Issuu on Google+

ART. DESIGN. ARCHITECTURE. PHOTOGRAPHY ISSUE.

ISSUE 16


“Chimp� (2001/2011) | animal portrait series | archival pigment print | limited edition of 40: 24 x 30


GLEN WEXLER

Blue Chimp速 Editions | BlueChimp.com | prints@BlueChimp.com | 323 465.0268


Beccome Become a better be etter photographer pho otogra apherr Develop a critical eye Refine es essential ssential skills Master new n technolog technology gy

Creative Creative C i Ph Photography otography h W Workshops orksho k hops of offers ffers ffers f courses abilities for studentss of all ages, abilitie es and goals, in a environment. rrelaxed elaxed yet challenging creative creative e envir onment. you Whether yo u are are a casual user, user, a developing advanced image maker artist or an a ma aker aiming for professional Creative a pr ofession nal photographic career, ca areer, Cr eative Photography will Ph Photograph t h hy Workshops Workshops k h ill provide provide id the th input i t and supportt you need to move e forward. forward.


Marcia Ziffren Mar rcia Zif frren

Jan W Woods oods

6018 Wilshi Wilshire ire Boulevar Boulevard d Angeles, Los Angeles s, CA 90036 Edward (In the Edw ward Cella Gallery)

Telephone: 310.839.8866 Telephone: e tracey@creativephotoworkshops.com tra acey@creativephotoworksho ops.com www.creativephotoworkshops.com ww ww..creativephotoworkshopss.com


CONTRIBUTORS MASTHEAD Publisher Chris Davies Associate Editor Peter Frank Managing Editor Aparna Bakhle-Ellis Creative Director Chris Davies Art Direction & Design Shout Design Agency Paul Soady Contributing Writers Jacki Apple Aparna Bakhle-Ellis Nicholas Forrest Peter Frank Eric Junker Lanee Neil Phil Tarley Contributing Photographer Ted VanCleave Account Executive Dale Youngman Production Associate Fernando Barrera

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING

JACKI APPLE Jacki Apple is a Los Angeles-based visual, performance, and media artist, designer, writer, composer, and producer whose work has been presented internationally. Her writings have been featured in numerous publications including THE Magazine LA, The Drama Review, Art Journal, and High Performance. She is a professor at Art Center College of Design.

APARNA BAKHLE-ELLIS Aparna Bakhle-Ellis is a writer enthralled by the consonance and dissonance of ‘being’ in Los Angeles. L'écriture féminine, outsider art, and altered states of consciousness rank high among her myriad interests. She is also Fabrik’s Managing Editor.

NICHOLAS FORREST Nicholas Forrest is a Sydney/London based art market analyst, art consultant and writer. He is the founder of the Art Market Blog (artmarketblog.com) which offers independent commentaries, research and analysis on the current art market.

PETER FRANK Peter Frank is art critic for the Huffington Post and Associate Editor for Fabrik magazine. He is former critic for Angeleno magazine and the L.A. Weekly, served as Editor for THE magazine Los Angeles and Visions Art Quarterly, and contributes articles to publications around the world. Frank was born in 1950 in New York, where he was art critic for The Village Voice and The SoHo Weekly News, and moved to Los Angeles in 1988. Frank, who recently served as Senior Curator at the Riverside Art Museum, has organized numerous theme and survey shows for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Venice Biennale, Documenta, and other venues. McPherson & Co.-Documentext published his Something Else Press: An Annotated Bibliography in 1983. A cycle of poems, The Travelogues, was issued by Sun & Moon Press in 1982. Abbeville Press released New, Used & Improved, an overview of the New York art scene cowritten with Michael McKenzie, in 1987.

ERIC JUNKER Eric Junker is a Los Angeles based creative thinker whose background as an artist, writer, entrepreneur, graphic designer, bicycle commuter, banjo picker, and surfer fuels his insights on the merging of artful thinking and practical living.

Editorial editorial@fabrikmagazine.com

LANEE NEIL

Advertising ads@fabrikmagazine.com

Lanee Neil is a Los Angeles-based writer who uses her craft to pursue her passions: travel, culture, cuisine, and discovering artisans from around the globe. You can follow her latest quest at www.laneelee.com and @wanderlushdiary.

Contact

PHIL TARLEY

269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 Tel 310 360 8333 info@fabrikmagazine.com http://www.fabrikmagazine.com

Phil Tarley is a Fellow of The American Film Institute and an artist member of the Los Angeles Art Association. He posts regular stories on The WOW Report as its art and pop culture critic and writes about art and photography for Fabrik Magazine. He is currently working on a book of narrative non-fiction travel stories and a variety of art projects.

INFORMATION Fabrik is published Quarterly by Fabrik Media Group, Inc., 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Contents cannot be reproduced in part or in full without the written permission of the copyright holder. The opinions expressed are those of the artists and writers themselves and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Fabrik or Fabrik Media Group. Copyright © 2012. All rights reserved.

ART. DESIGN. ARCHITECTURE. PHOTOGRAPHY ISSUE.

ISSUE 16

ON THE COVER Josh, 2007 Catherine Opie Chromogenic print 30 x 22 1/4 inches (76.2 x 56.5 cm) Edition of 5, 2 AP

PRINTED IN LOS ANGELES


CONTENTS 8

Profile: Going for Baroque: The Cinematic Signature of Alex Prager

24 Profile: The Photography of John Klukas 44 Iconoclast: Catherine Opie: An American Photographer 56 Through The Lens: Vintage Imagery: Back to the Future 66 Art Market: The Market for Contemporary Photography in 2012 76 Profile: The Indelible Image: The Fahey/Klein Gallery 88 Profile: Kirk Pedersen: No Map Required 94 Spotlight: Beverly Hills Art Show: Art for All 96 Profile: Austin Young Is A Tranimal 100 Coming Out, Going In: Cardwell Jimmerson Gallery: Going In: Ben Sakoguchi: Paintings 1966 to Present. Coming Out: John Paul Jones: Image and Object 106 Spotlight: Sonic Alchemy 114 Art About Town: Peter Frank’s Museum Views 116 Art Galleries & Museums

8


ALEX PRAGER • 11:45 PM, GRIFFITH PARK, 2012 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT © ALEX PRAGER, COURTESY M+B GALLERY, LOS ANGELES

GOING FOR BAROQUE:

The Cinematic Signature of Alex Prager — WORDS APARNA BAKHLE-ELLIS IMAGES COURTESY M+B GALLERY AND ALEX PRAGER


PROFILE

AT J U S T T H I R T Y-T H R E E , Alex Prager is already as golden as that famed Los Angeles ‘magic hour,’ a photographic term used to designate the first and final hour of sunlight during day. In this highly desirable light, shadows are less dark, contrast diminishes and highlights are much less likely to be overexposed. Prager’s images, foreboding in their large-scale, are stylistically suggestive of Sirk’s Technicolor, sharp and saturated moments hinting at repression, with the turbulence of emotion suspended in surreal cinematic glamour. They exude a suspense some have likened to Hitchcock, where a determined uneasiness pervades. Yet the heroines, as all her subjects are women, have a certain clarity and confidence of being, assured as they are of starring roles in the tundra of melodrama that comprises each still frame. A photographer who untiringly taught herself technique in her twenties after being inspired by a William Eggleston photo exhibit at the Getty, Prager disarms with a kind of Gothic innocence, untainted by art school theories about how to position her work. Although her images are unambiguously synthetic in their staging of scenarios that women, named Rita, Wendy, Jane, or Cathy, might daydream themselves into, peril lurks, beneath surfaces, and before, as well as after, the instant so dazzlingly captured. As a native Angeleno, Prager grew up a shade east of Hollywood in Los Feliz, where her grandmother raised her until she flew the coop. Her unconventional childhood gave shape to a nomadic existence, and the ensuing flux complicated her receiving a more formal education.

Shuttling

between SoCal and Florida, where her father lived, and Switzerland, where she sold knives one summer at the age of fourteen (!) and returned to for a few years, she took to exploring Europe for months after her seasonal job ended. Still Los Angeles based, she mines the myths that permeate this city to expose a melancholic, noir poetry in the remnants of feminine dreams on the brink of being dashed, albeit brightly in the constant saturation of California’s sun. Her raw spiritedness has hooked in many tastemakers, even garnering her a MoMA show, in 2010, where she participated in the New Photography exhibition. Her photographs are also in the permanent collections of several major museums including MoMA (New York), the Whitney Museum of

10

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


PROFILE

American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Moderna Museet (Stockholm). Prager has won an International Photography Award, as well as a Lucie, and publications such as Art in America, Vogue, Details, i-D, Tank, Dazed and Confused, New York Magazine and New York Times Magazine count her as a contributing photographer while she continues to exhibit her work to critical acclaim in galleries internationally. Fabrik caught up with Alex Prager, after a choice gig making a fashion film starring Dutch model Lara Stone for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week and before she finishes mounting Compulsion, an upcoming show of her new work, which opens simultaneously in Los Angeles (M+B Gallery), London (Michael Hoppen Gallery) and New York (Yancey Richardson Gallery).

Fabrik: Growing up in Los Angeles as you did, how did you personally encounter the sense of artifice and melodrama that permeates your aesthetic? Alex Prager: This city has many facets. It is a good city to come to if you have big dreams. That said, a lot of those dreams can either become forgotten, slowly fade, or get brutally crushed all in one fell swoop when met with the more devious side of LA. It’s a wicked city ripe with melodrama.

Fabrik: The avant German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder once said, “Love is the best, most insidious, most effective instrument of social repression.” Hints of turbulent emotions, seething just beneath, and sometimes even above, the surface, also inform the narratives you construct in your photographs and short films. How do you frame your fashion and editorial work with regard to this particular idea of love, as some thing dazzling, uncertain, synthetic, and surreal? Do you see your work within the specific context of ‘magazines’ as advancing any alternative narratives about women and what we are made to understand is their ‘beauty’? AP: I try to keep my aesthetic when working on commissions. Sometimes they let me have full creative control in all areas, sometimes not as much, but so far I’ve been pretty lucky in producing things that are true to my vision.

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

11


ALEX PRAGER • CRYSTAL, 2008 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT © ALEX PRAGER


ALEX PRAGER • CATHY, 2009 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT © ALEX PRAGER


ALEX PRAGER • EVE, 2008 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT © ALEX PRAGER


ALEX PRAGER • JULIE, 2007 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT © ALEX PRAGER


PROFILE

Fabrik: Besides working, how do you have fun in Los Angeles? AP: I like to cook or eat at Flore, go hiking, play tennis in Griffith Park, drink wine with friends at Edendale, or Blair’s. I’m more of a daytime activity sort of person...I’m not really into going to clubs or anything, but I do like the occasional karaoke.

Fabrik: MoMA curator Roxanna Marcoci has described your work as “intentionally loaded” with “something pregnant, about to happen…” Whether still or moving, your images play with the element of suspense. As an artist and/or woman, what about uncertainty or ambiguity entices you? AP: I like leaving a story on a wall that still needs filling in. The idea that a total stranger might see one of my pictures and put their own take on it. Or try and figure out what’s going on in the picture based on what they’ve experienced in their own life - that's really great. A lot of times I’ll hear stories far more interesting than what I might have made up. I think my role as an artist is to spark the imagination in others.

Fabrik: You have described Los Angeles as a place that is both beautiful and magical. Please share something about its beauty as well as how, and perhaps where, magic is still intact here. AP: It’s a very photogenic city. I’ve lived here my whole life, born in Los Feliz, and yet almost everyday I find myself staring at something in wonder as though I’d never seen it before. How is it possible that the sky has so many different shades of blue on its way down to the horizon? I think the light in this city makes everything look a little bit surreal. It’s very magical indeed.

Fabrik: What, if anything, seems impossible in L.A.? AP: Public transport. I like that they’re trying to put in more bike lanes here and there, but come on. This city really needs to take public transportation seriously and start making it happen. It would make it so much better. That’s the main problem with LA.

Fabrik: You travel quite frequently for work. When away from Los Angeles, what do you long for that is still here? AP: My own bed. 16

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


PROFILE

Fabrik: Much of your work has a decidedly cinematic aesthetic, where you also reference and romanticize, as well as complicate, the myriad ways in which we understand and depict the 60s, 70s and early 80s eras. These periods seem so crucial with regard to defining certain notions about individuality and personal freedom from the restrictions of ‘society.’ As you continue to explore moving images, through your short films Despair and the soon to premiere La Petite Mort, what do you hope to say about how and what we see, as the ‘compulsive spectators’ we have become? AP: I suppose I just really hope you like the photographs and film enough to want to look and make your own conclusions. I can only give my take on what I’m feeling in the world, but everyone is feeling it in different ways. Maybe technology has been able to give us the impression we’re really connected because we know what’s going on, but I personally feel very disconnected sometimes. Especially when reading about some of the less thrilling things going on in the world that I feel very emotional towards but can do nothing about. It’s a false connect in a way and gives me a bit of a helpless feeling towards it all. I’m left staring at my computer.

Prager’s new work furthers her exploration of subversive narratives through the construction of “scenes” inspired by media tragedies and paired with emotive close-ups of eyes. The eyes, whether interpreted as belonging to the viewer or the subject, operate as a mode of investigation — an aid to decoding the scenes and implicating the viewer by provoking an emotional response.

Inspired by the photography of Weegee and Enrique Metinides and films such as Metropolis and Un Chien Andalou, Compulsion confirms Prager’s vivid cinematic aesthetic. Unlike her previous work, however, the protagonists now remain anonymous and distant. Prager’s new series investigates the complexity of observation within a society inundated by compulsive spectators, as well as the recurrent discourse in photography—that “meaning” is often derived from a multiplicity of gazes. Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

17


ALEX PRAGER • EMILY, 2007 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT © ALEX PRAGER


ALEX PRAGER • EYE #2 (BOULDER), 2012 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT © ALEX PRAGER, COURTESY M+B GALLERY, LOS ANGELES


PROFILE

Fabrik: What is the most profound way in which Compulsion, your new series of works (opening at M+B on April 7th), differs from your previous work? AP: I’m not sure the fashion magazines will be as keen on hiring me.

