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ART. DESIGN. ARCHITECTURE.

ISSUE 18


LA ART SHOW 2013 HISTORIC | MODERN | CONTEMPORARY


CONTRIBUTORS MASTHEAD

APARNA BAKHLE-ELLIS is a writer enthralled by the conso-

Publisher Chris Davies

nance and dissonance of ‘being’ in Los Angeles. L'écriture féminine, outsider art, and altered states of consciousness rank high among her myriad interests. She is also Fabrik’s Managing Editor.

Associate Editor Peter Frank

NICHOLAS FORREST is a Sydney/London based art market analyst, art consultant and writer. He is the founder of the Art Market Blog (artmarketblog.com) which offers independent commentaries, research and analysis on the current art market.

Managing Editor Aparna Bakhle-Ellis Creative Director Chris Davies

PETER FRANK is art critic for the Huffington Post and Associate Editor

Art Direction & Design Chris Davies & Paul Soady Contributing Writers Aparna Bakhle-Ellis Nicholas Forrest Peter Frank Meher McArthur Phil Tarley David Vega 5790projects Account Executive Dale Youngman

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING Editorial editorial@fabrik.la Advertising ads@fabrik.la Contact 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 Tel 310 360 8333 • http://www.fabrik.la

for Fabrik magazine. He is former critic for Angeleno magazine and the L.A. Weekly, served as Editor for THE magazine Los Angeles and Visions Art Quarterly, and contributes articles to publications around the world. Frank was born in 1950 in New York, where he was art critic for The Village Voice and The SoHo Weekly News, and moved to Los Angeles in 1988. Frank, who recently served as Senior Curator at the Riverside Art Museum, has organized numerous theme and survey shows for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Venice Biennale, Documenta, and other venues. McPherson & Co.-Documentext published his Something Else Press: An Annotated Bibliography in 1983. A cycle of poems, The Travelogues, was issued by Sun & Moon Press in 1982. Abbeville Press released New, Used & Improved, an overview of the New York art scene cowritten with Michael McKenzie, in 1987.

MEHER McARTHUR Originally from the UK, Meher McArthur is a freelance art historian, author and educator, specializing in Asian art. Her current exhibition about contemporary origami entitled Folding Paper: The Infinite Possibilities of Origami is touring the US until the end of 2016 (and was featured in last month’s issue of Fabrik). She worked for many years as Curator of East Asian Art at Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena, has collaborated with several Southern California museums and advised for the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. She has published several books on Asian art and culture, including Reading Buddhist Art: An Illustrated Guide to Buddhist Signs and Symbols (Thames & Hudson, 2002), The Arts of Asia: Materials, Techniques, Styles (Thames & Hudson, 2005) and Confucius: A Throneless King (Pegasus Books, 2011) and two children’s books. She has also written for publications including The V&A Magazine and The Royal Academy Magazine. She lives in Los Angeles with her family.

INFORMATION Fabrik is published Quarterly by Fabrik Media Group, Inc., 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Contents cannot be reproduced in part or in full without the written permission of the copyright holder. The opinions expressed are those of the artists and writers themselves and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Fabrik or Fabrik Media Group. Copyright © 2012. All rights reserved. PRINTED IN LOS ANGELES

ART. DESIGN. ARCHITECTURE.

ISSUE 18

ON THE COVER Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom, Chapel, 2010 Mei Xian Qiu Photograph on Plexiglass Substrate Courtesy the artist. Available at ArtCapitol.com

PHIL TARLEY is a Fellow of The American Film Institute and an artist member of the Los Angeles Art Association. As an art and pop culture critic: he regularly posts stories on The WOW Report; he writes about art and photography for Fabrik Magazine; and he is a juror on the Lark International Art Competition. Tarley is currently working on a book of narrative non-fiction travel stories and on a variety of photographic art projects. He has recently been appointed to a City of West Hollywood task force on Public Art Installation. Phil Tarley now curates for Artist’s Corner, Hollywood’s newest fine art photography gallery. DAVID VEGA is an L.A. based writer with so many interests he might need three lifetimes to fully explore them. When not collecting chairs, building bikes, making wine, shucking oysters, climbing Machu Picchu, or learning how to build houses from hay, he can be found on his laptop at a cafe near you. 5790projects is a curatorial entity that produces quarterly pop-up exhibitions in Los Angeles, and was founded by Catlin Moore and Matthew Gardocki in 2011. Moore is the Director of Mark Moore Gallery (Culver City, CA), where Gardocki is also Assistant Director. Gardocki studied at the School of the Art Institute, Chicago, and is one of the founding members of Igloo Tornado arts collective. Moore is completing her MA at California State University, Long Beach, and is a contributor to several art publications, including Daily Serving, Beautiful/Decay, and ArtLog.


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CONTENTS 10 Spotlight: ArtBound’s Contours of Place 26 Profile: What Can I Say About Mei? 36 Fresh Faces in Art: Emergent Presence: Eight LA Artists You Should Know 52 Art Market: Searching Los Angeles for Artistic Alternatives to Uninspiring Architectural Components 60 Iconoclast: The Physical Spirit: Divine Sex, Beauty and the Grotesque in the Art of Eric Gill 70 Spotlight: Materials & Applications: 10 Years of Transforming Space 78 Coming Out, Going In: Edward Cella Art+Architecture: Coming Out: Donnie Molls, “Disposable Culture,” and Scott McMillin, “New Works” Going In: Penelope Gottlieb, “Gone,” Ruth Pastine, “Counterpoint” 80 Art About Town: Peter Frank’s Museum Views 84 Art Galleries & Museums


IMAGE FROM “JACK RABBIT HOMESTEAD” BY KIM STRINGFELLOW, HIGHLIGHTS REMOTE DESERT COMMUNITIES IN SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY


ARTBOUND'S

Contours of Place — WORDS APARNA BAKHLE-ELLIS IMAGES COURTESY ARTBOUND AND KCET


SPOTLIGHT

T

he desire to source cultural journalism as free-range as the food

some aspire to ingest might compel Southern California viewers to forage. After all, this more intrepid content is rarely on offer as part

of traditional broadcast or “public” television programming, which is usually stifling in its predictability of tone.

Serendipitously, in October of 2010,

KCET officially announced it was ending its forty-year relationship as PBS’ flagship West Coast station. After years of discussing the challenges it had been facing with the public media behemoth, KCET chose independence. Even Al Jerome, CEO and President of KCET, noted in an interview with Santa Barbara’s Independent, the “vast majority of PBS’s ‘icon programs’ are produced by three East Coast stations,” the average prime-time series has been on for 32 years and it has been more than eight years since PBS implemented its last major new series. Honing its bold mandate to now produce “community media,” the newly independent KCET decided to invest in the local community, which also just happens to be the creative capital of the nation. Under the steady inspired guidance of Director of Production + Program Development Juan Devis, KCET’s new arts journalism initiative Artbound stealthily infuses authenticity into the corporate media dictated cultural landscape. A currency missing from our consumer driven environments, authenticity is necessary for genuine reflection upon the human condition. The space to reflect on where we are, ponder how we may have arrived here and co-navigate novel paths to living and learning as communities. Since launching in May of this year, Artbound has culled insights, observations and analysis from 20 writers, cultural advisors and critics, all of whom are deeply embedded in Southern California’s multifaceted and diverse cultural landscape. These contributors, many of whom are artists with complex practices themselves, have already produced more than 150 online columns for the initiative. Artbound actively engages audience participation by encouraging readers to vote on the long-form multimedia arti12

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IMAGES ABOVE FROM “JACK RABBIT HOMESTEAD” BY KIM STRINGFELLOW, HIGHLIGHTS REMOTE DESERT COMMUNITIES IN SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY


IMAGE FROM “JACK RABBIT HOMESTEAD” BY KIM STRINGFELLOW, HIGHLIGHTS REMOTE DESERT COMMUNITIES IN SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY


SPOTLIGHT

cles, which are then vetted every week by the show’s editorial team. Stories receiving the most votes are produced into weekly short videos that can be viewed online. The inaugural Artbound television show, which debuted August 16th on KCET, featured the best of these compelling hyper-local videos and marks the first time viewers actually curate the content they watch on public television. Each month until November, a new hour long Artbound will air on KCET. Fabrik engaged Juan Devis about the fascinating directions being explored by the visionary team producing Artbound.

Among the videos presented in the first installation of ArtBound: •

“Jack Rabbit Homestead” by Kim Stringfellow, highlights remote desert communities in San Bernardino county.

“The Date Farmers” by Drew Tewksbury, also Artbound’s Managing Editor, tells the story of an eclectic group of artists in the Coachella Valley and their influence on Chicano pop art.

“California Hot Tubbing: An Oral History of the Steam Egg” by Robby Herbst, spotlights a communal steam bath in the shape of an egg in downtown Los Angeles.

“A Year in the Life: Manuel Paul López's ‘1984’” by Amy Sanchez, an animated short, that delves into López's encyclopedic knowledge of modern and contemporary literature and borderchild vernacular sensibility.

FABRIK: How did the idea for KCET Public Media’s Artbound evolve and come into fruition? JUAN DEVIS (JD): The concept for the series was formulated after our split from PBS and our mission to engage with our local community in a more relevant and participatory way. Before our split, KCET had already began experimenting with the online space, incubating ideas and creating web-only series that addressed

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IMAGE FROM “CALIFORNIA HOT TUBBING: AN ORAL HISTORY OF THE STEAM EGG”


SPOTLIGHT

issues of community engagement, mapping and participation, such as it is the case with Departures, while defining our role and the purpose of cultural journalism in Southern California. Once the split occurred, one of KCET’s main strategic initiatives was to create programming focusing on the arts and culture of our region, and provide new production and distribution models that embraced the changing landscape of public media. Artbound: Southern California Cultural Journalism was designed to address these two issues head on. FABRIK: With the independence KCET has garnered since leaving the PBS fold, there seems to be a renewed commitment to serving the public in a bolder and far more transparent manner as evidenced by Artbound’s emphasis on participatory media. How is this experiment working so far? JD: We live in a networked, participatory culture where the consumption of art and culture is not only multi-linear — see it - record it, social media it — but where the recommendation of a peer often carries more weight than the word of the critic. This is forcing many of us to expand not just the ways in which we think about culture, but the traditional vehicles we use to communicate them. In our new media saturated environment, the critical issue for the arts is not just one of analysis but also distribution; that is why we've created a platform where audiences can become a participant in the re-telling or creation of a story. FABRIK: You have identified Artbound as “transmedia.” Please can you talk more about this term and how you came to designate the series as such? How important and/or necessary is engaging the public and audience to public media’s mandate? JD: With over thirty columnists and cultural critics in 11 counties of Southern California, Artbound scans the region, providing seeds of engagement through articles, videos, projects and partners, who are narrating the cultural stories of the area. By selecting articles that will be turned into short-format documentaries and TV episodes, Artbound audiences become programmers, curators and critics, helping us determine what is current and viable. 18

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SPOTLIGHT

FABRIK: The comprehensiveness with which Artbound explores the cultural landscape of Southern California is astounding. Can you share a bit about the process by which the show enlists contributors and subjects to fill out the 9 disciplines being reported upon? JD: Good criticism reveals layers of hidden meaning, allowing audiences to uncover the relationship a particular work of art has to place and community. A critic who doesn’t understand local connections, or can’t translate them legibly for their audience, is unable to explain how culture and the production of art is embedded in the daily life. Variables such as the economy, access, transportation, and landscape—to name a few—have had an enormous impact on the development of the cultural life of Southern California. Journalists and writers who do not understand the implications of these variables often report as outsiders, practicing what I call: drive-by journalism. With Artbound, we wanted to change this dynamic and provide a space for writers and cultural critics to report from within their communities and bring a focus back to local feature reporting. Beyond writing a review and sharing an informed opinion, we asked our contributors to become “context providers” who create stories that are not an end to themselves but instead act as seeds for engagement in their own local communities and networks. In Artbound, each article is rated and “reviewed” by the audience, the most popular weekly article goes head to head against the editor’s choice - the story that garners the most votes gets turned into a short format documentary that later migrates into Television. Contributors are encouraged to mobilize their local communities to vote and support for the artists and stories of their region – allowing us to engage in a hyper-local level with the residents of the area. In a sense, Artbound contributors are engaging with the idea of access as central to their role as public intellectuals. FABRIK: What do you feel prepared you in particular to spearhead a cutting edge experimental arts oriented program format such as the one you have been able to develop for Artbound? JD: I grew up in Colombia surrounded by a family of artists, social workers and cowboy style DIY entrepreneurs; this gave me the tools to find connecWeb fabrik.la

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SPOTLIGHT

tions between the public sector, the art world, and the pioneer spirit of my grandparents’ generation. I have brought these three sensibilities to my work in film, television and new media, not only in terms of the content that I choose to produce, but the way in which it is presented. The resourceful mindset of the Colombian, paired with the tools that I’ve been provided in the Unites States, have allowed me to propose a new economy or mode of production and engagement. Although I appreciate traditional documentary and narrative work, I believe the process in which these works comes into being is often more interesting and relevant for an audience. Instead of relying on a time based narrative – be it a film or a doc – to provide a point of view, why not maximize the hard work and money that goes into developing a story, by framing each step as an indispensable part of a larger narrative?

