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ART. DESIGN. ARCHITECTURE. FASHION.

ISSUE 11


CONTRIBUTORS MASTHEAD Publisher Chris Davies Associate Editor Peter Frank Creative Director Chris Davies Art Direction & Design Shout Design Group Paul Soady Contributing Writers Jacki Apple Aparna Bakhle-Ellis Peter Frank Phil Tarley Dale Youngman Contributing Photographer Ted VanCleave

JACKI APPLE Jacki Apple is a Los Angeles-based visual, performance, and media artist, designer, writer, composer, and producer whose work has been presented internationally. Her writings have been featured in numerous publications including THE Magazine LA, The Drama Review, Art Journal, and High Performance. She is a professor at Art Center College of Design.

APARNA BAKHLE-ELLIS Bollywood born and bred Aparna Bakhle-Ellis studied film at Emerson College in Boston before checking into Hotel California. A writer enthralled by the consonance and dissonance of being specifically in Los Angeles, she is also Fabrik’s managing editor. Her interests include modern art, l’écriture féminine and conscious parenting.

PETER FRANK Account Executive Dale Youngman Production Associate Allem Ramirez

Peter Frank is Senior Curator at the Riverside Art Museum and is also the Associate Editor for Fabrik. He was born in 1950 in New York, where he served as art critic for The Village Voice and The SoHo Weekly News, and moved to Los Angeles in 1988.

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING Editorial editorial@fabrikmagazine.com Advertising ads@fabrikmagazine.com

PHIL TARLEY Phil Tarley is a Fellow of The American Film Institute, an artist and a filmmaker. He is currently working on a book of narrative non-fiction travel stories.

Contact

DALE YOUNGMAN

269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 Tel 310 360 8333 info@fabrikmagazine.com http://www.fabrikmagazine.com

Dale Youngman is a freelance curator and writer who has been living in LA for 15 years. Her raison d’être is to reverse the paradigm of the starving artist, one at a time.

INFORMATION Fabrik is published bi-monthly by Fabrik Magazine, Inc., 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Contents cannot be reproduced in part or in full without the written permission of the copyright holder. The opinions expressed are those of the artists and writers themselves and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Fabrik Magazine, Inc. Copyright © 2011. All rights reserved. PRINTED IN LOS ANGELES

ART. DESIGN. ARCHITECTURE. FASHION.

ISSUE 11

ON THE COVER

‘The Beatification’ by Featured Artist David LaChapelle.


42 WUNDERBAUM. PHOTO CREDIT: STEVEN GUNTHER

CONTENTS 8

Profile: The Rize of David LaChapelle

26 Profile: The Real (Ann) McCoy 38 Through the Lens: Life, Art & Death in Multimedia Experimental Theater 52 Coming In, Going Out: Stephen Cohen Gallery: Josef Hoflehner and Maya Mercer 58 Profile: Michael Hayden: A Painter With A Burning Desire 64 Fabrik Art Prizes 74 Spotlight: Raffi and Argishti Musakhanyan: Like Father, Like Son — A Powerful Two-Man Show 77 Directory: LA Art & Design Directory 80 Art About Town: Peter Frank’s Exhibit Highlights 96 Showcases: Artist and Gallery Showcases


THE RIZE OF DAVID LACHAPELLE WORDS PHIL TARLEY IMAGES © DAVID LACHAPELLE, COURTESY FRED TORRES COLLABORATIONS

KANYE WEST, RIOT • © DAVID LACHAPELLE


PROFILE

PHOSPHORESCENT, OVER-SATURATED COLOR POURS OUT OF HIS MIND’S EYE AND FILTERS THROUGH A MAD-HYSTERICAL KIND OF PHOTOSHOP-ED SYNESTHESIA. SEX AND SENSUALITY, POLITICAL COMMENTARY, AND POP ICONOGRAPHY FUSE TOGETHER IN DAVID LACHAPELLE’S WONDROUS, SOMETIMES NUMINOUS WORLD OF EPIC, LARGE-FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHY. EXHILARATING AND EXHAUSTING (EXCESS IS NEVER ENOUGH), MANY OF LACHAPELLE’S BEST PHOTOGRAPHS CAN BE BOTH ALLURING AND ABHORRENT — AT THE SAME TIME. DLC zaps the pop zeitgeist. His Hollywood divas like Paris Hilton and Angelina Jolie vie with Amanda Lepore and Lil’ Kim, in cutting-edge reinterpretations of the female form – and I do mean cutting edge. Little Kim’s lips and hips, engorged with silicone and implants and Lepore’s countless sex-change surgeries make us redefine what a beautiful woman can or can not be. His eerie underwater series, and his personal favorite, Deluge - soon to be eclipsed by an even bigger waterwork, The Raft – explore hydrodynamics in search of a new visual domain. LaChapelle is everywhere. His travel schedule is dizzying. “I will be opening a show in Turkey that’s moving from the Museum of Contemporary Art Tel Aviv, then I’m going to Asia for three weeks - we have some great exhibitions planned for China, so it’s a little hectic.” When I met David in the winter of 2009 at the shows that surround Art Basel Miami Beach 2009, he was bursting out from a howling cacophony of art anarchy. LaChapelle was all over Miami like an art angel, bedeviling the event with magnificent works that appeared at the most important venues. He had a one-man exhibition at Wolfgang Roth & Partners and had three Michael Jackson pieces in the main show at ABMB. He also created a surreal, intensely compelling image, Berlin Stories, for German automaker Maybach, who had commissioned Lachapelle to celebrate and commemorate their historic and contemporary line of luxury cars for their Daimler Art Collection. The lucrative alliance between artists and purveyors of high-end luxury goods has morphed into a major trend. Murakami went to Louis Vuitton, David Lynch went to Cartier, and LaChapelle went to Maybach. DLC had a rough assignment: how to promote his sponsor’s wares and push his photography into new artistic territory. He did 10

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RIZE • © DAVID LACHAPELLE


PROFILE

both, and he did it with his leitmotif over-the-top hyper-sensuality in both the mural and in the opulent party David staged at The Raleigh, one of South Beach’s most glamorous hotels. The artist meticulously styled the elements of the party exactly like the 1932 New Year’s Eve party depicted in Berlin Stories, replete with a carnival of period dancer-swimmers (synchronized Busby Berkeley-like performers), submerged in The Raleigh’s Art Deco pool. Serenaded by a jazzy ‘30s swing band, the event was a kind of performance art extension of the party depicted in the mural it celebrated – all done in art overdrive. After Miami, David was the Guest Host at the photo l.a. vernisage 2009. This year, LaChapelle is again participating in the January event as a member of the Honorary Host Committee. Fair Director and gallery owner Stephen Cohen talked to me about David’s work. “Los Angeles has never been shy about itself. Glitz and glamour has always been its bread and butter. Stepping it up quite a few notches from George Hurrell is David LaChapelle.” “Last year along with LACMA, we thought David was a great choice for photo l.a.’s guest of honour, because of his long-time commitment to photography. David’s style has made an impact on how celebrity is seen by the public. It’s become part of the public conversation. He has so many iconic images that stay with people. They might not know his name, but they know his image and the celebrity and that’s what it’s all about. He has taken photography to a new level. If L.A. had a photographic style, it would be his.” When Heaven to Hell, David’s latest book from Taschen, barreled onto my desk to review, I got to take a fresh look at this man’s torrid body of work. Brimming with insouciant, sassy sexuality, LaChapelle’s world is a lexicon of luminous pop-culture, an uber-world of brilliant, fine art photography. Studying the eye-popping double truck images of Heaven To Hell renders David’s unique perspective as that of a visionary- Pop; yes - but flush with ironic pleasures and bizarre cultural parodies. Seeding this artist’s cosmology are tributes to the photographic worlds of Diane Arbus, Pierre et Gilles, Terry Richardson, Kenneth Anger, and James Bidgood – with constant homage to Da Vinci and Warhol. Cascading from his consciousness is a non-stop parade of celebrities, often referencing other celebrities. Amanda Lepore does Elizabeth Taylor; Pamela Anderson does Bardot; Decaprio does Brando. LaChapelle also references iconic movie culture, with a series on Taxi Driver and another on Scarface. And then, in Jesus is my Homeboy, there are images deifying the most deified celebrity on the planet; one of DLC’s most notorious and strangely compelling works. When I decided to look at LaChapelle’s feature film Rize, a dance documentary shot entirely in South Central Los Angeles, it was like unlocking the gates to heaven. Rize (2005), a Sundance favorite and DLC’s only feature film, functions as a kind of codex of creation, a stylistic key that can be used to fathom this artist’s work, enabling us to parse his preoccupation with Los Angeles and its culture. The film opens with clips of actual footage of the streets on fire during one of Los Angeles’ many riots. L.A. burning, police over-reactions, and dystopian cityscapes can also be seen in many of LaChapelle’s still images. 12

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AWAKENED ABRAM • © DAVID LACHAPELLE


LAST SUPPER • © DAVID LACHAPELLE


GUILTY THINGS • © DAVID LACHAPELLE


LEONARDO DICAPRIO, NOSTALGIC STYLING • © DAVID LACHAPELLE


AMANDA, AS ANDY WARHOLS LIZ RED • © DAVID LACHAPELLE


PROFILE

MURDERER II • © DAVID LACHAPELLE


Out from a bullet-ridden culture of gangstas, drive-byes, and homeboys, comes Krumping, a desperado style of ghetto dance, performed by lithe, heavily muscled black bodies dripping with sweat and fever. In Rize, we see the computer used to enhance the color saturation of the image, another LaChapelle hallmark. The celebration of muscled, black bodies that dance across the frame come also to inhabit other DLC works, like Guilty Pleasures. The homeboy culture laid down in Rize reappears in the Jesus Is My Homeboy series. Los Angeles’ gang-thug culture is clearly a totemic marker, a touchstone the artist returns to again and again. LaChapelle’s Hollywood studio is a Byzantine warren of offices, stages, cycloramas, computer retouch and composite stations, and costume and prop rooms. Hard at work are a dozen assistants and devotees – it’s a light day. As George, the studio manager, tours me through the facility, we ascend to the second floor. Lining the staircase are shelves of archives detailing the craftsmen and resources used to make each image, which LaChapelle can source for subsequent jobs. George affably escorts me up into David’s dark, wood-paneled office and private screening room. Caulked by hand on a mirror over a Baroque mantle is, “Love as much as you can. Laugh as a child. Ride your bike.” A large black and white photo of Andy Warhol, David’s muse and mentor, casually leans against the mirror. And I get it. I am in The Factory; not Andy’s but David’s version of it. Trying to interview David LaChapelle is like asking questions of a force of nature. David’s words come tumbling out gushing faster than I can keep up. I let him take the lead. He organizes our meeting visually, flipping through pages of photographs in his countless books and stopping on an image to tell its story. How Faye Dunaway generates tears (she declines make-up, she acts); how shooting Milton Berl, a bit crotchety in old age, necessitates David assigning a scantily clad model to flirt with him - so Berl can be silly and David can get great poses. “Always try to make things as engaging as you can for the person you are photographing. Keep it fun.” We come to a photo of Tom Jones, and David remembers how he saved the film from a lab mistake by using one of the first computers made for retouching, with a hard drive as big as a boiler room. David is the consummate circus ringmaster. He is in total control. Yet with scores of elements marshaled to his directorial will, he retains the remarkable ability to let go like a child at play and be completely “in the moment,” free to improvise and create. David LaChapelle is on fire. His obsessive iconography is matched only by his burning desire to make art, to make film, to make parties, to see and be seen everywhere all the time. Planet LaChapelle is a visceral and procreative non-stop ejaculation of art spewing out all over the universe.

More information about David LaChapelle can be found at: www.lachapellestudio.com

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GLI SPOSI E IL CORTEO, 1992

TINA LUPO www.kultrunmuseum.it


PROFILE WORDS APARNA BAKHLE-ELLIS IMAGES COURTESY OF CAPORALE/BLEICHER GALLERY

The Real (Ann)McCoy IT WAS 1972. NEWLY MINTED WITH A MASTER’S FROM UCLA, ANN McCOY RECEIVED LACMA’S INFLUENTIAL MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ARTS COUNCIL (MCAC) NEW TALENT AWARD, AN INDISPUTABLY AUSPICIOUS LAUNCH TO WHAT HAS BECOME AN INTERNATIONALLY CELEBRATED CAREER. AFTER LEAVING LOS ANGELES ALMOST THIRTY YEARS AGO, ANN RETURNS AS “LIGHT BRINGER IN A TIME OF DARKNESS” WITH A POTENT ALLEGORY AS MIXED MEDIA INSTALLATION ENTITLED “THE ALCHEMIST OF PFAUENINSEL.” ANN McCOY’S EAGERLY ANTICIPATED SOLO EXHIBIT OPENS FEBRUARY 12TH AT CAPORALE/BLEICHER GALLERY AND CONTINUES UNTIL MARCH 7TH. ANN SHARES WITH FABRIK SOME RECOLLECTIONS OF DREAMS, IMAGERY AND/OR MESSAGES FROM THE COLLECTIVE UNCONSCIOUS THAT FORMED AROUND HER DECISION TO LEAVE L.A. AT THAT TIME. 26

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PFAUENINSEL CASTLE • WATER COLOR ON PAPER WITH PENCIL • 60 X 42 INCHES


PROFILE

Ann: In 1977 I got a D.A.A.D. Berliner Kunstler Grant. My Market Street studio was sold, so I had to leave it. Lives move in cycles, and fate intervened to lift me out of Los Angeles. I put my old Rover on blocks in Lyn Kienholz’s garage, my work in storage, and left for Berlin in January of 1977. I had had a very stressful 1976 (a nervous collapse) and needed a rest. Eberhard Kornfeld, a Bernese dealer, suggested I take a studio near the Brucke Museum in the Grunwald. I left sunny California for Berlin and arrived to see people ice-skating on the Grunwald See. I was given the Nazi atelier of Arno Braker, Hitler’s sculptor, where the statues for the Munich Stadium were made. Ed Kienholz showed me books of Nazi medical experiments, and the Arian Race Institute (where Jews were killed for cranial measurements) was on my street. This period ushered in the Night Sea works. I fell into the depths like Jonah in the leviathan, into a deep state of introversion. Fabrik: The imagery you create is resonant with your significant studies in mythology, depth psychology and alchemy. How do you perceive alchemy as a tactical practice that can enhance individual and collective existence? Ann: My adoptive father was a chemist. My recurring childhood dream (at about five) was of the king from ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ being bludgeoned by an evil queen, and ground up with a mortar and a pestle. When I entered Jungian analysis with Dr. James Kirsch in Los Angeles, he showed me the tale of the Alexandrian alchemists who kill the king, grind him into a paste, and bake him like dough in an oven. This tale of regicide is mythic and is described in Mary Renault’s “The King Must Die.” The king represents the old form of consciousness that must die and be replaced by his son, the new form. This cycle is a process in the psyche of the individual, and is reflected in society. We are caught in a warfare mentality (Dick Cheney), which must give way to a new paradigm and ecological and spiritual renewal. If we don’t transform as individuals and as a society, we perish. Our current ecological crisis and the breakdown of society are apparent. Alchemy was not simply an early form of chemistry, but a symbolic language of the psyche. Alchemical processes are represented in the dreams 28