In addition to provocative juxtapositions, Prager manipulates the scenes through her choice of cropping, continually interrogating the truth content within photography — a trope as old as the medium itself. As artist John Baldessari has noted: “For most of us photography stands for the truth, but a good artist can make a harder truth by manipulating forms… It fascinates me how [one] can manipulate the truth so easily by the way [you] juxtapose opposites or crop the image or take it out of context.”

Prager’s altered and manufactured scenes, in conjunction with the evocative eyes remove the images from their original context and allow them to acquire new associations.

In her new short film, La Petite Mort, starring French actress Judith Godrèche, Prager navigates the mysteries of death through a woman experiencing the boundaries of her body and those of this world. Prager’s La Petite Mort (which literally translates to “the little death,” but is a common French expression for an orgasm) declares that “the act of dying and the act of transcendent love are two experiences cut from the same cloth — the former a grand exit, and the latter a slow escape. Indeed, many of the world’s greatest poets have long have long considered a passionate interlude as man’s closest moment to seeing god.” The film features music by composer Ali Helnwein and Director of Photography Matthew Libatique (Black Swan, Iron Man, Requiem for a Dream).

20

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


PROFILE

Fabrik: Within your work, much has been made of the influence of Weegee, Enrique Metinides, Guy Bourdain, Diane Arbus, Cindy Sherman, David Lynch, Fellini, Douglas Sirk and Alfred Hitchcock. Who are some photographers, filmmakers and artists not mentioned here whose work affects you emotionally? AP: Lucian Freud, Balthus, Breugel, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Joel Sternfeld, Bruce Gilden, Maya Deren, Jean Cocteau, Luis Bunuel...and the list goes on and on.

Fabrik: Do you collect art and if so, whose works might we find in your collection? AP: Yes! Vanessa Prager, Mercedes Helnwein, Asger Carlsen, Clint Peterson, Bryten Goss, Justin-John Greene, Mel Kadel, William Rugen.

— ADDENDUM On March 13th, an international jury chose Alex Prager as the winner of the Foam Paul Huf Award 2012. The annual prize is given to a photography talent under 35 years and consists of ¤20,000 and an exhibition in Foam Amsterdam. Prager’s work will be shown from August 31st to October 14th, 2012. The Foam Paul Huf Award continues to attract portfolios from all over the world. Out of 100 nominees this year, 49 were from Europe, 13 from Asia, 19 from North America, 6 from South America, 3 from Africa and 10 from the Middle East.

The jury was quoted as saying:

We would like to recognize the incredible diversity and richness of nominations from all corners of the world. Our shortlist resulted in a select group comprising the very best in contemporary documentary, fine art and conceptual practice. In our unanimous choice of winner, Alex Prager, the jury recognizes work that draws brilliantly on different but complementary threads in the photographic

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

21


ALEX PRAGER • 1:18 PM, SILVERLAKE DRIVE, 2012 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT © ALEX PRAGER, COURTESY M+B GALLERY, LOS ANGELES


PROFILE

tradition, but that nevertheless results in a fresh and distinct voice in photography today. The jury would also like to make special mention of Noémie Goudal as runner up, whose work stood out for its complex treatment of form, structure, landscape and environment. The chairman of the jury noted on the winner: "Alex Prager's work is original, intelligent and seductive. She thoroughly deserves her place in the company of former Foam Paul Huf winners, which is fast becoming a who's who of contemporary photographic practice." The members of the jury were: Simon Baker, Chairman (UK, Curator of Photography an International Art, Tate) Nathalie Herschdorfer (Switzerland, Director International Photography Festival Alt. + 1000) Darius Himes (USA, assistant-director Fraenkel Gallery / Co-Founder Radius Books) Vasif Kortun, (Turkey, Director research and programs, SALT) Viviane Sassen (Netherlands, photographer).

— Also part of MOPLA (Month of Photography-Los Angeles), Alex Prager’s upcoming exhibition will feature a selection of color photographs from the series, as well as her new short film, La Petite Mort, with accompanying film stills. The exhibition will be shown simultaneously in Los Angeles, New York and London. Compulsion runs from April 7 through May 12, 2012, with an opening reception for the artist on Saturday, April 7 from 6-8 pm.

For more information on this and other MOPLA events, workshops and lectures, please visit: monthofphotography.com

— Exhibit: Alex Prager — Compulsion M+B Gallery, 612 North Almont Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90069 April 7—May 12, 2012 Artist’s Reception: Saturday, April 7, 2012 from 6 – 8 pm Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 10 am – 6 pm, and by appointment

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

23


ECHO IN THREE PHASES - PHASES 1.1 • © JOHN KLUKAS


The Photography of

John Klukas


PROFILE

P H O T O G R A P H E R J O H N K L U K A S was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. After receiving his B.A. in Psychology from the University of Minnesota, his interest in pursuing photography brought him first to Bangkok, Thailand and then to New York City, where he works primarily in fashion photography. His work has appeared in a wide range of art and editorial publications. For the last few years, John has also created album covers for Ghostly International Records. His solo show, opening at Edgar Varela Fine Arts in L.A. this spring, is also part of MOPLA (Month of Photography Los Angeles). John Klukas candidly shared some of his insights about Surrealism and its influence upon his practice. From the beginning I have been heavily influenced by surrealism. In fact, the name of my website, 45houses, comes from André Breton’s surrealist manifesto (1924). During a discussion of Surrealist language, and, in the broadest sense, an illustration regarding the disconnect between language and meaning, he brings up the case of a man with Ganser Syndrome, while speaking with his doctor. The doctor asks the man, “What is your name?” to which the patient replies, “Forty-five houses.” I remember being enthralled by this elegantly simple example, and further, excited by this notion of an elevated role for the subconscious or unconscious mind that Surrealism proposes. While much has changed for me since those formative years, I am still fascinated by what lurks below the surface of our conscious minds. In the Surrealist tradition, I draw upon dreams for much of my work, which usually deliver powerful images to me, that I then use as a basis to build a story that fits into a broader context. Many of my images are of powerful, aggressive female figures that defy our culture’s contemporary archetypes. Two perfect examples of this in my work would be the series “The Phantom Queen” and “Echo in Three Phases.” The idea for “The Phantom Queen” came seemingly out of nowhere and it started as this notion of a hyper-aggressive shape shifter who often chose to present herself as a raven. So I started with this idea, began doing some visual research and came across the Celtic Goddess Morrigan, a tripartite, shape-shifting Goddess of prophecy and death, sex and bloodlust. To me, she seemed to be the violent embodiment of the

26

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


THE PHANTOM QUEEN 2409 • © JOHN KLUKAS


PROFILE

potency of female power. I folded in parts of mythology of this phantom queen and started to work in the symbology associated with her as a means to add depth to both the character and images. With “Echo in Three Phases,” I started more with an idea for a technique of shooting through a pane of glass or plastic and then using different types of liquids on the pane in order to warp and distort the image; achieving an effect reminiscent of some of Francis Bacon’s paintings. At some point, the model requested reference images, which forced me to start pulling together images that conveyed what I was thinking. At that point, all I had really thought about was the way in which I was planning to distort the images. So I began delving through my cache of inspiration images that I collect for references and through the process of successive rounds of selecting and then editing down images that I feel are relevant, without actually knowing the story yet, a story actually started to emerge. Like a derivative of some type of Surrealist free association exercise except with images, in this instance, what emerged was a visceral and dynamic character that comes apart as the story progresses.

She decays from a

dark and mysterious figure, to an ephemeral apparition and finally to a violent rejection of corporeal form. Despite the frightening nature of the transformation, there is an essential beauty that permeates all three phases. This, I think, is an essential component of much of my most personal work. A deep tension between beauty and terror; sex and death. A selection of John’s work appears on the following pages. — "The Phantom Queen" opens at Edgar Varela Fine Arts on Saturday, April 28th and runs through May 19th. Edgar Varela Fine Arts 727 S. Spring Street, Los Angeles 90014 (213) 604-3634 John Klukas http://www.45houses.com

28

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


THE PHANTOM QUEEN 2803 • © JOHN KLUKAS


VITALISM • © JOHN KLUKAS


ECHO IN THREE PHASES - PHASES 1.2 • © JOHN KLUKAS


ECHO IN THREE PHASES - PHASES 1.3 • © JOHN KLUKAS


ECHO IN THREE PHASES - PHASES 2.3 • © JOHN KLUKAS


IDENTITY 5 • © JOHN KLUKAS


IDENTITY 6 • © JOHN KLUKAS


THE PHANTOM QUEEN 2993 • © JOHN KLUKAS


UNITITLED 3 • © JOHN KLUKAS


THE PHANTOM QUEEN 1074 • © JOHN KLUKAS


ICONOCLAST

CATHERINE OPIE: AN AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHER — WORDS PHIL TARLEY IMAGES COURTESY CATHERINE OPIE AND REGEN PROJECTS, LOS ANGELES

I

first met Catherine Opie photographing her for Stephen Cohen at the opening night of Photo LA. A tremendous woman with an even more tremendous resume, Opie is one of Los Angeles’ foremost photographers. She gave a keynote seminar at Photo LA where she signed her new book Inauguration and talked about her career and practice. She has been photographing the intersection of American landscapes and the faces that inhabit them for many, many years. Opie is best known for her documentary portraits of football players, surfers and her photography of gay, lesbian and the transgendered community, which include her own bold and honest self portraits as an out lesbian. She has two young children Sarah and Oliver and a life partner, Julie Burleigh, a painter. Opie is represented by Regen Projects here in Los Angeles and has shown in numerous solo exhibitions all over the world. In 1995, she was included in the Whitney Biennale. Her sadomasochistic portraits jolted the art world. 44

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


CATHERINE OPIE • SELF-PORTRAIT / CUTTING, 1993 CHROMOGENIC PRINT • 40 X 30 INCHES (101.6 X 76.2 CM) EDITION OF 8, 2 AP


ICONOCLAST

Perhaps her major retrospective at the Guggenheim, in 2008, was the most comprehensive exhibition of all the major bodies of her work- unifying her freeways, icehouses and portraits into a single visionary display that gave context, meaning and juxtaposition to the diversity of her subjects. An educator as well as an artist — Opie has taught fine art at Yale and currently teaches photography at UCLA — she graciously gave of her time to speak with me about her work. Fabrik: How did growing up in Ohio shape you as an artist? CO: I lived in Sandusky till I was thirteen. Lots of artists from that part of Ohio. Andrea Bowers and I grew up 15 miles from each other. The landscape shaped me. I always had a cornfield across from my house …always had a lot of time to contemplate what was interesting for me. Fabrik: How did your parent’s upbringing affect your artistry? CO: Dad owned a craft-based company that built découpage boxes. My uncle and my aunt were artists. We lived around interesting people who celebrated artists. They were worried about how I would make a living. Fabrik: What do you think is your most compelling body of work? CO: All of them are compelling for me at different times of my life. The hardest to shoot were the icehouses…because of the weather. Fabrik: It says in your Wikipedia blurb “Her assertive portraits bring queers to a forefront that is normally silenced by societal norms.” Is that part of a political agenda? CO: Homophobia and society …confronting and creating work that makes us visible is part of what I do. We live under an incredible amount of homophobia. Fabrik: What was it like to have a Guggenheim retrospective? Has it changed the way you are perceived as an artist? CO: People understand more about my multiple bodies of work and the way they came together. The Guggenheim showed people that there was a common thread in all my work. I am interested in community and relationships and how they are formed. »

46

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


CATHERINE OPIE • PIG PEN (TATTOOS), 2009 CHROMOGENIC PRINT • 32 X 24 INCHES (81.3 X 61 CM) EDITION OF 5, 2 AP


CATHERINE OPIE • JUSTIN BOND, 1993 CHROMOGENIC PRINT • 20 X 16 INCHES (50.8 X 40.6 CM) EDITION OF 8, 2 AP


CATHERINE OPIE • NICK, 2003 CHROMOGENIC PRINT • 30 X 23 1/2 INCHES (76.2 X 59.7 CM) EDITION OF 5, 2 AP


CATHERINE OPIE • OLIVER IN A TUTU, 2004 CHROMOGENIC PRINT • 24 X 20 INCHES (61 X 50.8 CM) EDITION OF 5, 2 AP


CATHERINE OPIE • MIGGI & ILENE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, 1995 CHROMOGENIC PRINT • 40 X 50 INCHES (101.6 X 127 CM) EDITION OF 5, 2 AP


CATHERINE OPIE • PAPA BEAR FROM "BEING AND HAVING", 1991 CHROMOGENIC PRINT • 17 X 22 INCHES (43.2 X 55.9 CM) EDITION OF 8, 2 AP, CO 260


ICONOCLAST

Fabrik: What are you shooting now? CO: Right now I am shooting these abstract landscapes. It’s about conjuring one’s own memory of landscapes. And I’m doing portraits in studio, shooting on black backgrounds. My son is in one, my trainer and Kate and Laura (Mulleavy) founders of Rodarte the fashion line, they’re in another. Fabrik: What’s the name of the fashion line? CO: Rodarte. Have you heard of them? Fabrik: No. CO: They do wonderful, very feminine clothes. Fabrik: Oh… Do you have any favorite writers? CO: I’m reading IQ 85 by Haruki Murakami. He’s amazing. Joan Dideon, of course. And Susan Sontag, she is very inspirational. Fabrik: What about galleries here in L.A. Do you have any favorites? CO: I try to see as much new work as I can - I’m going to New York in a few days. In L.A. I like to go to Susanne Vielmetter...Blum and Poe and Regen Projects, of course. I ‘ve been with them since 1992. Fabrik: Is there anyone you truly adore? CO: My partner Julie. Oliver and Sarah, our kids. We’ve been together 12 years in November. Fabrik: Well then…when it’s all over, how would you like to be remembered? You know the words on the tombstone kind of thing. CO: As a person who was relentless in my goals as an artist…and as a person of character who believes in equality. Catherine Opie’s honesty and bravery as an artist is a good and true measure of her character. She is a unique American voice; a singularity within what oftentimes is a howling cacophony of superficial art. I would proudly hang one of her brazen, queer self-portraits in my home on my favorite wall.

