A. KARGES FINE ART 427 Canon Dr., Suite 101 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 276-8551 http://www.kargesfineart.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-5pm WILLIAM GRANT STILL COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER 2520 West View St Los Angeles, CA 90016 (213) 734-1164 Daily 12-5pm WILLIAM TURNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0909 http://www.williamturnergallery.com Mon.-Sat.,11am-6pm XIEM CLAY CENTER AND GALLERY 1563 N. Lake Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 794-5833 http://www.xiemclaycenter.com XIT GALLERY AT AIU LA 12655 W. Jefferson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 302-2613 Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm YOUNG ART GALLERY 747 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 344-1322 http://www.youngartgallery.com

GOT NEWS? WANT LISTING? If you would like to be listed in Fabrik’s Los Angeles Art & Design Directory, please email us your gallery info to directory@fabrikmagazine.com. If you have exhibits and events at your gallery and would like to be considered for editorial or be included in our email newsletter, please email that info to events@fabrikmagazine.com.

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FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID A KNUDSEN

Specializing in meeting the needs of Interior Designers and Architects, to find the perfect decor for any space. Offerring custom prints of any size and quantity on gallery-wrapped canvases or a variety of other media. DAK’s most acclaimed series include “Textures & Patterns,” “Reflections on Architecture” and “Dynamic Lights.” See his vast catalog at www.dakshots.com 2800 BARRY AVENUE LOS ANGELES, CA 90064

info@dakshots.com

310.312.3928


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Oil Paintings and Custom designed art glass windows for residential and commercial applications.

IsaacDSmith.com isaac@isaacdsmith.com • (509)535-8406


‘watcher of the skies’ 2008 • 26”x26” mixed media assemblage

Eric Dinyer 913.221.7026 • dinyer@dreamless.com • assemblage © eric dinyer/dreamless studios 2008

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5/14/08 8:36:20 PM


ARTIST SHOWCASE

[646]708-3084 based in Los Angeles

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Ted VanCleave Fine Art Photography The Los Angeles Architectural Series

View portfolio at www.tedvan.com Represented in Los Angeles by Skylark Fine Art Gallery 8576-A Melrose Avenue, West Hollywood www.skylarkfineartgallery.com Tel (310) 657-0324


sharon weiner

World’s in Bloom Acrylic on Canvas, 60” x 48” www.sharonweinerart.com 310-559-4278


ARTIST SHOWCASE

www.randphoto.net

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rand alhadeff photography

310-395-8381


ARTIST SHOWCASE

“Signs of Hollywood” • www.HaleySonson.com FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEREDITH HALEY SONSON

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ETCHED IN TIME • 72" X 48" • ACRYLIC, CANVAS

JENNIFER PERLMUTTER

Artist Jennifer Perlmutter subtly balances the influences of nature and civilization in her work. She combines environmental character with urban features in a complex layering to create a push-pull of color, figure and texture.

jenniferperlmutter.com


8576-A MELROSE AVE., WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069 • (310) 657-0324 • WWW.SKYLARKFINEARTGALLERY.COM (ONE BLOCK EAST OF THE PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER)

Works on Paper and other recent Paintings by Luc Leestemaker


Fabrik Magazine - Issue #3