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THE RUBY GLASS • MULTI PANEL WATERCOLOR AND PENCIL • 35 X 45 INCHES EACH PANEL

of all people. Such dream images as baptism, dismemberment, ablution, and putrefaction are all alchemical processes. Our psyche is a laboratory. Fabrik: As an artist, what is your sense of contemporary Los Angeles, perhaps symbolically as well as ecologically, and can you address how this city in particular could benefit from the transformative social force of artistic practice grounded in depth psychology? Ann: I have not lived in Los Angeles since 1977. My brother founded the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve, so I am often on the border. With the rains, mudslides, earthquakes, and forest fires, Los Angeles was always a city affected by natural forces. I think of the house in the film “The Loved One,” balanced on an eroding cliff. When I lived in Los Angeles, I used to go to the Vedanta Society with Christopher Isherwood. Los Angeles was always the home of ashrams and alternative spiritually more than New York. There is a reason why writers like Aldous Huxley and Isherwood chose Los Angeles. Web fabrikmagazine.com

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ANN McCOY INSTALLATION


PROFILE

My friend Eric Orr was a big influence. We both read alchemy and were in the Venice Biennale ART AND ALCHEMY along with James Lee Byers. We live in perilous times and artists need to present solutions. When art becomes merely a commodity, the muse walks away. People crave meaning, not empty cynicism, puerile fun, and “art products.” Yesterday one of my students sent me the hauntingly beautiful work of a young woman artist who works with images of feet being bathed in honey. Her work was a welcome companion piece to Robert Hughes “The Mona Lisa Curse,” a film about art as a commodity. Fabrik: Since you frame the unconscious as that space which holds ‘seeds for future healing and therefore more than a mere repository for the past,’ how do you most authentically access that source? Ann: Through incubation, a “sleeping in.” I have recorded my dreams for thirty-five years. The unconscious brings new possibilities with each night. As Heraclitus says, “we never put our foot in the same river.” Dreams are letters from the gods; we need to read our mail. My Zurich analyst Dr. C.A. Meier worked with Wolfgang Pauli. Pauli got his theories of physics from his dreams. He is the case study in Jung’s volume on dreams; Maier was the young analyst. Fabrik: Even though Los Angeles appears primarily image-driven, more heart-based, non-linear, intuitive and perhaps lunar ways of thinking are still quite challenged by the ‘rational’ as dictated by economic reality. Do you have any insights from your own process you would like to share with regard to transforming our relationship with the ‘material’? Ann: For the last twenty years, October Magazine theoretical types dominated many art departments and journals. While I use a Marxist critique in some instances, this is not the whole picture. I got dumped from Barnard after twenty years by Benjamin Buchloch, when my class appeared in a film called, “Keep the River on Your Right: a Modern Cannibal Tale.” I had a gay Jewish cannibal lecturing to my students on the Asmat. Tobias Schneebaum taught my students how to communicate with the spirits in the Asmat sculptures. This is the sort of thing that drives a Frankfurt School type up the walls. Dialectical materialism is 32

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still materialism, there is something called pneuma. Now I teach at Yale in the Drama Department. I assign E.R. Dodds, “The Greeks and the Irrational.” The rational man is still thrown by irrational forces in the unconscious and needs to integrate them; or these manifest as phobias, psychosomatic illnesses, aggression, and the like. The Greeks and the Indians had the best thoughts on materialism; one must fill flesh with spirit and matter with Atman. It is always a question of moving between the opposites. A one-sided stance is always dangerous. We live between the pairs: spirit and matter, the rational and the irrational. I have been lecturing on Joseph Beuys, both in the US and Europe. My students are interested in Beuys’ balance of the political with Rudolph Steiner’s theories. Beuys’ dimensionality is extraordinary; the archetypal drives the political. His ‘Coyote’ piece is for me the great masterpiece of our century, the marriage of shamanism, nature, archetype, politics, and art. Gandhi understood this as well with his Salt March and spinning wheel, two archetypal symbols.

SOLO EXHIBIT: ANN McCOY “The Alchemist of Pfaueninsel” Artist’s Reception: Saturday, February 12, 2011, 6-10pm Show Duration: February 11-March 7, 2011 Caporale/Bleicher Gallery 355 North La Brea Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90036 www.CaporaleBleicher.com Hours: 11-7pm, Tuesday-Sunday or by appointment Gallery Phone: +1-323-545-6018

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CHEERIO • 68 INCHES DIAMETER X 28 INCHES DEEP • LAMINATED WOOD & COPPER

Studio: 48-020 Beverly dr. Palm deSert, Ca 92260 lwieSe917@maC.Com (760) 346-8549

lesterwiese.com


giampieropodesta.com vital organs | 2008 | pigment, resin, cordage on canvas | 8 elements more-one 45½� x 29� | photo quino | light betanit.com


Life, Art & Death in Multimedia Experimental Theater WORDS JACKI APPLE

“HOW CAN YOU STAY IN THE HOUSE ALL DAY AND NOT GO ANYWHERE,” PART 1 - "SUNSHINE ROOM". RALPH LEMON. PHOTO BY DAN MERLO.


THROUGH THE LENS

The latest digital technologies have made it relatively easy to produce spectacular entertainment with stunning visual effects and wrap-around sound. Thus, more than ever the challenge for experimental theater is to probe beneath mere surface stimuli and use these tools to reveal the complexities of the human condition and the nature of contemporary society in ways that offer fresh insights into our experience. Three companies of very different esthetics — The Wooster Group, Ralph Lemon/Cross Performance, and Wunderbaum — have masterfully succeeded in creating innovative new works that not only deep dig into the psyche but resonate well beyond the time watching them. Despite the artists’ radically different approaches, the interface of art and life is a meta-theme within each of the works—Vieux Carre, How Can You Stay in the House All Day and Not Go Anywhere, and Looking for Paul, respectively. And all three use film/video in concert with the live performance to underscore the blurred boundaries between autobiography and fiction. The New York-based Wooster Group under the direction of Elizabeth LeCompte is well known for four decades of audacious idiosyncratic re-interpretations of texts and groundbreaking multi-faceted staging. In their latest production, Tennessee Williams’ sexual coming-of-age memory play Vieux Carre, set in the decrepit 1930s Rue Toulouse, New Orleans boardinghouse of Williams’ youth, is brought into sharp contemporary focus in an unrelenting two hour bombardment of language and visceral physical performance. In Wooster’s deconstruction Williams’s effusive journey through discovery and defeat, longing and loss, desperation and self-deception, hope and despair, careens from comedic grotesquerie to wrenching pathos and back again as the residents of the boardinghouse attempt to find meaning in their failed dreams and battered lives. Beneath the dark humor of ribald encounters and achingly inept efforts at connection is the conflict between the pursuit of sexual gratification and artistic ambitions. The youthful Writer (young Hemingway) clad in a black leather thong struggles with his secret homosexual desires. The dissolute tubercular Nightingale, who struts about wearing a huge rubber phallus sticking out of his tattered robe, seeks to quell his loneliness by seducing the inexperienced boy. Between gropings, he takes pleasure in coaxing him into confessing the carnal details of the Writer’s guilty encounter with a paratrooper. Alternately the old man sardonically raps about real art (and what that might be) versus his demeaning job of sketching tourists to pay his expenses. Other boarders are Jane, an ex-New Yorker with an unnamed disease and pretensions of respectability. Also an artist on the skids, she longs for intelligent conversation, but instead finds solace in sex with her thieving heroin addicted, low life lover. Interspersed are the ravings of 40

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VIEUX CARRE. PHOTO BY STEVEN GUNTHER — (L TO R) SCOTT SHEPHERD, ARI FLIAKOS.

Mrs. Wire, the landlady gone crazy with loneliness and her African American servant Nursie, who longs for escape into a bag lady life on the street. Disease, decay, denial and guilt are palpable substances in this house where delusions do battle with the realities of the flesh. Between the fornicating, drinking, and blood-spewing coughs, the bedbugs and gumbo, are the ripped up drawings and writings, and the promise of redemption. In the midst of this seedy dissolution where sex and drugs substitute for love, and death conquers all, the Writer surrenders his innocence and ironically discovers his inner muse as he furiously types out the very tale we are watching in a great burst of inspiration. But then, isn’t life in all its extremes what “art” is made of? Wooster’s postmodern dissection and reconstruction of Williams’s original play fractures any pretense of linear storytelling, replacing it with a rapid-fire montage of imagery. LeCompte effectively employs a cinematic syntax breaking the “plotline” into a series of jump cuts, time lapses, and dissolves that more accurately embody the discordances and slippages of memory, along with the contradictions in the time and place from which this excursion is being perceived. In addition, the projected video images look inward, subjectively mirroring the Writer’s point of view, be it in recollection, or from the notes of a diary. This is underscored by the production design, which is more urban industrial loft flopWeb fabrikmagazine.com

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THROUGH THE LENS

house than French Quarter decay, with the Writer’s use of computer keyboards, and an oddly ghostlike soundtrack of cries from the street, rain, and strains of jazz. Finally Vieux Carre reminds us that out on the streets of Hollywood, and perhaps post-Katrina New Orleans, there is a whole new generation of cast-out and homeless young gay men not so far removed from the young Williams, in search of a life. In sharp contrast to the Wooster Group’s non-stop assault of words and images is the spatial narrative of the bare stage, poetic clarity of voice, and deeply spiritual introspection of Ralph Lemon’s How Can You Stay in the House All Day and Not Go Anywhere. This too is an autobiographical journey, but its exploration of love and loss, art, life and death, is of an entirely different tone, one that seeks and finds not redemption but transcendence in the creative act in everyday life. Lemon uses the body and the voice not only as the vehicles for the expression of pathos, humor, doubt, wonder, grief and joy, but as the manifesting force of mind and spirit to prevail. He raises profound questions about the condition of endurance and impermanence at the core of all life, and the struggle to accept and overcome that reality in the process of living. This internal mythos is mirrored in the structure of the performance, a play between order and chaos, suffering and grace. By transforming the creative act of making and viewing the work into a simultaneous search for enlightenment, Lemon makes art and life inseparable. How Can You Stay in the House…begins by establishing both the heartbreaking and transcendent process of dying by the two most important people in his life- his companion dancer Asako Takami who died in 2007, and his inspiration and collaborator Walter Carter, a former sharecropper, carpenter, and gardener Lemon met in the Mississippi Delta in 2004 who died at the age of 102 in 2010. In the first section “Sunshine Room,” Lemon sits on the bare stage reciting a poetic text that is also the narration for an accompanying film, the central image of which is a wood and scrap metal handcrafted spaceship made by Walter for his journey into the next life in Heaven. As he dances in his silver spacesuit with his wife Edna to old juke joint tunes, this old black man embodies the history of the 20th century VIEUX CARRE. PHOTO BY FRANCK BELONCLE in what he has witnessed— southern — ARI FLIAKOS. 42

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VIEUX CARRE. PHOTO BY NANCY CAMPBELL — (L TO R) ARI FLIAKOS, JUDSON WILLIAMS, KATE VALK.

lynchings, the Civil Rights movement, and the Apollo astronauts’ journey to the moon. Walter sleeps and dreams. He also encounters a giant Hare (a dancer in costume). Brer Rabbit comes to life, an imaginary creature appearing and disappearing throughout the performance like Harvey or the White Rabbit. Lemon juxtaposes and interweaves Walter’s daily life with other images and texts, including excerpts from Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1972 philosophical space odyssey Solaris, scenes of drunk and stoned dancers pushing the limits in the rehearsal studio, quotations from Walter Benjamin and Camus’s Myth of Sisyphus, and recollections of watching all of Ozu’s films during the long slow process of Asako’s decline. It is a tender odyssey of love and loss, and it’s re-enactments – Lemon and Asako, Walter and Edna, Kris Kelvin and his ghost wife Hari – are a synthesis of art and life as seen through the eye of memory. What comes next in section two is the raw power of the live dancers in action – six lean hard bodies pushing into and through space, colliding, slamming, struggling, falling, thrusting, rolling over each other, shoving, grasping, wrestling, a tangle of arms and legs coming apart, pushing towards exhaustion on an emotional roller coaster ride. And then there is only one spinning like a dervish as if possessed. She stops suddenly, bends down as the others return, covers her face with a sweatshirt and lets out a smothered howl. And the unrelenting flailing and battering resumes without any space to breath and it is almost unbearable to Web fabrikmagazine.com

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THROUGH THE LENS

WUNDERBAUM. PHOTO CREDIT: STEVEN GUNTHER

watch as they hit the floor over and over again. And then they are all gone and we are all alone staring into the dark empty space when the sound of a woman crying begins. It is a visceral sound of unbearable anguish, wrenching agony, despair, sorrow and grief. And we are forced to listen to this howling with nothing to look at until the androgynous Okwui wanders onto the stage, shoulders heaving, arms hanging loose, suffering made palpable in our own skin. It is a shared catharsis. The dancers are surrogates for all our tears. The last two sections are about acceptance and letting go, moving on beyond suffering, finding beauty again in the everyday, and even life beyond 44