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

53


 30#&35 #&3."/ ("--&3:        

   

$ ("--&3:      ."3$)       4)"30/ + 0)/40/ 5&//"/5

% *  ' ' 6 4 *  0 /

4)"30/ + 0)/40/ 5&//"/5 #-6& 46* 54     "3$)* 7"- 1* (.&/5 13* /5    9  * /$)&4


"U  #FS HBNPU  4U BU J PO "S U T  $FOU FS # ("--&3:    ."3$)    "13* -    ."3-" 365)&3'03%

- " :   5 & 9 5 1-64  a (  3061 &9)* #* 50/

."3-" 365)&3'03% $"/%: $"/&     $ 13* /5    9  * /$)&4 30#&35 #&3."/ ("--&3: "U  #FS HBNPU  4U BU J PO "S U T  $FOU FS   .J D IJ HBO "WF  4VJ U FT  $   #  4BOU B .POJ D B  $"  $       #       '     XXX S PCFS U CFS NBOHBM M FS Z D PN   XXX .01-" PS H


THROUGH THE LENS

VINTAGE IMAGERY: BACK TO THE FUTURE — WORDS LANEE NEIL

1.

2.

3.

4.

56

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


THROUGH THE LENS

I enter the party to see dozens of people huddled in a semicircle, silently staring in one direction. What did I get myself into: an artists’ séance, a meditation session, or maybe a covert operation for the Moon sect? Peeking around to get a better look, the partygoers were simply soaking in the power of a still image. Coinciding with Photo LA, Patrick Alt hosts an annual photo fest of his own. Professionals and students alike show photographic work in front of a rapt audience passionate for straight photography and historical (also referred to as alternative) processes like wet plate collodium, cyanotype, platinum, and silver gelatin. It’s the anti-digital photography fest. Digital photography has evened the playing field and made everyone a photographer, able to produce fast, cheap, fleeting images with a click of a cell phone. But a return to straight photography and hand-printed images is emerging. Like the farm-to-table movement, society is craving human connection and pride of craftsmanship once again. Even Kodak senses the trend with their recent announcement of discontinuing digital cameras to focus on film. During this party dedicated to foundational photography, I met four artists of the alternative process who are pursuing the path less taken to encourage the viewer to slow down, absorb, connect and dream again. » Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

57


THROUGH THE LENS

1. L U T H E R G E R L A C H Luther, born on a farm, began building things by hand at an early age from antique tools. Since 1983, he’s been studying 19th century photography books and perfecting the wet plate collodium technique, one of the oldest forms of reproducing an image. Wet plate collodium is the antithesis of digital photography. It’s slow, cumbersome, dangerous, irreproducible and beautiful. It produces a ghostly image transferred onto glass. Each image takes roughly thirty minutes to create and must be processed on the spot. To handle the rigors of this, Luther has two portable darkrooms to accommodate the urgency: a shuttle bus and a Ford truck, but he has also been know to use tents and wheelbarrows. Luther explains why he persists on the laborious, twenty-step process to make one image, “It’s a one on one experience. Every step I make by hand, thus it’s poetic, certainly sensual. It’s a dirty process, which makes me imminently connected to each image I create.” Because there are no negatives and no film, the size of the image is defined by the camera. Throwing off traditional 8x10 camera confines, Luther,

LUTHER GERLACH • BIRDHOUSE, OJAI CEMETERY

58

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


THROUGH THE LENS

with help from Patrick Alt, built the world’s largest camera: a 25’’ x 30’’ glass plate camera they affectionately named ‘the behemoth.’ Captivated with Luther’s sense for the ethereal and his Proustian approach to photography, First Lady Michelle Obama is one of his most renowned collectors. Two of his pieces currently hang in the White House. A retrospective show of Luther’s work will be at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, November 2012. www.luthergerlach.com

LUTHER GERLACH • COTTON CANDY

2. LINDSEY ROSS “Just because something is shot or printed with a historical process does not make it good art,” says Lindsey Ross, recent MDA Photography graduate of Brooks Institute. In the “American War” series, she employed the cyanotype process to fully immerse herself in the experience of producing images in a post-War America with limited resources. Cyanotype, invented in 1842, utilizes cyanide and UV light to reveal a cyan blue photographic print. Out of an efficiency studio the size of a Beverly Hills’ closet, a communal bathroom as her nighttime darkroom and the hood of her VW convertible, Lindsey created a cyanotype series of harrowing, weighty images questioning our obsession with war(s). Her work is an amalgamation of modern meets vintage, inspired by the works of Marcia Resnick and Francesca Woodman. She further explains, “I

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

59


THROUGH THE LENS

LINDSEY ROSS • NEXT-DOOR NEIGHBOR

work in the lineage of conceptual photographers who approach ideas about aestheticization of suffering and war. Even if you broaden the scope to conceptual photographers and those who employ historical processes, you don’t see much crossover. Sally Mann and Chris McCaw are both exceptions to this.” Lindsey reiterated the current need for connectivity in a modern world. “I think people are trying to reconnect to the physical world in so many ways and alternative processes are one of them.” Her “American War” series in featured at Acero Gallery, Santa Barbara, June 7th, 2012. www.lindseyrossphoto.com 60

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


THROUGH THE LENS

LINDSEY ROSS • FAMILY OF FOUR

3 . P AT R I C K A LT Serendipity and beauty motivates Patrick’s passion for platinum printing. Like wet plate collodium, it cannot be enlarged but it can be reproduced, and was a revolutionary evolution in the photographic process. Speaking softly like an enlightened sage, Patrick lights up as he explains this dedication to a near two hundred year old photographic process, “Platinum imbues the image with layers of complexity and 3-D like tonal depth that forces the viewer to engage.” As a master of perfection, it’s no surprise he is known by his contemporaries as one of the world’s best platinum printers. Patrick has been at it for over thirty years, all self-taught, trial by error. Beyond platinum printing, women and Americana landscapes are Patrick’s source of splendor. He photographs women in an attempt to underWeb fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

61


THROUGH THE LENS

PATRICK ALT • OLD GRAIN ELEVATOR & RAILROAD TRACKS, ELKHART, KS

stand them (he says he still hasn’t after 40 years of shooting them), and with landscapes he seeks the ‘oddly, wonderful human imprints’ upon the land. Now he’s creating photographic sculptures of found objects, natural elements and hand-built frames to create altar-type tributes for his “Goddess” series of women dressed in tribal headdresses and ethnic accoutrements. With the humble sincerity of a saint, he declares, “When I look at my prints, it amazes me that I can create such beauty.” He has no tolerance for anything less than excellence, no matter the time and effort it takes. He says with platinum printing and large format cameras, it takes ‘God-like patience to do it.’ When a student of his proudly denounced using a large format for the ease of a digital camera, he asked, “When did laziness become a virtue?’’ His work is represented by Peter Fetterman Gallery. www.patrickalt.com

62

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


THROUGH THE LENS

PATRICK ALT • THERAPY TUB, ALCATRAZ — SAN FRANCISCO

4 . M A R C VA L E S E L L A After many failed attempts to recreate the feeling of light of a Jeanloup Sieff photograph he owned, Marc Valesella simply called him up and asked for help with printing. Sieff obliged and apprenticed him over six months. Silver gelatin printing, using silver halide to create black and white images, is the most contemporary of the alternative processes. Before digital, it was the standard method until a decade ago. Inspired by NASA’s photos of the moon and the acutance of 1960s military spy photography, Marc has pushed the process to bestow small and medium format negatives with razor-like sharpness and luminous contrast. Like man cannot live on bread alone, neither can Marc be satisfied with craft alone. He explains, “I am not happy just creating a beautiful print. If I allow myself to stop there, I’ve lost my edge as a fine art photographer.”

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

63


THROUGH THE LENS

Marc explains his revelation after visiting Donald Judd’s military barracks in 1993, “Marfa is the perfect osmosis of both craft and concept. Art without craft is like a score without a musician, concept without craft is just confusion.” As a master printer for photographers like Helmut Newton, Julius Shulman, Julian Wasser and Christopher Williams, craft is king for Valesella. Yet his quest remains to challenge traditional boundaries of photography with the unorthodox. Marc Valesella’s “Dreams” show exhibits at Cuny NYC, Fall 2012. www.marcvalesella.com

MARC VALESELLA • GUNS, UNTITLED

Although historical processes will never be mainstream again, we can still go back to the future with a chosen coterie committed to creating the magic of a handmade image.

64

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


ART MARKET

THE MARKET FOR CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY IN 2012 — WORDS NICHOLAS FORREST

T

he market for contemporary photography has undergone drastic changes since the dizzying heights of the art market boom that came to an abrupt end in 2008. Unable to justify the high prices that were paid for the work

of many contemporary photographers during the boom years, collectors and investors shied away from artists who did not have the history or credentials to back up their prices. Thankfully, the market has improved considerably since 2008, but only for a select few artists. The most successful contemporary photographers of late are Cindy Sherman and Andreas Gursky who, along with Richard Prince, are responsible for all of the top ten highest prices achieved for contemporary photography at auction and have each claimed the top spot on the ladder over the last five years. The most successful contemporary photographer to date is Andreas Gursky who can lay claim to five of the top ten highest prices. Three of those were achieved with his 99 cent and 99 cent II photos which are two of the most iconic works of contemporary photography. 66

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


ART MARKET

2011 was a big year for photography, which saw the record for the highest price paid for a contemporary photograph at auction change twice. The first new record was set in May when Cindy Sherman’s Untitled #96 was sold by Christie’s New York for $3,890,500. This was the first time that the record had been broken since 2007 when Sotheby’s sold Richard Prince’s Untitled (Cowboy) for $3,401,000. Only five months later in November, the record was broken again when Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II fetched $4,338,500. The market for Cindy Sherman’s photographs has been given a big boost by the major Cindy Sherman retrospective being held at New York’s Museum of Modern Art from the 26th of February to the 11th of June. Two major collectors of Sherman’s work, Eli Broad and hedge-fund manager Adam Sender, have lent photos to the exhibition, which has brought together more than 170 photographs covering the artist’s career from the mid 1970s to the present. The most recent sale of a photo by Sherman took place 16th of February when Phillips de Pury sold the artist’s Untitled #410 in London for £433,250 against an estimate of £200,000-300,000. According to Phillips de Pury, “Untitled #410 belongs to Cindy Sherman’s Clowns series executed between 2003 and 2004. It is one of the first five images from the series, and an edition of this particular

RICHARD PRINCE • “UNTITLED (COWBOY)”

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

67


ART MARKET

work is housed in the permanent collection of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art.” One of the factors that resulted in Sherman standing the test of time is the fact that her photographs are not merely a collection of random images but constitute a relatively cohesive story centered on a central theme of gender and identity that has been an integral part of her oeuvre for decades. Being able to associate a single image with a more extensive body of work makes a photo much more appealing. Of the

ANDREAS GURSKY • “99 CENT”

ANDREAS GURSKY • “RHINE II”

68

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


ART MARKET

CINDY SHERMAN • “UNTITLED #96”

AI WEIWEI • “6.3-4”

three contemporary photographers who hold the top ten auction records, Richard Prince is the most controversial. An image from Richard Prince’s Cowboy series was the first work of photography to achieve more than $1,000,000 at auction when it sold at a Christie’s sale for $1,248,000 in 2005. New York dealer Stellan Holm was the winning bidder. Interestingly, when interviewed about the event’s importance to the photography community, Prince said that: Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

69


ART MARKET

“I’ve never been included in any photography-based survey, museum show, and photo magazine. I’ve heard that Peter Galassi (Curator of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York) hates my work. That he would never acknowledge it in the photo department at MoMA. I think he’s wrong. I think my photo work is all about photography…When you don’t have any training in a particular medium you can bring something to it that hasn’t been brung (sic)…I ‘brung’ the

GILBERT AND GEORGE • “BLOODY LIFE NO. 13”

70

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


ART MARKET

CINDY SHERMAN • “UNTITLED #410”

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

71


ART MARKET

sheriff and I shot him. I killed photography. Maybe they hated that. Maybe I should have ‘rescued’ photography.” (artcritical.com, December 2005, David Cohen, Editor) Unfortunately for Prince, he inadvertently predicted his own downfall, photographically speaking. According to Artprice, US$100 invested in 1998 in a photographic work by Richard Prince had an average value of US$520 in October 2011. That figure was US$1561 in 2009. It seems that Prince underestimated the importance of curatorial recognition – something that both Sherman and Gursky have received plenty of. One of the only Chinese photographers to emerge from the art market downturn unscathed was Ai Weiwei. His 6.3-4, a series of 24 photographs which document the stages of construction of China’s Olympic Stadium, sold for £145,250 against an estimate of £70,000-90,000 during Phillips De Pury’s April 2011 London BRIC auction setting a new auction record for a photograph by the artist. When it comes to up and coming photographers, the British artistic duo Gilbert and George may be the ones to watch. The pair’s Bloody Life No. 13 fetched £1.27m ($1,999,003) against an estimate of £700,000-1,000,000 ($1,100,000 - $1,500,000) during Christie’s Post War and Contemporary Art Evening Auction held in London on the 14 February 2012. According to Christie’s, “over the course of their remarkable career, Gilbert & George have pioneered new directions in European conceptual art. Elevating photography to the status of art, they introduced new, enlarged scales of reproduction into the medium, creating ingenious compilations of multiple prints into a single work.”