FABRIK: How has working with and producing ‘public media’ with KCET changed the way you experience Los Angeles?

JD: I discovered Los Angeles through public media and learned how to produce public media because of Los Angeles; they’ve had a yin and yang effect on each other; they are interchangeable. After a bad hangover climbing LA’s entertainment ladder, I learned to find a place here in Los Angeles thanks to the tools that the practice of public media offered me. I have tried to get lost in the city and let its people and history lead me to a path back home. This personal journey of inquiry and curiosity is at the center of what I have been doing at KCET.

FABRIK: What aspects of this city continue to surprise you?

JD: Los Angeles is not an easy place to live – you can easily get lost here and never find your way back. I think we are still trying to understand what Los Angeles is, define it, contain it – but somehow it continues to slip out of our hands.

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SPOTLIGHT

IMAGES ABOVE FROM “CALIFORNIA HOT TUBBING: AN ORAL HISTORY OF THE STEAM EGG”

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SPOTLIGHT

When you walk out on the street in New York or Bogota, the city is right in front of you – all of it – the good, the bad and the ugly. Here in Los Angeles, you open the door and find yourself…. with yourself. That is what makes Los Angeles so fascinating – at least for me. It is a very introspective megalopolis with a series of multi-ethnic villages that never seem to stop. I think that that sense of solitude and at times isolation has created the perfect environment for some of the most extraordinary community expressions and art practices to emerge in the last 50 years. FABRIK: Who are some local artists you have discovered in the process of working on this series and what in particular about their work affects or interests you? What within the Southern California arts landscape do you hope to influence with the show Artbound? JD: The fascinating part of all this process is that we have been able to discover great artists thanks to the breath and variety of contributors that we have and to the amazing work that our Managing Editor Drew Tewksbury has done to help shape and guide some of these stories. Because of their geographic location and editorial perspective, each contributor has opened the door to a variety of artists, disciplines and perspectives that together contribute to create a larger story about Southern California’s cultural DNA. One of the first columns of the series was penned by writer and artist Robbie Herbst, who wrote about the work of Michael Parker, a public practice sculptor who created a steam room in the shape of an disco-ballegg (The Steam Egg) and the steam seasons that accompanied it creating a sort of living sculpture. We convinced Parker to hold a steam session for one of our video segments and he invited a group of friends along with a herbj and dj. In the morning we went foraging with the herbj in the hills of Highland Park and later that night, communed with artists and poets during a steam session in the middle of downtown Los Angeles. Lilledeshan Bose, a contributor from the OC, wrote a fascinating article about a community ran exhibition — ART WITH AN AGENDA — honoring the murder of Kelley Thomas in the city of Fullerton. People from all ages and walks of life contributed to the exhibit with over 80 pieces con-

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SPOTLIGHT

JUAN DEVIS SEATED WITH 'ART WITH AN AGENDA' AUDIENCE

demning or examining the events of the murder. After meeting with the organizer Steve Baxter and listening to him explain the ethos of the exhibit, Bruce Dickson (video unit producer/director) agreed that the best way to approach this story was to hold a “town-hall� meeting about the role and purpose of art in the face of collective anger and loss. It was an emotional and relevant moment for us that signaled the role we could play in covering the arts and culture of Southern California. Both of these stories encapsulate the editorial goals of Artbound; our public media practice is to explore the role that art has in our community and the ways in which people participate with it, both formally and informally.

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Karrie Ross Opening: Sunday, October 7, 2012 VisJt the website below for show information

My Trees Talking; #15, #63, #47; 11” x 7”; pen & ink (3 of 100 Trees I’m drawing for the book)

Available for commission projects: watercolor, oil, acrylic; mixed media, painting, sculpture and installations.

www.karrierossfineart.com/my-trees-talking/ 310-915-0920

©2012 Karrie Ross All rights reserved.


the 22nd international los angeles photographic art exposition santa monica civic auditorium

january 17 - 21, 2013 www.photola.com


PROFILE

WHAT CAN I SAY ABOUT MEI? — WORDS PHIL TARLEY PHOTOS COURTESY MEI XIAN QIU

M

ove over David Lachapelle and Pierre et Gilles. Get back Wang

Qingsong. Here comes Mei Xian Qui. Eastern themes of post Chairman Mao politics enliven a bizarre dialog in Mei’s highly original,

super sexy, uber-feminine photography. Mei is a quintessential Los Angeles artist, whipping up images in which Asian and Western themes implode in a delightful mélange of post modern sensibility. Mei’s photographs take me into a world I’ve never seen before. Many allude to classic western tableaux, a nod to her painterly background. But then Mei infuses her work with a dramatic narrative. She catches her models in moments filled with expectancy and anticipation. She poses her characters, which are often gender ambiguous, as if they are in a play. Her actors often allude to a sexual back story, and seem to promise a big surprise at the end, after they have left her stage. Mei Xian Qiu was born in the town of Pekalongan, on the island of Java, Indonesia, to a third generation Chinese minority family. She has lived all over Europe, is based in Los Angeles and makes frequent trips back to China. “I feel 100% Chinese Indonesian, and 100% American. I am a part of a kind of floating culture. My sense of individual identity becomes linked to something ever shifting and transient.” I first met the Mei Xian Qui through the Los Angeles Art Association - we are both artist members. Peter Mays, the association’s director thrilled to promote her work, was quite proud that his Gallery 825 could provide a launch pad for her stratospheric career trajectory. Mei is blowing up big. At their Photo LA booth, her photo26

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LET A THOUSAND FLOWERS BLOOM, CHERRY BLOSSOMS (2010) © MEI XIAN QIU


LET A THOUSAND FLOWERS BLOOM, HOLLYWOODLAND (2010) © MEI XIAN QIU


LET A THOUSAND FLOWERS BLOOM, 8099 (2010) © MEI XIAN QIU


LET A THOUSAND FLOWERS BLOOM, GRAND CANYON (2010) © MEI XIAN QIU


TEMPTATION OF EVE © MEI XIAN QIU


PROFILE

graphs sold handsomely. Then the L.A. Art Association took the artist to Basel Switzerland, where she sold every work she showed and took orders for five additional pieces. Peter was delighted and plans to take Mei to Art Basel Miami Beach in December. “I love her work; it’s timely, contemporary and challenging.” I have watched Mei’s photography mature and marry her diverse inspirations to their current incarnation, which she renders in Plexiglass. Mei prints onto the Plexiglass itself allowing a gentle backlight to infuse her imagery. Against a delicate palette of tropical birds and pink flowers, this soft kiss of backlight lays down a gossamer femininity and lightness that leaves me gender intrigued and scratching my head in delight wondering what is really going on in her photographs. The artist, sweet-natured and quick-smiled, cultivates an air of purposeful mystery. Rex Bruce, director of LACDA, Los Angeles Center for Digital Art, who showed the artist a few months ago, told me, "Mei Xian Qui is an artist with the perfect balance of humor, politics, multiculturalism and visual pleasure. Her images are exquisite and irresistible—her peculiar combinations of gay love, Chinese takeover, and L.A. pop sensibility illicit a sense of surprise in the onlooker." How gay is Mei? Can the work of an Asian woman on Plexiglass really evoke gay anyway? And what is gay today? In her post-modern world of ethnic diversity, can’t we all be gay for a day? Half the fun in Mei’s work is trying to decode the artist’s campy, sometimes zany, quasi-political iconography. Mei Xian Qui is about process-melding her Asian and Los Angeles identities to constantly collide in clever, amusing and surprising ways. Her work is adorable, campy art that has both pith and ash. Who could ask for more? Resistance is futile. I’m wanting a piece to hang on my living room wall. During the month of September, the artist has work in Tarfest and Art Platform. Her solo show, Early Spring, at Artist’s Corner, opens on Friday, September 21, with a reception for the artist at 7pm. Artist’s Corner 6585 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood 90038, (323) 464-3900

I M AG E S F R O M T H I S STO RY A R E AVA I L A B L E O N P L E X I G L ASS S U B ST R AT E , A N D C A N B E P U R C H AS E D F R O M T H E F I N E A RT W E B S I T E , A RTC A P I TO L @ www. a r tc a p i to l .co m

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FRESH FACES IN ART: EIGHT LA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW

EMERGENT PRESENCE BY CATLIN MOORE AND MATTHEW GARDOCKI, CO-DIRECTORS OF 5790projects

1. THEODORA ALLEN Citing cultural snippets reflective of a nostalgic Americana, UCLA MFA candidate Theodora Allen paints seemingly insignificant fragments of a master image. A hazy vase of flowers plucked from the background of a popular Gram Parsons album, heavy royal blue velvet curtains drawn from the corridors of Graceland, and wispy portraits from archival television footage forge a larger narrative of heartache and reflection. Allen's feathery textures and ghostly figures allude to a bittersweet reminiscence, a cultural lineage that is at once memorialized and reanimated within her canvases. Loosely referred to as tokens from a "vanishing heritage," Allen's works explore the motifs of a collective identity, but void of context or era. Through her skillfully nebulous rendering, Allen manipulates the coalescence between multiple disparate social moments - producing a sentimental projection through a plaintive hand and haunting intimacy. Allen (b. 1985) is the recent recipient of the Resnick Scholarship, and is expected to graduate in 2014. www.theodoraallen.com

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(ABOVE) MORNING GLORY, 2012 • THEODORA ALLEN OIL ON LINEN • 12 X 16 INCHES • COURTESY OF THE ARTIST (LEFT) VASES, 2012 • THEODORA ALLEN OIL ON LINEN • 16 X 20 INCHES • COURTESY OF THE ARTIST


FRESH FACES IN ART: EIGHT LA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW

2. KEVIN APPEL In his solo exhibition at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects (July 14 – August 23, 2012), Kevin Appel's aesthetic mixology culminates in a rich survey of terrains and mediums; forging an uncharted topography as variant as it is alluring. Appel's preoccupation with physical space and perception is manifested through a territorial struggle between collage, geometric abstraction, and minimalism – a compositional annexation in which borders are effectively nullified. Photographic regions are invaded by great swaths of paint and frenetic textile-like patterning; fashioning an obscured landscape peppered with architectural and organic forms alike. His adroit use of structure and spontaneity generates a mood of order on the verge of chaos, a palpable tension between the visual and imagined, the tangible and psychological. Appel (b. 1967) received his M.F.A from UCLA, and has works in several public collections, including LACMA (CA) and MoMA (NY). www.kevinappelstudio.com

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(ABOVE) SALTON SEA (WINDOW), 2012 • KEVIN APPEL ACRYLIC, OIL, AND UV CURED INK ON CANVAS OVER PANEL • 48" H X 40" W COURTESY OF SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS • PHOTO: ROBERT WEDEMEYER (LEFT) SALTON SEA (ROOM), 2012 • KEVIN APPEL ACRYLIC, OIL, AND UV CURED INK ON CANVAS OVER PANEL • 77" H X 66" W COURTESY OF SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS • PHOTO: ROBERT WEDEMEYER


FRESH FACES IN ART: EIGHT LA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW

3. AMIR H. FALLAH Amir H. Fallah's models are at once refined and awkward. Like hallucinatory portraits of 17th century elite, their moment of noble repose is shrouded by anonymity and contorted posture. Their gangly hands grasp atypical tchotchkes and appear inelegantly candid, making Fallah's painterly caricatures unpretentious excerpts from assorted biographies. Much like his art historical predecessors, Fallah highlights objects as personal signifiers; anecdotal tokens that allude to a larger memoir. His harlequin palette and angular aesthetic reference the fantastic whimsy of Persian miniature paintings, while his contemporary composition leads the eye through a timeline gone awry. Sharply angular lines chart a visual trajectory that retraces a story both obscure and familiar, and intersect a miscellany of opulent textures and artifacts indicative of an authentic experience. Fallah (b. 1979) received his M.F.A. from UCLA and is represented by The Third Line (Dubai) and Frey Norris Contemporary (San Francisco). www.amirhfallah.com

SHE WHO LOOTS THE PERSIAN EMPIRE, 2012 • AMIR FALLAH ACRYLIC, OIL, INK, PENCIL, AND COLLAGE ON PAPER MOUNTED TO CANVAS • 96 X 72 INCHES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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EXPLOSIONS THAT ARE BUILT TO SPILL, 2012 • AMIR FALLAH ACRYLIC, OIL, INK, PENCIL, AND COLLAGE ON PAPER MOUNTED TO CANVAS • 72 X 96 INCHES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST


FRESH FACES IN ART: EIGHT LA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW