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death. A menagerie of animals emerge one by one out of the dark. At first the dog greeted by the mythical Hare appears to be “real” but by the time we get to the cow and the giraffe it is clear that they are virtual creatures, 3-D projections of a remembered past and/or a sustained future. They are both transient and eternal. In the final duet Lemon and Okwei Okpokwasili try out movements, rediscover possibilities, test out what the body can do. A sock comes off, is folded, contemplated, pocketed. Lemon does little bouncing jumps. It is renewal, rebirth. He lies down on the floor and repeatedly says “yes!” Life will go on. But the images and words in this work will resonate for a long time, as will the timeless questions Lemon poses. In contrast to the well-established Wooster Group and Ralph Lemon is Wunderbaum, a relatively young performance ensemble from Holland. Although they draw on historical precedents, stylistically their approach to the art/life interface is from a very different critical perspective and esthetic. They are confrontational, satirical, and very witty in their examination of contemporary culture. Their subject matter is political and controversial, and their process exposes the complex social mechanisms of conflict negotiation. Their latest sitebased work, Looking for Paul was the culmination of a three-week residency in L.A. in which local artist John Malpede (founder and director of the Los Angeles Poverty Department group) acted as a foil to their discourse. In Looking for Paul group dynamics and cultural parody are capped off with laughable excesses of visual obscenity. They are extremely clever in the devices they use to manipulate their audience into being complicit players in their theatrical experiment. The central “plot” revolves around the pros and cons of a public art work by critically acclaimed Los Angeles artist Paul McCarthy, and one woman’s quest Web fabrikmagazine.com

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THROUGH THE LENS

to get revenge on the artist for the fact that she has been subjected to the indignity of being forced to view this “vulgar eyesore” day and night from her place of work in a bookshop and her apartment above. This statue of a giant Santa Claus “gnome” holding a huge phallic butt plug presently resides in a public square in Rotterdam. This young woman, Inez, awkwardly tells us her story along with a slide show. She is then joined by the Wunderbaum actors Walter, Marleen, and Matijs who sit down and proceed to explain that since they have failed to come up with a “piece” they will read to us their collective emails of the past month’s attempt. This begins with the “recruitment” of Inez – “a regular person, not an actor” to come to L.A. with them. What unfolds are the philosophical, intellectual, and personal arguments and discord amongst the group about Inez, McCarthy’s art, public art, censorship and arts funding, definitions of obscenity, kitsch, theater, plus L.A culture, materialism, new media, the pursuit of celebrity, money, and finally – what are they going to do at REDCAT. Malpede joins them as a counterpoint, critiquing their “lack of strategy”, and offering hardcore pragmatic arguments to their flights of fantasy. (Walter doesn’t believe in social democracy anymore, loves pop L.A., wants to recruit Lady Gaga, or maybe open a cheese shop). Intercut into this socalled non-performance is their film of Inez’s hilarious “attack” on McCarthy which consists of plastering stickers and posters of her face with the message “good morning Paul think of me as the one you made think of you every day” on ketchup bottles, palm trees, the side of his house (not really his house), and a huge billboard overlooking the swimming pool on the roof of the Standard Hotel. They decide the solution to their dilemma is to stage their version of McCarthy’s performance video of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolff, which comes off as a compendium of McCarthy’s expressionist pop esthetic, indulging every pornographic and scatological excess, engaging in masses of food consumption, all manner of excretions and orifices, and exultant primal degradation. It is not until we witness Inez’s enthusiastic participation in this theatrical orgy with a wild wig and an exposed breast that we understand that she is one of the group, not an aggrieved average citizen. Her role has been a ruse for the purposes of ideological debate, as has been the “reality” show construct as a device to expose both the creative process and the issues at hand. The question of the validity of the Santa Claus Butt Plug sculpture as “art” is left open to further conjecture. Ironically, we discover that once the initial shock impact of the image and either the disgust or delight at its impudence has 46

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"HOW CAN YOU STAY IN THE HOUSE ALL DAY AND NOT GO ANYWHERE” - PART 3. RALPH LEMON. PHOTO BY DAN MERLO.

passed, it has faded into the environment, replaced by the proliferation of all the images it comments on. In using McCarthy’s work as “raw material,” Wunderbaum both illuminates the artist’s own social critique and makes it an example for provocative investigation of the role of “art” in public discourse. How prescient Wunderbaum’s work is in light of the recent debacle at the Gagosian Gallery in New York, involving the expulsion of a group of people whose T-shirt texts were responding to Anselm Kiefer’s exhibition Next Year in Jerusalem. In the words of the gallery’s representatives, the gallery is not a place for the exchange of ideas, but for selling art. Bravo Wunderbaum! And REDCAT for presenting them. And Paul McCarthy for his tolerance.

The Wooster Group — Vieux Carre; December 1-12, 2010 Ralph Lemon/Cross Performance — How Can You Stay in the House All Day and Not Go Anywhere; November 10-14, 2010 Wunderbaum — Looking For Paul; November 17-20, 2010 REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney/Cal Arts Theater) 621 West Second Street, Downtown Los Angeles 90012 www.redcat.org

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Gwen Samuels

“Urn Series”

C U R R E N T LY O N V I EW BY A P P O I NT M E N T AT:

#18 Santa Monica Art Studios gwensamuels@mac.com • gwensamuels.com


COMING OUT, GOING IN WORDS PETER FRANK IMAGES COURTESY OF STEPHEN COHEN GALLERY

COMING OUT, GOING IN —

STEPHEN COHEN GALLERY 7 3 5 8 B E V E R LY B O U L E VA R D, LOS A N G E L ES

JOSEF HOFLEHNER JOSEF HOFLEHNER works in black and white exclusively, which, given his subject matter, seems at once an affectation and a relief. Born in Austria, Hoflehner seems addicted to places – not to their exotic or even picturesque qualities, but to the elegance of their surfaces. By selecting images from Hoflehner’s various portfolios rather than showing the entire contents of any one, the gallery emphasized the artist’s skills as a visual stylist rather than as a documentarian – but also demonstrated that Hoflehner is especially adept at emphasizing certain distinctive factors of his places, just enough to betray the identities of the topographies, urban and natural, historical and contemporary, upon which he sets his gaze. The exhibition did feature a goodly number of images from one portfolio, taciturnly titled “Jet Airliner,” which revealed Hoflehner’s strong sense of humor, and even of the absurd. The portfolio documents a peculiarity of a particular Caribbean island – Aruba, if memory serves, but it may be Curaçao – whose airport lies right by one of its beaches most popular with tourists. As a result, the bathers are buzzed consistently with incoming airplanes. Hoflehner JET AIRLINER 09 AA captures the nearly naked, sand JOSEF HOFLEHNER, 40” X 40”, SILVER GELATIN PRINT beflecked sun-worshipers (usually Caucasian, usually women, usually seen from behind, which usually proves a less than flattering angle) standing up in either wonder or indignation (or, most likely, both) as these monstrous birds nearly knock their bathing caps off and, worse, block the sun for a long second. 52

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MAYA MERCER MAYA MERCER, a Paris- and Los Angeles-based actress and artist – and member of a family closely connected to European theater and filmmaking – has put her own sense of drama to good, indeed, intense, use in her “Ladykillers” portfolio. The photographs comprising this series refer only in the most oblique way to the midcentury film of the same name, and to a certain extent the title gives a misleadingly sinister cast to images that are peculiar and unsettling, no question, but poignant and tender rather than gruesome. Mercer’s Ladykillers are men, to be sure, striking and virile (and thus “ladykililers” in the parlance) but vaguely tragic and lost, caught (well, posed) by Mercer stumbling and languishing in fields and woods and beaches — and garbed in nothing more than women’s slips. Remarkably, there isn’t the slightest hint here of drag travesty, and even CHRYSAOR 01, MAYA MERCER the cliché about men “finding their feminine side” seems rather beside the point. These men have found their vulnerability (or, rather, Mercer, their “director,” has brought it out in them), and that psychic exposure manifests in clothing that lies lightly on the body and does little to protect it from the elements – clothing designed to show off one gender’s assets that here effectively bares the other’s soul. Even the occasional presence of (unworn) high-heeled pumps signals the absence – or, rather, the internalization – of the “other,” not the desire to possess or be her. Full disclosure: I was involved in organizing an exhibition of work from the “Ladykillers” portfolio in West Los Angeles this past fall, and am delighted that a broader selection can now be displayed. And this is only the tip of Mercer’s passion-ridden iceberg; her newer series are even wilder and more inventive. Web fabrikmagazine.com

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TO ASSUME BODILY FORM New Paintings and Sculptures by Raffi Musakhanyan and Argishti Musakhanyan WORLD CLASS ART EXHIBITION AT ICONIC EASTERN COLUMBIA BUILDING

855 South Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90014 – Corner of 9th & Broadway Open Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays 7–10 PM • January and February 2011

For more information or private viewing contact Lisa at 805-217-2186, or email lisa@artmeetsarchitecture.com A PRESENTATION BY

Art meets Architecture www.artmeetsarchitecture.com


Color Photograms of Nature

Christine Caldwell

www.IlluminatedNegatives.com


Michael Hayden

"IT WAS JUST A DREAM" ENCAUSTIC, MIXED MEDIA, 56 X 46 INCHES, MICHAEL HAYDEN

www.MichaelHaydenArt.com 310.613.6626


PROFILE WORDS DALE YOUNGMAN IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

M ICHAEL H AYDEN

A PAINTER WITH A BURNING DESIRE

MICHAEL HAYDEN, BORN IN 1961 IN MEMPHIS TENNESSEE, IS A MAN AS COLORFUL AND MULTI-LAYERED AS HIS STRIKING ENCAUSTIC PAINTINGS. LANDING IN LOS ANGELES AFTER SEVERAL DIVERSE AND CREATIVE PROFESSIONS, WE DISCOVER THAT HAYDEN IS A MAN OF MANY TALENTS, UNUSUAL PHILOSOPHY, AND A PASSION…HIS CURRENT SOLO SHOW AT SMOOTH N PURDY GALLERY IS CURIOUSLY ENTITLED “I LIKE TO BURN THINGS” BECAUSE OF HIS FASCINATION WITH FIRE.

As a young child visiting his grandmother in Blytheville, Arkansas, Michael was quite taken with the then-preferred method of trash disposal, namely barrel – burning. As he likes to explain, he would “experiment with fire on almost anything.” Once, he accidentally set fire to the interior of his parent’s new car while using the cigarette lighter to burn the Comic section of the Sunday paper. Lucky for him, Michael’s uncle was in the car upholstery business! These days, he has translated his obsession to encaustic painting, an ancient method of melting beeswax with pigment, whose name is derived from the Greek word “enkaustikos” meaning “to heat” or “to burn.” Hayden says, "When I was young, my dream was to be a singer but life got in the way. As it turns out, I found 'my voice' through painting and I learned it's never too late to follow your dreams." His journey took him through various positions and locations, as an assistant to the Art Director at Vogue Magazine, then a manager at a law firm in New York City, and eventually to San Francisco and The Day Studio, where he studied a variety of decorative painting and faux finishing techniques under the renowned JoAnn Day. He became a master painter, operat58

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"AUGUST" • ENCAUSTIC, MIXED MEDIA • 53.5 X 53.5 INCHES • MICHAEL HAYDEN • 2010

ing a lucrative business in decorative painting. One day, while collaborating on a large mural at a live/work artist loft building in Oakland, he was introduced to painting using beeswax. Although he loved transforming blank spaces, he moved into painting canvases because he missed seeing his work after completion. He soon began melting crayons to convey emotion through a colored streak in a series of his own paintings. This highly toxic experiment led him to fall in love with and learn the proper encaustic method. This transition to fine artist about 15 years ago also brought another dimension to Michael’s work – the inclusion of recycled materials. Trying to utilize leftovers from his faux finishing business, he soon started incorporating cheesecloth, metal leaf and eventually found objects from a scrap metal dumping yard near an ocean side dog park he frequented in the Bay Area. He says “I’ve learned that everything has energy on a molecular level, whether it’s a piece of metal, or a


PROFILE

"FORGIVE AND FORGET" • ENCAUSTIC, MIXED MEDIA • 48 X 32 INCHES • MICHAEL HAYDEN

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puppy. That’s why I love using found objects in my work. When things are thrown away, I can give them new life. They can then become a focal point or the soul of a painting. I have given that object an opportunity to be appreciated, not become a piece of garbage.” From that, a new series, “The Castaways,” was born, and has evolved into his signature style of art. When asked about his influences, or favorite artists, Hayden explains his earliest paintings. “ My very first painting was a drip painting, inspired by Jackson Pollack. It’s called “Journey”. I’ll never part with it. I admire him because he did his thing, no matter what anyone thought of it. Jasper Johns’ work “Target With Plaster Casts” inspired me to begin using hinges as a way to increase the size of my own artworks. I consider him to be the modern day Father of encaustic painting. I am also sometimes compared to Rothko, because of my color fields and horizon-line aspect.” Michael clearly loves to paint, but is very humble about his success and now highly collectable pieces. Michael explains, “I try to never let my thoughts influence my process. A large portion of the time I do not even know what the next step or color will be. It’s a channeling or divine connection with something that is directing me. I don’t want to mess with that. Sometimes the name comes early and that may influence how I feel about what I am doing, but it does not dictate how I do it.” Some collectors of his work include an enthusiastic Jenny McCarthy who said in a recent interview for Elle magazine, “I wish I could have purchased all of his art!” Other collectors include Brian Henson, Jessica Stroup, and Diane Lander-Simon, who are all more than happy with his divine connections!

Michael Hayden’s current solo show is his second at SnP Gallery, located at 3015 Glendale Blvd, LA, 90039. Call 310-463-6277 or visit www.snpgallery.com for more details or hours. The exhibit runs through Feb. 4, 2011.