72

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


PROFILE

THE INDELIBLE IMAGE: THE FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY — WORDS PHIL TARLEY IMAGES COURTESY THE FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY AND PHIL TARLEY

D

avid Fahey is tall. An ample man, distinguished by a generous head of long, neatly kept white hair; he is quick-smiled, warm and friendly. Fahey is the best kind of art dealer. He is the consummate raconteur. Every photograph he possesses triggers a terrific story; narratives of the countless world-class photographers Fahey has shown during his thirty-six year career. David started taking pictures when he was sixteen, while he studied guitar. Shooting was his free ticket into Los Angeles nightclubs like the Troubador, the Light House, Shelley’s Manhole – a trade for his photographic services. After coming home from the war in Vietnam, an experience which seems to have seared a love of photojournalism into his soul, David realized that there were lots of photographers but only a few dealers. “I knew that I could have more fun selling photographs than taking them.” 76

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


DAVID FAHEY • PHOTO © PHIL TARLEY


PROFILE

Fahey got his first job in 1975 at Los Angeles’s original photo gallery, G. RAY HAWKINS, where he curated a show for Edward Weston. In 1987, he started Fahey/Klein with partner, Randee Klein Devlin. Ken Devlin, who shares his wife Randee's passion for photography, joined the gallery as co-owner and partner in 1998. Fahey/Klein is the oldest, the biggest and unarguably one of the most important photography galleries in Los Angeles. As I waited for my interview in his commodious La Brea Avenue gallery, Marco, an associate, toured me through the current hang of classic vintage prints, naming all the photographers for me. Then, he guided me through a narrow photo gallery-library, past cases of white Formica slide-out drawers that held the thousands of photographic prints in the collection, and on into David’s office. The focal point of Fahey’s inner sanctum was a busy working desk stacked with books and papers. The office was defined by a massive black and white print of Muhammad Ali that hung above a crimson leather couch. Fahey surrounds himself with an ever-changing array of some of the most compelling large-format photographs ever shot. A visit to Fahey/Klein often leaves me humbled, in awe of the amazing prints that hang on his gallery walls. I tend to linger on the images that send me off into a strange kind of ecstasy, an ecstasy that somehow has always eluded me in churches and temples but seems to grip me up in a very special way when I see the human condition captured on paper in a revelatory flash of insight and exaltation... Fahey tells me that, “photojournalists do what photography does best… they render reality in such a way that is so authentic and indelible.” He gestures with his chin at Sudan, a James Nachtwey print on the wall across his desk. “That is inherently different than the photography that is set up...like Herb Ritts, one of the first local boys who did good. Herb was so likeable. He had the ability to gain his subject’s trust and confidence to shoot them with honesty and to portray their inner essence in an artful and wonderful way so they could reveal themselves to the camera…People loved and trusted him. I was the first to show Herb Ritts.” Fahey seems to brag like a proud father. “His True Blue portrait of Madonna is amazing.” On Andy Warhol: Fahey worked for Interview Magazine for many 78

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


MADONNA (TRUE BLUE PROFILE), HOLLYWOOD 1986   ©HERB RITTS FOUNDATION, COURTESY FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY, LOS ANGELES


JAMES NACHTWEY • SUDAN (REF#: 04-08-96-10T), 2004 ©JAMES NACHTWEY, COURTESY FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY, LOS ANGELES


VEE SPEERS • IMMORTAL # 11, 2010 ©VEE SPEERS, COURTESY FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY, LOS ANGELES


MANUEL ALVAREZ BRAVO • COYOACAN, MEXICO CITY, JANUARY, 1982  ©DAVID FAHEY, COURTESY FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY, LOS ANGELES


JULIE BLACKMON • NIGHT MOVIE, 2011 ©JULIE BLACKMON, COURTESY FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY, LOS ANGELES


MELVIN SOKOLSKY • DRAGON’S BREATH, PARIS, 1963 ©MELVIN SOKOLSKY, COURTESY FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY, LOS ANGELES


PROFILE

HELMUT NEWTON • CHATEAU MARMONT, HOLLYWOOD, CA, MARCH 1985 © DAVID FAHEY, COURTESY FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY, LOS ANGELES

years. “Andy was always very detached, distant and he loved gossip. He was fascinated by Hollywood and the BBC…the Billionaires Boys Club.” On David LaChapelle: “David is very expressive, a real talent...imaginative… and he is able to be child-like and playful. David’s work is quite full of fun, he is a very clever artist and quite prolific.” On Helmut Newton: “Helmut had a whole new way of seeing women. He made them masculine, assertive and aggressive. He was always full of ideas.” David’s phone rang and our interview was over. The two hours I spent with him steeped in his world of highly potent, elegant imagery had passed too quickly. My scribbled notes and the photos I shot in David’s office are remembrances of a few hours well spent, in the company of a California pioneer - a man who was the first to bring much of the world’s best photography to Los Angeles. Fahey/Klein regularly mounts two-person exhibitions every five weeks. There is always something wonderful to see. Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

85


PROFILE

KIRK PEDERSEN: NO MAP REQUIRED — WORDS ERIC JUNKER IMAGES COURTESY KIRK PEDERSEN

sk Kirk Pedersen about his journey from accomplished painter and teacher, to photographer and bookmaker, to prolific limited-editionart-book-publisher and he’ll tell you, “I don't have a roadmap.” Indeed, metaphors for journeys and transformations don’t apply, because he's comfortably all of these things at once. No map required. His subtle Western drawl and hospitable demeanor belie an intensity and focus that’s more apparent in the shear volume and quality of his work. His ZERO+ imprint published 12 limited edition titles in 2011 alone. He creates monumental abstract paintings and shows them in galleries around the world. He holds a full time teaching position at a local college. His travels? Seoul, Shenyang, Bangkok, Beijing, Macau, Shinjuku...Pomona is home base. One pauses for the punch line about Pomona, but we shouldn't be surprised to find this level of sophisticated creative diligence coming from the unusually fecund Claremont/Pomona womb. Though removed from Los Angeles’ assorted art hubs by 30 plus roaring miles of anxious freeway, this cultural border zone has nurtured a diverse assortment of shining creative lights and visionaries including the Dust Brothers, Chris Burden, Ben Harper, Tom Waits, James Turrell, Art Clokey, Frank Zappa, Mort Sahl, Peter Drucker, Hal Glicksman and maybe Jessica Alba. That would be a fun party, and well worth the drive.

A

88

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


PROFILE

POPPY, SHIBUYA, TOKYO (2009)

LOOK RIGHT – LOOK LEFT, HONG KONG (2008)

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

89


PROFILE

The depth of Pedersen’s energy and vision are quite apparent in two beautiful volumes of his photographic work: Urban Asia and Tradeoffs. These are not books of photographic reproductions; rather the books themselves are self-contained works where Pedersen's images exist in their purest form. They are sense maps of the free and energetic ramblings that produced them. The book form liberates the images from the sentimentality of framed gallery art, and allows them to be enjoyed as manic, introspective and slightly dangerous urban adventures. It's about experiencing the books as much as the photos; their portability, the feel of the pages, their heft, and the pleasure of autonomously hustling through their pages where we are left alone and free to be surprised. Pedersen’s images themselves are both familiar and abstract. For those of us illiterate in hànzì, hiragana, and katakana, the typography becomes pure graphic pleasure and painterly gesture in photographs of walls layered with rust, decaying wood, graffiti and tattered posters. These can be savored for an elegant formalism that has much in common with Pedersen’s huge paintings. The bustling pedestrians that burst into the photo frames more frequently in the second volume, however, are less formal and will be entirely familiar to harried city dwellers everywhere. They are us, but there is distance. Observing the trigonometries of their interaction (or lack thereof) within the cityscapes can be likened to the experience of sitting in a cafe in a place where we don't speak the language. Being an outsider allows us to more fully take in the totality of the scenes, because we are not distracted by the minutia of tactical understanding or implication. This outsider’s disconnect instigates the moment best explained by that great disconnector Willem de Kooning: we become “a slipping glimpser, with a strong sense of the fleeting moment in which people are caught unawares." This applies equally to the observer and the observed. In this de Kooning moment, Pedersen's work allows us to experience the infinite unexpected disassociative possibility of things. In that space we can make up stories. That's the power and the pleasure of these books. Between their covers lies a great deal of fun for those of us who enjoy the vertiginous feeling of the ground subtly slipping beneath our feet.

90

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag


PROFILE

888, BANGKOK (2006)

BILLBOARD, DALIAN, CHINA (2007)

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

91


SPOTLIGHT

BEVERLY HILLS ART SHOW: ART FOR ALL — WORDS LANEE NEIL

ot many things are cheap, much less free, in Beverly Hills. When it comes

N

to art, Beverly Hills Art Show rolls out the red carpet. Spanning four blocks on Santa Monica Boulevard, the semiannual Beverly Hills Art Show is a

free public art event of two hundred and fifty vetted artists from across the country showcasing photography, painting, sculpture, ceramics and traditional prints. The Spring Show, May 19–20, 2012, features the curated exhibit Landscape and the Los Angeles Imagination with photographers Austin Hargrave, Gray Malin, and Martin J. Waterman and painter Kris Cunz. As a tribute to LA’s complex extremes, the exhibit will highlight the decay and glamour of Hollywood, a pictorial essay of downtown LA and contemporary Los Angeles renditions. Unlike many art openings, the Beverly Hills Art Show is family friendly with art demos, food trucks, beer and wine gardens, kids’ art stations and live music. Can’t make to it to the Spring Show? The Fall Show, featuring the Anime, Animated, Animation exhibit, takes place October 20–21, 2012. www.beverlyhills.org/artshow 94

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


SPOTLIGHT

ZALE RICHARD RUBINS • MARTY'S

MARTIN WATERMAN • FELIX THE CAT

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

95


SPOTLIGHT

AUSTIN YOUNG IS A TRANIMAL — WORDS PHIL TARLEY IMAGES COURTESY AUSTIN YOUNG

A

ustin Young, whose work has shown at LACMA, LACE, the  Hammer Museum, the Stephen Cohen Gallery and countless other spaces and places in and around the avant California  scene, is bristling with excite-

ment about his latest project Tranimal…Young’s  new endeavor  - a collaboration with Squeaky Blonde and Fade-Dra, is infused with  the artist’s  high voltage underground  creative energy. Tranimal is a big and bold project. It incorporates video, photography,  and  interactive sound design.  And its  taking performance art to an operatic level. I spoke with the Austin one morning, just after a night of performance at the Machine Project and he told me about his creative partners. Participants are put through an assembly line where Squeaky Blonde, Fade-Dra , Young  costume them, make-them up  and turn them into a cast of  glamorous, genderless creatures.  Mark Allen, director of Machine Project, makes  light sensitive circuitry boards that are sewn into theor costumes. The boards have knobs that the performers use to change the sound frequencies, creating musical score with light and movement.    Juliana Snapper,  an opera singer and performance artist, guides the players to find the vocal expression of their new identities. The particpant-performers become collaborators in a musical performance.  Then Young shoots  formal portraits and video of the end result.  Here is a sneak peak of his work. 96

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


IMAGE FROM MACHINE PROJECT, HAMMER MUSEUM © AUSTIN YOUNG


IMAGE FROM MACHINE PROJECT, BERKELEY ART MUSEUM © AUSTIN YOUNG


IMAGE FROM MACHINE PROJECT © AUSTIN YOUNG


COMING OUT, GOING IN

CARDWELL JIMMERSON GALLERY 8658 Washington Boulevard, Culver City WORDS PETER FRANK

COMING OUT: John Paul Jones: Image and Object For much of the postwar (hereafter known as the “PST”) era, John Paul Jones was one of southern California’s leading printmakers. Jones, however, thought of himself as a painter who made prints – and, later, turned more or less entirely to making sculpture. That’s not the only about-face in Jones’ career: an abstractionist early on, later much respected for his softly rendered, mysterious, almost ghostly figures occupying immense, indistinct landscapes, he returned to non-objectivity in his last couple of decades. Indeed, his work in three dimensions contains no figures. That is, it contains no figures until you walk up to (and in certain cases into or under) it: the elementary but dramatic architectural premises of those geometric wood structures concern the framing or even measuring of the human body, describing walls and stairs and portals and other “stages” for human activity with a

JOHN PAUL JONES BOVITCH IN EGYPT, 1963 TAMARIND LITHOGRAPH, 36 X 26" IMAGE COURTESY CARDWELL JIMMERSON GALLERY

simple, unadorned elegance. By all accounts an inspiring teacher, Jones also set an ornery example of artistic contrariness, defying his audience to peg him or predict his next move. But the zigs and zags Jones’ oeuvre made throughout the latter half of the 20th century were not evasive diversions so much as methodical investigations, consistent with Jones’ clear and deep intellectual and emotional investment.

100

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


COMING OUT, GOING IN

GOING IN: Ben Sakoguchi: Paintings 1966 to Present (THROUGH APRIL 21) Another “artist’s artist” from the PST years, Ben Sakoguchi was – has been – throughout his career one of America’s harshest, most consistent, and grimly funny social-commentary artists. Blessed (or, perhaps, cursed) with the wit and the outrage of a political cartoonist, Sakoguchi has skewered social and (especially) political follies for upwards of half a century. Indeed, his parodies and condemnations of contemporary conditions go back to the Vietnam War, and his no-holds-barred approach has maintained ever since the coruscating tone with which that era’s counterculture answered power. Sakoguchi, still going strong, has lost or even softened nothing. And this show allows up-close-and-personal experiences with the objects of his wrath, making sense of his insistence on painting rather than drawing (or, if you would, muralizing) his statements. Sakoguchi is a veritable grandfather of both “newbrow” and graffiti art; it’s never gotten more surrealistically pop than this. Had he created his nasty take-offs on orange crate labels or vast compilations of mediated figures as funny-page japes or spray-painted tags, they would not have the same devastating, pull-you-into-the-picture-and-rub-your-nose-in-governmental-miscreancy power; his awkwardly translated appropriations from newspaper photos and TV captures radiate a heat their sources lack. There are pictures here that will make you cry; many of these comprise a grid of little narrative paintings highlighting (often astounding) incidents during the Japanese-American internment of World War II. For Sakoguchi, who lived through that affront (and who here documents its effects on his parents), we are still living down the 20th century.

