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DIY INITIATIVE

Blunden F. | Krol J. | Min K. T. | Skrucha K.


URBAN STRATEGY FOR CITY OF SŁUPSK, POLAND

Master of Architecture, year 2, 2015/2016 Plymouth University


TABLE OF CONTENTS

00

table of contents executive summery

01SŁUPSK/SUBJECT OF STUDY introducing Slupsk history of Słupsk recent Słupsk city’s aspects summary city’s social aspects city’s economic aspects city’s spatial aspects city’s pressing issues social migration unemployment energy poverty

00 p. 5 p. 8

p. 14 p. 16 p. 20 p. 22 p. 24 p. 28 p. 30 p. 34 p. 38 p. 40 p. 42


02RESEARCH/FIELD TRIP education system level of education in relationship to occupation our purpose in SĹ‚upsk public consultations social dialogue our initiative roles of participants education literature precedent study DIY history DIY initiative precedents urban analysis precedents study Dluga site analysis site photos W. Polskigo site analysis site photos New Museum site analysis site photos

p. 44 p. 46 p. 52 p. 54 p. 56 p. 58 p. 60 p. 62 p. 64 p. 66 p. 68 p.70 p. 78 p. 84 p. 90 p. 92 p. 94 p. 96 p. 98 p. 100


03DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY the framework scale interventions urban rules design intentions masterplan proposal: small scale masterplan proposal: medium scale spatial intervention funding proposal street atmosphere Dluga Wojska Polskiego New Museums future proposals bibliography

00 p. 106 p. 108 p. 110 p. 118 p. 120 p. 126 p. 130 p. 132 p. 134 p. 138 p. 142 p. 146 p. 150


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Summary of what is the aim of the project with showing the way of achieving it.

# state # urban commons # social dialogue

Presence of deprivation areas has made an impact onto the growth of the economy. Disproportionately, it affects the local residence, precariats and the public especially in heavy populated areas. We have identified 2 patterns of social interventions state and urban common initiatives who are involved in the revitalisation process of deprivation areas. Highlights of different social participation and their behaviours can be described as follows1: • Top-down state intervention: Government participation where decision makers are chosen based on their technical expertise and background. It works along strong hierarchical constraints and active enforcement to develop the city. • Bottom-up initiatives: Community participation in the evaluation of development proposals. Decision making is based on community interest; design and planning involved in advocacy and participated by the commons. We believe the cause of deprivation areas are closely linked towards long term unemployment. This is caused by deficit of initiative to create full time employment in the city2. When people are long term unemployed, they may become unskilled, demotivated and have difficulty finding jobs in future. Lack of aggregate demands can be overcome if public skills and social dialogue can be strengthen in the city. However, according to Flexibility and Security in Labour Market2 report in Poland, social dialogue in Poland is still a fairly early stage of development. The process takes place mainly at national level among government, trade unions and employers. In particular parts of social dialogue within these social partners, there lies a problem of limited roles played on influencing the change of legal policies. At the same moment, neither the trade unions nor the employers in Poland are sufficiently mature to balance the needs for social security and labour market flexibility. 1. Birkeland. J. ‘Community participation’ in urban project assessment’ (Wollongong, Australia: Science and Technology Studies, University of Wollongong, 1999), [online] Available from: http://www.uow.edu. au/~bmartin/pubs/99tpp/birkeland.html#fn1, (accessed 17th December), pp. 113-142. 2. Economics Onliine, [online] Available from: http://www.economicsonline.co.uk/Managing_the_economy/ Unemployment_types_and_causes.html, (accessed 17th December 2015). 3. Google Books: Flexibility and Security in the Labour Market: Poland Experience , chapter 7.

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TWO INTERVENTIONS Between top-down and bottom-up agencies

Mayor

City Planners

Stakeholders

Territorial enforcement and policing.

>

Top-down Agency

>

Fails to consider significance of actions taken earlier in policymaking process.

State Intervention

Deficit demands lifted by participants Mismatch between skill sets and labour market demands

Unequal terrestrial distribution

Bottom-up Agency

NGOs

Prekariats

Long term unemployment

General Public

Social groups in common, collective and uncommodified movement

Polarization, barriers for collaborations

> >

Urban commons Often reflective on community interest and limited action taken upon large development proposals that requires large capital funding.

9


01

SŁUPSK SUBJECT OF STUDY


01 The current trends that were developed during various Capitalistic structures have had influence on the role of individuals within the system. The visible signs of polarisation derive from: spatial, economic and social marginalisation of different activities. The city of Slupsk acts as a case study depicting unequal terrestrial distributions and a mismatch in skill sets causing long term unemployment, social migration and energy poverty. This chapter of the document refers to an analysis of Slupsk in relation to its history of powerful social forces and different forms of administrative systems - for example the territorisation by the Prussians, Germans and Soviet Unions. How has this dramatic urbanisation lead towards the current conditions of Slupsk today? The chapter also describes the current economic conditions in Slupsk that was outlined by the mayor, Robert Biedroń, who suffers a huge debt weighting almost 275 million zł, resulting from the implementation of projects financed from EU funds. The following statistics show that key areas of deprivation in Slupsk indicates a high percentage of unemployment, emission of pollution and low economic growth which require more social support and building maintenance. Areas in Dluga, New Museum and Wojska Polskiego present high amounts of correlation of issues based on the statistics.


INTRODUCING SŁUPSK Location of the subject, it’s connections and relations with other important Polish cities.

POLAND IN EUROPE

14

POMERANIAN VOIVODSHIP


Słupsk is a city located in the north-western part of Pomerania Voivodeship. The city lies in the Bay of Pomerania of the Baltic Sea, on both sides of the river Słupia. It is an important hub of communication and transport in the region of Central Pomerania. The city meets the railway lines from Szczecin to Gdańsk, and road connections to Poznań via Miastko and Piła, and to Bydgoszcz and Toruń via Bytów and Chojnice. Importantly, Słupsk also has a good bus service from coastal tourist towns. The distance of only 18 km away Słupsk from the Baltic Sea coast.

SŁUPSK’S SUBREGION

CITY OF SŁUPSK

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HISTORY OF CITY From fortress to the city.