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FABRIK ART PRIZES WORDS PETER FRANK IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

FABRIK ART PRIZES In the Autumn of 2010 Fabrik Magazine initiated an international art competition. Its purpose is to help advance the careers of artists all over the world, and similarly to bring attention-worthy art to the attention of an ever-growing and ever-hungry audience. The response to the magazine’s call was even better, in volume and in quality, than had been anticipated. As can be seen from the extensive list of Honorable Mentions, dozens of eminently qualified artists honored us with their entries. The eventual winners, submitting from Athens and Seattle, London and New York, Toronto and California, distinguish themselves in a wide variety of media and styles; but so do the painters and sculptors, installation artists and conceptualists, video artists and digital artists who made Honorable Mention, or came close to doing so. Exhausting as the job of jurying was, it has rekindled the editors’ faith in the artistic spirit and optimism about artistic practice in at least the near future. We look forward eagerly to next year’s competition — and, in light of this one, to the rest of this year’s art season, here in Los Angeles and abroad. 64

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First Prize Winner Timothy Siciliano (Seattle, WA) Don’t let the candy colors and cartoon figures fool you. Timothy Siciliano’s world is a dark one, ridden with fissures that cut across logic, psyche, and even the eye. To be sure, an ecstatic thrill also runs through Siciliano’s world, powered by – or powering – an intensely sexual frisson rooted as much in the corporeal indulgences of infancy as in the desirous passions of adulthood. But Siciliano understands those desirous passions (and perhaps those corporeal indulgences) as the means by which our consumer culture enthralls and enslaves us. This is a world of sex and stuff and rack ‘n’ ruin – and Siciliano delivers it up as a kind of cartoon grand Guignol, endlessly entertaining in its myriad detail but endlessly painful in its DONGGUAN HIGHWAYS, HOT PINK, ©TIMOTHY SICILIANO unflinching graphic allegory, a kind of Boschian Big Top played out in a landscape scorched with anxiety. This dystopian fantasy started driving Siciliano’s vision as he got into his day job. Over the past decade he has been running Party Partners Design, which designs gift and paper products – an innocent, and appropriate, enough vocation, it would seem, for an artist so graphically gifted. (His firm has designed and produced items for, among other clients, the Chicago Art Institute and New York’s Museum of Modern Art.) But Siciliano, also trained in the theater, traveled for work to some places whose grotesqueries struck him as simultaneously comedic and tragic. He has spent a good deal of time in mainland China’s Guangdong Province, which he describes as “the ‘Heart of Darkness’ of Web fabrikmagazine.com

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the new industrial age,” a “landscape of industry and decadence” where people are cogs in an immense system of production for worldwide consumption, but can consume little themselves. In this veritable frontier of capitalism rampant, which he bemoans as “the ‘Wild West’ of the new century,” Siciliano finds the makings not simply of a vast company town, but a Moloch-kingdom of degradation in which physical and spiritual infrastructure alike is rapidly eroding and even the bread and circuses are ephemeral. Siciliano’s references to the specifically Chinese source of his agitation, and object of his commentary, are oblique (except in several lantern-bedecked boxes): the stylized, attenuated structure of the spaces he describes recalls traditional Chinese landscape painting, and the children’s-book renditions of figures and animals reflects modern China’s (and, for good measure, the entire Far East’s) taste for the cute and the vapid – a taste that, contextualized this way, is intensely sinister. But Siciliano isn’t letting the West off the hook, either: we are, after all, the primary target of Guangdong’s production, and at the rate we’re buying their stuff (and they’re buying our debt), the artist reminds us, they’ll own us by sometime late next year. To be sure, at first glance Siciliano’s paintings, drawings, and objects, lusciously hued and rhythmically composed, are visually delightful. He envelops his artworks in an aura of mystery and seemingly innocent seduction: the Boschian comparisons do not start right away. The devil is in the details – indeed, all over them. Often invisible at first glance, masked by the garish veneer of frivolity, the gruesome images and events populating these fantasies can emerge suddenly, without warning – and once emerged, are hard to get out of mind, much less out of sight.

Second Prize Winner Susan Rowe Harrison (Toronto, Canada) Susan Rowe Harrison contributes to the current discourse in street art, mural painting and graffiti by practicing none of the above. Harrison works on walls, interior as well as exterior, and her projects are as likely as not to include some sort of message, often but not always verbal. Their powerful graphic presence, however, resembles nothing so much as traditional paintings, backdrops for theatrical stages, or even children’s-book illustrations. Oscillating between the abstract and the imagistic, Harrison locates a barrier site (normally by commission) – a wall along a walkway, a window, a staircase landing, a garage door, etc. – and enlivens it with a dynamic composition that somehow builds on the givens of the site. An arrangement of silhouettes, for instance, can reflect the 66

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INFLORESCENCE, ©SUSAN ROWE HARRISON

presence of various objects at a given moment, fixed in place for months as a result; the particulars of an otherwise unremarkable architectural configuration can spur a (seemingly) abstract elaboration; a poem or quotation can bring forth a wall-filling design that visually sets off the words while thematically underscoring them. Harrison’s real strength is her graphic and situational versatility, an ability to respond with grace as well as imagination to a situation that demands sensitivity to social as well as aesthetic considerations.

Second Prize Winner Ioanna Pantozopoulou (Athens, Greece and London, UK) Ioanna Pantozopoulou fabricates free-standing sculptures and site-specific installations out of commonly found objects and materials, leaving those objects and materials raw and un-transformed but still engaging them as essentially abstract elements in larger compositions. Tables, string, toilet paper rolls, and all manner of mundane and even abject things find their way into Pantozopoulou’s elaborate structures, thoroughly absorbed into these confabulations while still basically unmediated. These arrangements themselves stand apart, to be looked at rather than entered, further discouraging “exploration” of Pantozopoulou’s elements and emphasizing instead the comprehension of the Web fabrikmagazine.com

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AMWE, ©IOANNA PANTOZOPOULOU

installations as self-sufficient presences. These presences, already unsettling in their scale and bulk, serve in turn to re-contextualize the utilitarian stuff comprising them, establishing “regions” in which the ordinary world and assumptions about it are turned inside out. Such bricolage is not in itself that unusual, but Pantozopoulou distinguishes her approach to this practice by emphasizing the formal rather than the contextual or associative; her work proffers its frisson not by destabilizing chairs, light fixtures, and two-by-fours but by effectively decommissioning them and enmeshing them in overarching entities.

Third Prize Winner Terry Hoff (Pacifica, CA) Terry Hoff gives a distinctive spin to an already interesting hybrid. One of a number of painters whose work conflates abstraction and figuration in ways that bespeak the artificial realms of computer graphics and (especially) on-line gaming, Hoff’s especially painterly approach favors sensuality and implied motion. Indeed, his acrylic-oil-drawing media mixes on panel, superimposing quasi-cartoony passages with areas of vigorous brushwork, all superimposed on smeary but luminous, frequently hyper-vivid color fields, recapitulate the agitated kinesis and surfeit of detail that characterize contemporary gaming. But Hoff 68

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also conjures the sign language of contemporary urban walls, feeding spray-painted passages and even graffiti imagery into his otherwise completely non-objective visual world.

Third Prize Winner Emma Lloyd (London, UK)

SWEET STATE 2007, ©TERRY HOFF

EMERGENCE (VIEW FROM ABOVE), ©EMMA LLOYD

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Emma Lloyd is a book artist, but she shows far less respect for the page than for the book itself. Lloyd distinguishes herself among any number of current artist-bookmakers – or, more accurately, unmakers – who reflect at once on the book’s simultaneous disintegration in the social sphere and its heightening presence as a kind of art object. These artists carve into extant tomes, treating the book’s pages as geologic strata or its contents as an unstable realm of unlikely visual or even tactile experience – anything, that is, but the indexical reservoir of verbal information or confabulation that the book used to be. In her extravagant modeling of layers into everything from masks to mountain ranges, arrangements of lace to arrangements of lakes, Lloyd exercises a particularly deft, high, and graceful transformation of the book. You always hurt the one you love, but in this case, Lloyd’s tough love effects a near-magical metamorphosis. Twitter twitter.com/fabrikmag

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Third Prize Winner Deborah Martin (Los Angeles, CA) Deborah Martin is blessed with a technique that allows her to portray space and the things in it with a quavering, almost feverish luminosity as she trains her eye on all forms of the American outback. Martin is probably best known for her paintings of the blasted communities that surround the Salton Sea. But she paints other parts of the California desert as well, and has also painted the rural American south, the nether parts of Cape Cod, and other places in this country where society dissolves and individuals find solitude whether or not they seek it. What interests Martin – whose pictures are full of human presence but devoid of humans – is SLAB CITY CHAIRS, ©DEBORAH MARTIN not the mundane or the abject, but how habitation seems only to amplify the emptiness of the land itself. In this respect she extends Edward Hopper’s lonely realms into the context of “new topographic” photography.

Third Prize Winner Luis Sanchez (Los Angeles, CA) Luis Sanchez employs an oftenstaggering virtuosity to all manner of media, enabling him to fabricate exacting renditions of fantasies that are at once nightmarNOTHING TO HIDE, ©LUIS SANCHEZ ish and re-assuring, intensely passionate and coolly austere, harsh in their social commentary and irresistible in their erotic charge. Sanchez combines trompe l’oeil technique with found 70

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objects, dense renditions of flesh with passages of delicately textured emptiness, classical elegance with over-the-top situations that seem to expose the sadomasochism in Greco-Roman mythology (and, by inference, the stateliness of meso-American theology). Sanchez’s art, painted and sculpted, collaged and assemblaged, brims with familiar tropes, but he renews their power with his fabrication skills and equally formidable ability to juxtapose incongruous elements in unforeseeable ways. The grotesque is rarely so beguiling, or the perfectly wrought so exquisitely painful.

Third Prize Winner Sam Still (New York, NY) Sam Still’s minimalism takes especially aggressive, and yet especially poetic, form. Confining himself to ink on paper, applied with a rapidograph pen, Still generates notably large drawings of emphatically flat silhouettes, shapes that are sometimes as forward and uninflected as a perfect circle, and other times strange – and strangely familiar – in their eccentricities. Their contours may describe shapes never quite seen before, or conversely seen somewhere far away from the rarefied visual experience Still’s large, stark images provide. One suddenly recognizes a particular form – a ©SAM STILL black square with a bent white shape interrupting its center, for instance, or a black rectangle interrupted in the middle by a curved, pinched white area – as the silhouette of a common household item or supermarket package or something as dumb as that. Still responds to the poetry of the everyday not by reveling in its pathos or celebrating its silliness but by simplifying and amplifying its basic object-hood – not even its bulk, but its footprint. Web fabrikmagazine.com

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Third Prize Winner Leslie Tucker (Brooklyn, NY) Leslie Tucker employs digital media in the generation of visually and contextually elaborate documents commenting archly on American consumer culture. The documents themselves, from postage stamps to stock certificates to legal forms to flow charts to all manner of paper-borne banality, tend to be depicted in gridded accumulations inferring the social and personal costs of consumption. In all cases Tucker has enlivened their already potent graphic presence with pointedly humorous evocations of our appetites, habits, and reliance on and expectations of devices, MEN IN TIES, ©LESLIE TUCKER mechanical and digital. The icon at the center could be as distinctive as a Coke bottle or as generic as a slice of bread. But even the bread, Tucker reminds us, is packaged in a certain way – a way that also affects our behavior and our health.

HONORABLE MENTIONS Rebecca Alston (U.S.), Lea Anderson (U.S.), Mia Babalis (U.S.), Robyn Barrington (U.S.), George Belcher (U.S.), Francis Berry (U.S.), Michele Castagnetti (U.S.), Michael Chearney (U.S.), Kazuko Eisenbeiss (U.S.), Sheila Elias (U.S.), Suzan Etkin (U.S.), Doro Hofmann (U.S.), Stanton Hunter (U.S.), Milan Jilka (U.S.), Jenny Kemp (U.S.), Lili Lakich (U.S.), Ellen Lane (U.S.), Nic Lyons (U.S.), Eric Magnuson (U.S.), Lark Pilinsky (U.S.), Kazimierz Poznanski (U.S.), Robert Reynolds (U.S.), David Scherrer (U.S.), Kris Schomaker (U.S.), Joan Schulze (U.S.), Michael Smoler (U.S.), James Stern (U.S.), Francoise Studer (U.S.), Haikuhie Tataryan (U.S.), Kathleen Thompson (U.S.), Annaliese Vobis (U.S.), Dave Zarick (U.S.). More information and links to the artists websites can be found on the Fabrik website at http://www.fabrikmagazine.com/content/juried-competition/ A show of work by the nine winners opens at The Factory, in downtown Los Angeles’ Arts District, on January 22, 2011 with a reception from 4 to 7 pm. The Factory is at 912 East 3rd Street, Suite 204, LA 90013, only blocks from the Los Angeles Convention Center, where Fabrik is participating in this year’s LA Art Show. 72

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art holeman

photography for purchase www.artholeman.com 480.759.0228


SPOTLIGHT WORDS DALE YOUNGMAN IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON— A POWERFUL TWO-MAN SHOW “TO ASSUME BODILY FORM” is an exhibition of painting and sculpture by Raffi Musakhanyan and his son Argishti at a temporary gallery created by Mark and Lisa Ames in the iconic Eastern Columbia Building. This extensive show was first exhibited in San Francisco to widespread acclaim, although many of the works on view here were created as site-specific installations for this landmark architectural gem. Raffi and his family are originally from Armenia, where he says mentality, culture and perception played a crucial role in his artistic development. Although he has been creating art since he was a young child, when he moved his family here in 1988, his work took on a new dynamic, and has especially flourished in the last decade. Creating his mixed media textural paintings with earth-toned layers of oil paint contrasted by subtle planes of pale gold metallic, he creates a depth and a contrast between matte and luster, with highly textured borders to distinguish his technique. Depicting a surreal world through symbolism and the recurrent use of certain images, he intends the viewer to see strength and positivity even through the pain and struggles that may be portrayed. He says, “symbols are very simple yet powerful tools. I use them to illicit, develop or complete an idea or feeling. The egg (seen in both his paintings and sculptures) represents the preciousness of birth and fragility. The tree represents growth and development. The elongated figures primarily represent physical spirits and character.” His bronze sculptures range from the powerful to the poetic, in strange creatures and graceful figures. One favorite piece entitled “Elevate” portrays a man supporting a woman, attempting to launch her with all his might into the heavens. It is strong, yet gently moving, and a tribute to the power of his love. Argishti, now 24, came to this country at the age of two, and was encouraged to express himself creatively while still very young. Also a painter and sculptor, he has already exhibited in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, San Francisco, New York, and Utah. Although he holds a BFA from the California College of Arts in San Francisco, he says, “Ever since I was able to crawl I've been surrounded by art and encouraged to 74

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"LAST MINUTE, LAST ROUND" • 55" X 90" X 12" • YARN, PLASTER AND ACRYLIC INSTALLATION ON WALL

express myself in whatever field I was interested in. One thing I am very grateful for is that my father has never limited my ways of creating. I have been taught how to use materials in painting and in sculpture, and when it came time to work, I was left to take what I have learned and use it however I wanted. My formal education was for 4 years, what my father has taught me will never cease to help me grow as an individual and artist.” Especially strong are his large sculptures, including life-size figures in yarn and resin with 24kt gold, and a large and strangely elegant bird in expanded metal and resin. When asked about his future plans, Argishti says, “What keeps me engaged in my practice is that unknown, and figuring things out as I work. I plan on pushing my art practice in places that I have never been and embrace that unknown to see where it will lead. I have many pieces that are in the process of being created so it’s an exciting time for me.” It’s an exciting time for us too, as we will continue to monitor this engaging and artistic family affair.