BEN SAKOGUCHI • PICASSO/RIVERS SUCKS, 1981, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 10 X 15.5" IMAGE COURTESY CARDWELL JIMMERSON GALLERY

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

101


A BOOK PUBLISHING COMPANY

Sell Bookstore Quality Books Self Published by You SELL YOUR BOOKS ONLINE AS eBOOKS Our electronic books translate your conventional printed books. eBooks can be read on computers or any digital devices that support flash files.

services: book printing ‡ electronic books ‡ book supplies ‡ art reproduction photography    ‡ framing / mounting / laminating fine art print making ‡FUHDWLYHÀOHHGLWLQJ

VISIT US: 323 . 464 . 3900 ‡ www.bookblocks.us 6585 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood CA, 90038

M-F: 9-6:30pm - Closed Saturday & Sunday


ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINTS SCHULMAN PHOTO LAB

BY

SHARON JOHNSON-TENNANT AT ROBERT BERMAN GALLERY

Specializing in Fine Art Exhibition Printing for artists, galleries and museums.

Silver Gelatin Archival Printing Archival Pigment Printing Drum Scanning Retouching / Restoration Custom B&W Fiber-based Prints up to 30 x 40 Film Processing

6677 SUNSET BOULEVARD, HOLLYWOOD, CA • TEL: (323) 466-3343 • SCHULMANPHOTOLAB.COM


SPOTLIGHT

SONIC ALCHEMY — WORDS JACKI APPLE IMAGES COURTESY CALIFORNIA E.A.R. UNIT

T

he past six months of Pacific Standard Time exhibitions have given us the opportunity to re-look at our recent history and reframe it. And while this may change the way we perceive the artworks individually and as a whole, the visual images and objects remain materially fixed in their original form. Not so with music, especially the experimental electronic works of the past forty years which are open to renewal and rebirth as they transit from old to new technologies. Sonic materials can recycle and reconfigure in new arrangements, and variant mutable hybrids emerge. Such is the case with the grandfather of techno Morton Subotnick, who joins up with the always daring 106

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


SPOTLIGHT

E.A.R. UNIT MEMBERS ERIC KM CLARK, AMY KNOLES, AND VICKI RAY

California E.A.R. Unit for a live revisit to his iconic landmark works, Silver Apples of the Moon (1966) and A Sky of Cloudless Sulphur (1977). From the mid 1960s to the mid 1970s, Subotnick explored the McLuhanesque question, “What is the message of the phonograph record,� working with Buchla synthesizers and tape recorders to create electronic works meant for the home environment. After a decade of composing and thinking about the nature of recorded sound as medium, the answer to the question of what to do with the technology in live performances finally came together in A Sky of Cloudless Sulphur. Long before digital technology made sampling and looping a commonplace technique, Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

107


SPOTLIGHT

Subotnick’s concept for performances was to gather together and organize all the musical materials created for a particular record, including the discarded music and musical fragments. Then, by adding new electronic ‘patches’ to the assembled materials, a live performance environment could be created that would allow for the kind of spontaneous performance improvisation and decision-making he envisioned. Not an easy feat in 1977. Not really possible until fairly recently. But today with Ableton Live on his Mac and the new Buchla 200e, he can do it, thus bringing the earlier pieces to maturity in a new body. In the latest version of Silver Apples of the Moon / A Sky of Cloudless Sulphur, created in collaboration with the California E.A.R. Unit, Subotnick reselects sections from the original recordings that he likes and wants to work with and loops them. The live performance improvisations by E.A.R. Unit’s Amy Knoles (percussion), Vicki Ray (piano), Eric KM Clark (violin), and Subotnick (analog Bucla) will be based on this pre-determined semi-structure of loop environments. The audience quite literally tunes into the creative life cycle of the musical artwork from its inception to its state of becoming in the present moment. The experience is kaleidoscopic and multi-dimensional as past, present, and future intersect, entwine and unravel, and rewind again. A few squeaks, a drop of water hitting a metal surface, bell-like, then falling like the first ripples of rain. They gather into a rhythmic pattern, a rapid patter. New layers appear. Dance beats that make you want to move – head, shoulders, feet to the rhythm. Another layer of long extended flowing sounds whistle past, speed increasing. Sound on the run. You are flying, streams of light rushing past. Polyrhythmic layers of metallic and electronic sound in repetitive patterns inter-cut and dissolve into surprising new beats. A sudden opening of space admits shimmers and spackles of high pitched glass-like tones, random as chimes caught in a breeze, joined by crickets here and there, slowly becoming more dense, then fading to a note or two, a ripple in the open spaces. The sonic journey travels downriver in an electronic forest filled with high pitched extended sounds like long bird calls in conversation, a dialogue of trills. Then silence, followed by buzzing electronic spurts and hisses. They meet the high-pitched tinkles, tossed like pebbles into the stream. The rush of currents in eddies. Shadows of sound pass over a persistent rhythmic beat in the under-

108

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


SPOTLIGHT

AMY KNOLES AND MORTON SUBOTNICK AT WORK IN HER STUDIO MARCH 2012. PHOTO: RICHARD HINES

current, whistling in the wind. Silence. Random voices hidden from view but sending messages into places filled with anticipation. A rich symphonic voice intercedes and departs. A melodic rapid chattering becomes a group discussion and a bass bellow makes a point. A play of light bouncing on reflective surfaces, settles into quiet. A single stone drops, a leaf. That is just a sample of one listener’s experience of the original recording. What comes next in the live performance is a high-definition landscape of possibilities and discoveries, of hybrids and mutations producing new palettes of color and tone, timbre and texture, out of the past, into the future. Interacting in temporal space, the recordings become another instrument in the electro-acoustic ensemble. This collaboration celebrates the California E.A.R. Unit’s 30th anniversary performing electro-acoustic and live interactive computer music, and its long

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

109


SPOTLIGHT

history with Subotnick, who was Knoles’s mentor at CalArts in the early 1980s. When she founded the E.A.R. Unit, he inspired her to “bravely embrace electronics” and now it is “in her genes.” Knoles’s collaboration as a performer with Subotnick goes back to the 1988 production of Hungers at ARS Electronica. In this experimental multi-media opera involving layers of live performance, acoustical and computer-generated music by Subotnick, and video and computer images by Ed Emshwiller, state of the art real-time sound and image processing systems expanded and complemented the performances by a singer, a dancer, and three musicians. The latest re-creation of Silver Apples of the Moon (1966) and A Sky of Cloudless Sulphur (1977) embodies Knoles’s own history and evolution from CalArts music student to world-class innovator, performer, and composer. In her most recent collaborations, she composes and performs computerassisted live electronic music with percussion controllers and interactive video, and her work has accurately been described as being of “frightening beauty, fascinating, complex.” The California E.A.R. Unit has earned international critical acclaim, and many awards for its contributions to the field of contemporary American music. Vicki Ray, who has been with the E.A.R. Unit for seventeen years, came to this kind of music at its inception and she shares the same history and experience as Knoles. Whereas the youngest member, Eric Clark, enters at the point where the history and tradition has already been well documented and he brings a different perspective to it. This live performance of Silver Apples of the Moon / A Sky of Cloudless Sulphur tops off three decades of riveting E.A.R. Unit concerts. This is a one time only experience that won’t be seen or heard again in Los Angeles. — REDCAT Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater, Downtown L.A. 631 W. 2nd St. Los Angeles, CA 90012

110

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


ART ABOUT TOWN WITH PETER FRANK

Peter Frank’s

MUSEUM VIEWS PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART L.A. Raw: Abject Expressionism in Los Angeles, 1945-1980 THROUGH MAY 20 One of Pacific Standard Time’s last hurrahs is also one of its most remarkable, as it examines a tendency in southern California art that few have acknowledged but keeps erupting to the surface. Indeed, many of the artists featured in this survey, as well as the post-PST artists they influenced, are among L.A.’s best known, precisely for the harrowing view of humanity they proffer. From Hans Burkhardt to Paul McCarthy (and beyond), “L.A. Raw” avers, a funky, corrosive, highly critical and yet highly spiritual – in sum, highly existential – impulse has coursed through artistic practice here, bespeaking a streak of moral challenge, even fury, that entirely belies California’s laid-back reputation. It manifested in a number of “movements,” such as the mid-century cubo-expressionism of Rico

Lebrun

and

Howard

Warshaw; the “Watts renaissance” assemblage of Betye Saar, John Outterbridge, and David Hammons; the deliberately clumsy figuration of artists

such

as

Charles

Garabedian, Roberto Chavez, and other painters associated with the CeeJe Gallery; the Pop-adjacent symbol-signage

WILLIAM BRICE UNTITLED (MALIBU FIGURE), 1968 OIL ON CANVAS, 69 1/2 X 59 IN. COURTESY OF L.A. LOUVER, VENICE, CALIFORNIA © ESTATE OF WILLIAM BRICE.

of Wallace Berman, James Gill, and Llyn Foulkes; and the body-focused performance art of McCarthy, Barbara Smith, Chris Burden, and Nancy Buchanan. One of the exhibition’s most surprising and illuminating positions, in fact, is the continuity of spirit and practice

114

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


ART ABOUT TOWN WITH PETER FRANK

it reveals between soCal painting, sculpture, and performance (not to mention printmaking and mural painting). Less surprising, but even more illuminating, is the show’s insistence on the the central presence of the human figure, no matter how ethereal or atomized, in all this work. Another significant and especially salutary aspect of “L.A. Raw” is its recovery (not just rediscovery) of so many brilliant and gutsy but all-but-forgotten artists from Jan Stussy and James Strombotne to Joyce Treiman and Les Biller. No other PST show, it can be argued, has made more of a counter-argument to conventional narrative(s) about LA art history than has “L.A. Raw”; it takes a stance as tough in some ways as the work it contains. For more information, please visit the museum’s website at http://www.pmcaonline.org/

LOS ANGELES MUNICIPAL ART GALLERY Un-Natural THROUGH MAY 6 Along with two other LAMAG exhibitions – “Saving Paradise,” traditional landscape paintings drawing from the membership of the California Art Club, and “Hybrid Romance,” featuring Lawrence Yun’s vibrant watercolors of elaborate floral arrangements – “Un-Natural” takes the measure of spring fever at Barnsdall Art Park. Unlike the work in the other two shows, though, “Un-Natural” (as the name clearly implies) maintains something of a skewed view of nature. Hardly a sorority of fin-de-siècle aesthetes, the four painters are certainly not opposed to nature; indeed, pervading the show is an urgent and rather protective attitude toward natural phenomena and the overarching ecosystem. But in that very urgency these artists manifest a post-modernist anxiety that hovers around contemporary environmentalism: everything they depict seems fragile, transient, ephemeral, dreamlike, ready to disappear even while freighted with human memory and passion. Birds and trees recur in all four bodies of work, as if to represent nature at its most and least rooted. The presence of humanity insinuates everywhere, too, not quite obtrusive but always shaping our regard for nature as well as natural structures themselves. You feel this most in Lisa Adams’ compressed, rationalized landscapes, with their acid prettiness; but the far more expansive and complex formulations of Merion Estes, brimming with stylized references and visual montages, also seem to be coding and recording how humanity interacts with nature. Relying on more, er, naturalistic approaches, Fatemeh Burnes and Constance Mallinson still find a nature mindfully recomposed, taking on a symbolic and almost architectural intricacy (not to mention a lyric and tragic profundity) in Burnes’ painstakingly rendered, dynamically composed pictures-within-pictures and an ominous playfulness in Mallinson’s even more exacting trompe-l’oeil specificity, which she often applies to the “building” of (art-historically referenced) human figures out of plant forms. For more information, please visit the gallery’s website at http://www.lamag.org/

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

115


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS 1301PE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 938-5822 http://www.1301pe.com

ACUNA-HANSEN GALLERY 427 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 441-1624 http://www.ahgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm

18TH STREET ARTS CENTER 1639 18th St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-3711 http://www.18thStreet.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-5pm; Saturday, 1-5pm

ALTERED SPACE GALLERY 1221 Abbot Kinney Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 452-8121 http://www.alteredspacegallery.com

57 UNDERGROUND 300 C. So. Thomas St. Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-0218 http://www.57underground.com Thurs. by appointment, Fri.-Sun., 12pm-4pm

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF CERAMIC ART 340 S. Garey Ave Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 865-3146 http://www.ceramicmuseum.org Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm

A+D ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN MUSEUM 6032 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-932-9393 http://www.aplusd.org Tues-Fri. 10-6, Sat. & Sun. 10-5

ANDERSON GALLERIES 354 North Bedford Drive Beverly Hills, CA 90210 310-858-1644 www.andersongalleries.com

ABACOT GALLERY 970 N. Broadway, Suite 201 (Mandarin Plaza) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-1599 http://www.abacotgallery.com ABORIGINAL DREAM TIME GALLERY 9011 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 310-278-4278 http://www.aboriginaldreamtimegallery.com ACE GALLERY LA INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART @ The Wilshire Tower 5514 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm ACE GALLERY BEVERLY HILLS INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 9430 Wilshire Blvd. Beverly Hils, CA 90212 (310) 858-9090 http://www.acegallery.net ACME 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5942 http://www.acmelosangeles.com

116

Web fabrikmagazine.com

ANDREW SHIRE GALLERY 3850 Wilshire Blvd., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 389-2601 http://www.andrewshiregallery.com ANGELS GATE CULTURAL CENTER 3601 S. Gaffey St San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 519-0936 http://angelsgateart.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-4pm ANGLES GALLERY 2222 & 2230 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-5019 http://www.anglesgallery.com ANNIE WHARTON LOS ANGELES Pacific Design Center, Suite B275 8687 Melrose, West Hollywood 90069 (305) 905-9304 http://www.anniewhartonlosangeles.com ANN 330 GALLERY ART 170 Bldg. 170 South La Brea Los Angeles, 90036 http://www.ANN330Gallery.com (323) 954-9900 ARC 2529 W. Magnolia, Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 848-9998 http://www.czappa.com Tues.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat., 9am-3pm Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