The town of Słupsk dates back to eighth to ninth century, when the small fortified town was located on the island that does not exist today, surrounded by the valleys of the river Słupia. St Otto church is located there today. At the turn of the tenth and eleventh centuries Słupsk went under the sovereignty of the Piast dynasty. Around 1230-1236 year power over the castle and the Gdansk Pomerania was passed to the Prince Świętopełk II. Probably in 1265 he gave Słupsk civic rights (civitas) referring to the settlement situated in what is now the old town of Słupsk. Over the centuries, as a part of Central Pomeranian region, the city was under various political influences - constantly developing and growing. In the 30-ties of 16th century, with the whole Pomeranian Principality, Słupsk townsmen accepted the teachings of Martin Luther. During the Thirty Years War in 1630, Slupsk was entered by Swedes who conducted robbery and imposed high taxations which contributed to ruining its economy. In 1653, the land of Słupsk was taken over by Electors of Brandenburg (since 1701. Prussian kings). The period of reconstruction and another crisis caused by weakening of the town during the Seven Years War (1756-1763) and the Napoleonic Wars (18061813), when Słupsk became the strong point of the Prussian resistance against the French. In 1831, the city had to give up the eternal rights to the port of Ustka to Prussia. In the years 1878-1900 city experienced a period of industrial development, in which the dominant role led industries of construction materials, wood and metal machinery. In the first decade of the twentieth century, water supply and sewage systems was expanded and first mechanical sewage treatment plant was built.

1. 2. 3. 4.

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Czarnik A., Lindmajer J. Dzieje Słupska, Słupsk 1986 Stachlewski W., Słupsk: przewodnik turystyczny, Słupsk, 2000. Szypowska M., Słupsk, Warszawa 1971. Figure 1: Local Regeneration Programme City of Slupsk, 28 April 2010, Slupsk, June 2013, p23.


SĹ‚upsk in the mid-seventeenth century.4

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Slupsk

Vilnius Gdansk

Szczecin

Warsaw

Wroclaw Cracow

Lviv

Baltic Sea Slupsk

1265 SIGNIFICANT HISTORY OF SŁUPSK TAKEN OVER BY DIFFERENT SOCIAL FORCES

1. 2. 3. 4.

18

Gdansk

1918

1265 it was given city rights.

Plebiscite for ownership of the Polish Corridor.

Eastern Pomerania with Gdansk was a part of Poland. Slupsk at that time was situated on Prussian territory. Tightly cooperating with Ustka it became of the trade cities.1

A Plebiscite was insisted to determine the ownership of the “Polish Corridor”. Germany wanted the corridor and the seaport of Gdynia would become a Polish enclave with a route connecting Poland with Gdynia. After BritishFrench guaranteed support for Poland, the Plebiscite negotiation over Danzig ended.2

Local Regeneration Programme City of Slupsk, 28 April 2010, Slupsk, June 2013, p21-28. Ibid, p21-28. Ibid, p21-28. The rise of Solidarnosc, [online] Available from: http://isj.org.uk/the-rise-of-solidarnosc/, (accessed 16th December 2015).


Baltic Sea

Slupsk

Vilnius Gdansk

Slupsk

Gdansk

Szczecin

Warsaw

Wroclaw Cracow

Slupsk

Vilnius Gdansk

Lviv

Slupsk

Szczecin

Warsaw

Warsaw

Wroclaw Cracow

Slupsk

Lviv

1939 Warsaw

After theofPolish After the war war switch Polish borders borders were switched. After war switch of Polish borders

1945 People’s Republic of Poland.

1980 Solidarnosc

German population soon Polish boarders It was the first trade union Polish borders beforebefore World People’sdeported Republic of Poland Solidarność War II after 1945. Their houses were taken World War II. in a Warsaw Pact country Polish borders before World People’s Republic of Poland Solidarność population deportedthat soonwas after not controlled It was the first trade War II Polish borders. over by PolesGerman form central Poland Current current Polish borders 1945. Their houses deported were taken over by a Warsaw coun the Pact first trade and, from theGerman former population Polish eastern bysoon a after communistIt was party. Poles from central Poland and from the was not controlled current Polish borders 1945. Their houses were taken over by a Warsaw Pact counb territories, Poland was eastern conquered Originally, it started in party. area of of former former eastern eastern former Polish territories communist Area Poles from central Poland and from the was not controlled b by the Sovietformer UnionPolish which created borderlands (now belong to Poland was conquered by Gdansk the Sovietshipyard communist Itthanks originally party. started i area of former eastern territories borderlands (now eastern 3 the territories of belong Lithuania, Union, which created People’s Republic of shipyard thanks to Li People’s Republic Poland. Lech Walesa initiative. borderlands (now to Polandof was conquered by tothe Soviet It originally started belong to Ukraine) the territories Belarus and Poland.which created People’sSoon, Wałęsa initiative. the territories of Lithuania, the spark of riot Union, Republic of shipyard thanks to L of Lithuania, Belarus and Soon, the spark of r Belarus and Ukraine) Poland. Wałęsa initiative. against communist current polish territory (part Ukraine.) Slupsk most German population deported. communist governm the spark of r government tookSoon, over is pre-war Poland and parts Resettled communities in Slupsk. over other cities as current polish territory (part Slupsk most German population deported. communist governm other cities as well.over Slupsk belonged to the and German was one ofcities them,assh Current territory is pre-war Polish Poland parts Resettled communities in Slupsk. other Reich) Gdynia was one of them Gdańsk shortly belonged to the German was oneand of them, sh (part is pre-war Poland 4 after Gdansk and Gdynia. Reich) Gdańsk and Gdynia and parts belong to the German Reich).

1265 it was given city rights 1265 it was given city rights Eastern Pomerania with Gdańsk a part of Poland. Eastern was Pomerania with Słupsk that timeof was situated Gdańskatwas a part Poland. on Prussian teritory. Tightly Słupsk at that time was situated cooperating with Ustka it became on Prussian teritory. Tightly

Collapse of Poland. Divided into parts by its neighbours Collapse of Poland. Divided into parts by its neighbours

Plebiscite for own Corridor. for own Plebiscite Corridor.

A Plebiscite was insi 19 of insi ownership the A Plebiscite was Germany wanted t ownership of the seaport Gdynia wt Germanyof wanted exclave with a rout seaport of Gdynia w


RECENTLY IN SŁUPSK Słupsk current economical and political situation.

Biedroń was elected for a president of Slupsk in autumn 2014. In a letter which he sent on 17th of June 2015 to Polish Prime Minister, Ewa Kopacz, he widely described bad financial situation, which he found in Slupsk after previous government. He recalled that the city is in debt for 275 million zł, it also has a number of current liabilities resulting from the implementation of projects financed from EU funds, many of which he performs together with other local governments. Previous president of Slupsk has terminated the city contract for building aqua park facility. This decision was a based on multiple years of delay in its construction. Construction of a aqua park in Slupsk began in May 2011. The facility was expected to cost 57.7 million zł and to be completed by June 2012. Construction, which got a subsidy from the European Funds, prolonged and in January 2013 was stopped completely: City Hall broke an agreement with the contractor due to delays. As a result building company was charged with penalties. Part of the costs of the city investment where recovered. However, the Contractor - Renovation and Construction Company TERMOCHEM sp. - responded with a counterclaim, seeking zł 24.5 million for additional works. TERMOCHEM company won the case: the local government has until July 11 to find that sum.1 Referring to the difficult situation and the court order, Biedroń declared in a letter to Prime Minister that Slupsk is able to pay nearly 17 million zł obligation arising from the court order. To satisfy the claim in full, the local government would need nearly 7.5 million zł of external help.