The exhibit will be on display through February at “Art Meets Architecture”, in the Eastern Building, 849 S. Broadway, LA, CA 90014. For more information, please see: www.artmeetsarchitecture.com, http://raffisstudio.blogspot.com and http://argishtim.blogspot.com

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s stetz tetz stetz.clik.net stetz@clik.net 818.400.0714 CITYSCAPES ARCHITECTURE PORTRAITS PEOPLE AT WORK CHICAGO LOS ANGELES LIMITED EDITIONS FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY


Los Angeles

ART & DESIGN DIRECTORY Pacific Design Center Showrooms

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Artist & Gallery Showcase

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PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER SHOWROOMS 8687 MELROSE AVENUE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069

RUDIN G172 310-659-2388 arudin.com

CENTURY DESIGNER SHOWROOMS B425 310-652-5176 centuryfurniture.com

DURALEE FABRICS B601 310-360-0778 duraleefabrics.com

HOKANSON CARPET B613 310-657-8026 hokansoncarpet.com

ALMAR CARPETS INTERNATIONAL G277 310-859-1200 almarcarpets.com

CHOW'S ORIENTAL ARTS, INC. B433 310-659-6208

EBANISTA INC. G190 310-246-9170 ebanista.com

HOLLY HUNT B377 310-657-3776 hollyhunt.com

ECCOLA B211 310-360-5959 eccolaimports.com

INNOVATIONS M20 310-289-0100 innovationsusa.com

EDELMAN LEATHER G158 310-855-9355 edelmanleather.com

INTERNATIONAL DOWN AND LINEN B368 310-657-8243 internationaldownandlinen.com

ESPASSO B433 310-657-0020 espasso.com

ITALIAN LIVING/UMBRIA B455 310-775-8081 italianlivingumbria.com

EUROCONCEPTS BATH B119 310-652-3472 euroconcepts.com

J.H. MINASSIAN & CO. B139/B147 310-657-7000 jhminassian.com

EUROCONCEPTS KITCHEN B124 310-657-5391 euroconcepts.com

JANUS ET CIE B146/B193 310-652-7090 janusetcie.com

FORT STREET STUDIO B213 310-855-9832 fortstreetstudio.com

JULIA GRAY, LTD. B355 310-360-9457 juliagrayltd.com

GIATI DESIGNS B122 310-659-9924 giati.com

KNEEDLER FAUCHÈRE B600 310-855-1313

ARC-COM FABRICS, INC. B260 310-659-0376 arc-com.com ASHBURY HIDES B605 310-854-5499 ashburyhides.com ASID / LOS ANGELES B241 310-659-4716 asidla.org AST B409 310-659-9970 astfabrics.com ATELIER LAPCHI G176 310-967-0087 lapchi.com AUDIO VIDEO INTERIORS G280 310-657-0104 avinterior.com THE AVENUES M38 310-289-2534 avenuesartdesign.com BAKER KNAPP & TUBBS B525 310-652-7252 bakerfurniture.com BROWN JORDAN B445 310-659-0771 brownjordan.com BRUNSCHWIG & FILS B653 310-659-9800 brunschwig.com CBS SHOWROOM B450/B464 310-652-9180

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CJ MATSUMOTO M48 310-659-6343 COOPER-PACIFIC KITCHENS G299 310-659-6147 cooperpacific.com CORAGGIO TEXTILES B633 310-659-4295 coraggio.com COWTAN & TOUT B647 310-659-1423 cowtan.com CREATIVE ENVIRONMENTS B103 310-652-3713 CREST SIGNATURE LEATHER M33 310-854-0294 crestleather.com D' ESCOTO WEST, INC. M34 310-657-0562 descotowest.com DAKOTA JACKSON G170 310-659-7424 dakotajackson.com DAVID SUTHERLAND SHOWROOM B182 310-360-1777 davidsutherlandshowroom.com DESIGN BATH & HARDWARE B444 310-358-9669 designbath-hardware.com DESIGN SPEC FLOOR COVERINGS B418 310-859-8861 DONGHIA G196 310-657-6060 donghia.com Web fabrikmagazine.com

HAGAN FLYNN, INC. B435 310-659-2614 haganflynn.com

KRAVET B624 310-659-7100 kravet.com

HANASSAB ORIENTAL RUG IMPORTS B149 310-657-3674

LEE JOFA B639 310-659-7777 leejofa.com

HBF FURNITURE / HBF TEXTILES B270 310-652-5344 hbf.com

MAGNI DESIGN, INC B273 310-623-1623 magni.com

HERITAGE BOOK SHOP M46 310-659-3674

MARTIN PATRICK EVAN B457 310-652-2292 martinpatrickevan.com

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PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER SHOWROOMS 8687 MELROSE AVENUE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069

MICHAEL TAYLOR DESIGNS B542 310-360-8118 michaeltaylordesigns.com

PASTON/RAWLEIGH/EVERETT M9 310-652-4060 seating-restaurant.com

S. HARRIS/FABRICUT/VERVAIN B470 310-358-0404 fabricut.com

WILDFLOWER LINEN G285 310-360-9899 wildflowerlinens.com

MICHAELIAN & KOHLBERG B502 310-360-8400 michaelian.com

PAUL FERRANTE B362 310-854-4412 paulferrante.com

THE SCHEFFEY GROUP B245 310-657-8922 thescheffeygroup.com

WILLIAM HAINES DESIGNS M32 310-288-0220 williamhaines.com

MICUCCI B209 310-360-7323 micuccicollection.com

PIERRE DEUX G152 310-657-9400 pierredeux.com

SCHUMACHER & CO./PATTERSON, FLYNN & MARTIN, ROSECORE B489 310-652-5353 fschumacher.com

WILLIAM SWITZER & ASSOCIATES B515 310-855-1135 williamswitzercollection.com

MIMI LONDON INCORPORATED G168 310-855-2567 mimilondon.com

PINDLER & PINDLER, INC. B530 310-289-0200 pindler.com

MONTANARI GROUP G281 310-659-5348 montanarigroup.com

POGGENPOHL U.S., INC. B188 310-289-4901 poggenpohl.de

MOURA STARR B547 310-854-9100 mourastarr.com

POTTERTON BOOKS G154 310-289-1247 pottertonbooksusa.com

NANCY CORZINE B305 310-652-4859 nancycorzine.com

PROVASI COLLECTION B460 310-657-3040 provasicollection.com

NASIM CARPETS B255 510-791-3035 OSBORNE & LITTLE B643 310-659-7667 osborneandlittle.com PACIFIC DESIGN SERVICES M60 310-360-6418 pacificdesigncenter.com PACIFIC HIDE AND LEATHER B447 310-657-9802 pacifichide.com PAFID B408 310-855-9808 pafid.com PANACHE DESIGNS B504 310-659-1700 panachedesigns.com

PRUDENTIAL CALIFORNIA REALTY G271 310-855-0100 prudentialcal.com QUADRILLE M21/M22 310-657-6070 quadrillefabrics.com

SOOFER GALLERY B226 310-659-3044 STARK & DARIUS RUGS B427 310-289-5200

GALLERIES CARL BERG PROJECTS

STARK CARPET CORPORATION B629 310-657-8275 starkcarpet.com SUMMIT FURNITURE, INC. B135 310-289-1266 summitfurniture.com

D.E.N. CONTEMPORARY CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY JOHN HOUSHMAND & HOUS PROJECTS MOCA PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER PAUL YOUNG GALLERY

SUPERVISION B120 310-652-9510 supervisionav.com

SAM LEE GALLERY SEE LINE GALLERY WALTER MACIEL GALLERY

TAI PING CARPETS B400 310-652-3058 taipingcarpets.com

RALPH PUCCI WEST COAST B203 310-360-9707 ralphpucci.net

THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (MOCA) Plaza 310-289-5223 moca.org

RAOUL TEXTILE LIBRARY G160 310-657-4931 raoultextiles.com

THEMA, LLC B300 310-659-8400 thema-llc.com

ROBERT ALLEN BEACON HILL B484/B499 310-659-6454 robertallendesign.com

THOMAS LAVIN B310 310-278-2456 thomaslavin.com

RODENBECK ASSOCIATES B200 310-659-1051 rodenbeck.com

VILLA SAVOIA M6 310-860-8978 villasavoiainc.com

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WOLF GORDON, INC. M5 310-652-1914 wolf-gordon.com

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ART GALLERY & MUSEUM HIGHLIGHTS

ARTABOUTTOWN WORDS PETER FRANK

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART “Suprasensorial: Experiments in Light, Color and Space” THRU FEBRUARY 27 South America was a hotbed of modernist experimentation, especially during the postwar era; some of the most exciting ideas and practices in the art of the 1950s and ‘60s came out of countries like Brazil, Argentina, and Venezuela. “Suprasensorial” brings together six artists – two from each of the aforementioned countries – in an examination of Op art, kinetic art, and even light-andspace from well south of the border. What unified the investigations of these disparate experimentalists, besides their common continent, was a powerful desire to involve the audience actively in the artistic experience. In Venezuela, Jesús Rafael Soto and Carlos Cruz Diez worked with moiré patterns and other forms of visual perturbation which required the viewer to be constantly changing vantage. In Argentina, Lucio Fontana and Julio le Parc made sculp-

INSTALLATION VIEW OF SUPRASENSORIAL: EXPERIMENTS IN LIGHT, COLOR, AND SPACE, DECEMBER 12, 2010 THRU FEBRUARY 27, 2011, THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY AT MOCA. PHOTO BY IWAN BAAN

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ture out of light, generated and reflected. And Brazilians Hélio Oiticica (who coined the term “suprasensorial”) and Neville D’Almeida went the furthest in engaging the visitor with conceptual tricks, situational surprises, and installations designed to undermine the ordinary viewing experience. Indeed, you’ll need a swimsuit to participate fully in the reconstruction here of Oiticica and D’Almeida’s 1973 Nocagions, “a [heated] swimming pool installed amid colored lights and multiple wall projections of John Cage's book Notations, a collection of music manuscripts, covered with lines of cocaine.” Actually, you can buy disposable swimwear at the museum bookstore, but MOCA is throwing in free towels and a lifeguard (but no, no cocaine). For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.moca.org

ORANGE COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART California Biennial THRU MARCH 13 Everybody likes to beat up on a biennial, whether it’s in Venice, Italy, or the Whitney Museum. OCMA has been getting its fair share of lumps for its latest overview of art in our state, but, as usual, what people are complaining about is why it feels so boring or so crazy or so restricted or so amorphous or…. whatever. Or worse, why so and so is in it and so and so isn’t (which sounds so, well, high school). It does skew young, of course, but its smattering of postemergent talent sits confidently amongst all the youngsters. Taken as a sum of parts rather than a whole, at least, OCMA’s survey is a jolly, and relatively unpredictable, lot, ranging from austere monochromatic canvases to elaborate, slightly ridiculous installations, from works that exist as intimate images to works that exist only as sound. I mean, don’t look for pretty still lifes, but do look – and listen – for people and places, hermetic gestures and collaborative investigations, danceworks (live – if you time it right – and on video) and wordworks, very small and very large things, animals and buildings and pure swaths of color. As any good biennial should be, OCMA’s California Biennial is the ‘everything’ bagel of art shows. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.ocma.net Web fabrikmagazine.com

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LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART “India’s Fabled City: The Art of Courtly Lucknow” THRU FEBRUARY 27 Art flourishes under enlightened patronage, both directly and as a result of the tolerant social atmosphere such patronage engenders. Between the mid18th and mid-19th centuries, Lucknow, in northern India was a crossroads for many cultures and many talents – and, to be sure, many competing interests, from the Indians themselves to the Ottomans and the British (prime among Hindu, Muslim, and Christian nations). Lucknow may have been only a provincial capital, but it capitalized on the unrest that kept Delhi, seat of the Mughal empire, a relative cultural backwater, and built itself up into a city of legend, beautiful and serene, a place where the competition was between artists and statesmen, not politicians and warriors. Even after the British consolidated their rule over India, Lucknow maintained its vaunted status for much of the 19th century. “India’s Fabled City” documents Lucknow’s dramatic rise and gradual decline with an opulent and varied

MUHAMMAD AZAM (INDIA, DATES UNKNOWN) NASIR AL-DIN HAIDAR, CIRCA 1830 INDIA, UTTAR PRADESH, LUCKNOW OIL ON CANVAS 36 1/4 X 28 3/8 INCHES COLLECTION DRS. AZIZ AND DEANNA KHAN ON VIEW AT THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART (LACMA) THRU FEBRUARY 27, 2011

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array of objects and pictures. The opulence may lure you in, but it’s the variety that keeps you riveted. Paintings and jewelry, palaces and photographs, courtiers and landscapes, harems and diplomats, robes and rajahs, the assembly is endlessly fascinating, no less than the history. The goods on view tell an epic tale worthy of the screen – part Hollywood, part Bollywood. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.lacma.org

J. PAUL GETTY MUSEUM “Photography from the New China” and “Felice Beato: A Photographer on the Eastern Road” THRU APRIL 24 The art scene in China has exploded over the last 20 years, and the oncemonolithic society is now producing artists almost as fast as it’s producing millionaires. Those artists are getting up to speed with the west; notoriously tendentious, Chinese contemporary art still reflects its time and place with intense, and sometimes highly critical, precision. It comes as no surprise that new photography in China burrows particularly deeply into the fissures and anomalies of its country, and it is reassuring to see it do so with increasing inventiveness as well as social acuity. This small survey, drawn from the Getty’s own collection and comprising the work of eight photographers (Hai Bo, Huang Yan, Liu Zheng, Qiu Zhijie, Rong Rong, Song Yongping, Wang Qingsong, and Zhang Huan), spans a range of expression – and thus imagery – from the political to the poetical, from the personal to the theoretical, from the nostalgic to the futuristic, from the posed to the performed. “Photography from the New China” accompanies a show of photography from the old China – and Russia, and India, and Japan, and Korea, and Burma – by 19th century Italian-born British documentarian Felice Beato, a fascinating figure who went from embedded journalist in various military campaigns (British, French, Amercian) to portrait photographer in Yokohama. For more information, please visit their websites at http://www.getty.edu/museum

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS 1301PE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 938-5822 http://www.1301pe.com

ACUNA-HANSEN GALLERY 427 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 441-1624 http://www.ahgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm

ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN 1700 Lida St. Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 396-2446 http://www.artcenter.edu/williamson Tues-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., 12-9pm