ARMORY CENTER FOR THE ARTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 792-5101 http://www.armoryarts.org ARMSTRONG'S 150 E. Thrid St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-6464 http://www.armstronggallery.net Tues.-Sat. 9am-4:30pm ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN 1700 Lida St. Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 396-2446 http://www.artcenter.edu/williamson Tues-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., 12-9pm ARTIST STUDIO 742 N. Broadway 2nd Flr.(Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.tree-axis.com ART FOR HUMANS GALLERY 945 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.artforhumans.com ART PIC 6826 Troost Ave. No. Hollywood, CA 91605 (818) 503-5999 http://www.artpic2000.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5pm ARTPEACE GALLERY 2317 W. Magnolia Blvd. Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 846-8688 http://www.artpeacegallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-5pm ARTSPACE WAREHOUSE 7354 Beverly Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 936-7020 http://www.artspacewarehouse.com Tues-Sat 11am-6pm ARTY 634 S. Main St. Los Angeles CA 90014 213-213-7829 AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER -MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST 4700 Western Heritage Way (in Griffith Park adjacent to L.A. Zoo) Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 667-2000 http://www.autrynationalcenter.org


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER: SOUTHWEST MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN Corner of Marmion Way and Museum Dr Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 221-2164 http://www.southwestmuseum.org AUTOMAT 936 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 617-0422 AVENUE 50 STUDIO 131 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 258-1435 http://www.avenue50studio.com BARNSDALL ART PARK EXHIBITIONS 4800 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 644-6275 Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; First Fridays, 12-9pm BILLY SHIRE FINE ARTS 5790 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 297-0600 www.billyshirefinearts.com BLEICHER/GOLIGHTLY GALLERY 1431 Ocean Avenue Santa Monica, CA 90401 310-237-6423 www.BGshowrom.com BLK/MRKT GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-1989 http://www.blkmrktgallery.com Tues.-Fri., 11am-6pm; Sat., 12-6pm BLUE FIVE ART SPACE 2935 S. Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90064 (310) 478-8500 http://bluefivedesign.com BLYTHE PROJECTS 5797 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.990.3501 www.blytheprojects.net BLUEBIRD ART HOUSE 6747 Bright Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 696-9493 http://www.bluebirdarthouse.com

CARDWELL JIMMERSON CONTEMPORARY ART 8658 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 310-815-1100 www.cardwelljimmerson.com

BLUM & POE GALLERY 2754 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-2062 http://www.blumandpoe.com BONELLI CONTEMPORARY 943 North Hill St. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 213-617-8180 www.bonellicontemporaryla.com BOWERS MUSEUM 2002 N. Main St Santa Ana, CA 92706 (714) 567-3643 http://www.bowers.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-4pm; fourth Thursday of each month, 10am-8pm BRAND LIBRARY ART GALLERY 1601 West Mountain St. Glendale, CA 91201 (818) 548-2051 http://www.brandlibrary.org Tues. & Thurs., 12-9pm; Weds., 10am6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-5pm CACTUS GALLERY 4534 Eagle Rock Blvd. Eagle Rock, CA 90041 323-256-6117 http://www.eclecticcactus.com CAL POLY POMONA DOWNTOWN CENTER 300 W. Second St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-0080 http://www.class.csupomona.edu/dow ntowncenter Tues.-Sat., 11am-8pm; 2nd Saturdays., 1-9pm CAL POLY POMONA KEITH & JANET KELLOGG 3801 W. Temple Ave Pomona, CA 91768 (909) 869-4302 http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery Tues.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Sat., 12-4pm CAL STATE L.A. – LUCKMAN GALLERY 5151 State University Dr Los Angeles, CA 90032 (323) 343-6604 http://www.luckmanfineartscomplex.org Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 12-5pm CALIFORNIA HERITAGE MUSEUM 2612 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8537 http://www.californiaheritagemuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-4pm Web fabrikmagazine.com

CARL BERG PROJECTS Pacific Design Center, Suites #B315 & B380 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 323-286-9059 www.carlbergprojects.com CARMICHAEL GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART 5795 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 969-0600 http://www.carmichaelgallery.com Weds.-Sun., 2-7pm CB1 GALLERY 207 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-806-7889 www.cb1gallery.com CENTER FOR THE ARTS, EAGLE ROCK 2225 Colorado Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90041 (323) 226-0949 http://www.centerartseaglerock.org CHARLIE JAMES GALLERY 975 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 687-0844 http://www.cjamesgallery.com CHERRY AND MARTIN 2712 South LA Cienga Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 310-559-0010 http://www.cherryandmartin.com CHINA ART OBJECTS GALLERIES 933 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0384 http://www.chinaartobjects.com CHINESE AMERICAN MUSEUM 125 Paseo de la Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-5240 CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 916 Colorado Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 587-3373 http://www.cgrimes.com Tues-Sat. 10-5:30

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

117


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS CHUNG KING PROJECT 945 Chung King Rd. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1802 http://www.chungkingproject.com

COUTURIER GALLERY 166 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-933-5557 http://www.couturiergallery.com/

CIRRUS GALLERY 542 S. Alameda Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 680-3473 http://www.cirrusgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm

CRACK GALLERY 204 W. 6th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-622-3493 http://crackgallery.com/

CITY OF BREA GALLERY #1 Civic Center Circle Brea, CA 92821 (714) 990-7730 http://www.breagallery.com Weds., Thurs., Sun., 12-5pm, Fri., Sat., 12-8pm CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART The Packing House, 536 W. First St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-3200 http://www.claremontmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-7pm CLASSIC ARTFORMS 9009 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 273-6306 COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS ART GALLERY 26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd Santa Clarita, CA 91355 (661) 362-3612 http://www.canyons.edu/offices/artgallery Tues.-Thurs., 11am-3pm; Sat., 10am-2pm COPRO/NASON GALLERY 2525 Michingan Ave., T-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 398-2643 www.copronason.com COREY HELFORD GALLERY 8522 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 287-2340 http://www.coreyhelfordgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm COTRUTZA GALLERY 446 S. Main St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 Tel: 213-622-0121 http://www.cotrutza.com

118

Web fabrikmagazine.com

CRAIG GALLERY 5723 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90019 (323) 939-0351 http://www.craiggallery.com Fri., Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't. CRAIG KRULL GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6410 http:// www.artnet.com/ckrull.html Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm CREATIVE ARTS CENTER GALLERY 1100 W. Clark Ave Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 238-5397 www.burbankusa.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-8pm; Fri., 9am-4pm; Sat., hours vary

CSU LONG BEACH UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90840 (562) 985-5761 http://www.csulb.edu/uam Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm, Thurs., 12-8pm CSU NORTHRIDGE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY 18111 Nordhoff St. Northridge, CA 91330 (818) 677-2156 http://www.csun.edu/artgalleries/ Mon.-Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-8pm D.E.N. CONTEMPORARY ART Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue, #B275, 2nd Floor West Hollywood, CA 90069 323-422-6340 www.dencontemporaryart.com DA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 252 D S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-9716 http://www.dacenter.org DANIEL SAXON GALLERY 552 Norwich Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-6033

CREWEST 110 Winston Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-627-8272 www.crewest.com

DANIEL WEINBERG GALLERY 6148 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 954-8425 http://www.danielweinberggallery.com

CROSSROADS SCHOOL FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES 1714 21st St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't.

DRKRM/GALLERY 727 S. Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90014 Hours: Wed.-Sun., 12-6 pm http://www.drkrm.com (323) 271-5635

CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS ART GALLERY 92 Palm Dr. Camarillo, CA 93010 (805) 437-8863 http://art.csuci.edu/gallery Mon.-Fri., 10am-4pm

DAVID GALLERY 5797 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 323-939-9069 www.ddavidgallery.net

CSU FULLERTON ART GALLERY 800 N. State College Blvd. Fullerton, CA 92634 (714) 278-3262 http://www.arts.fullerton.edu/events Tues.-Fri., 12-4pm; Sat., 12-2pm

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY 3143 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 310-558-3030 http://www.davidkordanskygallery.com DAVID LAWRENCE GALLERY 8969 A Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069 310-278-0882 www.DavidLawrenceGallery.com


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS DAVID SALOW GALLERY 977 N. Hill St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 620-0240 http://www.davidsalowgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm DBA256 GALLERY 256 S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-7600 http://www.dba256.com Mon.-Thurs., 8am-10pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-midnight DCA FINE ART 3107 Pico Blvd Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 770-2525 http://www.dcafineart.com By Appt. only DE SOTO GALLERY 2635 Fairfax Avenue Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 253-2255 http://www.desotogallery.com Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm & by app't DEL MANO GALLERY 11981 San Vicente Blvd West Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 476-8508 http://www.delmano.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm DENENBERG FINE ARTS 417 North San Vicente Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 360-9360 http://www.fada.com DIALECT 215 W. 6th St. #111 Downtown LA, CA 213-627-7599 info@downtowndialect.com DNJ GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Avenue, Suite J1 Santa Monica, California 90404 (323) 931-1311 or (310) 315-3551 http://www.dnjgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm DOWNEY MUSEUM OF ART 10419 So. Rives Ave Downey, CA 90241 (562) 861-0419 http://www.thedmoa.org Weds., 3-7pm; Thurs.Fri., 1-5pm;

DOWNTOWN ART CENTER GALLERY 828 S Main Street Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-7374 http://www.dacgallery.com

EL NOPAL PRESS 109 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-239-0417 EXPOSITION PARK MUSEUMS 900 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 763-3515 http://www.nhm.org

DOWNTOWN ART GALLERY 1611 So. Hope St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 255-2067 http://www.downtownag.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm DRKRM/ GALLERY Capitol Studios Building 2121 San Fernando Rd., #3 Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 223-6867 http://www.drkrm.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm Sun., 1pm-4pm and by appointment DRKRM/ GALLERY WEST 729 Montana Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90403 323-271-5635 DUNCAN MILLER GALLERY 10959 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-2440 http://www.duncanmillergallery.com EARL MCGRATH GALLERY 454 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 657-4257 http://www.earlmcgrathgallery.com Tues- Sat. 10-6

FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY 148 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 934-2250 http://www.faheykleingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm FARMLAB 1745 N. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1158 http://www.farmlab.org Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm FELLOWS OF CONTEMPORARY ART 970 N. Broadway # 208 (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 808-1008 www.focala.org FIFTH FLOOR GALLERY 502 Chung King Court (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 687- 8443 www.fifthfloorgallery.com

EDGAR VARELA FINE ARTS (EVFA) 727 S. Spring Street, LA 90014

FIFTY/24 LA GALLERY 125 E. 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 213-623-4300 http://www.fifty24sf.com

EDGEMAR CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2437 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 399-3666 http://www.edgemarcenter.org Mon.-Fri., 11am-5:30pm

FIG 2525 Michigan Ave. # G6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-0345 http://www.figgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-5pm

EDWARD CELLA ART + ARCHITECTURE 6018 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 525-0053 http://www.edwardcella.com Tues.-Sun, 11am-5pm

FOUND GALLERY 1903 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027 www.foundla.com Sat - Sun 1-5 or by appt. jonny@foundla.com

EL CAMINO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 16007 Crenshaw Blvd Torrance, CA 90506 (310) 660-3010 http://www.elcamino.edu/commadv/art gallery Mon., Tues., 10am-3pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-8pm; Fri., 10am-2pm

FOWLER MUSEUM AT UCLA 405 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 825-4361 http://www.fowler.ucla.edu Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm; Thurs. 12-8pm

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

119


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS FRANK LLOYD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., B5b Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-3866 http://www.franklloyd.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm FRANK PICTURES GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-0211 http://www.frankpicturesgallery.com FREDERICK R. WEISMAN MUSEUM AT PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY 24255 Pacific Coast Highway Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 506-4851 http://arts.pepperdine.edu/museum FRESH PAINT 9355 Culver Blvd., Suite B Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-9355 http://www.freshpaintart.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-6pm; Fri., 8am-12 noon; & by app't FULLERTON COLLEGE ART GALLERY 321 E. Chapman Ave., Building 1000 Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 992-7434 http://art.fullcoll.edu Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 10am-2pm; Weds, 5-7pm FULLERTON MUSEUM CENTER 301 N. Pomona Ave Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 738-6545 http://www.cityoffullerton.com/depts/ museum Tues.-Sun., 12-4; Thurs., 12-8pm

GALLERY 825 / LA ART ASSOCIATION 825 N. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 310-652-8272 http://www.laaa.org GALLERY 1927 Fine Arts Building 811 West Seventh St. Los Angeles, CA 90017 661-816-1136 http://www.gallery1927.com/ GALERIE ANAIS 2525 Michigan Ave., Building D-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-4433 www.galerieanaisla.com GALLERY BROWN 140 S. Orlando Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-651-1956 www,gallerybrown.com GALLERY AT 1000 VAN NESS SAN FRANCISCO GALLERY AT EASTERN COLUMBIA LOS ANGELES 849 S. Broadway Unit 905 Los Angeles, Ca. 90014 http://www.artmeetsarchitecture.com GALLERY AT REDCAT 631 W. Second St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 237-2800 http://www.redcat.org GALLERY LUISOTTI 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0043

GAGOSIAN GALLERY 456 N. Camden Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-9400 http://www.gagosian.com

GALLERY NUCLEUS 210 East Main St. Alhambra, CA 91801 (626) 458-7477 http://www.gallerynucleus.com

GALERIE MICHAEL 260 N. Rodeo Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 273-3377 www.galeriemichael.com

GARY LEONARD TAKE MY PICTURE 860 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-622-2256 http://takemypicture.com

GALLERY 9 6101 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.836.4601 www.thegallery9.com

GEMINI G.E.L. 8365 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-0513 http://www.geminigel.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat. by app't.