1. Polska Newsweek, [online] Available from: http://polska.newsweek.pl/ile-wynosi-zadluzenie-slupskabiedron-prosi-kopacz-o-pomoc-,artykuly,365365,1.html, (accssed 16th December 2015). 2. Natemat, [online] Available from: http://natemat.pl/151249,robert-biedron-potwierdza-slupsk-dostanie-odrzadu-pieniadzea, (accessed 16th December 2015). 3. Zbigniew Marecki November 2, 2015, [online] Available from: http://www.gp24.pl/wiadomosci/slupsk/ art/9051883,do-konca-roku-wladze-slupska-wyremontuja-105-mieszkan-komunalnych-i-socjalnychwideo-zdjecia,id,t.html, (accessed 16th December 2015).

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Slupsk’s financial situation :

‘PLN 300m (€72m) in debt, a recent court ruling on the collapse of a project to build a waterpark left the city with a bill of PLN 24m to pay contractors.’

Slupsk’s financial situation :

‘PLN 300m (€72m) in debt, a recent court ruling on the collapse of a project to build a waterpark left the city with a bill of PLN 24m to pay contractors.’

Robert Biedron Slupsk Mayor :

Strategy to introduce healthier food at schools and other municipal institutions; banning circuses on animal-welfare grounds; ordering city officials to drink tap water instead of the expensive bottled variety.’

Robert Biedron Slupsk Mayor :

Strategy to introduce healthier food at schools and other municipal institutions; banning circuses on animal-welfare grounds; ordering city officials to drink tap water instead of the expensive bottled variety.’

The city received financial help from the budgetary reserve of about 4.4 million zloty. Slupsk will receive 3.36 million zł for the renovation of social housing and 1 million zł for the modernization of State Puppet Theatre ‘Rainbow’ premises, and the purchase of the bus. End of June 2015, the town hall wrote to the Regional Court in Gdansk with a request to suspend the execution of the court order of the Court of Arbitration in Warsaw. As a result, the enforcement of the sentence has been suspended.2 With the financial assistance of the government, Slupsk started renovation of 105 council apartments from urban resources, which in coming months will go to individuals and families waiting for council housing and social services. On average, the renovation of an apartment cost 30 thousand. zł. Those apartments have undergone a major renovation, often including replacing stoves to electric heating, municipal or central heating. Also had replaced the electrical circuit systems and windows. These homes were replastered, painted, laid with new carpeting, replaced doors and installed new stoves and sinks. Bathrooms were also renovated.3

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sues combined

CITY’S ASPECTS SUMMARY Most problematic areas in the city, summing up social, economical and spatial aspects.

less

#summary #deprivation #problems

most

The highlighted areas indicated large numbers of deprivations as statistics are overlapped to show possible correlations.

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Deprivation areas are caused by unequal distribution of commodity in terms of economic wealth and quality spaces. The presence of inequalities are caused by neo-liberalisation where decentralisation and autonomy are primary vehicles of it1. Local authoritise seek out interventions to improve the city through polarisations on economic and residential zones, private property solutions, automic policies and social housings in order to meet socio-economic demands. The increasing polarisation in the distribution of wealth and power have inevitably influenced the spacial forms of Slupsk.

HIGHLIGHTED ISSUES • biggest inhabitants Nowe Muzeum Area population

• highest number of domestic violence cases • highest unemployment rate

Wojska Polskiego Street • highest population density • highest number of criminal offences • highest unemployment rate • highest economic growth

• highest percentage of long term unemployed • highest percentage of buildings polluting the air

Długa Street Area • highest number of social benefits granted • highest number of domestic violence cases • highest percentage of buildings in bad condition • highest percentage of buildings polluting the air

1. Harvey. D. ‘Rebel cities from the right to the city to the urban revolution’, (2012, London: Verso), p.83

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CITY’S SOCIAL ASPECTS #benefits #unemployment #problems

PLN

no of social benefits per 1000 people

City areas the most problematic in terms of social aspects.

highest number of social benefits per 1 000 persons 79.5 - 100 benefits/1 000 persons

The following diagrams showed statistics of deprivations in Slupsk based on the report of ‘Delimitation of degraded areas in the City of Slupsk’1. 1. Delimitation of crisis areas of the City of Slupsk, Prepared by: Faculty of Management Funds City Hall in Slupsk, p16-63.

24


no of so

value of social benefits in PLN

highest value of social benefits granted per person 183.87 - 245.16 PLN/person

25


population density

highest population density of SĹ‚upsk - 180 - 240 persons/Ha

26


populati

elderly people

highest percentage of retired people in general population

27


CITY’S ECONOMIC ASPECTS

unemployment

City areas the most problematic in terms of economic aspects.

highest general unemployment rate - 17.16 - 22.88 %

28

#benefits #unemployment #problems


unempl

growth of economy

highest growth of economic activities - 10.97 - 21.94%

29


CITY’S SPATIAL ASPECTS

no of listed buildings

City areas the most problematic in terms of spatial aspects.

highest percentage of listed buildings - 36.48 - 48.64 %

30

#benefits #unemployment #problems


no of lis

built before 1970

highest percentage of buildings built before 1970- 63.45 - 84.60%

31


buildings to repair

highest percentage of buildings demanding repairs 47.88 - 61.84%

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building

built before 1970

highest emission of pollution in buildings - 85.92 - 100%

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CITY’S PRESSING ISSUES The effects of deprivation

#polarisation #unemployment #deficit demands

Polarisation Slupsk urban planning system are managed through marginalised zonnings - locations for special economic zones, social housings and privatised allotment spaces. Not only there are income gaps between rich and poor households, this gap shows different urban communities that house the rich and poor.

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Unequal terrestrial distribution

Mismatch between skill sets

Communities living in segregation based on demographics and opportunities present in unequal locations of Slupsk.

Employers are gradually believing that new graduates are inadequately prepared for work as education institutions are not keeping in touch with the needs of corporate recruiters.

Signs of gentrification of housing and chain stores emerges in Slupsk, providing cleaner environment but expensive accountrements of life. (food, education, coffee shops and houses)

As local industries are gradually advancing, educational facilities still teach students based on conventional teaching model.