18TH STREET ARTS CENTER 1639 18th St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-3711 http://www.18thStreet.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-5pm; Saturday, 1-5pm

ALTERED SPACE GALLERY 1221 Abbot Kinney Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 452-8121 http://www.alteredspacegallery.com

ARTIST STUDIO 742 N. Broadway 2nd Flr.(Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.tree-axis.com

57 UNDERGROUND 300 C. So. Thomas St. Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-0218 http://www.57underground.com Thurs. by appointment, Fri.-Sun., 12pm-4pm

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF CERAMIC ART 340 S. Garey Ave Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 865-3146 http://www.ceramicmuseum.org Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm

A+D ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN MUSEUM 6032 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-932-9393 http://www.aplusd.org Tues-Fri. 10-6, Sat. & Sun. 10-5

ANDERSON GALLERIES 354 North Bedford Drive Beverly Hills, CA 90210 310-858-1644 www.andersongalleries.com

ABACOT GALLERY 970 N. Broadway, Suite 201 (Mandarin Plaza) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-1599 http://www.abacotgallery.com ABORIGINAL DREAM TIME GALLERY 9011 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 310-278-4278 http://www.aboriginaldreamtimegallery.com ACE GALLERY LA INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART @ The Wilshire Tower 5514 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm ACE GALLERY BEVERLY HILLS INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 9430 Wilshire Blvd. Beverly Hils, CA 90212 (310) 858-9090 http://www.acegallery.net ACME 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5942 http://www.acmelosangeles.com

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ANDREW SHIRE GALLERY 3850 Wilshire Blvd., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 389-2601 http://www.andrewshiregallery.com ANGELS GATE CULTURAL CENTER 3601 S. Gaffey St San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 519-0936 http://angelsgateart.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-4pm ANGLES GALLERY 2222 & 2230 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-5019 http://www.anglesgallery.com ARC 2529 W. Magnolia, Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 848-9998 http://www.czappa.com Tues.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat., 9am-3pm ARMORY CENTER FOR THE ARTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 792-5101 http://www.armoryarts.org ARMSTRONG'S 150 E. Thrid St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-6464 http://www.armstronggallery.net Tues.-Sat. 9am-4:30pm,

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ART FOR HUMANS GALLERY 945 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.artforhumans.com ART PIC 6826 Troost Ave. No. Hollywood, CA 91605 (818) 503-5999 http://www.artpic2000.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5pm ARTPEACE GALLERY 2317 W. Magnolia Blvd. Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 846-8688 http://www.artpeacegallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-5pm ARTY 634 S. Main St. Los Angeles CA 90014 213-213-7829 AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER -MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST 4700 Western Heritage Way (in Griffith Park adjacent to L.A. Zoo) Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 667-2000 http://www.autrynationalcenter.org AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER: SOUTHWEST MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN Corner of Marmion Way and Museum Dr Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 221-2164 http://www.southwestmuseum.org AUTOMAT 936 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 617-0422 AVENUE 50 STUDIO 131 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 258-1435 http://www.avenue50studio.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS BARNSDALL ART PARK EXHIBITIONS 4800 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 644-6275 Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; First Fridays, 12-9pm BERT GREEN FINE ART 102 West 5th St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-624-6212 http://www.bgfa.us/

BRAND LIBRARY ART GALLERY 1601 West Mountain St. Glendale, CA 91201 (818) 548-2051 http://www.brandlibrary.org Tues. & Thurs., 12-9pm; Weds., 10am6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-5pm

BILLY SHIRE FINE ARTS 5790 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 297-0600 www.billyshirefinearts.com

BUCHANAN GALLERY 204 _ 6th Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 323-823-1922 http://www.byronbuchanan.com

BLEICHER/ GOLIGHTLY GALLERY 1431 Ocean Avenue Santa Monica, CA 90401 310-237-6423 www.BGshowrom.com BLK/MRKT GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-1989 http://www.blkmrktgallery.com Tues.-Fri., 11am-6pm; Sat., 12-6pm BLYTHE PROJECTS 5797 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.990.3501 www.blytheprojects.net BOB POE PHOTOGRAPHIC ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. G8A Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 582-2278 BLUEBIRD ART HOUSE 6747 Bright Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 696-9493 http://www.bluebirdarthouse.com BLUM & POE GALLERY 2754 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-2062 http://www.blumandpoe.com BONELLI CONTEMPORARY 943 North Hill St. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 213-617-8180 www.bonellicontemporaryla.com

BOWERS MUSEUM 2002 N. Main St Santa Ana, CA 92706 (714) 567-3643 http://www.bowers.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-4pm; fourth Thursday of each month, 10am-8pm

CACTUS GALLERY 4534 Eagle Rock Blvd. Eagle Rock, CA 90041 323-256-6117 http://www.eclecticcactus.com CAL POLY POMONA DOWNTOWN CENTER 300 W. Second St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-0080 http://www.class.csupomona.edu/dow ntowncenter Tues.-Sat., 11am-8pm; 2nd Saturdays., 1-9pm CAL POLY POMONA KEITH & JANET KELLOGG 3801 W. Temple Ave Pomona, CA 91768 (909) 869-4302 http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery Tues.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Sat., 12-4pm CAL STATE L.A. – LUCKMAN GALLERY 5151 State University Dr Los Angeles, CA 90032 (323) 343-6604 http://www.luckmanfineartscomplex.org Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 12-5pm CALIFORNIA HERITAGE MUSEUM 2612 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8537 http://www.californiaheritagemuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-4pm

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CARDWELL JIMMERSON CONTEMPORARY ART 8658 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 310-815-1100 www.cardwelljimmerson.com CARL BERG PROJECTS Pacific Design Center, Suites #B315 & B380 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 323-286-9059 www.carlbergprojects.com CARMICHAEL GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART 5795 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 969-0600 http://www.carmichaelgallery.com Weds.-Sun., 2-7pm CB1 GALLERY 207 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-806-7889 www.cb1gallery.com CENTER FOR THE ARTS, EAGLE ROCK 2225 Colorado Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90041 (323) 226-0949 http://www.centerartseaglerock.org CHARLIE JAMES GALLERY 975 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 687-0844 http://www.cjamesgallery.com CHERRY AND MARTIN 2712 South LA Cienga Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 310-559-0010 http://www.cherryandmartin.com CHINA ART OBJECTS GALLERIES 933 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0384 http://www.chinaartobjects.com CHINESE AMERICAN MUSEUM 125 Paseo de la Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-5240 CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 916 Colorado Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 587-3373 http://www.cgrimes.com Tues-Sat. 10-5:30

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS CHUNG KING PROJECT 945 Chung King Rd. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1802 http://www.chungkingproject.com

COUTURIER GALLERY 166 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-933-5557 http://www.couturiergallery.com/

CIRRUS GALLERY 542 S. Alameda Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 680-3473 http://www.cirrusgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm

CRACK GALLERY 204 W. 6th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-622-3493 http://crackgallery.com/

CITY OF BREA GALLERY #1 Civic Center Circle Brea, CA 92821 (714) 990-7730 http://www.breagallery.com Weds., Thurs., Sun., 12-5pm, Fri., Sat., 12-8pm CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART The Packing House, 536 W. First St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-3200 http://www.claremontmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-7pm CLASSIC ARTFORMS 9009 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 273-6306 COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS ART GALLERY 26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd Santa Clarita, CA 91355 (661) 362-3612 http://www.canyons.edu/offices/artgallery Tues.-Thurs., 11am-3pm; Sat., 10am-2pm COMPACT SPACE 105 E. 6th St Los Angeles, CA 90014 626-676-0627 http://www.compactspace.com

COREY HELFORD GALLERY 8522 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 287-2340 http://www.coreyhelfordgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

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CRAIG KRULL GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6410 http:// www.artnet.com/ckrull.html Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm CREATIVE ARTS CENTER GALLERY 1100 W. Clark Ave Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 238-5397 www.burbankusa.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-8pm; Fri., 9am-4pm; Sat., hours vary

CSU NORTHRIDGE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY 18111 Nordhoff St. Northridge, CA 91330 (818) 677-2156 http://www.csun.edu/artgalleries/ Mon.-Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-8pm D.E.N. CONTEMPORARY ART Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue, #B275, 2nd Floor West Hollywood, CA 90069 323-422-6340 www.dencontemporaryart.com DA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 252 D S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-9716 http://www.dacenter.org DANIEL SAXON GALLERY 552 Norwich Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-6033

CREWEST 110 Winston Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-627-8272 www.crewest.com

DANIEL WEINBERG GALLERY 6148 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 954-8425 http://www.danielweinberggallery.com

CROSSROADS SCHOOL FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES 1714 21st St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't.

DAVID GALLERY 5797 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 323-939-9069 www.ddavidgallery.net

CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS ART GALLERY 92 Palm Dr. Camarillo, CA 93010 (805) 437-8863 http://art.csuci.edu/gallery Mon.-Fri., 10am-4pm

COPRO/NASON GALLERY 2525 Michingan Ave., T-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 398-2643 www.copronason.com

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CRAIG GALLERY 5723 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90019 (323) 939-0351 http://www.craiggallery.com Fri., Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't.

CSU LONG BEACH UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90840 (562) 985-5761 http://www.csulb.edu/uam Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm, Thurs., 12-8pm

CSU FULLERTON ART GALLERY 800 N. State College Blvd. Fullerton, CA 92634 (714) 278-3262 http://www.arts.fullerton.edu/events Tues.-Fri., 12-4pm; Sat., 12-2pm

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DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY 3143 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 310-558-3030 http://www.davidkordanskygallery.com DAVID LAWRENCE GALLERY 9507 Santa Monica Blvd. # 310 Beverly Hills, CA 310-728-0882 www.davidlawrencegallery.com DAVID PATTON LOS ANGELES 932 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-2524 http://www.davidpattonlosangeles.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS DAVID SALOW GALLERY 977 N. Hill St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 620-0240 http://www.davidsalowgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

DOWNTOWN ART CENTER GALLERY 828 S Main Street Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-7374 http://www.dacgallery.com DOWNTOWN ART GALLERY 1611 So. Hope St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 255-2067 http://www.downtownag.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm

DBA256 GALLERY 256 S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-7600 http://www.dba256.com Mon.-Thurs., 8am-10pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-midnight

DRKRM/ GALLERY Capitol Studios Building 2121 San Fernando Rd., #3 Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 223-6867 http://www.drkrm.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm Sun., 1pm-4pm and by appointment

DCA FINE ART 3107 Pico Blvd Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 770-2525 http://www.dcafineart.com By Appt. only DE SOTO GALLERY 2635 Fairfax Avenue Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 253-2255 http://www.desotogallery.com Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm & by app't

DRKRM/ GALLERY WEST 729 Montana Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90403 323-271-5635

DEL MANO GALLERY 11981 San Vicente Blvd West Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 476-8508 http://www.delmano.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm DENENBERG FINE ARTS 417 North San Vicente Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 360-9360 http://www.fada.com DIALECT 215 W. 6th St. #111 Downtown LA, CA 213-627-7599 info@downtowndialect.com DNJ GALLERY 154 1/2 N. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-1311 http://dnjgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm DOWNEY MUSEUM OF ART 10419 So. Rives Ave Downey, CA 90241 (562) 861-0419 http://www.thedmoa.org Weds., 3-7pm; Thurs.Fri., 1-5pm;

DUNCAN MILLER GALLERY 10959 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-2440 http://www.duncanmillergallery.com EARL MCGRATH GALLERY 454 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 657-4257 http://www.earlmcgrathgallery.com Tues- Sat. 10-6

EL NOPAL PRESS 109 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-239-0417 EXPOSITION PARK MUSEUMS 900 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 763-3515 http://www.nhm.org FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY 148 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 934-2250 http://www.faheykleingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm FARMLAB 1745 N. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1158 http://www.farmlab.org Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm FELLOWS OF CONTEMPORARY ART 970 N. Broadway # 208 (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 808-1008 www.focala.org FIFTH FLOOR GALLERY 502 Chung King Court (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 687- 8443 www.fifthfloorgallery.com

EDGAR VARELA FINE ARTS (EVFA) 727 S. Spring Street, LA 90014

FIFTY/24 LA GALLERY 125 E. 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 213-623-4300 http://www.fifty24sf.com

EDGEMAR CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2437 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 399-3666 http://www.edgemarcenter.org Mon.-Fri., 11am-5:30pm

FIG 2525 Michigan Ave. # G6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-0345 http://www.figgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-5pm

EDWARD CELLA ART + ARCHITECTURE 6018 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 525-0053 http://www.edwardcella.com Tues.-Sun, 11am-5pm

FOUND GALLERY 1903 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027 www.foundla.com Sat - Sun 1-5 or by appt. jonny@foundla.com

EL CAMINO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 16007 Crenshaw Blvd Torrance, CA 90506 (310) 660-3010 http://www.elcamino.edu/commadv/art gallery Mon., Tues., 10am-3pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-8pm; Fri., 10am-2pm

FOWLER MUSEUM AT UCLA 405 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 825-4361 http://www.fowler.ucla.edu Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm; Thurs. 12-8pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS FRANK LLOYD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., B5b Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-3866 http://www.franklloyd.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

GALLERY 825 / LA ART ASSOCIATION 825 N. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 310-652-8272 http://www.laaa.org

FRANK PICTURES GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-0211 http://www.frankpicturesgallery.com FREDERICK R. WEISMAN MUSEUM AT PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY 24255 Pacific Coast Highway Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 506-4851 http://arts.pepperdine.edu/museum FRESH PAINT 9355 Culver Blvd., Suite B Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-9355 http://www.freshpaintart.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-6pm; Fri., 8am-12 noon; & by app't FULLERTON COLLEGE ART GALLERY 321 E. Chapman Ave., Building 1000 Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 992-7434 http://art.fullcoll.edu Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 10am-2pm; Weds, 5-7pm

GALLERY 1927 Fine Arts Building 811 West Seventh St. Los Angeles, CA 90017 661-816-1136 http://www.gallery1927.com/ GALLERY ANAIS 2525 Michigan Ave., Building D-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-4433 www.galleryanaisla.com GALLERY BROWN 140 S. Orlando Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-651-1956 www,gallerybrown.com GALLERY AT 1000 VAN NESS SAN FRANCISCO GALLERY AT EASTERN COLUMBIA LOS ANGELES 849 S. Broadway Unit 905 Los Angeles, Ca. 90014 http://www.artmeetsarchitecture.com GALLERY AT REDCAT 631 W. Second St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 237-2800 http://www.redcat.org

FULLERTON MUSEUM CENTER 301 N. Pomona Ave Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 738-6545 http://www.cityoffullerton.com/depts/ museum Tues.-Sun., 12-4; Thurs., 12-8pm

GALLERY LUISOTTI 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0043

GAGOSIAN GALLERY 456 N. Camden Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-9400 http://www.gagosian.com

GALLERY NUCLEUS 210 East Main St. Alhambra, CA 91801 (626) 458-7477 http://www.gallerynucleus.com

GALERIE MICHAEL 260 N. Rodeo Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 273-3377 www.galeriemichael.com

GARY LEONARD TAKE MY PICTURE 860 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-622-2256 http://takemypicture.com

GALLERY 9 6101 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.836.4600 www.thewhole9.com

GEMINI G.E.L. 8365 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-0513 http://www.geminigel.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat. by app't.