120

Web fabrikmagazine.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY L.A. 2716 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-3685 http://www.georgebillis.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't. GEORGE J. DOIZAKI GALLERY Japanese Cultural & Community Center 244 S. San Pedro St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-2725 http://www.jaccc.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat. & Sun., 11am-4pm GEORGE STERN FINE ARTS 8920 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 276-2600 http://www.sternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-6pm GLORIA DELSON CONTEMPORARY ART 215 West 6th St. # 115 Los Angeles, CA 323-805-9363 www.artla.biz GLASS GARAGE FINE ART 414 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 659-5228 http://www.glassgaragegallery.com GLENDALE COLLEGE GALLERY 1500 Verdugo Rd Glendale, CA 91208 (818) 240-1000 http://www.glendale.edu/artgallery GP DEVA 9601 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 125 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 310-858-6545 www.gpdeva.com GRAMMY MUSEUM 800 W. Olympic Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 213-765-6800 www.grammymuseum.org GR2 2062 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 445-9276 http://www.gr2.net GREENFIELD SACKS GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., #B6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-0640 http://www.greenfieldsacks.com


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS GREGG FLEISHMAN STUDIO 3850 Main Street Culver City, CA 90232 310.202.6108 www.greggfleishman.com

H. KAZAN FINE ARTS 11456 Washington Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90066 310.398.0090 www.hkazanfinearts.com

GREY MCGEAR GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave G7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-0925

HONOR FRASER 2622 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-0191 http://www.honorfraser.com

GROUNDFLOOR GALLERY 433 Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-624-3010

HUNTINGTON BEACH ART CENTER 538 Main Street Huntington Beach, CA 92647 (714) 374-1650 http://www.surfcityhb.org/Visitors/art_center Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; Thurs., 12-8pm; Sun., 12-4pm

GUY HEPNER GALLERY 300 North Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 310-979-0011 www.guyhepner.com HAMILTON GALLERIES 1431 Ocean Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 451-9983 http://www.hamiltongalleries.com Tues.-Sun., 12-7pm HAMILTON-SELWAY FINE ART 8678 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 657-1711 http://www.hamiltonselway.com HARO GALLERY 3825 Main Street Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.4276 www.theharogallery.com HENKEN GALLERY Kyoto Grand Hotel 120 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-2505 http://www.thehenkengallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-10pm; Sun. by app't. HERITAGE GALLERY 1300 Chautauqua Blvd Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 230-4340 http://www.heritagegallery.com HIGH PROFILE PRODUCTIONS 5886 Smiley Drive Culver City, CA 90232 310.253.2255 www.highprofileproductions.com

JAMES GRAY GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave., D-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-9502 http://www.jamesgraygallery.com JAN KESNER GALLERY 164 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-6834 http: //www.jankesnergallery.com By appt. only JANCAR GALLERY 961 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-2522 http://www.jancargallery.com Wed.-Sat 12- 5pm and by app't.

HUNTINGTON LIBRARY 1151 Oxford Rd San Marino, CA 91108 (626) 405-2100 http://www.huntington.org

JAPANESE AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM 369 E. 1st St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-0414 http://www.janm.org

ICON GALLERY & INTERIORS 8899 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 310-246-1495 www.icon-interiors.com

JEFFREY WINTER FINE ARTS 8576 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 310-657-4278 www,jeffreywinter.com

IKON LIMITED/K. RICHARDS GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., G-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6629 http://www.ikonltd.com

JK GALLERY 2632 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-3330 http://www.jkgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm

IRON GALLERY 725 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-7149 http://www.ironartgallery.net/ By appointment only

JONATHAN NOVAK CONTEMPORARY ART 1880 Century Park East # 100 Century City, CA 90067 310-277-4997 www.novakart.com

ITALIAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE SPAZIO ITALIA 1023 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 443-3250 http://www.iiclosangeles.esteri.it/IIC_L osangeles Mon.-Fri., 9:30am-5pm JACK RUTBERG FINE ARTS 357 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-5222 http://www.jackrutbergfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 10am-5pm

Web fabrikmagazine.com

KANTOR ART 427 N. Canon Drive Suite 106. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 274-6499 http://www.kantorart.com Mon-Fri 10-5 KINKEAD CONTEMPORARY 6029 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-7400 http://www.kinkeadcontemporary.com KOPEIKIN GALLERY 8810 Melrose Avenue West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 385-5894 http://www.kopeikingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

121


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS KOPLIN DEL RIO GALLERY 6031 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-9055 http://www.koplindelrio.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

LACE (LA CONTEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS) 6522 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028 (323) 957-1777 http://www.welcometolace.org Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm

KRISTI ENGLE GALLERY 5002 York Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90042 323-472-6237 www.kristienglegallery.com

LACMA (LOS ANGELES CONTEMPORARY MUSEUM OF ART) 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-6111 http://www.lacma.org/ Mon., Tues., Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., 129pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-8pm

L.A. ARTCORE UNION CENTER FOR THE ARTS 120 N. Judge John Aiso St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-3274 http://www.laartcore.org Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm

LATINO ART MUSEUM 281 S. Thomas St., Suite 105 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-6009 http://www.lamoa.net

LA ART HOUSE 8825 Beverly Blvd., West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 205-0480 http://www.laarthouse.net Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat.-Sun. by app't

THE LATINO MUSEUM OF HISTORY, ART & CULTURE 514 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-626-7600

LA CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 102 West Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-629-1102 http://www.lacda.com

LATIN AMERICAN MASTERS 2525 Michigan Ave., Building E-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-4455 http://www.latinamericamasters.com

LA CONTEMPORARY 2634 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6200 http://www.lacontemporary.com

LAXART 2640 S. La Cienega Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 559-0166 http://www.laxart.org

L.A. COUNTY ARBORETUM 301 N. Baldwin Ave Arcadia, CA 91007 (626) 821-3232 http://www.arboretum.org

LEBASSE PROJECTS 6023 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-0200 http://www.lebasseprojects.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-6pm

L.A. LOUVER GALLERY 45 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-4955 http://www.lalouver.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm L2 KONTEMPORARY 990 N. Hill St., #205 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 225-1288 http://www.L2kontemporary.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm; & by app't. LA LUZ DE JESUS 4633 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 666-7667 http://www.laluzdejesus.com 122

Web fabrikmagazine.com

LEFT COAST GALLERIES 12324 Ventura Blvd Studio City, CA 91604 (818) 760-7010 http://www.leftcoastgalleries.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm; Sun., 12-6pm; & by appointment LESLIE SACKS FINE ART 11640 San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 820-9448 http://www.lesliesacks.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

LIGHTBOX GALLERY 2680 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-1111 http://www.kimlightgallery.com LILI BERNARD ART STUDIO 935 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (323) 936-3607 www.lilibernard.com LM PROJECTS 125 W. 4th St., LA, CA 90014 213-621-4055 LOIS LAMBERT GALLERY OF FUNCTIONAL ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave.,E-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-6990 www.Galleryoffunctionalart.net LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 4901 E. Carson St. Long Beach, CA 90808 (562) 938-4817 LONG BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 2300 E. Ocean Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 439-2119 http://www.lbma.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-5pm LORA SCHLESINGER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-1133 http://www.loraschlesinger.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm LOS ANGELES CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 107 W. Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (323) 646-9427 http://www.lacda.com Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm LOUIS STERN FINE ARTS 9002 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-0147 http://www.louissternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm LOUWE GALLERY 306 Hawthorne St. So. Pasadena, CA 91030 (626) 799-5551 http://www.louwegallery.com


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS LUIS DE JESUS LA Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. F-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7773 www.luisdejesus.com M. HANKS GALLERY 3008 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8820 http://mhanksgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't. M+B GALLERY 612 N. Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 550-0050 http://www.mbfala.com MACHINE PROJECT 1200 D North Alvarado St. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 483-8761 http://www.machineproject.com Irregular hours - call ahead MADISON GALLERY 1020 Prospect Suite 130 LaJolla, California 92037 (858) 459-0836 http://www.madisongalleries.com MAK CENTER FOR ART AND ARCHITECTURE L.A. 835 N. Kings Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-1510 http://www.makcenter.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-6pm MARK MOORE GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. #A1 SM,CA 90404 310-453-3031 www.MarkMooreGallery.com MANNY SILVERMAN GALLERY 619 Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 659-8256 www.mannysilvermangallery.com MARCEL SITCOSKE GALLERY 7829 Torreyson Dr. LA, CA 90046 323-650-0238 www.marcelsitcoske.com MARC FOXX GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5571 http://www.marcfoxx.com

MARC SELWYN FINE ART 6222 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-9911 http://www.marcselwynfineart.com

MICHAEL KOHN GALLERY 8071 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 658-8088 http://www.kohngallery.com

MARINE CONTEMPORARY 1733-A Abbot Kinney Blvd Venice, CA 90291 T: (310) 399-0294 http://www.marinecontemporary.com

MIHAI NICODIM GALLERY 3143 S. La Cienega Blvd. Unit B Los Angekes, VCA 90016 310-838-8884 www.nicodimgallery.com

MARK MOORE GALLERY 5790 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 310-453-3031 http://www.markmooregallery.com

MIXOGRAFIA 1419 E. Adams Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90011 (323) 232-1158 http://www.mixografia.com Mon.-Fri., 11am- 5pm; & by app't.

MARTIN & LOZANO GALLERY 302 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA www.martinlozano.com 310-358-0617 MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERY 1000 Universal Studios Blvd. #171 Burbank, CA 91608 818-508-7867 www.martinlawrence.com

MOCA - THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY 152 North Central Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 621-1745 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thurs., 11am8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed.

MATIN GALLERY 9905 South Santa Monica Blvd. LA, CA 90212 310-788-0055 www.matin-gallery.com MERRY KARNOWSKY GALLERY 170 S. LA Brea LA, CA 90036 323-933-4408 www.mkgallery.com

MOCA PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 289-5223 http://www.moca.org

MESLER & HUG GALLERY 510 Bernard St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (3232) 221-0016 www.meslerandhug.com MICHAEL DAWSON GALLERY 535 N. Larchmont Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90004 (323) 469-2186 http://www.michaeldawsongallery.com Weds.-Sat., 9am-5pm MICHAEL HITTLEMAN GALLERY FINE ISRAELI ART 8797 Beverly Blvd., #302 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 655-5364 http://www.michaelhittlemangallery.com Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sunday, 1-5pm

Web fabrikmagazine.com

MOCA (MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART) 250 S. Grand Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 62-MOCA-2 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thursday, 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed.

MORONO KIANG GALLERY 218 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 628-8208 http://www.moronokiang.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm MOUNT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE JOSE DRUDIS-BIADA GALLERY 12001 Chalon Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 954-4360 http://www.msmc.la.edu/pages/1897.asp Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm MUCKENTHALER CULTURAL CENTER 1201 W. Malvern Ave Fullerton, CA 92633 (714) 738-6595 http://www.muckenthaler.org

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

123


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS MUSEUM OF JURASSIC TECHNOLOGY 9341 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-6131 http://www.mjt.org MUSEUM OF LATIN AMERICAN ART 628 Alamitos Ave Long Beach, CA 90802 (562) 437-1689 http://www.molaa.com Tues.-Sat., 11:30am-7:30pm; Sun., 12-6pm MUSEUM OF NEON ART 114 W. 4th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-489-9918 http://www.neonmona.org/ MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS 1649 El Prado San Diego, CA 92101 (619) 238-7559 http://www.mopa.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-9pm MUSEUM OF TOLERANCE 9786 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 553-8403 http://www.museumoftolerance.com NEUARTIG GALLERY & ART CONSULTING 366 West 7th Street San Pedro, CA 90731 (213) 973-8223 http:www.galleryneuartig.com Wed – Fri 1:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Sat 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and by appointment 1st Thursday artwalk: 6pm - 9pm NEW HIGH (M)ART 741 New High Str. LA, CA 90012 213-621-7822 www.newhighmart.com NORBERTELLEN GALLERY 215 West 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 818-662-5041 http://www.norbertellengallery.com NORTH HILL EXHIBITIONS 945 North Hill St. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 213-626-2020 www.northhillexhibitions.com

124

Web fabrikmagazine.com

NORTON SIMON MUSEUM 411 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 449-6840 http://www.nortonsimon.org Weds.-Mon., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm

PALOS VERDES ART CENTER 5504 W. Crestridge Rd. Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 (310) 541-2479 http://www.pvartcenter.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Sun., 1-4pm

OFF-ROSE, THE SECRET GALLERY 841 Flower Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 664-8977 Sat., 1-5pm; & by appt.

PARKER JONES GALLERY 510 Bernard St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 227-0102 www.parkerjonesgallery.com

OPTICAL ALLUSION GALLERY 2414 West 7th St. Los Angeles, CA 90057 (310) 309-7473

PAPILLON GALLERY 8272 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 323-655-2205 http://www.papillongallery.com

ORANGE COUNTY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 117 N. Sycamore Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 667-1517 http://www.occca.org Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., Sat., 12-9pm ORLANDO GALLERY 17037 Ventura Blvd. Tarzana, CA 91356 (818) 705-5368 www.orlando2.com OTIS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN BEN MALTZ GALLERY 9045 Lincoln Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045 (310) 665-6905 http://www.otis.edu Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm; Thurs., 10am-7pm OVERDUIN AND KITE 6693 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (323) 464-3600 http://www.overduinandkite.com PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM 46 N. Los Robles Ave Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 449-2742 http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 10am-6pm PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM 101 Museum Dr Palm Springs, CA 92262 (619) 325-7186 http://www.psmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Fri., 10am-8pm

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

PASADENA CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 1570 E. Colorado Blvd Pasadena, CA 91106 (626) 585-3285 http://www.pasadena.edu/artgallery Mon.-Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., Sat., 12-4pm PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART 490 E. Union St. Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 568-3665 http://www.pmcaonline.org PATRICK PAINTER, INC. 2525 Michigan Ave. # A-8 & B-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 254-6953 http://www.patrickpainter.com PEACE YOGA GALLERY 903 South Main St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 213-500-5007 www.peaceyogagallery.com PERES PROJECTS 2766 La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6100 http://www.peresprojects.com PETER FETTERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-6463 http://www.peterfetterman.com PETER MENDENHALL GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd. # 8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 323-936-0061 www.PeterMendenhallGallery.com