Education (Knowledge)

Lack of dialogue

Lack of discipline

Lack of organisation

Deficit in demands

Polarisation

Unequal terrestrial distribution

Mismatch between skill sets

Long term unemployment

DEPRIVATION

Social migration

Social housing

Energy Poverty


no new work places & no entrepreneteur

no service demand MAIN ISSUES

no connections

UNEMPLOYMENT ISSUES ORIGIN

no skills housing

energy poverty

lack of ideas skills out of date

migration

POOR KNOWLEDGE UNEMPLOYMENT ORIGIN

Influencing mechanisms originating from poor knowledge and how it contributes to unemployment.

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The conventional wisdom of what is now taught as economics bypasses the poor, the very people for whom development is really needed. The economics of giantism and automation is a leftover of nineteenth-century conditions and nineteenth-century thinking and it is totally incapable of solving any of the real problems of today. An entirely new system of thought is needed, a system based on attention to people, and not primarily attention to goods—(the goods will look after themselves!). It could be summed up in the phrase, ‘production by the masses, rather than mass production’.

Small is Beautiful - E.F. Schumacher

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SOCIAL MIGRATION The most common motivator for Poles to emigrate is primarily the possibility of increasing the amount of remuneration. Subsequently, they are indicated factors associated with the comfort of living and social security. The most important reason indicated by 78% of respondents are therefore higher wages and bettering economical situation. For 44% the motivator to go is to raise the standards of life. 37% declared that what leads them to emigrate is lack of suitable jobs in Poland, and the same number of respondents expects to experience a greater career prospects abroad. Secondly in relation to migration, Poles have stated: exploration of the world and traveling (35%), better healthcare (29%), and better social conditions (19%).1 The president of Slupsk also recognizes the impact of educational migration on depopulation of the city. As he describes, many young people are leaving to study at polytechnics and universities located in larger cities, settle there and never come back. As Datko suggests in her study on educational migration in Poland, achieving education, economical independency, leaving parents home, change of an environment are mainly the reasons for students migrating to larger academic orientated cities.2 In most cases, future students do not consider moving to academic city for a temporary stay. Often their plan is to remain in the city after the end of this stage of education. Moving back to your native city is not considered as a possible path in life, because it is often associated with personal failure - the ones who come back, are seen as unsuccessful, and as those who could not cope with leading the forefront metropolitan culture, or were not good enough to succeed on demanding, but yet attractive employment market. The graduation itself is not considered a success - in the era of ‘mass production of academic education’ it is simply the next step towards personal development. Success is the beginning of career.3

1. Work Service, ‘Economic migration of Poles - Report’ [online] Available from: http://www.workservice.pl/ content/download/4139/32794/file/Migracje%20zarobkowe_WS_RAPORT.04.2015_digital.pdf, (accssed 15th December 2015). 2. Slupsk migration in numbers, [online] Available from: http://gdansk.stat.gov.pl/vademecum/vademecum_ pomorskie/portrety_miast/miasto_slupsk.pdf, (accessed 15th December 2015). 3. Datko, A., ‘ZA DYPLOMEM? MIGRACJE MâODYCH POLAKÓW DO MIAST AKADEMICKICH’

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d roa ab 53 1

mo ve 1 2 d ou 13 t

in ed ov 98 8

m

from

POPULATION 93 706

abro 67 ad

POPULATION 461 935

oad abr 4 48

GDAŃSK (2013) POPULATION 461 935

from abro 360 ad

oad abr 4

mo ve 3 6 d out 07 oad abr 4

migration balance: 1 112 mo ve 3 6 d out 07

from abro 360 ad

SZCZECIN (2013)

in ed ov 3 m 5 36

mo ve 4 1 d out 27 oad abr 4 48

in ed ov 3 m 5 36

mo ve 4 1 d out 27

in ed ov 9 m 3 64

POPULATION 408 105

from abro 124 ad

migration balance: 162

in ed ov 9 m 3 64

POPULATION 408 105

from abro 124 ad

SŁUPSK (2013)

d roa ab 53 1

mo ved 1 2 ou 13 t

in d e ov 8 m 89

from

POPULATION 93 706

abro 67 ad

migration balance: -401

in d e ov 3 m 5 36

mo ve 4 1 d out 27 oad abr 4 48

from

POPULATION 461 935

abro 360 ad

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UNEMPLOYMENT In 1990 Słupsk’s dominant sector of the economy was agriculture and industry. With its later crises, so called ‘structural unemployment’ occur. The sub-region is facing this unfavorable situation for over 10 years. Industry in the former province of Słupsk was strongly linked to the countries of the former Comecon block. It was mainly the footwear, shipbuilding, wood and machinery industry. It was focused primarily in Slupsk, Kępice, Ustka and Sławno. In order to adapt to a market economy, local manufacturers had to find themselves in a competitive market. In the postwar years, in Slupsk large factories employing about 1 thousand personnel were created (including Slupsk Furniture Factory). At the end of the sixties, three big plants were put into operation: Utility Companies Repair of buses “Kapena” (1968.), North Betting Leather Industry “Alka” (1969), and Ship and Equipment Factory “Sezamor” (1970.). In total they have employed more than 5 thousand people. Industry therefore had an important place in the economical development on Slupsk. It provided the main source of income for city’ population. In the late eighties, the industry employed more than 31% of total city population. Large companies, however, did not resist the reduction of employment. Industries initiate restructuring, including privatization and the introduction of modern machinery. In the nineties, the most visible changes in the market came as a result of enterprises privatization. In recent years, processes related to employment were mainly influenced by reforms that shaped the basis of the market and unemployment mechanisms. Changes in the Polish economy have forced many entrepreneurs to downsize production. The importance of agriculture and industry, has decreased, while development of services intensified. The changing structure of Polish economy meant that demand for some professions significantly decreased, thereby influenced the rise and consolidation of unemployment.1

1. Rydz, E., Siwek, A., (2003), PRZEOBRAŻENIA NA LOKALNYCH RYNKACH PRACY W LATACH 1988-2001 NA PRZYKŁADZIE POWIATU SŁUPSKIEGO, Słupskie Prace Geograficzne vol. 1, Instytut Geografii Pomorska Akademia Pedagogiczna Słupsk

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12.2% SŁUPSK

6.5%

13.2%

GDAŃSK POMERANIA

10.6%

SZCZECIN

13.4% POLAND

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ENERGY POVERTY “Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the action of human beings.’’ - Nelson Mandela The increase in energy prices, which are affected by long-term, global trends in commodity prices, charge the budgets of households. Consequently, most of them will have difficulty in meeting basic needs. Today the budgets of households in Poland are more burdened by expenditure on energy than in other countries of the European Union (EU). In 2010, energy costs accounted for 11% of total Polish households expenditures, about half more than the average for countries in the EU. The reasons are: the lower level of income in Poland relating to fixed prices of energy commodities on world markets, as well as, high heating costs related to climate and the quality of building structures. In 2013, as many as 18% of households were under heated in order to reduce the costs of living. These were mainly households of unemployed people and those who are using fuel stoves in their apartments.1 Energy poverty is not only lack of comfort associated with the right temperature at home, but also a difficulty to heat the water or light a room; not to mention the possibility of using seemingly basic household appliances - refrigerators, washing machines, stoves, gas or electricity, radio, television, computer and the Internet. This concept therefore means lack of access to energy understood as electricity, heat and gas, mainly for financial reasons, as well as the inability to pay bills, make appropriate modernization purchasing systems or devices.