4. MICHELLE CARLA HANDEL With a dexterous manipulation of industrial materials, Michelle Carla Handel transfigures wood, polyester fiberfill, muslin, silicone, rubber, urethane, vinyl and rope from the banal to the corporeal. Coy references within the dichotomous nature of her mediums – which are as easily commercial as they are deviant – evoke a purely visceral confrontation with our most latent associations. Tapping into a lineage of body politics, Handel employs a comical tone in her evaluation of beauty constructs, her deformed anatomies misshapen and vulnerable in their configurations. Seated, reclining, suspended, or bound, her abstracted forms summon conflicting notions of the erotic and repellent, and evoke an instinctive grapple between the carnal and psychological. Handel (b. 1968) received her M.F.A. from the Claremont Graduate University; she recently showed in a two-person exhibition at Garboushian Gallery, aptly titled "Your Mouth Undone." www.michellecarlahandel.com

(ABOVE) TRYING HARD TO DO THIS GRACEFULLY, 2012 • MICHELLE CARLA HANDEL PLASTER, WOOD, FABRIC, FLOCKING, SILICONE RUBBER • 35 X 22 X 9 INCHES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST (RIGHT) MIXED MESSAGES, 2012 • MICHELLE CARLA HANDEL WOOD, COTTON ROPE, FOAM, FABRIC, SILICONE RUBBER • 40 X 11 X 7 INCHES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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FRESH FACES IN ART: EIGHT LA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW

5. LESTER MONZON Ever since the war between "fine art" and "design" has been waged, a border increasingly diminishing in the advent of accessible technology, context has historically been the dividing faction between the two practices – and Lester Monzon is its analog commentator. Colorful gesticulations conceal sections of rigid patterning, a tête-á-tête between abstract expressionism and hard-edge abstraction that implies a kind of gentle lampooning of the taxonomic tradition. Monzon upends the rigid formalism and segregation innate to the fine art world, and fabricates a composite genealogy of painting – a pithy resolution to an otherwise vapid debate. Monzon's luscious brushstrokes slyly creep into a Hirst-esque field of dots or Nolandlike plane of stripes, like the resurrection of a once-declared dead practice through a satirical hand. Monzon (b. 1973) received his M.F.A. from Art Center College of Design.

HOT BUTTONS, 2008 • LESTER MONZON ACRYLIC ON LINEN • 12 X 9 INCHES • COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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FROM MY SITUATION TO YOURS, 2011 • LESTER MONZON ACRYLIC AND GRAPHITE ON LINEN • 9 X 12 INCHES • COURTESY OF THE ARTIST


FRESH FACES IN ART: EIGHT LA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW

6. NANO RUBIO Channeling the squeegee technique of Gerhard Richter and the pinstripe precision of hot rod detailing, Nano Rubio weds heterogeneous extremes of a singular medium. In his hands, paint is both the unifying and dividing constituent of a comprehensive framework – the meticulously rendered veins in his background giving object-like life to the explosive smears in the foreground. While occupying a shared space and makeup, the paint's variance implies disconnected genres; an inequality that Rubio likens to sociopolitical polarities and limited choice. Loosely referencing the abstracted human form in motion, Rubio incorporates much of himself in his process-oriented execution. While some paintings require a laborious system of layering and exactitude, others broach the subject of our physicality through performance – in which Rubio fills a punching bag with paint, and lets the result of his exertion drag across the canvas. Exploring the increasing disconnection between cognizance and being, Rubio profiles the limitations of a shared constitution with candor and conviction. Rubio (b. 1982) received his M.F.A. from Claremont Graduate University, and had his first solo exhibition at George Lawson Gallery titled, "Vectors: Recent Paintings." www.nanorubio.com

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(ABOVE) PANTHER SPHINX, 2012 • NANO RUBIO ACRYLIC ON CANVAS OVER PANEL • 24.5 X 35.5 INCHES • COURTESY OF THE ARTIST (LEFT) TERROR, 2012 • NANO RUBIO ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8 X 11 FEET • COURTESY OF THE ARTIST


FRESH FACES IN ART: EIGHT LA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW

7. CHRISTOPHER RUSSELL Dealing less with the supernatural than the psychosomatic, Christopher Russell rouses ghosts. Within his scratched photographs, fractured glass panes, and hazy metallic paints, there are haunting recollections – the kind of outlier memories that plague our psyche well after childhood. Through a purposefully repressive fog, we habitually revisit the monsters of our innermost selves, and find ourselves the protagonist of a lifelong plight – a cinematic tale evocatively illustrated by Russell's eerie ships and spectral trees. Like a folkloric odyssey into our cognitive web, his mixed-media works and installations traipse through places of fragility and wistfulness; evidence of the divine and unsettling encounters inherent to our complex mortality. Russell (b. 1974) received his M.F.A. from the Art Center College of Design. He is represented by Luis de Jesus, Los Angeles. www.russellarchive.com

RUNAWAY, INSTALLATION VIEW • CHRISTOPHER RUSSELL BOOK: FOUNTAIN PEN INK ON PAPER, 18 X 24 INCHES BACKGROUND IMAGES: UNIQUE ARCHIVAL DIGITAL PIGMENT PRINTS, SCRATCHED, MOUNTED AND FRAMED; SPRAY PAINT. SIZES RANGE 5 X 7 INCHES TO 24 X 36 INCHES • COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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THE CHALLENGE WIND MAKES IV, 2011 • CHRISTOPHER RUSSELL UNIQUE ARCHIVAL DIGITAL PIGMENT PRINTS, SCRATCHED, MOUNTED AND FRAMED 68 X 55 INCHES / 172.7 X 139.7 CM • COURTESY OF THE ARTIST


FRESH FACES IN ART: EIGHT LA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW

8. LISA WILLIAMSON Lisa Williamson conjures elegance from the ordinary. Through a manipulation of scale and balance, she fabricates graceful – yet purposefully imperfect – prototypes of spatiality. Powdercoated aluminum forms appear as matte corrugated steel, ribbons, or forceps, but with subtle evidence of intervention in a folded corner or asymmetrical composition. Grappling with the perception of physical and cognitive space, Williamson interrupts a purely minimalist practice with playful curiosity – as if satirizing the formal properties associated with its calculated rituals. Recalling a Therrien-esque preoccupation with signified function and three-dimensionality, Williamson's works on paper, sculptures, painting, video, and publications accentuate the notion of rationality as simply animated in the mind of the viewer – a refined study in subjectivity. Williamson (b. 1977) received her M.F.A. from USC, and was recently featured in Made in L.A. at the Hammer Museum through September 2. She is represented by Shane Campbell Gallery (Chicago). lisawilliamsonart.blogspot.com

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(ABOVE) BED SHADE WITH MARGINS, 2012 • LISA WILLIAMSON ACRYLIC AND GRAPHITE TRANSFER ON POWDER-COATED ALUMINUM • 72 X 36 X 2 INCHES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SHANE CAMPBELL GALLERY (LEFT) OFF STEP, 2012 • LISA WILLIAMSON ACRYLIC ON POWDER-COATED STEEL • 77 X 10 X 4 INCHES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SHANE CAMPBELL GALLERY


ART MARKET

SEARCHING LOS ANGELES FOR ARTISTIC ALTERNATIVES TO UNINSPIRING ARCHITECTURAL COMPONENTS — WORDS NICHOLAS FORREST

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ncorporating artistic elements into the most mundane of architectural com-

ponents such as doors, walls and windows has proven a challenge for even

the most resourceful designers and architects. Known for its innovative

architecture and design, Los Angeles is one of the best sources for collectors, investors and interior designers of inspired and inventive artistic alternatives to uninspiring architectural components and materials. Dividing a room has traditionally been the job of a folding screen or a wall, so when David Cressey designed his bizarre totemic stoneware “Glyph Wall” for the Architectural Pottery Pro/Artisan Collection in 1965, it must have caused quite a stir in the world of interior design. Each column was made of individual “glyphs”, which were designed so that they could be arranged in any configuration using any number of the glyphs, thus allowing for the creation of short barriers or tall walls. Six of Cressey’s columns were acquired by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in early 2011 which, according to LACMA, originally came “from a state government office building on P Street in Sacramento nicknamed 52

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GLYPH SCREEN WALL, C. 1963 DAVID CRESSEY FOR ARCHITECTURAL POTTERY IMAGE COURTESY LA MODERN AUCTIONS


ART MARKET

the ‘Brown Towers’ because they were built under the tenure of governor Edmund Gerald ‘Pat’ Brown, who served from 1959–1967.” Such is the rarity of Cressey’s columns nowadays that if you are lucky enough to find even one tall thirteen glyph column, it would likely set you back around $10,000. Capistrano Beach based artist Mabel Hutchinson (1903-1999) solidified her place in California design history with her series of sculptural doors produced during the 1960s. Made of walnut and covered in a series of exquisitely carved patterns and designs, the doors are so beautifully made that they could also double as wall hangings. Los Angeles Modern Auctions offered a pair of Hutchison’s doors for sale at their May 6 auction with an estimate of $12,000-$18,000, but unfortunately they failed to find a buyer. A similar pair of doors, originally created for the entrance of the Laguna Beach Art Guild building, and exhibited at the California National Design Show in 1968, were offered for sale by Wright Auctions in 2005 with an estimate of $10,000–15,000. One of the most fascinating artistic approaches to a usually boring building component was the concrete “textile block” devised by Frank Lloyd Wright and first installed in a house built by the architect in Pasadena in 1923. Commissioned by Alice Millard, an antiques collector and rare book dealer, Millard House, also known as La Miniatura, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. Commenting on the creation of the “textile blocks” in his autobiography, Wright said: "The concrete block? The cheapest (and ugliest) thing in the building world… Why not see what could be done with that gutter-rat?" What Wright did was add a simple artistic element to the humble concrete block which transformed it into an aesthetically pleasing, yet functional building material. Although Wright’s textile blocks were essentially just textured and patterned precast concrete bricks with perforated, glass-filled apertures, the design of the block system utilised a quite complex strengthening system of horizontal and vertical steel rods that were woven through the bricks – a technique which led to them being called “textile blocks.” Wright even referred to himself in his autobiography as a “weaver” who, with his textile blocks, crocheted “a free masonry fabric capable of stunning variety, great in architectural beauty.”

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MABEL HUTCHINSON, PAIR OF SCULPTURAL DOORS, EXECUTED C. 1968 IMAGE COURTESY LA MODERN AUCTIONS


MILLARD HOUSE (LA MINIATURA), PASADENA, CALIFORNIA. 1923. FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

TEXTILE BLOCK, MILLARD HOUSE (LA MINIATURA), PASADENA, CALIFORNIA. 1923. FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT


ART MARKET

After undergoing an expensive restoration, Wright's Millard House (La Miniatura) was listed for sale with an asking price of $7.7 million in 2009, but has since been dropped to below $5 million. The house was last sold in 2000 for $1.3 million. Another of Wright’s textile block houses, the Ennis House, was also on the market for some time starting off with an asking price of $15 million in 2009 which was reduced several times until it was sold to billionaire businessman Ron Burkle for just under $4.5 million in July 2011. Because of current economic conditions and the cost of caring for such important buildings, both the Millard House and the Ennis House have proven a tough sell. For those that can’t afford a multi-million dollar house, a 4" Sq Millard paperweight based on the textile block of the Alice Millard House can be purchased from The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation website for a mere $30.00. Or perhaps you would prefer a Millard key ring and card case of etched brass with nickel silver plating available for just $50.00. Artist De Wain Valentine, one of the key figures in the California Light & Space movement, and one of the most influential sculptors active in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, became a sculptor after being in a position where he had to make the choice between a career in architecture or art. Choosing to challenge the boundaries between art and architecture using materials and techniques from both disciplines, Valentine is best known for his massive wall, column and disc sculptures that he produced using highly toxic industrial materials. One such sculpture, “Curved Waterwall (1990),” a custom designed architectural outdoor sculpture, will be offered for sale by Los Angeles Modern Auctions on the 7th of October with an estimate of $50,000–100,000. Commissioned for the consignor and measuring over 6 feet tall, this sculpture is one of the largest of Valentine’s works ever to be offered at auction. Valentine’s sculptures have become extremely popular over the last few years with his “Blue Rose Circle” acquired by the National Gallery in Washington and his “Triple Disk Red Metal Flake — Black Edge” acquired by New York’s Museum of Modern Art – both acquisitions were made in 2011. More recently, the artist’s “Blue Rose Circle” was acquired by the National Gallery in Washington, D.C.