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS PHOTO-EYE GALLERY 376-A Garcia Street Santa Fe NM 87505 Tel/Fax: (505) 988-5152, x116 http://www.photoeye.com PITZER CAMPUS GALLERIES 1050 North Mills Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 607-3143 http://www.pitzer.edu/artgalleries PLAZA DE LA RAZA 3540 N. Mission Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 223-2475 POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 330 N. College Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8283 http://www.pomona.edu/museum Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat., Sun., 1-5pm POV EVOLVING GALLERY & PRINT STUDIO 939 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 (213) 594-3036 www.povevolving.com PYO GALLERY LA 1100 Hope St., Suite 105 Los Angeles, CA 213-405-1488 http://www.pyogalleryla.com RAID PROJECTS GALLERY The Brewery Art Complex 602 Moulton St. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 441-9593 http://www.raidprojects.com Sat., Sun., 12-5pm; & by app't. REBECCA MOLAYEM GALLERY 306 N. Robertson West Hollywood, CA90048 310-652-2620 www.rebeccamolayemarts.com REDLING FINE ART 990 North Hill St. #210 (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 323-230-7415 www.redlingfineart.com REGEN PROJECTS 633 N. Almont Drive Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

REGEN PROJECTS II 9016 Santa Monica Blvd (at Almont Drive) Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

ROUGE GALERIE 548 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-489-7309 www.rougegalerie.com

RICHARD HELLER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-5A Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-9191 http://www.richardhellergallery.com

ROYAL/T 8910 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.559.6300 www.royal-t.org RUTH BACHOFNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. (Bergamot Station), G-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-3300 http://www.ruthbachofnergallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm

RICHARD TELLES FINE ART 7380 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 965-5578 http://www.tellesfineart.com RIO HONDO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 3600 Workman Mill Rd., B-13 Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 908-3471 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-3pm; Mon.-Weds., 6-9pm RIVERA & RIVERA 454 N. Robertson West Hollywood, CA 90069 310.713.1635 http://www.riveraandrivera.com

SABINA LEE GALLERY 971 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 213-620-9404 www.sabinaleegallery.com SAM LEE GALLERY 990 N. Hill St., #190 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-0275 http://www.samleegallery.com Wed. - Sun, 12-6pm

RIVERSIDE ART MUSEUM 3425 Mission Inn Ave. Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 684-7111 http://www.riversideartmuseum.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Thurs., 10am-9pm

SAM LEE GALLERY @ the Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue, Suite B267 W. Hollywood, CA 90069 323-788-3535 www.samleegallery.com Monday - Friday, 12 - 5 pm & by app’t

ROBERT BERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-5, & C-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-1937 http://www.robertbermangallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

SAMUEL FREEMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-1479 http://www.samuelfreeman.com

ROBERTS & TILTON GALLERY 5801 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 549-0223 http://www.robertsandtilton.com

SANDRONI REY GALLERY 2762 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 280-0111 http://www.sandronirey.com

ROSAMUND FELSEN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. B-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-8488 http://www.rosamundfelsen.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm

SANTA FE ART COLONY 2401 S. Santa Fe Ave Los Angeles, CA 90058 (213) 587-6381

ROSE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building G-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-8440 http://www.rosegallery.net Web fabrikmagazine.com

SANTA MONICA ART STUDIOS AND ARENA 1 GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7449 http://www.santamonicaartstudios.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

125


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS SANTA MONICA COLLEGE - PETE & SUSAN BARRETT ART GALLERY 1310 11th St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 434-3434 http://events.smc.edu/art_gallery.html SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. G-1 Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 586-6488 http://www.smmoa.org Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SARAH LEE ARTWORKS & PROJECTS Bergamot Station 2525Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-4938 www.sarahleeartworks.com SCA PROJECT GALLERY 101 & 281 So. Thomas St., Unit 104 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-5481 http://www.scagallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-4pm SCHOMBURG GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. E-3a Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-5757 http://www.schomburggallery.com SCI-ARC GALLERY 960 E. Third St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 473-8432 SCION INSTALLATION L.A. 3521 Helms Ave [at National] Culver City, CA 90232 310.815.8840 www.scion.com/space SEA AND SPACE EXPLORATIONS 4755 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 445-4015 http://www.seaandspace.org Sundays 1-5 or by appt. info@seaandspace.org SEE LINE GALLERY Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue Suite B274 West Hollywood, CA 90069 818-604-3114 http://www.seelinegallery.com

126

Web fabrikmagazine.com

SEYHOUN GALLERY 9007 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 858-5984 http://www.seyhoungallery.com SHERRY FRUMKIN GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave., Suite 21 Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7493 http://www.frumkingallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm SHOSHANA WAYNE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7535 http://www.shoshanawayne.com SISTER 955 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 (213) 628-7000 http://www.sisterla.com SKIDMORE CONTEMPORARY ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. B5 Santa Monica, CA (310)-828-5070 www.skidmorecontemporaryart.com SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-4500 http://www.skirball.org Tues.-Fri.12-5pm; Thurs.12-9pm; Sat.& Sun. 10am-5pm GALLERY SOHO 300 A. South Thomas St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-1599 www.pvaa.net Thurs.-Sun., 11am-4pm; second Sats., 11am-10pm SOLWAY JONES 990 N. Hill Street # 180 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 223-0224 http://www.solwayjonesgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SPF:A GALLERY 8609 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.0902 www.spfagallery.com

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

SPARC ART GALLERY 685 Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-9560 http://www.sparcmurals.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm (Closed at Noon-1pm) SPENCER JON HELFEN FINE ARTS 9200 West Olympic Blvd. Ste 200, Los Angeles, CA 310-273-8838 www.helfenfinearts.com STEPHEN COHEN GALLERY 7358 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-5525 http://www.stephencohengallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm STG (STEVE TURNER CONTEMPORARY) 6026 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-3721 http://www.steveturnergallery.com SUMI INK CLUB 970 N. Broadway #212 (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.sumiinkclub.com SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS 6006 W. Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 310-837-2117 www.vielmetter.com SYLVIA WHITE GALLERY 1783 East Main Street Ventura, CA 93001 805-643-8300 http://www.artadvice.com TAG, THE ARTISTS' GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., #D-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-9556 http://www.TAGgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm TAKE MY PICTURE GARY LEONARD 860 S. Broadway @ 9th Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-622-2256 http://takemypicture.com TASENDE GALLERY 820 Prospect St. La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 454-3691 www.tasendegallery.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm;


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS TAYLOR DE CORDOBA 2660 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-9156 http://www.taylordecordoba.com TELIC ARTS EXCHANGE 972B Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 213-344-6137 ww.telic.info TEMPLE OF VISIONS 719 S. Spring St. Los Angeles CA 213-537-0139 http://templeofvisions.com TERRENCE ROGERS FINE ART 1231 Fifth St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 394-4999 http://www.trogart.com Thurs-Sat., 12-5; & by app't. TERRELL MOORE GALLERY 1221 S Hope Street LA CA 90015 (213) 744-1999 www.terrellmoore.net THE ART FORM STUDIO 716 North Figueroa St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 213-613-1050 www.theartformstudio.com THE BREWERY ARTS COLONY 2100 N. Main St. at Avenue 21 Los Angeles, CA 90031 http://www.breweryart.com THE BOX 977 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 625-1747 www.theboxla.com THE CLAYHOUSE 2909 Santa Monica Blvd. (near Yale St.) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-7071 THE COMPANY 946 Yale Street (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 213-221-7082 THE FOLK TREE 217 S. Fair Oaks Ave Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 795-8733 http://www.folktree.com Mon.-Weds., 11am-6pm; Thurs.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm

THE GETTY CENTER 1200 Getty Center Dr Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Tues.-Thurs., Sun., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-9pm 213-955-9091

TOBEY C. MOSS GALLERY 7321 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 933-5523 http://www.tobeycmossgallery.com

THE GETTY VILLA 17985 Pacific Coast Highway Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Thurs.-Mon., 10am-5pm; closed Tues. Weds. and major holidays THE HAMMER MUSUEM AT UCLA 10899 Wilshire Blvd. LA, CA 90024 310-443-7000 www.hammer.ucla.edu THE HAPPY LION 963 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 625-1360 www.thehappylion.com

THE LOFT AT LIZ'S 453 S. La Brea Ave. (Enter through back alley) Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-939-4403 www.theloftatlizs.com

TRACK 16 GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building C-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-4678 http://www.track16.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

TRIGG ISON FINE ART 511 N. Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 274-8047 http://www.triggison.com

THE PERFECT EXPOSURE GALLERY 3519 West 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (213) 381-1137 http://theperfectexposuregallery.com

TROPICO DE NOPAL GALLERY 1665 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 481-8112 http://www.tropicodenopal.com UCR/CALIFORNIA MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY 3824 Main St Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 784-FOTO http://www.cmp.ucr.edu Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm

THINKSPACE ART GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.3375 www.thinkspacegallery.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm THOMAS SOLOMON GALLERY 410 Cottage Home St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 310-428-2964 www.thomassolomongallery.com

Web fabrikmagazine.com

TORRANCE ART MUSEUM 3320 Civic Center Dr Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 618-6340 http://www.torranceartmuseum.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

TRACY PARK GALLERY The Malibu Country Mart 3835 Cross Creek Road Malibu, CA 90265 310-456-7505 http://www.tracyparkgallery.com

THE HIVE GALLERY 729 S. Sping St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 955-9051 http://hivegallery.com

TINLARK GALLERY 6671 Sunset Blvd., #1516 Hollywood, CA 90028 (323) 463-0039 http://www.tinlark.com

TOPANGA CANYON GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 109 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-7909 http://www.topangacanyongallery.com Tues.-Sun., 10am-6pm

USC FISHER GALLERY 823 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90089 (213) 740-4561 http://fishergallery.org Tues.-Sat. 12-5pm

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld

127


ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez Monterey Park, CA 91754 (323) 265-8841 http://elac.edu/collegeservices/ vincentprice/ Mon.-Weds., Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-7pm VIVA (VALLEY INSTITUTE OF VISUAL ART) 13261 Moorpark St., Sherman Oaks, CA 91423 (818) 385-0080 Weds.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Satu., 12-4pm VOILA! ART FOR THE MODERN EYE 518 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-954-0418 www.voilagallery.com WAL ART 1639 S. La Cienega Los Angeles, CA 90035 310-274-9055 www.walartinc.com WALTER MACIEL GALLERY 2642 S. La Cienega Blvd. LA, CA 90034 310-839-1840 www.waltermacielgallery.com

WATTS TOWERS ART CENTER NOAH SYLVESTER PURIFOY GALLERY 1727 E. 107th St Los Angeles, CA 90002 (213) 847-4646 Weds.-Sun., 10am-4pm

WILLIAM TURNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. E-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0909 http://www.williamturnergallery.com Mon.-Sat.,11am-6pm

WESTERN PROJECT 2762 S. La Cienega Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-0609 http://western-project.com

WONDERLAND GALLERY 1257 North La Brea Ave West Hollywood, CA 90038 323-645-6920 WONDERFUL WORLD ART GALLERY 9517 Culver Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.836.4992 www.wwagallery.com

WHITTIER MUSEUM 6755 Newlin Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (310) 945-3871 WILIAM GRIFFIN GALLERY 2902 Nebraska Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 586-6886 http://www.griffinla.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't.

XIEM CLAY CENTER AND GALLERY 1563 N. Lake Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 794-5833 http://www.xiemclaycenter.com YOUNG ART GALLERY The Women's building 1727 North Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1230 http://www.youngartgallery.com By appt. only

WILLIAM A. KARGES FINE ART 427 Canon Dr., Suite 101 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 276-8551 http://www.kargesfineart.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-5pm

SUBSCRIPTION DETAILS NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE

ZIP

PHONE EMAIL

PAYMENT INFORMATION

❏ AMERICAN EXPRESS

PLEASE CHARGE:

❏ VISA

❏ MASTERCARD

CREDIT CARD #

Connecting artists, designers, architects, collectors, exhibitors and lovers of art and design @ www.fabrikmagazine.com

Subscribe Today!

5 ISSUES FOR ONLY $25

128

Web fabrikmagazine.com

EXP. SIGNATURE

Please fax this subscription form to (310) 360-9194, or mail to: Fabrik Magazine, 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234 Beverly Hills, CA 90212

Twitter twitter.com/fabrikworld


THE KNITTER, 24" HIGH X 16" WIDE ACRYLIC AND STEEL MESH OIL ON CANVAS 2002 • $1600

Ione Citrin (310) 556-4382 www.artbyione.com icitrin@aol.com


The Beverly Hills Art Show Landscape and the Los Angeles Imagination Zale Richard Rubins, new media photography

May 19 & 20 2012 10am - 6pm Bannon Fu, watercolor

Paz Winshtein, oil on canvas

on Santa Monica Blvd from Rodeo to Rexford Dr beverlyhills.org/artshow 310.285.6836


May 17-20, 2012 Opening Preview May 16 benefiting Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Fort Mason Center, San Francisco

Media Partner

sffineartfair.com Klari Reis, SF to Marin (detail), 2011, Mixed media on floating aluminium panel, 60 in. Diameter. Klari Reis, Courtesy Cynthia Corbett Gallery, London


Introducing ArtConcierge. ArtConcierge, transforms the way in which art enthusiasts experience Los Angeles and its multitude of artrelated events. The ArtConcierge app for iPhone guides Los Angeles culture enthusiasts to galleries, art fairs, art-related exhibits, including all of The Getty’s Pacific Standard Time (PST) programs, special and independently organized events, VIP parties and fringe venues with GPS navigation, a search feature and social networking buttons that encourage users to share favorite events or exhibits via email, Facebook and Twitter. The ArtConcierge app features include: • Guides – Pacific Standard Time, Galleries, Art Fairs and Special Events – What is happening, where and when! A calendar of events with map locations. • Favorites – allows you to tag your favorite galleries, exhibits and events for future reference. • Social Networking – send favorites to both Facebook and Twitter, or email updates from Fabrik’s own live and up to date Twitter stream. • Where am I? – a fully embedded map of Los Angeles and environs allowing you to find your precise location in relation to all listed venues. The GPS function, which locates you on Google maps, helps you arrive at your chosen destination(s). • Twitter – Fabrik’s Twitter feed will keep art enthusiasts up-to-date with the latest art news, events and developments.

ArtConcierge° Free download available from ArtConciergeApp.com and iTunes.

SCAN QR CODE TO DOWNLOAD


Fabrik - Issue 16