1. Komu grozi ubóstwo energetyczne?article: Forbes, [online] Available from: http://csr.forbes.pl/komu-grozi-ubostwoenergetyczne-,artykuly,197514,1,1.html, (accessed 17th December 2015). 2. Figure 1: Działania Słupska ograniczające niską emisję, [online] Available from: http://misja-emisja.pl/goodpractice/ dzialania-slupska-ograniczajace-niska-emisje/, (accessed 17th December 2015).

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in 2009 -2013 SĹ‚upsk

309,000 zł from city budget removed 273 masonry heaters 37 coal stoves modernized heating in 19 public use buildings 117 council houses 29 housing community buildings spent

Figure 1.

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SYSTEM OF EDUCATION IN POLAND Polish educational system faces two basic problems, and for further generations of its students these may contribute to an overall struggle in meeting constantly evolving employment market demands. The first is profound systematic problem that characterise all educational systems around the world. Most educational programmes are unresponsive in following fast-paced revolutionary changes taking place across the other major sectors of society. ‘Economic or social problems faced by parents were usually very similar to the problems their children encountered. Today, however, the younger generations face changes in their social environment that are completely foreign to those their parents had faced.’1 Past educational models were based on equipping students with certain skills and knowledge base, with assumption that this would serve them for life. Nowadays, this model produces not sufficient framework for the needs of today. ‘If information, skills and attitudes become quickly outdated then we cannot continue to allow students to live in the past by participating in an increasingly archaic system of education.’ 2 ‘The second problem is unique to education systems within post-communist countries.’3 The political system has influenced the education in specific way. In post totalitarian society, the role of teacher is still primary to books, manuals, individual research or extra-curricular activities. 4

1. Kulewski. W. (1998) The Basic Problems of Education in Poland and the Potential Role of NGO’s, [online] Available from: http://www.21learn.org/archive/the-basic-problems-of-education-in-poland-and-thepotential-role-of-ngos/ (accessed:November 2015). 2. Ibid, Kulewski. W. (1998) The Basic Problems of Education in Poland and the Potential Role of NGO’s, 3. Ibid, Kulewski. W. (1998) 4. Ibid, Kulewski. W. (1998)

44


SCHOOL SYSTEM

y.o. 0

3 EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE

7 PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION

13 PRIMARY EDUCATION

16

19 UPPER-SECONDARY

LOWER-SECONDARY

EDUCATION

EDUCATION

POST-SECONDARY

EDUCATION

BASIC VOCATIONAL

EDUCATION

TECHNICAL UPPER-SECONDARY

EDUCATION

5

16 COMPULSORY FULL-TIME EDUCATION

18

TERITARY EDUCATION

PART-TIME

SCHOOLS IN SŁUPSK

NUMBER OF INSTITUTIONS IN SŁUPSK

EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE

PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION

PRIMARY EDUCATION

LOWER-SECONDARY EDUCATION

6

43

12

14

UPPER-SECONDARY EDUCATION

26

POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION

20

BASIC VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

12 TECHNICAL UPPER-SECONDARY EDUCATION

13

TERITARY EDUCATION

3

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LEVEL OF EDUCATION IN RELATION TO OCCUPATION

46


UNEMPLOYED BY EDUCATIONAL LEVEL IN SŁUPSK

1 5

30% 1. tertiary education 2. post-secondary and vocational secondary 3. general secondary 4. basic vocational 5.lower-secondary, primary and incomplete primary

14%

20%

2

24% 12% 4

3

Number of research analysed how creativity is perceived among various populations in Poland. The studies ‘investigated the teachers’ opinion about characteristics of creative, non-creative, ideal, and conduct-challenging students.’ The results suggested the teachers had not only problem with identifying creative individuals’ characteristics, but what is more important, ‘they showed a tendency to ignore the personality characteristics typical for creative individuals. Typically for Eastern societies, creativity is being perceived through its product and usefulness. ‘(…) Polish people understand creativity as self-expression, with stress in artistic attributes’. 2 During the time in which Poland was under Communism influence, ‘ubiquitous shortages of basic goods stimulated creativity. In other words, to get hold of unavailable products, Polish people had to draw on ingenuity and innovativeness. Making dresses from dyed diapers - improbable as it might now sound - is a good case in point. Poles ‘remarkable creativity played a role in overthrowing the system.’1 This creativity derived from and aimed to challenge general constrains and the authority.

1. Zientara, P. (2014) Human Resources Management in Emerging Economies, New York: Routledge , p.13 2. Kaufman, J. C., Sternberg, R. J., ed. (2006) The International Handbook of Creativity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, p.290

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02

RESEARCH FIELD TRIP


How can two social forces - state interventions and urban ‘commons’ come under mutual grounds in a cohesive environment to build the future resilience of Slupsk underpinning its socio-economic deprivations, social migrations, unemployment and energy poverty in that area?

What is the role of urban ‘commons’ and state authority? What are the initiatives for the two social forces? How does the collective behaviors of the two social forces contribute into the development of Slupsk in terms of social, spatial and economic perspective?


02 Chapter 2 consists of the site trip to Slupsk social dialogue with a range of actors including; residents, city planners, the Mayor, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), and a member of the Slupsk Technology Incubator. From the range of dialogue gathered and institution analysis, two types of actors were discovered; the state interventions and the urban commons. Our initiative ams to collaborate the state and existing urban commons via community practices. To tackle the lack of collaboration between these two actors we aim to analyses the existing educational system in Poland and the unemployment figures after having graduated. The unemployment figures in Slupsk are low and in order to tackle the education system would be via similar techniques adopted by Schumacher College using the Stephen Stirling ‘Transformative Learning’ practice. The co-creation and dexterous skills encouraged here link to the design strategy of encouraging more collaboration and communication amongst the actors of state and commons via DIY (do it yourself) techniques. The DIY co-creations would be to investigate of green energy solutions for Slupsk. The spatial analysis is investigated covering themes of heritage, nature, circulation and spatial functions. Three typologies were discovered after site analysis; space A: existing pocket spaces in courtyards, space B: large open courtyard spaces, and space C: characterful, historic public institutional buildings with large open courtyard spaces. Corresponding precedents are studied for spaces A, B and C.