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ICONOCLAST

THE PHYSICAL SPIRIT: DIVINE SEX, BEAUTY AND THE GROTESQUE IN THE ART OF ERIC GILL — WORDS DAVID VEGA IMAGES ERIC GILL’S WORK COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF ERIC GILL / BRIDGEMAN ART LIBRARY

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t would be unfair to judge Eric Gill the artist by his spotted personal life; it would be equally unfair to judge Eric Gill the man solely by his body of creative work. In essence, it is impossible to define or assess a character of such complexity. A letter cutter, sculptor, typeface designer, and writer, Gill managed to embrace several different art forms, impacting the 20th century art and design world in a few short years. What is most impressive, however, is how Gill incorporated the erotic with divine reverence, inviting his viewers to consider the possibility that the two are not mutually exclusive impulses. In doing so, this distinctly curious artist managed to boldly challenge the aesthetic norms of a post-Victorian society while still maintaining the respect of the religious institutions that supported much of his work. Gill first began his career in 1903, cutting stone inscriptions for various clients in London’s Hammersmith district under one Edward Johnston. Gill had a deft hand and business was soon thriving. He decided to start his own studio and moved to Ditchling in 1907, bringing with him assistant Joseph Cribb. Johnston decided to join the two. Along with a fourth man, Hilary Pepler, they founded The Guild, a community of like-minded individuals dedicated to the protection and the promotion of its members' work, the Catholic faith and domestic simplicity. 60

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ICONOCLAST

Here in Ditchling, Gill felt free from the watchful eyes of modest society, frequently working in a rough tunic (sans undergarments), reminiscent of the robes of medieval monks, or writing tracts on the proper role of the craftsman in society. He valued the hard, honest work of a simple artisan of the old days who would cater to the common man just as readily as to the well heeled. As a founder of Distributism, the “3rd position” between communism and capitalism, Gill argued that skilled labor and the general populace should control the means of production, rather than the state or elite property owners.

“On those occasions I was caught unprepared. I did not know such beauties could exist. I was struck as by lightning, as by a sort of enlightenment. On that evening I was thus rapt. It was no mere dexterity, that transported me; it was as though a secret of heaven were being revealed.” — E R I C G I L L , O N H I S F I R S T I N T RO D U C T I O N T O T Y P O G R A P H Y It was during the early years in Ditchling that Gill carved his first figures in stone and wood, reviving the direct carving method rather than the common practice of sending models to be cast by industrial means. (Across the English Channel in France, Romanian born sculptor Constantin Brancusi would do the same). These years would also introduce him to sex as a subject in his sculpture: after hearing art critic Ananda Coomaraswamy’s discussions on Indian art in 1908, Gill began to mimic the images of Hindu gods overseeing coupled figures mid coitus carved on temple facades. This act of blending the divine and the erotic was not new to British eyes, of course; printmaker Aubrey Beardsley had been focusing on the erotic in his decadent work years before. Had Gill read Nietsche’s Birth of Tragedy, he may have found that British reserve and Apollonian rationale both benefitted from a dose of the Dionysian cults of the east. The kind of art that blended reason with ecstatic release was a pure one. 62

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LOVING • ERIC GILL • CARVED PORTLAND STONE THE WILLIAM ANDREWS CLARK MEMORIAL LIBRARY, LOS ANGELES


ICONOCLAST

Gill’s sculptural commissions soon increased in number and in 1911, he had his first exhibition in London to great success. This did not go unnoticed. By 1914, he was chosen to carve the Stations of the Cross at the Roman Catholic Westminster Cathedral. A new convert, Gill found that the prestigious commission reinforced his growing interest in religious matters. It may well have been that the mystical nature of the early Catholic church appealed to him; the symbols of the church as bride and Christ as groom may have fit in perfectly with his new religious ideology, justifying the view that human sex was only an earthly manifestation of a blessed act that begged to be brought to the public sphere. His interest in sex as divine act has been the subject of discussion for several decades, especially now after his sketches and writings have been examined by a new series of biographers. A man obsessed with these things, Gill found that human desire could only find true satisfaction were it to be elevated to the holy and the sublime. This held true for the forms of everything he imagined, whether it be letter or flesh. More often than not it involved the latter. There were countless hours of study devoted to the anatomy of others and his own erect member, watching animals mating and his friends playing tennis in the nude. Appendages were drawn and redrawn in the studio, subjects of dutiful worship. All was carefully recorded in his diaries and sketchbooks, a collection of life’s beautiful, carnal possibilities. Were it not for the ghastly discovery in 1989 by biographer Fiona MacCarthy—that Gill had committed heinous abuses, sexually molesting his children and sleeping with his sister (not to mention the family dog)—he may have simply been relegated to the shelves of other sexobsessed artists who easily jump from reclining nude to Madonna and Child. This is exactly what makes Gill so problematic for most critics and art scholars today. How does one reconcile the brilliance of a man’s talent with his reprehensible human behavior? It’s true that once MacCarthy’s biography became public, Gill’s moral reputation was destroyed. The art world, however, has been much more forgiving: his reputation as a master craftsman remains untarnished, and his woodcuts, sculpture, prints and typeface have been given more attention than ever before. Gill shines best when one studies his simple linear expressions. One can’t help but admire his most famous font, the self-referential Gill Sans, widely used by the BBC, or the more traditional Perpetua, based on Roman inscriptions. He explains his view on the art of designing fonts: 64

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ICONOCLAST

“What is good lettering? That was the job before me. And at every point a justification must be found in reason. What is decoration but that which is seemly and appropriate? Ornamental typography is to be avoided no less than ornamental architecture in an industrial civilization he states in his autobiography. The truth is that a thing fit for its purpose is necessarily pleasant to use and also beautiful.” — A N E S S AY O N T Y P O G R A P H Y (L O ND O N, J .M . D E NT, 19 31 ) He continues his discussion of simple, beautiful design:

“My one complaint against machine-made goods is precisely this: that they too often hide their light under a bushel of “design.” Think how decent alarm clocks might be if they were just as plain and well-made outside as they often are inside! I think an artist is not a person who makes things beautiful, but simply one who deliberately makes things as well as he can — whether he is a clockmaker or picture-painter. I think that if you look after goodness and truth, beauty will take care of itself...” Regardless of his talent, not everyone can so easily forgive him of his transgressions. There is an ongoing call for the removal of the Stations of the Cross in Westminster Cathedral and his sculpture entitled “The Creation of Adam” that stands in the lobby of the Palais des Nations, now the European HQ

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ICONOCLAST

of the U.N. in Geneva. Is it possible for the viewer to ignore the crimes of the creator when he knows full well how the work came into being? Have we gotten past the anti-semitism of Wagner, or forgiven Caravaggio—painter, killer, and homoerotic depicter of young boys—his sins? The answer to that question is a subjective one, perhaps left for another debate.

CANTERBURY TALES • ERIC GILL THE WILLIAM ANDREWS CLARK MEMORIAL LIBRARY, LOS ANGELES

A special thank you to the archivists at The William Andrews Clark Library in Los Angeles, who have been working diligently on organizing its collection of sculpture, woodblock prints, engravings, drawings, sketchbooks, and copper and zinc plates by the artist. It will soon make this vast collection available for public viewing, further inviting the public to make its own conclusions.

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SUNDIAL, 1937 • ERIC GILL • CARVED HOPTON-WOOD STONE THE WILLIAM ANDREWS CLARK MEMORIAL LIBRARY, LOS ANGELES


BETSY ENZENSBERGER ART MIXED MEDIA RESIN: ‘ENERGIZE’

www.betsyenzensberger.com


SPOTLIGHT

MATERIALS & APPLICATIONS: TEN YEARS OF TRANSFORMING SPACE — WORDS MEHER McARTHUR IMAGES COURTESY MATERIALS & APPLICATIONS

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estled among boutiques and restaurants along a stretch of Silver Lake Blvd in Northeast Los Angeles is a small front yard that has become a testing ground for audacious experiments in architecture and design. From the tinted mylar, space-warping Maximilian’s Schell (2005-2006), designed by Benjamin Ball & Gaston Nogues, to the angular metal structure Density Fields (2007) by the Oyler Wu Collaboration (featured in last month’s issue of Fabrik), for the last decade artists, architects and landscape designers from all over the world have squeezed spectacular and highly inventive structures into this 25 x40 foot outdoor exhibition space. The space belongs to Materials & Applications (M&A), a research and exhibition center dedicated to advancing new and underused ideas in art, architecture and landscape design. Founded in 2002 by artist Jenna Didier, the space was conceived as a place where innovative and emerging artists and designers can collaborate on new ideas for public space. Didier also hoped it would inspire social engagement and involve the local community, something that she believed to be missing in her own artistic practice. She set up M&A as a non-profit, and

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SPOTLIGHT

MAXIMILIAN'S SCHELL (2005-2006) DESIGNED BY BENJAMIN BALL & GASTON NOGUES PHOTO: OLIVER HESS

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BLOOM (2011-2012) DESIGNED BY DORA SUNG, IN COLLABORATION WITH INGALILL WAHLROOS-RITTER AND MATTHEW MELNYK PHOTO: MAYORAL PHOTO


UKENDT (IGLOO) (2007) DESIGNED BY ARTIST ANJA FRANKE AND ARCHITECT JOHN SOUTHERN PHOTO: MATERIALS & APPLICATIONS


SPOTLIGHT

UKENDT (IGLOO) (2007) PROCESS. PHOTO: MATERIALS & APPLICATIONS

with the help of grants, the support of a dedicated team of volunteers, and the co-direction of fellow artist and frequent collaborator Oliver Hess from 2004-12, transformed her front yard into a pocket public park that hosts two large installations a year and numerous public programs, events and workshops and is open free of charge 24-7. Now, ten years on, M&A has been embraced by the architectural community as a test-bed for developing ideas about materials and their applications. Almost immediately after its inception, Marcelo Spina, founder and principal of PATTERNS, a Design Research Architectural Practice based in Los Angeles and Argentina, proposed a concept for the space. His installation Land.Tiles (20032004) was an articulated contoured topography – a micro-environment – made up of 140 concrete cast and textured blocks manufactured through a process of CNC (Computer Numerical Control) milling and vacuum-formed plastic. Though formed from concrete, each tile had a surface pattern like wood grain

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SPOTLIGHT

and a subtly different form, resembling rocks in a stream. Spina developed the work with students from his Land.Cro.Sy.Rials seminar class at SCI-ARC, incorporating research and development of new highly integrated, environmentallysensitive, contour-responsive erosion control and landscape consolidation systems. The extended display period of the installation, and the continuous flow of water over the piece, mimicking heavy rainfall, enabled the architectural team to monitor structural, surface and vegetation conditions. In late 2005, another transformation dazzled the neighborhood and significantly boosted M&A’s visibility in the national and international architectural world. Maximilian’s Schell by Benjamin Ball & Gaston Nogues was a gleaming canopy of over 500 tinted mylar scales arranged as a vortex evoking the mighty consuming force of a black hole. The designers’ goal was to create a work that combined architecture, sculpture and “made-to-order” product. To do this, they manipulated mylar, internally reinforced with bundled Nylon and Kevlar fibers, using a CNC cutting machine which sliced the sheets of amber mylar into components shaped like triangular scales that reflected light like stained glass. During the day as the sun passed overhead, the canopy cast colored fractal light patterns onto the ground, changing the space, color, and sound of the courtyard, and providing an environment for enhanced social interaction and contemplation. This delicate yet tensile web was inspired by the Disney cult sci-fi film, The Black Hole, in which an evil tyrant, Dr. Reinhardt, played by Maximilian Schell wishes to harness the “power of the vortex” and possess “the great truth of the unknown!” The installation did indeed function as a vortex, drawing thousands of people into M&A’s courtyard. In fact, it received so much press attention, says Didier, “that we were worried that we might lose some of our street cred!” For the tenth anniversary of M&A’s transformational space, the undulating metal installation Bloom, currently on view, is a perfect celebration of the organization’s mission. Designed by Dora Sung, Assistant Professor at the USC School of Architecture, “the piece really hit the sweet spot,” says Didier with great satisfaction. “It’s an intersection of high artistic achievement and rigorous research into materials, and it evokes a strong emotional response in viewers.” Created by Sung in collaboration with Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter and Matthew Melnyk, Bloom is particularly remarkable because it responds to its Web fabrik.la

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SPOTLIGHT

environment. Made up of 414 stacked panels of a smart thermobimetal (a sheet metal that curls when heated), as the sun heats it up, its surface shades and ventilates specific areas of the shell and also transforms to permit light and air through. The continuous flexing of the panels with the rises and falls in temperature causes the sculpture to actually move without the use of a power source or any mechanical parts, an innovation that could have valuable, zero-energy applications in architecture, such as canopies that curl shut when the sun is directly overhead, or vents that open automatically to let out hot air in summer. Each of the installations hosted by M&A in their pocket park has served to further research into architectural materials and their applications. They have also succeeded in drawing in the local community, as Didier had hoped. The artworks as well as the numerous open air discussions, workshops and performances hosted in the space have acted like magnets, attracting residents of Silver Lake (myself included) and beyond to the space to explore, learn, volunteer or simply lose themselves in the magical setting. The influx of visitors to the space also gives the local business community a boost. Lynette Carezo, manager of the clothing boutique Grace Ellay two doors down enthuses, “Everyone around here loves M&A. What they do is really cool. They bring a lot of new people to the neighborhood and that helps us too.” So what will the next ten years have in store for Materials & Applications? Didier and her team will continue to transform their Silver Lake front yard, but they are expanding their mission to include other parts of Los Angeles. In a project called the Urban Acupuncture Initiative (UAI), M&A will work with members of different communities throughout the city to identify interstitial blighted spaces in their neighborhoods and transform them into healthy spaces that are rich both artistically and spiritually. Because they will be motivated by the communities themselves, “these transformations will be from the inside out,” Didier explains. These will surely be spaces worth watching closely in the years to come. More information on M&A can be found at http://emanate.org.