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GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY L.A. 2716 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-3685 http://www.georgebillis.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't. GEORGE J. DOIZAKI GALLERY Japanese Cultural & Community Center 244 S. San Pedro St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-2725 http://www.jaccc.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat. & Sun., 11am-4pm GEORGE STERN FINE ARTS 8920 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 276-2600 http://www.sternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am6pm GLORIA DELSON CONTEMPORARY ART 215 West 6th St. # 115 Los Angeles, CA 323-805-9363 www.artla.biz GLASS GARAGE FINE ART 414 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 659-5228 http://www.glassgaragegallery.com GLENDALE COLLEGE GALLERY 1500 Verdugo Rd Glendale, CA 91208 (818) 240-1000 http://www.glendale.edu/artgallery GRAMMY MUSEUM 800 W. Olympic Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 213-765-6800 www.grammymuseum.org GR2 2062 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 445-9276 http://www.gr2.net GREENFIELD SACKS GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., #B6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-0640 http://www.greenfieldsacks.com GREGG FLEISHMAN STUDIO 3850 Main Street Culver City, CA 90232 310.202.6108 www.greggfleishman.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS GREY MCGEAR GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave G7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-0925

HUNTINGTON BEACH ART CENTER 538 Main Street Huntington Beach, CA 92647 (714) 374-1650 http://www.surfcityhb.org/Visitors/art_center Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; Thurs., 12-8pm; Sun., 12-4pm

GUY HEPNER GALLERY 300 North Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 310-979-0011 www.guyhepner.com

HUNTINGTON LIBRARY 1151 Oxford Rd San Marino, CA 91108 (626) 405-2100 http://www.huntington.org

HAMILTON GALLERIES 1431 Ocean Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 451-9983 http://www.hamiltongalleries.com Tues.-Sun., 12-7pm

ICON GALLERY & INTERIORS 8899 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 310-246-1495 www.icon-interiors.com

HAMILTON-SELWAY FINE ART 8678 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 657-1711 http://www.hamiltonselway.com

IKON LIMITED/K. RICHARDS GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., G-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6629 http://www.ikonltd.com

HARO GALLERY 3825 Main Street Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.4276 www.theharogallery.com HENKEN GALLERY Kyoto Grand Hotel 120 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-2505 http://www.thehenkengallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-10pm; Sun. by app't. HERITAGE GALLERY 1300 Chautauqua Blvd Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 230-4340 http://www.heritagegallery.com HIGH PROFILE PRODUCTIONS 5886 Smiley Drive Culver City, CA 90232 310.253.2255 www.highprofileproductions.com H. KAZAN FINE ARTS 11456 Washington Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90066 310.398.0090 www.hkazanfinearts.com HONOR FRASER 2622 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-0191 http://www.honorfraser.com

IMMORTAL GALLERY BY ANGEL 215 West 6th St. #116 Los Angeles, CA 90014 562-665-7371 www.immortalgallery.com IRON GALLERY 725 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-7149 http://www.ironartgallery.net/ By appointment only ITALIAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE SPAZIO ITALIA 1023 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 443-3250 http://www.iiclosangeles.esteri.it/IIC_L osangeles Mon.-Fri., 9:30am-5pm JACK RUTBERG FINE ARTS 357 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-5222 http://www.jackrutbergfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 10am5pm JAMES GRAY GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave., D-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-9502 http://www.jamesgraygallery.com

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JAN KESNER GALLERY 164 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-6834 http: //www.jankesnergallery.com By appt. only JANCAR GALLERY 961 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-2522 http://www.jancargallery.com Wed.-Sat 12- 5pm and by app't. JAPANESE AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM 369 E. 1st St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-0414 http://www.janm.org JEFFREY WINTER FINE ARTS 8576 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 310-657-4278 www,jeffreywinter.com JK GALLERY 2632 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-3330 http://www.jkgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm JONATHAN NOVAK CONTEMPORARY ART 1880 Century Park East # 100 Century City, CA 90067 310-277-4997 www.novakart.com JULIE RICO GALLERY@WEENEEZ 500 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 817-6002 http://www.weeneez.com KANTOR ART 427 N. Canon Drive Suite 106. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 274-6499 http://www.kantorart.com Mon-Fri 10-5 KINKEAD CONTEMPORARY 6029 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-7400 http://www.kinkeadcontemporary.com KOPEIKIN GALLERY 8810 Melrose Avenue West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 385-5894 http://www.kopeikingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS KOPLIN DEL RIO GALLERY 6031 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-9055 http://www.koplindelrio.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

LACE (LA CONTEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS) 6522 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028 (323) 957-1777 http://www.welcometolace.org Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm

KRISTI ENGLE GALLERY 5002 York Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90042 323-472-6237 www.kristienglegallery.com

LACMA (LOS ANGELES CONTEMPORARY MUSEUM OF ART) 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-6111 http://www.lacma.org/ Mon., Tues., Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., 129pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-8pm

L.A. ARTCORE UNION CENTER FOR THE ARTS 120 N. Judge John Aiso St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-3274 http://www.laartcore.org Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm

LATINO ART MUSEUM 281 S. THOMAS ST., SUITE 105 POMONA, CA 91766 (909) 620-6009 HTTP://WWW.LAMOA.NET

LA ART HOUSE 8825 Beverly Blvd., West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 205-0480 http://www.laarthouse.net Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat.-Sun. by app't

THE LATINO MUSEUM OF HISTORY, ART & CULTURE 514 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-626-7600

LA CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 107 W. 5th St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-629-1102 http://www.lacda.com

LATIN AMERICAN MASTERS 2525 Michigan Ave., Building E-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-4455 http://www.latinamericamasters.com

LA CONTEMPORARY 2634 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6200 http://www.lacontemporary.com

LAWRENCE ASHER GALLERY 5820 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 935-9100 http://www.lawrenceasher.com Tues.-Thurs., 11am-6pm; Fri., 11am7pm; Sat., 12-5pm; & by app't

L.A. COUNTY ARBORETUM 301 N. Baldwin Ave Arcadia, CA 91007 (626) 821-3232 http://www.arboretum.org

LAXART 2640 S. La Cienega Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 559-0166 http://www.laxart.org

L.A. LOUVER GALLERY 45 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-4955 http://www.lalouver.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm L2 KONTEMPORARY 990 N. Hill St., #205 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 225-1288 http://www.L2kontemporary.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm; & by app't. LA LUZ DE JESUS 4633 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 666-7667 http://www.laluzdejesus.com 90

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LEBASSE PROJECTS 6023 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-0200 http://www.lebasseprojects.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-6pm LEFT COAST GALLERIES 12324 Ventura Blvd Studio City, CA 91604 (818) 760-7010 http://www.leftcoastgalleries.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm; Sun., 12-6pm; & by appointment

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LESLIE SACKS FINE ART 11640 San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 820-9448 http://www.lesliesacks.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm LIGHTBOX GALLERY 2680 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-1111 http://www.kimlightgallery.com LILI BERNARD ART STUDIO 935 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (323) 936-3607 www.lilibernard.com LM PROJECTS 125 W. 4th St., LA, CA 90014 213-621-4055 LOIS LAMBERT GALLERY OF FUNCTIONAL ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave.,E-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-6990 www.Galleryoffunctionalart.net LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 4901 E. Carson St. Long Beach, CA 90808 (562) 938-4817 LONG BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 2300 E. Ocean Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 439-2119 http://www.lbma.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-5pm LORA SCHLESINGER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-1133 http://www.loraschlesinger.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm LOS ANGELES CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 107 W. Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (323) 646-9427 http://www.lacda.com Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm LOUIS STERN FINE ARTS 9002 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-0147 http://www.louissternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS LOUWE GALLERY 306 Hawthorne St. So. Pasadena, CA 91030 (626) 799-5551 http://www.louwegallery.com

MARC FOXX GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5571 http://www.marcfoxx.com

MIHAI NICODIM GALLERY 3143 S. La Cienega Blvd. Unit B Los Angekes, VCA 90016 310-838-8884 www.nicodimgallery.com

LUIS DE JESUS LA Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. F-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7773 www.luisdejesus.com

MARC SELWYN FINE ART 6222 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-9911 http://www.marcselwynfineart.com

MIXOGRAFIA 1419 E. Adams Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90011 (323) 232-1158 http://www.mixografia.com Mon.-Fri., 11am- 5pm; & by app't.

M. HANKS GALLERY 3008 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8820 http://mhanksgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't. M+B GALLERY 612 N. Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 550-0050 http://www.mbfala.com MACHINE PROJECT 1200 D North Alvarado St. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 483-8761 http://www.machineproject.com Irregular hours - call ahead MADISON GALLERY 1020 Prospect Suite 130 LaJolla, California 92037 (858) 459-0836 http://www.madisongalleries.com MAK CENTER FOR ART AND ARCHITECTURE L.A. 835 N. Kings Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-1510 http://www.makcenter.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-6pm MARK MOORE GALLERY Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. #A1 SM,CA 90404 310-453-3031 www.MarkMooreGallery.com MANNY SILVERMAN GALLERY 619 Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 659-8256 www.mannysilvermangallery.com MARCEL SITCOSKE GALLERY 7829 Torreyson Dr. LA, CA 90046 323-650-0238 www.marcelsitcoske.com

MARTIN & LOZANO GALLERY 302 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA www.martinlozano.com 310-358-0617 MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERY 1000 Universal Studios Blvd. #171 Burbank, CA 91608 818-508-7867 www.martinlawrence.com MATIN GALLERY 9905 South Santa Monica Blvd. LA, CA 90212 310-788-0055 www.matin-gallery.com MERRY KARNOWSKY GALLERY 170 S. LA Brea LA, CA 90036 323-933-4408 www.mkgallery.com MESLER & HUG GALLERY 510 Bernard St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (3232) 221-0016 www.meslerandhug.com MICHAEL DAWSON GALLERY 535 N. Larchmont Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90004 (323) 469-2186 http://www.michaeldawsongallery.com Weds.-Sat., 9am-5pm MICHAEL HITTLEMAN GALLERY FINE ISRAELI ART 8797 Beverly Blvd., #302 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 655-5364 http://www.michaelhittlemangallery.com Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sunday, 1-5pm MICHAEL KOHN GALLERY 8071 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 658-8088 http://www.kohngallery.com

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MOCA (MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART) 250 S. Grand Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 62-MOCA-2 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thursday, 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed. MOCA - THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY 152 North Central Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 621-1745 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thurs., 11am8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed. MOCA PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 289-5223 http://www.moca.org MUCKHOUSE GALLERY 215 W. 6th St. # 109 Downtown LA, CA www.muckhouse,org MORONO KIANG GALLERY 218 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 628-8208 http://www.moronokiang.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm MOUNT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE JOSE DRUDIS-BIADA GALLERY 12001 Chalon Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 954-4360 http://www.msmc.la.edu/pages/1897.asp Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm MUCKENTHALER CULTURAL CENTER 1201 W. Malvern Ave Fullerton, CA 92633 (714) 738-6595 http://www.muckenthaler.org

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS MUSEUM OF JURASSIC TECHNOLOGY 9341 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-6131 http://www.mjt.org/ MUSEUM OF LATIN AMERICAN ART 628 Alamitos Ave Long Beach, CA 90802 (562) 437-1689 http://www.molaa.com Tues.-Sat., 11:30am-7:30pm; Sun., 12-6pm MUSEUM OF NEON ART 114 W. 4th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-489-9918 http://www.neonmona.org/ MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS 1649 El Prado San Diego, CA 92101 (619) 238-7559 http://www.mopa.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-9pm MUSEUM OF TOLERANCE 9786 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 553-8403 http://www.museumoftolerance.com NEUARTIG GALLERY & ART CONSULTING 366 West 7th Street San Pedro, CA 90731 (213) 973-8223 http:www.galleryneuartig.com Wed – Fri 1:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Sat 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and by appointment 1st Thursday artwalk: 6pm - 9pm NEW HIGH (M)ART 741 New High Str. LA, CA 90012 213-621-7822 www.newhighmart.com NORBERTELLEN GALLERY 215 West 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 818-662-5041 http://www.norbertellengallery.com NORTH HILL EXHIBITIONS 945 North Hill St. (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 213-626-2020 www.northhillexhibitions.com

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NORTON SIMON MUSEUM 411 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 449-6840 http://www.nortonsimon.org Weds.-Mon., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm

PALOS VERDES ART CENTER 5504 W. Crestridge Rd. Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 (310) 541-2479 http://www.pvartcenter.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Sun., 1-4pm

OFF-ROSE, THE SECRET GALLERY 841 Flower Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 664-8977 Sat., 1-5pm; & by appt.