OUR PURPOSE IN SLUPSK What are our intentions when engaging the community of Slupsk?

# site visits # interventions # participants

During our site visit in the city of Slupsk, we had engaged social dialogues through different actors such as the local residents of Slupsk, city planner, the mayor, NGO and a member of the Technology Incubator. Form of dialogues were initiated through sets of interviews, discussions, conferences and forum. Through our perspective, we understood that different actors shared different interest/visions on the development of Slupsk. We believe that the local community have the potential to contribute towards the future of Slupsk. For instances, there are already evidences of initiatives were performed by the NGOs and the local authority, responding to local situations and the value and interests of communities involved. It offers us a good opportuniy to envision this essence of collaboration to be taken through a large visionary approach, towards a mediation process that can be taken from small to large scale of interventions under the hands of both urban commons and the state authority. However, the practice of commoning can be challenging as these participants lie conflicting social and political interest. Our first aim is address the following questions: who are the participants involved? What would be the role of the participants in the interface between bottom-up initiatives and top-down governance?

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53


PUBLIC CONSULTATION Who are the participants?

Robert Bierdron is officially the city Mayor of Slupsk in 2014. He strongly believes on equal human rights, freedom of thinking and the development of the economy.. The role of the mayor represents the local government of The City of Slupsk.

Mayor

City planners study conditions and directions of spatial development of City of Slupsk. They are incharge of issued zonings and location of public investment. Recently, they developed ‘The Study for City Development’ model, featuring plans for different functions in development areas.

Stakeholders are independent party that have interest or concern in an organisation. Some stakeholders such as shareholders and investors can affect or be affected by organisation’s actions, objectives and policies.

City Planners

Stakeholders

1. Department of Urban Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, [online] Available from: http://bip.um.slupsk.pl/ urzad_miejski/wydzialy/122.html, (accessed 17th December 2015).

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Precariats is a social class living under existing poor conditions of houses that requires maintenenance, social benefits and economic support.

Prekariats

There are more than 100 listed non-governmental organisations (NGOs) available in Slupsk. Among of them are chategorised as Public Benefit Organisation (PBO) whereby 90% of efforts are focus on the benefit of general good.

NGOs

We defined the rest of the ‘commons’ such as the local residence as the ordinary people in society who are not involved in any particular political agenda and interest.

General Public

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SOCIAL DIALOGUE FROM DIFFERENT ACTORS WITH DIFFERENT DEMANDS/OPINIONS ON SLUPSK

“... city needs small businesses, not most profitable, but those that attract people...” “... need for better engagement of local NGO’s and coworkers...”

Mayor

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“... no facilities for families, no playgrounds...” “... some residents still using coal for heating...”

City Planners

Stakeholders


“... we need more playground...” “... I’m working under hourly paid contract of promoting political party in upcoming elections...” “... if the parliament got the seat, I’ll get 2000 Zloty...” “... after the election I’ll be unemployed again...”

Prekariats

“... over 400 registered NGOs in Slupsk...” “... city dispone 2mln zl per year, allocated for participatory budget, where residents can vote for most wanted projects...” “... only 10% of residents votes in participatory budget programme...” “... problems happen when voted projects exceed the costs estimated in their brief...”

NGOs

“... Dluga bad reputation for gypsy and travelers that used to live there...” “... young people going abroad..” “... a pensioner has to survive with their money from pay day to pay day, and still squeeze the expenses for it to last...”

General Public

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OUR INITIATIVE Collaborative mediation between the two social forces

Our initiative is to develop the practice of commoning for social forces of state intervention and the existing urban commons to come into mutual participation, with reference of multiple social dialogue and modes of interventions. This process will be taken through a continuous political mediation process to solve different socio-economic issues.

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Territorial enforcement and policing.

Top-down Agency

> >

Encourage community development in governance, planning and action

State Intervention

Continuous Political Mediation Process

Bottom-up Agency Social groups in common, collective and uncommodified movement

> >

Urban commons Steer people to collaborate across boundaries and tackles divisions of social-economic issues

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ROLES OF PARTICIPANTS What could be the roles of participants?

Represent the City of Slupsk to empower the people and their organisations to influence and transform public policies and services and all factors affecting the conditions of their lives.

Mayor

Adopt strategic approach to community development within their region, linking with other suitable bodies and departments within the City of Slupsk and considering community development when developing regional strategies, including sustainable economic strategies.

Recognise community development as an integral component in the delivery of good public services and local governance.

City Planners

Stakeholders

1. Communities and local government, [online] Available from: http://www.cdf.org.uk/wp-content/ uploads/2011/12/The-Community-development-challenge.pdf, (accessed 17th December 2015).

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Drives younger generations too and develop independent groups and projects across the community sector within an ethical framework, and increase networking between groups.

Advise and inform public authorities on community perspectives and assist them to strengthen communities and work in genuine partnership with them.

Precariats

NGOs

Support and develop independent groups and projects across the community sector within an ethical framework, and increase networking between groups.

General Public

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EDUCATION : LITERATURE ‘Education for Good Work.’ E.F. Schumacher, p.112

#school #uni #studyinghard

‘The Cartesian Revolution (ordered, rigid model) has removed the social sciences from our “map of Knowledge”, (qualitative evaluation); only the core subjects of quantitative learning are left.1 Being entrapped in the metaphysical Cartesian Revolution, education trains students to avoid subjective learning principles. ‘As long as we remain entrapped in the metaphysics represented by the Cartesian Revolution, education can be nothing but a training which, we hope, may enable people to establish themselves more comfortably - the body, not the soul! - in the dark wood of meaningless existence.’2 The present systems of education ‘were developed in large part to meet the labour needs of the Industrial Revolution and they are organized on the principles of mass production.’ ‘The problem is that these systems are inherently unsuited to the wholly different circumstances of the twenty-first century.’3 ‘How do we prepare young people for the future world or work?’4 Today’s ‘revolution in education’ must come ‘from the ground up’, to make changes within the education system.’5 ‘The more innovation there is within them, the more likely they are to evolve as a whole.’6

1. Dr E. F. Schumacher, ‘Small is Beautiful’, 1973 Blond & Briggs Ltd, p.113. 2. Ibid, p.114. 3. Ken Robinson, ‘Creative Schools Revolutionizing Education from the Ground Up’, United States of America: Viking Penguin, 2015, p.xv. 4. Dr E. F. Schumacher, ‘Small is Beautiful’, 1973 Blond & Briggs Ltd, p.118. 5. Ken Robinson, ‘Creative Schools Revolutionizing Education from the Ground Up’, United States of America: Viking Penguin, 2015, p.xvii. 6. Ibid, p.xvii. 7. Ibid, p.xvii.