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Fine Contemporary Art for Lease Including Painting, Print, Sculpture and Photography

KAORU MANSOUR

JOSHUA ELIAS

CARLO MARCUCCI

EMILY VAN HORN

MARY ADDISON HACKETT

ROBERT TOLL

Art Dimensions Inc. www.artdimensionsonline.com (310) 433-8934


COMING OUT, GOING IN

EDWARD CELLA ART+ARCHITECTURE 6018 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036 WORDS PETER FRANK

COMING OUT: Donnie Molls, “Disposable Culture,” and Scott McMillin, “New Works” (June 23-August 25) Cleverly complementing each other, Donnie Molls’ and Scott McMillin’s exhibitions both focused on the quintessentially American – and Angeleno – image and culture of the automobile. Needing to say something new about this familiar subject of social and artistic discourse, both rose to the occasion. Indeed, both were able to claim it as their own. Molls is concerned with the image and presence of the car in the quotidian landscape – although what he infers is that the car creates its own landscape, determines its own space through its ubiquity in our lives, and that “car space” ultimately takes the form of junkyards, not freeways. Molls in fact considers auto-culture from the vantage point of its physicality, painting with garish, car-customizing colors on steel or even on pistons (individually and in groups). His images are pulled from the urban landscape, but isolate the heaps of discarded autobodies and tires from their common spaces, rendering them instead like Pop icons against the flat brilliance of the colors they used to bear. (The images seem to originate in photographs but are hand-painted.) Apotheosized as such, these mounds of metal and ersatz rubber take on a tragic monumentality; you almost imagine the rusting hulks carcasses in some sort of mass slaughter. Molls furthers the poignant poetry of his imagery by rendering some of the piles from closer range – finding an accidental architecture in the stacking – and others from a great distance, whereby they become veritable mountains. For his part, McMillin transforms the very substance of cars, fabricating intricately layered abstractions from salvaged autobody parts. The parts display evidence of use and degradation, but these panel and bumper segments have been set into one another with a care bordering on elegance, resulting in geometric compositions flavored, you might say, with age. In this retro fashion McMillin harks back to the work of proto-Pop assemblagists such as John Chamberlain and (early) Ed Kienholz, making subtle commentary about the carishness of contemporary society while playing along with its pretense at order. Then again, McMillin is truly sensitive to the sabe no wabe of modern junk.

GOING IN: Penelope Gottlieb, “Gone,” Ruth Pastine, “Counterpoint,” through Oct. 27 In their extravagance, of both form and detail, Penelope Gottlieb’s paintings and drawings of flowers clearly point at something beyond the mere decorative presence of colorful flora. The blooms burgeon into and among one another with a fury that bespeaks at once staggering vitality and gripping urgency. Gottlieb draws and paints with thoroughgoing grace and precision, but her flat, eye-popping color moves her pictures well beyond hothouse refinement and into the realm of poster-bold politics. In fact, with these harshly gorgeous images Gottlieb bemoans and protests the extinction of many of the very flowers she portrays. By extension, then, these pictures add to the ecological clarion call, and their shrillness would seem to borrow from the general tenor of the environmental movement. But in this context such a voice drives home its message with noisy beauty, as if nature itself were crying out for help. The exhibition features works from two series, “Extinct Botanicals” and “Invasive Species.” As its name implies, the former group comprises depictions of floral species that have disappeared; Gottlieb is in effect painting their ghosts. The other series portrays the “bad guys,” flowers introduced into foreign climes where they have driven out native variants, many of whom now number among the extinct. But by rendering these plants

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COMING OUT, GOING IN

in such an over-the-top, decoration-conscious manner – at the same time referencing traditional visual practice in botany (such as Audobon’s) – Gottlieb reminds us that these plants do not wage war on one another, but that their victimization and their transgressions are our fault. On beyond this war of the flowers, Ruth Pastine’s ethereal pastels propose transcendence through pure color. Already well known for her nearmonochrome paintings, Pastine finds a different optical space in her works on paper – not only because these are too small to occupy the viewer’s entire optical field (and must thus operate like pages, miniature portals into universes of color) but because their dry, smoothly powdery hues have a different presence than do her painted surfaces. In effect, they feel different to the eye, more tactile and even sensual. This allows Pastine a sweeter, and perhaps fleshier, palette. However, she resists the temptation to “go pretty”; these intimate visual spaces still pull us toward purity.

COUNTERPOINT #33, 2012 RUTH PASTINE • PASTEL ON PAPER, 30 X 22 INCHES

POTENTILIA MULTIJUJA, 2012 • PENELOPE GOTTLIEB • ACRYLIC AND INK ON PANEL • 78 X 84 INCHES

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ART ABOUT TOWN WITH PETER FRANK

Peter Frank’s

MUSEUM VIEWS PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART Edgar Payne: The Scenic Journey THROUGH OCTOBER 14 The early history of art in the American west was determined at least as much by visitors as by residents. At a certain point, however, the former became the latter. Edgar Payne began his career in Chicago, but made his career with views of California and the Southwest. Ultimately, he moved here. Ironically, though, once Payne relocated to the Pacific coast, he became as much a master of European as of American scenes. His identification with his newfound home, finally, was stylistic even more than it was subjective: Payne is now recognized as one of the region’s premier plein air painters, whether he was painting in the plein air of Laguna Beach, Canyon de Chelly, or Brittany. Indeed, his approach helped define painterly practice among southern California plein-airistes: an emphasis on light but not necessarily on color, sharply defined forms not reliant on line, and a rich but restrained painterliness that (especially in his later work) indulges a subtle tendency to abstraction without undermining a naturalistic faithfulness to the observed. The picture remains paramount in such work, and Payne clearly conceived of painting as a process of picture-making, if not merely of illustrating. He was a master of detail, in part because he was not prisoner to it: the overall picture, whether of a mountain or of boats, trees or figures in a landscape, was the important thing, and he often talked about a “unspeakable sublime” that could only be captured visually. A comprehensive retrospective of Payne’s work, “The Scenic Journey” concentrates on his painting and, perforce, on his pictoriality. The fact that he dated rather few of his works makes it hard to hang the show in lockstep chronology – although his later style, with its short, post-pointillist brushstrokes, is easily distinguished – so the show has been hung with an emphasis on subject matter, i.e., location. The European paintings, Alps and Venice Lagoon and all that, are in the back room, for instance, while the Southwest paintings, with their buttes towering above mounted Navajos, are midway through the main hall. In this regard, however, the most fascinating moment in the show may be where two canvases of equal size and composition but very different geography, Le Grand Piz Blanc and Les Haut Sierra hang side by side. Shown thus in the 1923 Paris Salon, their pairing attests to Payne’s powers of observation and depiction: they are the same painting, conceptually and structurally, but, sensitive to atmosphere and detail, they are anything but the same picture. For more information, please visit http://www.pmcaonline.org

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ART ABOUT TOWN WITH PETER FRANK

EDGAR PAYNE • SUNSET, CANYON DE CHELLY, C. 1916 — OIL ON CANVAS, 28 X 34 IN. • MARK C. PIGOTT COLLECTION — ON VIEW AT THE PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART

LAGUNA ART MUSEUM Clarence Hinkle and “Modern Spirit and the Group of Eight” THROUGH OCTOBER 7 If Edgar Payne translated naturalism, impressionism, and other mid-19th-century European approaches to the seen world into a peculiarly American – especially western American – idiom, his fellow California landscapist Clarence Hinkle would do much the same with post-impressionism, fauvism, and other turn-of-the-century styles about a generation later. To be sure, as this retrospective demonstrates, Hinkle started at the beginning of the 20th century with a restrained tonalism derived from Barbizon and the Dutch Hague School, stylistic models going back well into the 19th. But somewhere along the line, Hinkle clearly caught wind of van Gogh, Cézanne and Matisse, because from the 1910s on, his oeuvre is propelled by a rich painterliness, a freedom with (although not dependence on) color, and an ability almost to extract a landscape magically from a welter of strokes, almost as if he were drawing with his brush. Hinkle’s

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ART ABOUT TOWN WITH PETER FRANK

E. ROSCOE SHRADER • SUN BATHERS, C. 1925 — OIL ON CANVAS • 20 X 26 INCHES • COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. MASSIH AHRANJANI — ON VIEW AT THE LAGUNA ART MUSEUM

most exciting paintings make manifest this tendency to tilt towards and then away from abstraction, and one rather regrets the more conventional efforts – trained on figures and especially still lifes – that he produced concurrently. There are other large figure paintings, including of his wife and various friends and colleagues, however, whose vivacious treatment not only connects to the landscapes but shows Hinkle trying out radical pictorial methods. Still, Hinkle let himself go, and, resultantly, developed his most distinctive approach in those landscapes. Hinkle, like Payne, spent considerable time in Laguna; he wound up in Santa Barbara, but while in Orange County, he was a central figure in the Group of Eight, the locus of “soft modernism” in 1920s southern California. (“Hard modernism” was maintained at the time, almost on his own, by Stanton Macdonald-Wright.) A supplementary show to the Hinkle retrospective surveys the Group of Eight in a single gallery, providing a glimpse into their artistic strengths (considerable), understanding of modernist thought (limited), and selfdeclared commitment to the “modern spirit” (quaint). Mabel Alvarez’s flat, DecoGauguin method and the luminous quasi-cubism of Edouard Antonin Vysekal (who owed an obvious debt to Macdonald-Wright) are the most intriguing of the bunch, because they were the most up-to-date. The others — Henry de Kruif, Donna Schuster,

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ART ABOUT TOWN WITH PETER FRANK

Luvena Buchanan Vysekal, John Hubbard Rich, E. Roscoe Shrader, and Hinkle himself — practiced various fin-de-siècle European tendencies a generation late. To be fair, such slippage in hipness characterized California modernism until the 1940s; moreover, the Eight were, to a man or woman, good at what they did. For more information, please visit http://lagunaartmuseum.org

CLARENCE HINKLE • MAID OF NEW MEXICO, 1933 — OIL ON CANVAS • 36 X 30 INCHES • SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART, GIFT OF MABEL BAIN HINKLE, 1961.20 — ON VIEW AT THE LAGUNA ART MUSEUM

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS 1301PE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 938-5822 http://www.1301pe.com

ARMORY CENTER FOR THE ARTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 792-5101 http://www.armoryarts.org

ACUNA-HANSEN GALLERY 427 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 441-1624 http://www.ahgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm

18TH STREET ARTS CENTER 1639 18th St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-3711 http://www.18thStreet.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-5pm; Saturday, 1-5pm

ALTERED SPACE GALLERY 1221 Abbot Kinney Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 452-8121 http://www.alteredspacegallery.com

57 UNDERGROUND 300 C. So. Thomas St. Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-0218 http://www.57underground.com Thurs. by appointment, Fri.-Sun., 12pm-4pm

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF CERAMIC ART 340 S. Garey Ave Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 865-3146 http://www.ceramicmuseum.org Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm

A+D ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN MUSEUM 6032 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-932-9393 http://www.aplusd.org Tues-Fri. 10-6, Sat. & Sun. 10-5

ANDERSON GALLERIES 354 North Bedford Drive Beverly Hills, CA 90210 310-858-1644 www.andersongalleries.com

ABACOT GALLERY 970 N. Broadway, Suite 201 (Mandarin Plaza) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-1599 http://www.abacotgallery.com ABORIGINAL DREAM TIME GALLERY 9011 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 310-278-4278 http://www.aboriginaldreamtimegallery.com ACE GALLERY LA INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART @ The Wilshire Tower 5514 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm ACE GALLERY BEVERLY HILLS INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 9430 Wilshire Blvd. Beverly Hils, CA 90212 (310) 858-9090 http://www.acegallery.net ACME 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5942 http://www.acmelosangeles.com

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ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN 1700 Lida St. Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 396-2446 http://www.artcenter.edu/williamson Tues-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., 12-9pm ARTIST STUDIO 742 N. Broadway 2nd Flr.(Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.tree-axis.com

ANDREW SHIRE GALLERY 3850 Wilshire Blvd., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 389-2601 http://www.andrewshiregallery.com ANGELS GATE CULTURAL CENTER 3601 S. Gaffey St San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 519-0936 http://angelsgateart.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-4pm ANGLES GALLERY 2222 & 2230 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-5019 http://www.anglesgallery.com ANNIE WHARTON LOS ANGELES Pacific Design Center, Suite B275 8687 Melrose, West Hollywood 90069 (305) 905-9304 http://www.anniewhartonlosangeles.com