PARKER JONES GALLERY 510 Bernard St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 227-0102 www.parkerjonesgallery.com

OPTICAL ALLUSION GALLERY 2414 West 7th St. Los Angeles, CA 90057 (310) 309-7473

PAPILLON GALLERY 8272 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90046 323-655-2205 http://www.papillongallery.com

ORANGE COUNTY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 117 N. Sycamore Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 667-1517 http://www.occca.org Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., Sat., 12-9pm ORLANDO GALLERY 17037 Ventura Blvd. Tarzana, CA 91356 (818) 705-5368 www.orlando2.com OTIS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN BEN MALTZ GALLERY 9045 Lincoln Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045 (310) 665-6905 http://www.otis.edu Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm; Thurs., 10am-7pm OVERDUIN AND KITE 6693 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (323) 464-3600 http://www.overduinandkite.com PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM 46 N. Los Robles Ave Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 449-2742 http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 10am-6pm PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM 101 Museum Dr Palm Springs, CA 92262 (619) 325-7186 http://www.psmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Fri., 10am-8pm

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PASADENA CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 1570 E. Colorado Blvd Pasadena, CA 91106 (626) 585-3285 http://www.pasadena.edu/artgallery Mon.-Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., Sat., 12-4pm PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART 490 E. Union St. Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 568-3665 http://www.pmcaonline.org PATRICK PAINTER, INC. 2525 Michigan Ave. # A-8 & B-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 254-6953 http://www.patrickpainter.com PEACE YOGA GALLERY 903 South Main St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 213-500-5007 www.peaceyogagallery.com PERES PROJECTS 2766 La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6100 http://www.peresprojects.com PETER FETTERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-6463 http://www.peterfetterman.com PETER MENDENHALL GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd. # 8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 323-936-0061 www.PeterMendenhallGallery.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS PITZER CAMPUS GALLERIES 1050 North Mills Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 607-3143 http://www.pitzer.edu/artgalleries

REGEN PROJECTS II 9016 Santa Monica Blvd (at Almont Drive) Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

PLAZA DE LA RAZA 3540 N. Mission Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 223-2475 POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 330 N. College Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8283 http://www.pomona.edu/museum Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat., Sun., 1-5pm POP LOCK GALLERY 211 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 310-666-4445 www.poplockgallery.com

RICHARD TELLES FINE ART 7380 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 965-5578 http://www.tellesfineart.com RIO HONDO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 3600 Workman Mill Rd., B-13 Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 908-3471 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-3pm; Mon.-Weds., 6-9pm

POV EVOLVING GALLERY & PRINT STUDIO 939 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 (213) 594-3036 www.povevolving.com

RIVERA & RIVERA 1100 S. Hope St. Los Angeles, CA 310-713-1635 www.riveraandrivera.com

PYO GALLERY LA 1100 Hope St., Suite 105 Los Angeles, CA 213-405-1488 http://www.pyogalleryla.com

RIVERSIDE ART MUSEUM 3425 Mission Inn Ave. Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 684-7111 http://www.riversideartmuseum.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Thurs., 10am-9pm

RAID PROJECTS GALLERY The Brewery Art Complex 602 Moulton St. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 441-9593 http://www.raidprojects.com Sat., Sun., 12-5pm; & by app't. REBECCA MOLAYEM GALLERY 306 N. Robertson West Hollywood, CA90048 310-652-2620 www.rebeccamolayemarts.com REDLING FINE ART 990 North Hill St. #210 (Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 323-230-7415 www.redlingfineart.com REGEN PROJECTS 633 N. Almont Drive Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

RICHARD HELLER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-5A Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-9191 http://www.richardhellergallery.com

ROUGE GALERIE 548 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-489-7309 www.rougegalerie.com ROYAL/T 8910 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.559.6300 www.royal-t.org RUTH BACHOFNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. (Bergamot Station), G-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-3300 http://www.ruthbachofnergallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm SABINA LEE GALLERY 971 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 213-620-9404 www.sabinaleegallery.com SAM LEE GALLERY 990 N. Hill St., #190 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-0275 http://www.samleegallery.com Wed. - Sun, 12-6pm SAM LEE GALLERY @ the Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue, Suite B267 W. Hollywood, CA 90069 323-788-3535 www.samleegallery.com Monday - Friday, 12 - 5 pm & by app’t

ROBERT BERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-5, & C-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-1937 http://www.robertbermangallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

SAMUEL FREEMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-1479 http://www.samuelfreeman.com

ROBERTS & TILTON GALLERY 5801 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 549-0223 http://www.robertsandtilton.com

SANDRONI REY GALLERY 2762 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 280-0111 http://www.sandronirey.com

ROSAMUND FELSEN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. B-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-8488 http://www.rosamundfelsen.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm

SANTA FE ART COLONY 2401 S. Santa Fe Ave Los Angeles, CA 90058 (213) 587-6381

ROSE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building G-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-8440 http://www.rosegallery.net Web fabrikmagazine.com

SANTA MONICA ART STUDIOS AND ARENA 1 GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7449 http://www.santamonicaartstudios.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS SANTA MONICA COLLEGE - PETE AND SUSAN BARRETT ART GALLERY 1310 11th St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 434-3434 http://events.smc.edu/art_gallery.html SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. G-1 Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 586-6488 http://www.smmoa.org Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SARAH LEE ARTWORKS & PROJECTS Bergamot Station 2525Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-4938 www.sarahleeartworks.com SCA PROJECT GALLERY 101 & 281 So. Thomas St., Unit 104 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-5481 http://www.scagallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-4pm SCHOMBURG GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. E-3a Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-5757 http://www.schomburggallery.com SCI-ARC GALLERY 960 E. Third St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 473-8432 SCION INSTALLATION L.A. 3521 Helms Ave [at National] Culver City, CA 90232 310.815.8840 www.scion.com/space SEA AND SPACE EXPLORATIONS 4755 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 445-4015 http://www.seaandspace.org Sundays 1-5 or by appt. info@seaandspace.org SEE LINE GALLERY Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue Suite B274 West Hollywood, CA 90069 818-604-3114 http://www.seelinegallery.com

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SEYHOUN GALLERY 9007 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 858-5984 http://www.seyhoungallery.com SHERRY FRUMKIN GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave., Suite 21 Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7493 http://www.frumkingallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm SHOSHANA WAYNE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7535 http://www.shoshanawayne.com SISTER 955 Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 (213) 628-7000 http://www.sisterla.com SKIDMORE CONTEMPORARY ART Bergamot Station 2525 Michigan Ave. B5 Santa Monica, CA (310)-828-5070 www.skidmorecontemporaryart.com SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-4500 http://www.skirball.org Tues.-Fri.12-5pm; Thurs.12-9pm; Sat.& Sun. 10am-5pm GALLERY SOHO 300 A. South Thomas St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-1599 www.pvaa.net Thurs.-Sun., 11am-4pm; second Sats., 11am-10pm SOLWAY JONES 990 N. Hill Street # 180 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 223-0224 http://www.solwayjonesgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SPF:A GALLERY 8609 Washington Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.0902 www.spfagallery.com

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SPARC ART GALLERY 685 Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-9560 http://www.sparcmurals.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm (Closed at Noon-1pm) SPENCER JON HELFEN FINE ARTS 9200 West Olympic Blvd. Ste 200, Los Angeles, CA 310-273-8838 www.helfenfinearts.com STEPHEN COHEN GALLERY 7358 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-5525 http://www.stephencohengallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm STG (STEVE TURNER CONTEMPORARY) 6026 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-3721 http://www.steveturnergallery.com SUMI INK CLUB 970 N. Broadway #212 (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 www.sumiinkclub.com SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS 6006 W. Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 310-837-2117 www.vielmetter.com SYLVIA WHITE GALLERY 1783 East Main Street Ventura, CA 93001 805-643-8300 http://www.artadvice.com TAG, THE ARTISTS' GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., #D-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-9556 http://www.TAGgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm TAKE MY PICTURE GARY LEONARD 860 S. Broadway @ 9th Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-622-2256 http://takemypicture.com TASENDE GALLERY 820 Prospect St. La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 454-3691 www.tasendegallery.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm;

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS TAYLOR DE CORDOBA 2660 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-9156 http://www.taylordecordoba.com

THE GETTY CENTER 1200 Getty Center Dr Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Tues.-Thurs., Sun., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-9pm 213-955-9091

TELIC ARTS EXCHANGE 972B Chung King Road LA, CA 90012 213-344-6137 ww.telic.info

THE GETTY VILLA 17985 Pacific Coast Highway Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Thurs.-Mon., 10am-5pm; closed Tues. Weds. and major holidays

TEMPLE OF VISIONS 719 S. Spring St. Los Angeles CA 213-537-0139 http://templeofvisions.com

THE HAMMER MUSUEM AT UCLA 10899 Wilshire Blvd. LA, CA 90024 310-443-7000 www.hammer.ucla.edu

TERRENCE ROGERS FINE ART 1231 Fifth St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 394-4999 http://www.trogart.com Thurs-Sat., 12-5; & by app't.

THE HAPPY LION 963 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 625-1360 www.thehappylion.com

TERRELL MOORE GALLERY 1221 S Hope Street LA CA 90015 (213) 744-1999 www.terrellmoore.net

THE HIVE GALLERY 729 S. Sping St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 955-9051 http://hivegallery.com

THE ART FORM STUDIO 716 North Figueroa St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 213-613-1050 www.theartformstudio.com

THE LOFT AT LIZ'S 453 S. La Brea Ave. ( Enter through back alley) Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-939-4403 www.theloftatlizs.com

THE BREWERY ARTS COLONY 2100 N. Main St. at Avenue 21 Los Angeles, CA 90031 http://www.breweryart.com

THE PERFECT EXPOSURE GALLERY 3519 West 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (213) 381-1137 http://theperfectexposuregallery.com

THE BOX 977 Chung King Road (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 (213) 625-1747 www.theboxla.com THE CLAYHOUSE 2909 Santa Monica Blvd. (near Yale St.) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-7071 THE COMPANY 946 Yale Street (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 213-221-7082 THE FOLK TREE 217 S. Fair Oaks Ave Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 795-8733 http://www.folktree.com Mon.-Weds., 11am-6pm; Thurs.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm

THINKSPACE ART GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 310.558.3375 www.thinkspacegallery.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm THOMAS SOLOMON GALLERY 410 Cottage Home St. (Chinatown) LA, CA 90012 310-428-2964 www.thomassolomongallery.com TINLARK GALLERY 6671 Sunset Blvd., #1516 Hollywood, CA 90028 (323) 463-0039 http://www.tinlark.com

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TOBEY C. MOSS GALLERY 7321 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 933-5523 http://www.tobeycmossgallery.com TOPANGA CANYON GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 109 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-7909 http://www.topangacanyongallery.com Tues.-Sun., 10am-6pm TORRANCE ART MUSEUM 3320 Civic Center Dr Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 618-6340 http://www.torranceartmuseum.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm TRACK 16 GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building C-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-4678 http://www.track16.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm TRACY PARK GALLERY The Malibu Country Mart 3835 Cross Creek Road Malibu, CA 90265 310-456-7505 http://www.tracyparkgallery.com TRIGG ISON FINE ART 511 N. Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 274-8047 http://www.triggison.com TROPICO DE NOPAL GALLERY 1665 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 481-8112 http://www.tropicodenopal.com UCR/CALIFORNIA MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY 3824 Main St Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 784-FOTO http://www.cmp.ucr.edu Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm USC FISHER GALLERY 823 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90089 (213) 740-4561 http://fishergallery.org Tues.-Sat. 12-5pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez Monterey Park, CA 91754 (323) 265-8841 http://elac.edu/collegeservices/ vincentprice/ Mon.-Weds., Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-7pm VIVA (VALLEY INSTITUTE OF VISUAL ART) 13261 Moorpark St., Sherman Oaks, CA 91423 (818) 385-0080 Weds.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Satu., 12-4pm VOILA! ART FOR THE MODERN EYE 518 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-954-0418 www.voilagallery.com WAL ART 1639 S. La Cienega Los Angeles, CA 90035 310-274-9055 www.walartinc.com WALTER MACIEL GALLERY 2642 S. La Cienega Blvd. LA, CA 90034 310-839-1840 www.waltermacielgallery.com

WATTS TOWERS ART CENTER NOAH SYLVESTER PURIFOY GALLERY 1727 E. 107th St Los Angeles, CA 90002 (213) 847-4646 Weds.-Sun., 10am-4pm

WILLIAM GRANT STILL COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER 2520 West View St Los Angeles, CA 90016 (213) 734-1164 Daily 12-5pm

WESTERN PROJECT 2762 S. La Cienega Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-0609 http://western-project.com

WILLIAM TURNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. E-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0909 http://www.williamturnergallery.com Mon.-Sat.,11am-6pm

WHITTIER MUSEUM 6755 Newlin Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (310) 945-3871 WILIAM GRIFFIN GALLERY 2902 Nebraska Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 586-6886 http://www.griffinla.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't. WILLIAM A. KARGES FINE ART 427 Canon Dr., Suite 101 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 276-8551 http://www.kargesfineart.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-5pm

WONDERFUL WORLD ART GALLERY 9517 Culver Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 310.836.4992 www.wwagallery.com XIEM CLAY CENTER AND GALLERY 1563 N. Lake Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 794-5833 http://www.xiemclaycenter.com YOUNG ART GALLERY The Women's building 1727 North Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1230 http://www.youngartgallery.com By appt. only

#&* $)&3 ("&3* &4 $"103"&   #&* $)&3  / " #3&" " $"     #&* $)&3   (0* ()5 :  0$&"/ " 7 & 4"/5 " .0/* $" $"     #("35 %&"* /(4 $0.

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

DREAMS FROM THE SUBCONSCIOUS The Art of Melody Brown

PRESENTED BY

Dog House Studios 717 Valley Drive Hermosa Beach, CA 90254 Contact: Mel Brown (310) 704-7258 www.melbrownstudio.weebly.com you tube: Dog House Studio

www.miatarduccihenry.com Web fabrikmagazine.com

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

Michael Hudson

www.hudsonfineart.com

630-260-9701

TERESA YOUNG Teresa Young’s style spans a range of surrealism and abstraction that allows emotions to be powerfully expressed visually. From one genre to the other, these pieces are ‘emotional landscapes’, meant to be interpreted by the viewer in a subjective fashion.

EMAIL: dalifan.teresa@gmail.com BLOG: http://www.teresa-young.net/blog WEBSITE: http://www.teresa-young.net

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FROM REMBRANDT TO RUSCHA AND BEYOND. PAINTING, SCULPTURE, WORKS ON PAPER, PHOTOGRAPHY, VIDEO, PERFORMANCE – OVER 100 PROMINENT GALLERIES FROM AROUND THE GLOBE. JANUARY 19–23, 2011 / LA CONVENTION CENTER

LAARTSHOW.COM INFORMATION 310 -822- 9145

PRESENTED BY FINE ART DEALERS ASSOCIATION. INCLUDING INTERNATIONAL FINE PRINT DEALERS ASSOCIATION 26TH ANNUAL LOS ANGELES FINE PRINT FAIR.

BENEFITING

MEDIA PARTNERS

SUPPORTERS

GUEST COUNTRY

CHINA


Benson Simmonds

Soular Power

Opening Reception:

7pm - 11pm

Saturday, February 5, 2011 Singles Night February 14 Closing Reception:

11am - 3pm

Sunday, February 27, 2011

2935 S. Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles - 90064

5 blue five ART SPACE

blueFivedesign.com

Fabrik Magazine - Issue 11  

This issue of Fabrik profiles artists David LaChapelle, Ann McCoy and Michael Hayden. We also feature the Stephen Cohen Gallery in Los Angel...

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