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‘ ‘

The present systems of education were developed in large part to meet the labour needs of the Industrial Revolution and they are organized on the principles of mass production.

Creative Schools - Ken Robinson


PRECEDENT STUDY Transformative Learning participatory qualitative shift in perception.

#school #uni #studyinghard

Transformative learning is an education model researched by Stephen Stirling who aims to invite a ‘qualitative shift in perception and meaning making on the part of the learner in a particular learning experience such that the learner questions or reframes his/her assumptions or habits of thought.’1

O’Connor (2002) transformative learning involves:

- ‘a participatory self or participatory mind (Reason, 1995, p.3).’2

For example Schumacher College plays an important role in ‘advancing, testing and mapping out new purposes, research and pedagogies that higher education could bring on board more centrally.’3 This test bed education facility keeps the ‘voracious appetite’, young children have for learning, ‘alive’ which is the ‘key to transforming education.’4

1. Sterling. S. (2010-11), Transformative Learning and Sustainability: sketching the conceptual ground Stephen Sterling University of Plymouth, UK, Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, Issue 5, p.19. 2. Ibid, p.20. 3. Ibid, p.28. 4. Robinson. K. (2015) ‘Creative Schools Revolutionizing Education from the Ground Up’, United States of America: Viking Penguin, p.xii. 5. Figure: Schumacher College [online] Available from: https://www.schumachercollege.org.uk/.jpg, (accessed 16th December 2015).

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Schumacher College is an international centre for naturebased education, personal transformation and collective action. The education programme involves, co-creation and participation in a more resilient, equal and sustainable world.5 Schumacher College, [online] Available from: https://www.schumachercollege.org.uk/, (accessed 13th December 2015).


DIY HISTORY In the past it was the most popular way of dealing with lack of goods

#diy #doityourself #peoplesrepublicofpoland

After the war, Poland got under the governance of the Communist Party starting a very difficult time for the society. Borders switched, the country needed to rebuild after the war and strengthen the economy. New government of People’s Republic of Poland didn’t care much about their citizens. It resulted in empty shop shelves, basic goods being basically unavailable to buy. Even if they were, people didn’t have money to pay for them. This is how DIY (do it yourself) culture started in Poland. If something was unavailable to buy, then someone had to built it. Need required to share knowledge and skills between family members and neighbours. But the biggest craze on DIY started when in late 50s National Television started showing new series called “Zrób to sam” (“Do it yourself”). It was hosted by Adam Słodowy, ex-soldier and handyman who could almost build everything from nothing. In the first episode, he demonstrated how to build a bird feeder. In 500 episodes of the programme, viewers could see how to build children telegraph, piggy bank with digital lock, small vacuum machine or alarming device that signalise when water is pouring out of the bath tube. While some object built on a programme might sound silly, skillful viewers were able to transform them into the machines they needed to substitute or produce what they needed. With time, as communism fell and society got wealthier, DIY culture faded into oblivion. 1

1. Robert Kozielski , Do it yourself, as Adam Malty, [online] Available from: http://biznes.pl/magazyny/marketing/ zrob-to-sam-jak-adam-slodowy/415tc, (accessed 16th December 2015). 2. Figure 1: [online]Available from: http://www.antykwariat.nepo.pl/images/produkty2/slodowylubiemajst1976. jpg (accessed 16h December 2015). 3. Figures 2, [online], Available from: http://ocdn.eu/images/pulscms/NTA7MDMsMCwyZDAsMSwx/ f27db8dea5b5275f7df2ed32a17d11c1.jpg, (accessed 16th December 2015).

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Figure 1.

Figures 2.

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DIY INITIATIVE # intermediate technology # placemaking # micro-generation

The right to city is the right of an individual or group to access resources and reinvent the city in the community’s desires1. DIY initiative highlights on the urban development of Slupsk through the forces by the individuals and local communities - the production for the masses, empowering them with strong sense of ownership and participation. By putting the urban ‘commons’ into public spaces, transforming into a political commons where people can have collaborative open discussions and debate over what the system should be doing for the future of Slupsk. Doing DIY projects enhance one’s capability of making their own resources, fostering connections between individuals, bridging deeper connections to materialism, having the wider thought on the resilience, training them to be selfreliance and inspiring the public to take up future projects. The success of the project depends on the collaborations between various civic stakeholders and urban ‘commons’. DIY projects can be used by the communities as mediators to engage residents locally through exchange of knowledge, creative hybrid prototypes that can create an impact of creative placemaking and urban design; solving deprivation issues and build resilience on the city of Slupsk. Based on current identified issues of Slupsk, we explore our ideas on alternative energy generation prototypes through the use of ‘intermediate technology’3 combines sophisticated ideas with cheap and readily available local materials that can be developed by the ‘commons’ as an example of DIY initiative towards improving the economy and social wellbeing.

1. Harvey. D. ‘Rebel cities from the right to the city to the urban revolution’, (2012, London: Verso). 2. http://www.artscapediy.org/Creative-Placemaking/Approaches-to-Creative-Placemaking.aspx 3. Dr E. F. Schumacher, ‘Small is Beautiful’, 1973 Blond & Briggs Ltd, p.48

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PRECEDENT STUDY DIY Wind Turbines Hydroelectic generators

&

#diy #cleanenergy #windandwater

DIY Wind Turbines & Hydroelectic generators Generating energy from a wind or water is mostly carried out in a big scale as it’s most efficient that way. However, on the Internet could be found numbers of guides and tutorials how to build small wind or water turbine. It’s hardly possible that DIY turbine will produce enough energy to power a house. It may be a great help to reduce household electricity expenses.1

1. Popular mechanics, [online] Available from: [online] Available from: http://www.popularmechanics.com/ science/environment/how-to/g118/make-your-own-miniature-wind-turbine/, (accessed 19th December 2015). 2. Figures 1: Popular mechanics, [online] Available from: [online] Available from: http://www.popularmechanics. com/science/environment/how-to/g118/make-your-own-miniature-wind-turbine/, (accessed 19th December 2015).

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Figures 1.

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PRECEDENT STUDY Turbine Tree by New Wind

#eco #cleanenergy #windenergy

Measuring 36 feet structure features 72 leaf-turbines operate around the tree. While wind blows, leaf turbines rotate producing the energy. Thanks to cables and generators being integrated within the tree structure, it operates almost silently. Tree inspired design allows it to perfectly blend into any landscape - urban and rural. It’s storm resistant and has no restrictions about it’s placement in a city. - can be installed as close to the buildings as possible.1 Figures 1.