ART FOR HUMANS GALLERY 945 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.artforhumans.com ART PIC 6826 Troost Ave. No. Hollywood, CA 91605 (818) 503-5999 http://www.artpic2000.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5pm ARTPEACE GALLERY 2317 W. Magnolia Blvd. Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 846-8688 http://www.artpeacegallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-5pm ARTSPACE WAREHOUSE 7354 Beverly Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 936-7020 http://www.artspacewarehouse.com Tues-Sat 11am-6pm ARTY 634 S. Main St. Los Angeles CA 90014 213-213-7829

ANN 330 GALLERY ART 170 Bldg. 170 South La Brea Los Angeles, 90036 http://www.ANN330Gallery.com (323) 954-9900 ARC 2529 W. Magnolia, Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 848-9998 http://www.czappa.com Tues.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat., 9am-3pm

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ARMSTRONG'S 150 E. Thrid St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-6464 http://www.armstronggallery.net Tues.-Sat. 9am-4:30pm

AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER -MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST 4700 Western Heritage Way (in Griffith Park adjacent to L.A. Zoo) Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 667-2000 http://www.autrynationalcenter.org

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER: SOUTHWEST MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN Corner of Marmion Way and Museum Dr Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 221-2164 http://www.southwestmuseum.org AUTOMAT 936 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 617-0422 AVENUE 50 STUDIO 131 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 258-1435 http://www.avenue50studio.com BARNSDALL ART PARK EXHIBITIONS 4800 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 644-6275 Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; First Fridays, 12-9pm BILLY SHIRE FINE ARTS 5790 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 297-0600 www.billyshirefinearts.com BLEICHER/GOLIGHTLY GALLERY 1431 Ocean Avenue Santa Monica, CA 90401 310-237-6423 www.BGshowrom.com BLK/MRKT GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-1989 http://www.blkmrktgallery.com Tues.-Fri., 11am-6pm; Sat., 12-6pm BLUE FIVE ART SPACE 2935 S. Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90064 (310) 478-8500 http://bluefivedesign.com BLYTHE PROJECTS 5797 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.990.3501 www.blytheprojects.net BLUEBIRD ART HOUSE 6747 Bright Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 696-9493 http://www.bluebirdarthouse.com

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BLUM & POE GALLERY 2754 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-2062 http://www.blumandpoe.com BONELLI CONTEMPORARY 943 North Hill St. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 213-617-8180 www.bonellicontemporaryla.com BOWERS MUSEUM 2002 N. Main St Santa Ana, CA 92706 (714) 567-3643 http://www.bowers.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-4pm; fourth Thursday of each month, 10am-8pm BRAND LIBRARY ART GALLERY 1601 West Mountain St. Glendale, CA 91201 (818) 548-2051 http://www.brandlibrary.org Tues. & Thurs., 12-9pm; Weds., 10am6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-5pm CACTUS GALLERY 4534 Eagle Rock Blvd. Eagle Rock, CA 90041 323-256-6117 http://www.eclecticcactus.com CAL POLY POMONA DOWNTOWN CENTER 300 W. Second St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-0080 http://www.class.csupomona.edu/dow ntowncenter Tues.-Sat., 11am-8pm; 2nd Saturdays., 1-9pm CAL POLY POMONA KEITH & JANET KELLOGG 3801 W. Temple Ave Pomona, CA 91768 (909) 869-4302 http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery Tues.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Sat., 12-4pm CAL STATE L.A. – LUCKMAN GALLERY 5151 State University Dr Los Angeles, CA 90032 (323) 343-6604 http://www.luckmanfineartscomplex.org Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 12-5pm CALIFORNIA HERITAGE MUSEUM 2612 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8537 http://www.californiaheritagemuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-4pm Social facebook.com/fabrikworld

CARDWELL JIMMERSON CONTEMPORARY ART 8658 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 310-815-1100 www.cardwelljimmerson.com CARL BERG PROJECTS Pacific Design Center, Suites #B315 & B380 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 323-286-9059 www.carlbergprojects.com CARMICHAEL GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART 5795 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 969-0600 http://www.carmichaelgallery.com Weds.-Sun., 2-7pm CB1 GALLERY 207 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-806-7889 www.cb1gallery.com CENTER FOR THE ARTS, EAGLE ROCK 2225 Colorado Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90041 (323) 226-0949 http://www.centerartseaglerock.org CHARLIE JAMES GALLERY 975 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 687-0844 http://www.cjamesgallery.com CHERRY AND MARTIN 2712 South LA Cienga Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 310-559-0010 http://www.cherryandmartin.com CHINA ART OBJECTS GALLERIES 933 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0384 http://www.chinaartobjects.com CHINESE AMERICAN MUSEUM 125 Paseo de la Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-5240 CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 916 Colorado Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 587-3373 http://www.cgrimes.com Tues-Sat. 10-5:30

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS CHUNG KING PROJECT 945 Chung King Rd. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1802 http://www.chungkingproject.com

COUTURIER GALLERY 166 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-933-5557 http://www.couturiergallery.com/

CIRRUS GALLERY 542 S. Alameda Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 680-3473 http://www.cirrusgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm

CRACK GALLERY 204 W. 6th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-622-3493 http://crackgallery.com/ CRAFT AND FOLK ART MUSEUM 5814 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 947 4230 http://www.cafam.org

CITY OF BREA GALLERY #1 Civic Center Circle Brea, CA 92821 (714) 990-7730 http://www.breagallery.com Weds., Thurs., Sun., 12-5pm, Fri., Sat., 12-8pm CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART The Packing House, 536 W. First St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-3200 http://www.claremontmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-7pm CLASSIC ARTFORMS 9009 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 273-6306 COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS ART GALLERY 26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd Santa Clarita, CA 91355 (661) 362-3612 http://www.canyons.edu/offices/artgallery Tues.-Thurs., 11am-3pm; Sat., 10am-2pm COPRO/NASON GALLERY 2525 Michingan Ave., T-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 398-2643 www.copronason.com COREY HELFORD GALLERY 8522 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 287-2340 http://www.coreyhelfordgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm COTRUTZA GALLERY 446 S. Main St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 Tel: 213-622-0121 http://www.cotrutza.com

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CRAIG GALLERY 5723 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90019 (323) 939-0351 http://www.craiggallery.com Fri., Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't. CRAIG KRULL GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6410 http:// www.artnet.com/ckrull.html Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm CREWEST 110 Winston Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-627-8272 www.crewest.com

CSU NORTHRIDGE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY 18111 Nordhoff St. Northridge, CA 91330 (818) 677-2156 http://www.csun.edu/artgalleries/ Mon.-Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-8pm D.E.N. CONTEMPORARY ART Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue, #B275, 2nd Floor West Hollywood, CA 90069 323-422-6340 www.dencontemporaryart.com DA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 252 D S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-9716 http://www.dacenter.org DANIEL SAXON GALLERY 552 Norwich Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-6033 DANIEL WEINBERG GALLERY 6148 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 954-8425 http://www.danielweinberggallery.com

CROSSROADS SCHOOL FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES 1714 21st St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't.

DRKRM 727 S. Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90014 Hours: Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm Sunday 12-4pm and by appointment http://www.drkrm.com (213) 612-0276

CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS ART GALLERY 92 Palm Dr. Camarillo, CA 93010 (805) 437-8863 http://art.csuci.edu/gallery Mon.-Fri., 10am-4pm

DAVID GALLERY 5797 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 939-9069 www.ddavidgallery.net

CSU FULLERTON ART GALLERY 800 N. State College Blvd. Fullerton, CA 92634 (714) 278-3262 http://www.arts.fullerton.edu/events Tues.-Fri., 12-4pm; Sat., 12-2pm

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CSU LONG BEACH UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90840 (562) 985-5761 http://www.csulb.edu/uam Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm, Thurs., 12-8pm

DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY 3143 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 310-558-3030 http://www.davidkordanskygallery.com DAVID LAWRENCE GALLERY 8969 A Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069 310-278-0882 www.DavidLawrenceGallery.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS DAVID SALOW GALLERY 977 N. Hill St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 620-0240 http://www.davidsalowgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm DBA256 GALLERY 256 S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-7600 http://www.dba256.com Mon.-Thurs., 8am-10pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-midnight DCA FINE ART 3107 Pico Blvd Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 770-2525 http://www.dcafineart.com By Appt. only

DOWNTOWN ART CENTER GALLERY 828 S Main Street Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-7374 http://www.dacgallery.com DOWNTOWN ART GALLERY 1611 So. Hope St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 255-2067 http://www.downtownag.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm DUNCAN MILLER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Avenue, Unit A7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 838-2440 http://www.duncanmillergallery.com EARL MCGRATH GALLERY 454 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 657-4257 http://www.earlmcgrathgallery.com Tues- Sat. 10-6

DE SOTO GALLERY 2635 Fairfax Avenue Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 253-2255 http://www.desotogallery.com Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm & by app't

EDGAR VARELA FINE ARTS (EVFA) 727 S. Spring Street, LA 90014

DEL MANO GALLERY 11981 San Vicente Blvd West Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 476-8508 http://www.delmano.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm

EDGEMAR CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2437 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 399-3666 http://www.edgemarcenter.org Mon.-Fri., 11am-5:30pm

DENENBERG FINE ARTS 417 North San Vicente Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 360-9360 http://www.fada.com

EDWARD CELLA ART + ARCHITECTURE 6018 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 525-0053 http://www.edwardcella.com Tues.-Sun, 11am-5pm

DIALECT 215 W. 6th St. #111 Downtown LA, CA 213-627-7599 info@downtowndialect.com DNJ GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Avenue, Suite J1 Santa Monica, California 90404 (323) 931-1311 or (310) 315-3551 http://www.dnjgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm DOWNEY MUSEUM OF ART 10419 So. Rives Ave Downey, CA 90241 (562) 861-0419 http://www.thedmoa.org Weds., 3-7pm; Thurs.Fri., 1-5pm;

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EL CAMINO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 16007 Crenshaw Blvd Torrance, CA 90506 (310) 660-3010 http://www.elcamino.edu/commadv/art gallery Mon., Tues., 10am-3pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-8pm; Fri., 10am-2pm EL NOPAL PRESS 109 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-239-0417 EXPOSITION PARK MUSEUMS 900 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 763-3515 http://www.nhm.org

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FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY 148 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 934-2250 http://www.faheykleingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm FARMLAB 1745 N. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1158 http://www.farmlab.org Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm FELLOWS OF CONTEMPORARY ART 970 N. Broadway # 208 (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 808-1008 www.focala.org FIFTH FLOOR GALLERY 502 Chung King Court (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 687- 8443 www.fifthfloorgallery.com FIFTY/24 LA GALLERY 125 E. 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 213-623-4300 http://www.fifty24sf.com FIG 2525 Michigan Ave. # G6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-0345 http://www.figgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-5pm FOUND GALLERY 1903 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027 www.foundla.com Sat - Sun 1-5 or by appt. jonny@foundla.com FOWLER MUSEUM AT UCLA 405 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 825-4361 http://www.fowler.ucla.edu Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm; Thurs. 12-8pm FRANK LLOYD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., B5b Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-3866 http://www.franklloyd.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm FRANK PICTURES GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-0211 http://www.frankpicturesgallery.com twitter.com/fabrikworld

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS FREDERICK R. WEISMAN MUSEUM AT PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY 24255 Pacific Coast Highway Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 506-4851 http://arts.pepperdine.edu/museum FRESH PAINT 9355 Culver Blvd., Suite B Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-9355 http://www.freshpaintart.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-6pm; Fri., 8am-12 noon; & by app't FULLERTON COLLEGE ART GALLERY 321 E. Chapman Ave., Building 1000 Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 992-7434 http://art.fullcoll.edu Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 10am-2pm; Weds, 5-7pm FULLERTON MUSEUM CENTER 301 N. Pomona Ave Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 738-6545 http://www.cityoffullerton.com/depts/ museum Tues.-Sun., 12-4; Thurs., 12-8pm GAGOSIAN GALLERY 456 N. Camden Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-9400 http://www.gagosian.com GALERIE MICHAEL 260 N. Rodeo Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 273-3377 www.galeriemichael.com

GALLERY 825 / LA ART ASSOCIATION 825 N. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 310-652-8272 http://www.laaa.org

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GEORGE LAWSON GALLERY 8564 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-6900 http://www.georgelawsongallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

GALLERY AT 1000 VAN NESS SAN FRANCISCO + GALLERY AT EASTERN COLUMBIA LOS ANGELES 849 S. Broadway Unit 905 Los Angeles, Ca. 90014 http://www.artmeetsarchitecture.com

GEORGE STERN FINE ARTS 8920 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 276-2600 http://www.sternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-6pm GLORIA DELSON CONTEMPORARY ART 215 West 6th St. # 115 Los Angeles, CA 323-805-9363 www.artla.biz

GALLERY AT REDCAT 631 W. Second St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 237-2800 http://www.redcat.org GALLERY LUISOTTI 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0043

GLASS GARAGE FINE ART 414 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 659-5228 http://www.glassgaragegallery.com

GALLERY NUCLEUS 210 East Main St. Alhambra, CA 91801 (626) 458-7477 http://www.gallerynucleus.com

GLENDALE COLLEGE GALLERY 1500 Verdugo Rd Glendale, CA 91208 (818) 240-1000 http://www.glendale.edu/artgallery

GARY LEONARD TAKE MY PICTURE 860 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-622-2256 http://takemypicture.com

GP DEVA 9601 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 125 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 310-858-6545 www.gpdeva.com

GEMINI G.E.L. 8365 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-0513 http://www.geminigel.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat. by app't.

GRAMMY MUSEUM 800 W. Olympic Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 213-765-6800 www.grammymuseum.org

THE GEORGE GALLERY 354 North Coast Hwy Laguna Beach, CA 92651 (949) 715- 4377 http://www.thegeorgegallery.com Wed.-Sun., 11am-5pm, or by appt.

GALLERY 9 6101 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.836.4601 www.thegallery9.com

GALLERY 1927 Fine Arts Building 811 West Seventh St. Los Angeles, CA 90017 661-816-1136 http://www.gallery1927.com/

GALLERY BROWN 140 S. Orlando Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-651-1956 www,gallerybrown.com

GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY L.A. 2716 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-3685 http://www.georgebillis.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't. GEORGE J. DOIZAKI GALLERY Japanese Cultural & Community Center 244 S. San Pedro St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-2725 http://www.jaccc.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat. & Sun., 11am-4pm

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GR2 2062 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 445-9276 http://www.gr2.net GREENFIELD SACKS GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., #B6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-0640 http://www.greenfieldsacks.com GREGG FLEISHMAN STUDIO 3850 Main Street Culver City, CA 90232 310.202.6108 www.greggfleishman.com GREY MCGEAR GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave G7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-0925

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS GROUNDFLOOR GALLERY 433 Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-624-3010 GUY HEPNER GALLERY 300 North Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 310-979-0011 www.guyhepner.com HAMILTON GALLERIES 1431 Ocean Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 451-9983 http://www.hamiltongalleries.com Tues.-Sun., 12-7pm HAMILTON-SELWAY FINE ART 8678 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 657-1711 http://www.hamiltonselway.com HARO GALLERY 3825 Main Street Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.4276 www.theharogallery.com HENKEN GALLERY Kyoto Grand Hotel 120 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-2505 http://www.thehenkengallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-10pm; Sun. by app't. HERITAGE GALLERY 1300 Chautauqua Blvd Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 230-4340 http://www.heritagegallery.com HIGH PROFILE PRODUCTIONS 5886 Smiley Drive Culver City, CA 90232 310.253.2255 www.highprofileproductions.com H. KAZAN FINE ARTS 11456 Washington Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90066 310.398.0090 www.hkazanfinearts.com HONOR FRASER 2622 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-0191 http://www.honorfraser.com

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HUNTINGTON BEACH ART CENTER 538 Main Street Huntington Beach, CA 92647 (714) 374-1650 http://www.surfcityhb.org/Visitors/art_center Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; Thurs., 12-8pm; Sun., 12-4pm HUNTINGTON LIBRARY 1151 Oxford Rd San Marino, CA 91108 (626) 405-2100 http://www.huntington.org ICON GALLERY & INTERIORS 8899 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 310-246-1495 www.icon-interiors.com IKON LIMITED/K. RICHARDS GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., G-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6629 http://www.ikonltd.com IRON GALLERY 725 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-7149 http://www.ironartgallery.net/ By appointment only ITALIAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE SPAZIO ITALIA 1023 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 443-3250 http://www.iiclosangeles.esteri.it/IIC_L osangeles Mon.-Fri., 9:30am-5pm JACK RUTBERG FINE ARTS 357 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-5222 http://www.jackrutbergfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 10am-5pm JAMES GRAY GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave., D-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-9502 http://www.jamesgraygallery.com JAN KESNER GALLERY 164 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-6834 http: //www.jankesnergallery.com By appt. only

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JANCAR GALLERY 961 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-2522 http://www.jancargallery.com Wed.-Sat 12- 5pm and by app't. JAPANESE AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM 369 E. 1st St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-0414 http://www.janm.org JEFFREY WINTER FINE ARTS 8576 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 310-657-4278 www,jeffreywinter.com JK GALLERY 2632 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-3330 http://www.jkgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm JONATHAN NOVAK CONTEMPORARY ART 1880 Century Park East # 100 Century City, CA 90067 310-277-4997 www.novakart.com KANTOR ART 427 N. Canon Drive Suite 106. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 274-6499 http://www.kantorart.com Mon-Fri 10-5 KINKEAD CONTEMPORARY 6029 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-7400 http://www.kinkeadcontemporary.com KOPEIKIN GALLERY 8810 Melrose Avenue West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 385-5894 http://www.kopeikingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't KOPLIN DEL RIO GALLERY 6031 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-9055 http://www.koplindelrio.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm KRISTI ENGLE GALLERY 5002 York Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90042 323-472-6237 www.kristienglegallery.com twitter.com/fabrikworld

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS L.A. ARTCORE UNION CENTER FOR THE ARTS 120 N. Judge John Aiso St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-3274 http://www.laartcore.org Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm

LACMA (LOS ANGELES CONTEMPORARY MUSEUM OF ART) 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-6111 http://www.lacma.org/ Mon., Tues., Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., 129pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-8pm

LA ART HOUSE 8825 Beverly Blvd., West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 205-0480 http://www.laarthouse.net Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat.-Sun. by app't

LATINO ART MUSEUM 281 S. Thomas St., Suite 105 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-6009 http://www.lamoa.net

LA CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 102 West Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-629-1102 http://www.lacda.com

THE LATINO MUSEUM OF HISTORY, ART & CULTURE 514 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-626-7600

LA CONTEMPORARY 2634 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6200 http://www.lacontemporary.com

LATIN AMERICAN MASTERS 2525 Michigan Ave., Building E-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-4455 http://www.latinamericamasters.com

L.A. COUNTY ARBORETUM 301 N. Baldwin Ave Arcadia, CA 91007 (626) 821-3232 http://www.arboretum.org

LAXART 2640 S. La Cienega Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 559-0166 http://www.laxart.org

L.A. LOUVER GALLERY 45 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-4955 http://www.lalouver.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm

LEBASSE PROJECTS 6023 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-0200 http://www.lebasseprojects.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-6pm

L2 KONTEMPORARY 990 N. Hill St., #205 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 225-1288 http://www.L2kontemporary.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm; & by app't.

LEFT COAST GALLERIES 12324 Ventura Blvd Studio City, CA 91604 (818) 760-7010 http://www.leftcoastgalleries.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm; Sun., 12-6pm; & by appointment

LA LUZ DE JESUS 4633 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 666-7667 http://www.laluzdejesus.com LACE (LA CONTEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS) 6522 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028 (323) 957-1777 http://www.welcometolace.org Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm

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LONG BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 2300 E. Ocean Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 439-2119 http://www.lbma.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-5pm LORA SCHLESINGER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-1133 http://www.loraschlesinger.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm LOS ANGELES CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 107 W. Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (323) 646-9427 http://www.lacda.com Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm LOUIS STERN FINE ARTS 9002 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-0147 http://www.louissternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm LOUWE GALLERY 306 Hawthorne St. So. Pasadena, CA 91030 (626) 799-5551 http://www.louwegallery.com

LESLIE SACKS FINE ART 11640 San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 820-9448 http://www.lesliesacks.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm

LUIS DE JESUS LA Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. F-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7773 www.luisdejesus.com

LIGHTBOX GALLERY 2680 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-1111 http://www.kimlightgallery.com

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LOIS LAMBERT GALLERY OF FUNCTIONAL ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave.,E-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-6990 www.Galleryoffunctionalart.net LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 4901 E. Carson St. Long Beach, CA 90808 (562) 938-4817

LILI BERNARD ART STUDIO 935 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (323) 936-3607 www.lilibernard.com 90

LM PROJECTS 125 W. 4th St., LA, CA 90014 213-621-4055

M. HANKS GALLERY 3008 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8820 http://mhanksgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't.

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS M+B GALLERY 612 N. Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 550-0050 http://www.mbfala.com

MARK MOORE GALLERY 5790 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 310-453-3031 http://www.markmooregallery.com

MACHINE PROJECT 1200 D North Alvarado St. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 483-8761 http://www.machineproject.com Irregular hours - call ahead

CHRISTOPHER MARTIN GALLERY 302 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA www.martinlozano.com 310-358-0617

MADISON GALLERY 1020 Prospect Suite 130 LaJolla, California 92037 (858) 459-0836 http://www.madisongalleries.com MAK CENTER FOR ART AND ARCHITECTURE L.A. 835 N. Kings Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-1510 http://www.makcenter.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-6pm MARK MOORE GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. #A1 SM,CA 90404 310-453-3031 www.MarkMooreGallery.com MANNY SILVERMAN GALLERY 619 Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 659-8256 www.mannysilvermangallery.com MARCEL SITCOSKE GALLERY 7829 Torreyson Dr. LA, CA 90046 323-650-0238 www.marcelsitcoske.com MARC FOXX GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5571 http://www.marcfoxx.com MARC SELWYN FINE ART 6222 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-9911 http://www.marcselwynfineart.com MARINE CONTEMPORARY 1733-A Abbot Kinney Blvd Venice, CA 90291 T: (310) 399-0294 http://www.marinecontemporary.com

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MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERY 1000 Universal Studios Blvd. #171 Burbank, CA 91608 818-508-7867 www.martinlawrence.com MATIN GALLERY 9905 South Santa Monica Blvd. LA, CA 90212 310-788-0055 www.matin-gallery.com MERRY KARNOWSKY GALLERY 170 S. LA Brea LA, CA 90036 323-933-4408 www.mkgallery.com MESLER & HUG GALLERY 510 Bernard St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (3232) 221-0016 www.meslerandhug.com MICHAEL DAWSON GALLERY 535 N. Larchmont Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90004 (323) 469-2186 http://www.michaeldawsongallery.com Weds.-Sat., 9am-5pm MICHAEL HITTLEMAN GALLERY FINE ISRAELI ART 8797 Beverly Blvd., #302 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 655-5364 http://www.michaelhittlemangallery.com Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sunday, 1-5pm MICHAEL KOHN GALLERY 8071 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 658-8088 http://www.kohngallery.com MIHAI NICODIM GALLERY 3143 S. La Cienega Blvd. Unit B Los Angekes, VCA 90016 310-838-8884 www.nicodimgallery.com

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MIXOGRAFIA 1419 E. Adams Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90011 (323) 232-1158 http://www.mixografia.com Mon.-Fri., 11am- 5pm; & by app't. MOCA (MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART) 250 S. Grand Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 62-MOCA-2 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thursday, 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed. MOCA - THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY 152 North Central Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 621-1745 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thurs., 11am8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed. MOCA PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 289-5223 http://www.moca.org MORONO KIANG GALLERY 218 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 628-8208 http://www.moronokiang.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm MOUNT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE JOSE DRUDIS-BIADA GALLERY 12001 Chalon Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 954-4360 http://www.msmc.la.edu/pages/1897.asp Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm MUCKENTHALER CULTURAL CENTER 1201 W. Malvern Ave Fullerton, CA 92633 (714) 738-6595 http://www.muckenthaler.org MUSEUM OF JURASSIC TECHNOLOGY 9341 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-6131 http://www.mjt.org

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS MUSEUM OF LATIN AMERICAN ART 628 Alamitos Ave Long Beach, CA 90802 (562) 437-1689 http://www.molaa.com Tues.-Sat., 11:30am-7:30pm; Sun., 12-6pm MUSEUM OF NEON ART 114 W. 4th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-489-9918 http://www.neonmona.org/ MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS 1649 El Prado San Diego, CA 92101 (619) 238-7559 http://www.mopa.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-9pm MUSEUM OF TOLERANCE 9786 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 553-8403 http://www.museumoftolerance.com NEUARTIG GALLERY & ART CONSULTING 366 West 7th Street San Pedro, CA 90731 (213) 973-8223 http:www.galleryneuartig.com Wed – Fri 1:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Sat 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and by appointment 1st Thursday artwalk: 6pm - 9pm NEW HIGH (M)ART 741 New High Str. LA, CA 90012 213-621-7822 www.newhighmart.com NORBERTELLEN GALLERY 215 West 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 818-662-5041 http://www.norbertellengallery.com NORTH HILL EXHIBITIONS 945 North Hill St. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 213-626-2020 www.northhillexhibitions.com NORTON SIMON MUSEUM 411 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 449-6840 http://www.nortonsimon.org Weds.-Mon., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm

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OFF-ROSE, THE SECRET GALLERY 841 Flower Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 664-8977 Sat., 1-5pm; & by appt.

PARKER JONES GALLERY 510 Bernard St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 227-0102 www.parkerjonesgallery.com

OPTICAL ALLUSION GALLERY 2414 West 7th St. Los Angeles, CA 90057 (310) 309-7473

PAPILLON GALLERY 8272 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 323-655-2205 http://www.papillongallery.com

ORANGE COUNTY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 117 N. Sycamore Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 667-1517 http://www.occca.org Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., Sat., 12-9pm ORLANDO GALLERY 17037 Ventura Blvd. Tarzana, CA 91356 (818) 705-5368 www.orlando2.com OTIS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN BEN MALTZ GALLERY 9045 Lincoln Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045 (310) 665-6905 http://www.otis.edu Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm; Thurs., 10am-7pm OVERDUIN AND KITE 6693 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (323) 464-3600 http://www.overduinandkite.com PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM 46 N. Los Robles Ave Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 449-2742 http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 10am-6pm PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM 101 Museum Dr Palm Springs, CA 92262 (619) 325-7186 http://www.psmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Fri., 10am-8pm PALOS VERDES ART CENTER 5504 W. Crestridge Rd. Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 (310) 541-2479 http://www.pvartcenter.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Sun., 1-4pm

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PASADENA CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 1570 E. Colorado Blvd Pasadena, CA 91106 (626) 585-3285 http://www.pasadena.edu/artgallery Mon.-Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., Sat., 12-4pm PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART 490 E. Union St. Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 568-3665 http://www.pmcaonline.org PATRICK PAINTER, INC. 2525 Michigan Ave. # A-8 & B-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 254-6953 http://www.patrickpainter.com PEACE YOGA GALLERY 903 South Main St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 213-500-5007 www.peaceyogagallery.com PERES PROJECTS 2766 La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6100 http://www.peresprojects.com PETER FETTERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-6463 http://www.peterfetterman.com PETER MENDENHALL GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd. # 8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 323-936-0061 www.PeterMendenhallGallery.com PHOTO-EYE GALLERY 376-A Garcia Street Santa Fe NM 87505 Tel/Fax: (505) 988-5152, x116 http://www.photoeye.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS PITZER CAMPUS GALLERIES 1050 North Mills Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 607-3143 http://www.pitzer.edu/artgalleries

RICHARD HELLER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-5A Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-9191 http://www.richardhellergallery.com

ROYAL/T 8910 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.559.6300 www.royal-t.org

PLAZA DE LA RAZA 3540 N. Mission Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 223-2475

RICHARD TELLES FINE ART 7380 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 965-5578 http://www.tellesfineart.com

RUTH BACHOFNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. (Bergamot Station), G-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-3300 http://www.ruthbachofnergallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm

POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 330 N. College Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8283 http://www.pomona.edu/museum Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat., Sun., 1-5pm POV EVOLVING GALLERY & PRINT STUDIO 939 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 (213) 594-3036 www.povevolving.com PYO GALLERY LA 1100 Hope St., Suite 105 Los Angeles, CA 213-405-1488 http://www.pyogalleryla.com RAID PROJECTS GALLERY The Brewery Art Complex 602 Moulton St. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 441-9593 http://www.raidprojects.com Sat., Sun., 12-5pm; & by app't. REBECCA MOLAYEM GALLERY 306 N. Robertson West Hollywood, CA90048 310-652-2620 www.rebeccamolayemarts.com REDLING FINE ART 990 North Hill St. #210 (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 323-230-7415 www.redlingfineart.com REGEN PROJECTS 633 N. Almont Drive Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com REGEN PROJECTS II 9016 Santa Monica Blvd (at Almont Drive) Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

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RIO HONDO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 3600 Workman Mill Rd., B-13 Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 908-3471 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-3pm; Mon.-Weds., 6-9pm RIVERA & RIVERA 454 N. Robertson West Hollywood, CA 90069 310.713.1635 http://www.riveraandrivera.com RIVERSIDE ART MUSEUM 3425 Mission Inn Ave. Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 684-7111 http://www.riversideartmuseum.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Thurs., 10am-9pm ROBERT BERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-5, & C-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-1937 http://www.robertbermangallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm ROBERTS & TILTON GALLERY 5801 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 549-0223 http://www.robertsandtilton.com

SABINA LEE GALLERY 971 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 213-620-9404 www.sabinaleegallery.com SAM LEE GALLERY 990 N. Hill St., #190 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-0275 http://www.samleegallery.com Wed. - Sun, 12-6pm SAM LEE GALLERY @ the Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue, Suite B267 W. Hollywood, CA 90069 323-788-3535 www.samleegallery.com Monday - Friday, 12 - 5 pm & by app’t SAMUEL FREEMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-1479 http://www.samuelfreeman.com SANDRONI REY GALLERY 2762 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 280-0111 http://www.sandronirey.com

ROSAMUND FELSEN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. B-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-8488 http://www.rosamundfelsen.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm

SANTA FE ART COLONY 2401 S. Santa Fe Ave Los Angeles, CA 90058 (213) 587-6381

ROSE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building G-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-8440 http://www.rosegallery.net

SANTA MONICA ART STUDIOS AND ARENA 1 GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7449 http://www.santamonicaartstudios.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

ROUGE GALERIE 548 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-489-7309 www.rougegalerie.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS SANTA MONICA COLLEGE - PETE & SUSAN BARRETT ART GALLERY 1310 11th St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 434-3434 http://events.smc.edu/art_gallery.html SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. G-1 Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 586-6488 http://www.smmoa.org Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SARAH LEE ARTWORKS & PROJECTS Bergamot Station 2525Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-4938 www.sarahleeartworks.com SCA PROJECT GALLERY 101 & 281 So. Thomas St., Unit 104 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-5481 http://www.scagallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-4pm SCHOMBURG GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. E-3a Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-5757 http://www.schomburggallery.com SCI-ARC GALLERY 960 E. Third St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 473-8432 SCION INSTALLATION L.A. 3521 Helms Ave [at National] Culver City, CA 90232 310.815.8840 www.scion.com/space SEA AND SPACE EXPLORATIONS 4755 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 445-4015 http://www.seaandspace.org Sundays 1-5 or by appt. info@seaandspace.org SEE LINE GALLERY Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue Suite B274 West Hollywood, CA 90069 818-604-3114 http://www.seelinegallery.com

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SEYHOUN GALLERY 9007 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 858-5984 http://www.seyhoungallery.com

SPARC ART GALLERY 685 Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-9560 http://www.sparcmurals.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm (Closed at Noon-1pm)

SHERRY FRUMKIN GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave., Suite 21 Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7493 http://www.frumkingallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm

SPENCER JON HELFEN FINE ARTS 9200 West Olympic Blvd. Ste 200, Los Angeles, CA 310-273-8838 www.helfenfinearts.com

SHOSHANA WAYNE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7535 http://www.shoshanawayne.com SISTER 955 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 (213) 628-7000 http://www.sisterla.com SKIDMORE CONTEMPORARY ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. B5 Santa Monica, CA (310)-828-5070 www.skidmorecontemporaryart.com SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-4500 http://www.skirball.org Tues.-Fri.12-5pm; Thurs.12-9pm; Sat.& Sun. 10am-5pm GALLERY SOHO 300 A. South Thomas St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-1599 www.pvaa.net Thurs.-Sun., 11am-4pm; second Sats., 11am-10pm SOLWAY JONES 990 N. Hill Street # 180 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 223-0224 http://www.solwayjonesgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SPF:A GALLERY 8609 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.0902 www.spfagallery.com

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STEPHEN COHEN GALLERY 7358 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-5525 http://www.stephencohengallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm STG (STEVE TURNER CONTEMPORARY) 6026 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-3721 http://www.steveturnergallery.com SUMI INK CLUB 970 N. Broadway #212 (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.sumiinkclub.com SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS 6006 W. Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 310-837-2117 www.vielmetter.com SYLVIA WHITE GALLERY 1783 East Main Street Ventura, CA 93001 805-643-8300 http://www.artadvice.com TAG, THE ARTISTS' GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., #D-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-9556 http://www.TAGgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm TAKE MY PICTURE GARY LEONARD 860 S. Broadway @ 9th Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-622-2256 http://takemypicture.com TASENDE GALLERY 820 Prospect St. La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 454-3691 www.tasendegallery.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm;

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS TAYLOR DE CORDOBA 2660 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-9156 http://www.taylordecordoba.com TELIC ARTS EXCHANGE 972B Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 213-344-6137 ww.telic.info TEMPLE OF VISIONS 719 S. Spring St. Los Angeles CA 213-537-0139 http://templeofvisions.com TERRENCE ROGERS FINE ART 1231 Fifth St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 394-4999 http://www.trogart.com Thurs-Sat., 12-5; & by app't. TERRELL MOORE GALLERY 1221 S Hope Street LA CA 90015 (213) 744-1999 www.terrellmoore.net THE ART FORM STUDIO 716 North Figueroa St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 213-613-1050 www.theartformstudio.com THE BREWERY ARTS COLONY 2100 N. Main St. at Avenue 21 Los Angeles, CA 90031 http://www.breweryart.com THE BOX 977 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 625-1747 www.theboxla.com THE CLAYHOUSE 2909 Santa Monica Blvd. (near Yale St.) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-7071 THE COMPANY 946 Yale Street (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 213-221-7082 THE FOLK TREE 217 S. Fair Oaks Ave Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 795-8733 http://www.folktree.com Mon.-Weds., 11am-6pm; Thurs.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm Web fabrik.la

THE GETTY CENTER 1200 Getty Center Dr Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Tues.-Thurs., Sun., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-9pm 213-955-9091 THE GETTY VILLA 17985 Pacific Coast Highway Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Thurs.-Mon., 10am-5pm; closed Tues. Weds. and major holidays THE HAMMER MUSUEM AT UCLA 10899 Wilshire Blvd. LA, CA 90024 310-443-7000 www.hammer.ucla.edu THE HAPPY LION 963 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 625-1360 www.thehappylion.com THE HIVE GALLERY 729 S. Sping St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 955-9051 http://hivegallery.com THE LOFT AT LIZ'S 453 S. La Brea Ave. (Enter through back alley) Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-939-4403 www.theloftatlizs.com THE PERFECT EXPOSURE GALLERY 3519 West 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (213) 381-1137 http://theperfectexposuregallery.com THINKSPACE ART GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.3375 www.thinkspacegallery.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm THOMAS SOLOMON GALLERY 410 Cottage Home St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 310-428-2964 www.thomassolomongallery.com TINLARK GALLERY 6671 Sunset Blvd., #1516 Hollywood, CA 90028 (323) 463-0039 http://www.tinlark.com Social facebook.com/fabrikworld

TOBEY C. MOSS GALLERY 7321 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 933-5523 http://www.tobeycmossgallery.com TOPANGA CANYON GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 109 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-7909 http://www.topangacanyongallery.com Tues.-Sun., 10am-6pm TORRANCE ART MUSEUM 3320 Civic Center Dr Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 618-6340 http://www.torranceartmuseum.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm TRACK 16 GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building C-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-4678 http://www.track16.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm TRACY PARK GALLERY The Malibu Country Mart 3835 Cross Creek Road Malibu, CA 90265 310-456-7505 http://www.tracyparkgallery.com TRIGG ISON FINE ART 511 N. Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 274-8047 http://www.triggison.com TROPICO DE NOPAL GALLERY 1665 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 481-8112 http://www.tropicodenopal.com UCR/CALIFORNIA MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY 3824 Main St Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 784-FOTO http://www.cmp.ucr.edu Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm USC FISHER GALLERY 823 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90089 (213) 740-4561 http://fishergallery.org Tues.-Sat. 12-5pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez Monterey Park, CA 91754 (323) 265-8841 http://elac.edu/collegeservices/ vincentprice/ Mon.-Weds., Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-7pm VIVA (VALLEY INSTITUTE OF VISUAL ART) 13261 Moorpark St., Sherman Oaks, CA 91423 (818) 385-0080 Weds.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Satu., 12-4pm VOILA! ART FOR THE MODERN EYE 518 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-954-0418 www.voilagallery.com WAL ART 1639 S. La Cienega Los Angeles, CA 90035 310-274-9055 www.walartinc.com

WATTS TOWERS ART CENTER NOAH SYLVESTER PURIFOY GALLERY 1727 E. 107th St Los Angeles, CA 90002 (213) 847-4646 Weds.-Sun., 10am-4pm

WILLIAM TURNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. E-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0909 http://www.williamturnergallery.com Mon.-Sat.,11am-6pm

WESTERN PROJECT 2762 S. La Cienega Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-0609 http://western-project.com

WONDERLAND GALLERY 1257 North La Brea Ave West Hollywood, CA 90038 323-645-6920 WONDERFUL WORLD ART GALLERY 9517 Culver Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.836.4992 www.wwagallery.com

WHITTIER MUSEUM 6755 Newlin Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (310) 945-3871 WILIAM GRIFFIN GALLERY 2902 Nebraska Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 586-6886 http://www.griffinla.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't.

XIEM CLAY CENTER AND GALLERY 1563 N. Lake Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 794-5833 http://www.xiemclaycenter.com YOUNG ART GALLERY The Women's building 1727 North Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1230 http://www.youngartgallery.com By appt. only

WILLIAM A. KARGES FINE ART 427 Canon Dr., Suite 101 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 276-8551 http://www.kargesfineart.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-5pm

WALTER MACIEL GALLERY 2642 S. La Cienega Blvd. LA, CA 90034 310-839-1840 www.waltermacielgallery.com

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Fabrik Magazine - Issue 18