1. New wind, [online] Available from: http://www.newwind.fr/en/innovations/, (accessed 16th December 2015). 2. Figures 1 and 2: New wind, [online] Available from: http://www.newwind.fr/en/innovations/, (accessed 16th December 2015).

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Figures 2.

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Demand Energy Equality It is a group that focuses their work on systematic change in the way energy is used, produced and controlled. The group is organizing practical energy workshops, collaborative engagement projects towards increasing energy literacy and contributing to a more resilient future. The group works to increase people’s energy understanding and agency in order that they can reduce their demand, and understand the need to do so, and where possible, reduce their vulnerability to future price rises and fuel poverty. One of their projects was focused on recycling old windows and turning them into solar panels. 1

1. Demand Energy Quality, [online] Available from: http://www.demandenergyequality.org/, (accessed 17th December 2015).

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PRECEDENT STUDY Transition Town Town Totness - from oil dependence to local resiliene

#eco #cleanenergy #windenergy

Transition Town Totnes is a ‘dynamic community - led and run charity that exists to strengthen the local economy. reduce the cost of living and build’ Totnes’s ‘resilience for a future with less cheap energy and a changing climate.’ The two central aspects to the project are; localisation which meets the core needs of local ‘food, building materials, energy ... as offering huge potential to’ Totnes’s ‘local economies, while also reducing oil vulnerability and carbon emissions.’2 The second aspect is resilience of rebuilding the fabric and economy of Totnes. The Transition Town movement is where ‘grassroots communities are developed to work towards building resilience in response to peak oil, climate change and economic instability.’ ‘Socioeconomic localisation.’1

1. Transition Town Totnes, [online] Available from: http://www.transitiontowntotnes.org/2015/11/updatefrom-grown-in-totnes/, (accessed 12th December 2015). 2. Ibid, Transition Town Totnes, [online]. 3. Figure 1: Transition Town Totnes, [online] Available from: http://www.transitiontowntotnes.org/2015/11/ update-from-grown-in-totnes/, (accessed 12th December 2015). 4. Figures 2: Transition Town Movement, The Planning Observer, [online] Available from: http://www. planningobserver.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/timeline.jpg, Alee Denham, February 28th 2012, ALEE DENHAM, FEBRUARY 28, 2012, (accesed 12th December 2015).

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Figure 1.

Figures 2.

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URBAN ANALYSIS Spatial analysis of the city with division on a typology.

# spatial # typologies # circulation

HERITAGE & NATURE

Cultural Buildings Green Space & River 5 mins walkability

78


79


VEHICULAR PATH, BIKE & CIRCULATION

Main traffic circulation Cycling paths Bus routes Trainline

80


SPATIAL FUNCTIONS

Education Facility National Service Government Service Non-government Service Retail Industrial Facility Business Incubator

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URBAN ANALYSIS Highlighted opportunities for future development of typologies.

# spatial # typologies # circulation

TYPOLOGY

Typology Space

Pocket spaces.

Typology Space B

Social activity courtya

Typology Space C

Public institutions and derelict, historic build social spaces.

The highlighted areas indicated large numbers of deprivations as statistics are overlapped to show possible correlations.

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83


PRECEDENT STUDY Exploring on the improvement of typology spaces

Figure 1.

Entrance from the courtyards in Wrocław, Poland Realization of artistic interventions in neglected corners of Wroclaw, mainly in backyards. Aim to interact inhabitants together - activate them.1

1. Wroclaw Entrance from the courtyard, [online] Available from: http://www.wroclaw2016.pl/ podworze?page=project-pages, (accessed 12th December 2015). 2. Figure 1: Wroclaw Entrance from the courtyard, [online] Available from: http://www.wroclaw2016.pl/ podworze?page=project-pages, (accessed 12th December 2015). 3. Chimney Pot Park , Salford, CABE, [online] Available from: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk, (accessed 12th December 2015). 4. Figure 2: Chimney Pot Park , Salford, CABE, [online] Available from: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov. uk, (accessed 12th December 2015).

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Chimney Pots Machester, UK

in

Salford,

Urban Splash and architect shedkm scheme illustrates the rearrangement of existing terrace housing in Salford to enable parking under the proposed first floor terrace. This aims to decrease the congestion of parking on the streets.2

Figure 2.

The Les Cours du BHV project (by Jamie Fobert Architects) in Paris, France It proposed new facades on Rue des Archives which aims to restore and revive a historic area of Paris. In the courtyards, stacked ‘cube’ forms are designed to be inhabited by retailers and will give the scale of the city to the historic courtyards.3

Figure 3.

5. Jamie Fobert, Les Cours du BHV , [onlin] Available from: http://jamiefobertarchitects.com/work/bhv/, (accessed 10th December 2015). 6. Figure 3: Jamie Fobert, Les Cours du BHV , [onlin] Available from: http://jamiefobertarchitects.com/work/ bhv/, (accessed 10th December 2015).

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1980 (Before)

Figures 1.

2009 (After)

Market Square in Bruges, Belgium 1980: Bruges market square. Cars parked around the square. 2009: Bruges market square. Cars banned from the square. Market stalls and pedestrian circulation.1 1. Family Trip to Europe - 1980-2009, [online] Available from: http://skynet.ohsu.edu/~hersh/eu/, (accessed 10th December 2015). 2. Figures 1: Family Trip to Europe - 1980-2009, [online] Available from: http://skynet.ohsu.edu/~hersh/eu/, (accessed 10th December 2015). 3. Farewell Willow, The Neighbourhood picnic in the quarter of Lompy, Daszyńskiego, Orzeszkowa and Jaracz., [online] Available from: http://filtrator.org/aktualnosci/pozegnanie-wierzby/, (accessed 12th December 2015).

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The Neighbourhood picnic in residential social yards in Wrocław, Poland Opportunity to meet both with the youngest generation of residents of the yard who helped with planting.3

Figure 2.

The Maker Faire in New York, USA The Life Size Mousetrap is a hand crafted, 16 piece, 50,000-lb. interactive kinetic sculpture set atop a 6,500-squarefoot game board.5 Creative engineering festival. This sculpture displayed at the Maker Faire was single-handedly designed, machined and sculpted by Adrian Landon, at his home and metal shop in Figure 3. Brooklyn, NY. DIY creative crafts displayed at social events.

4. Figure 2: Farewell Willow, The Neighbourhood picnic in the quarter of Lompy, Daszyńskiego, Orzeszkowa and Jaracz., [online] Available from: http://filtrator.org/aktualnosci/pozegnanie-wierzby/, (accessed 12th December 2015). 5. Maker Faire, [online] Available from: http://makerfaire.com/maker/entry/52576/, (accessed 12th December 2015). 6. Figure 3: Maker Faire, [online] Available from: http://makerfaire.com/maker/entry/52576/, (accessed 12th December 2015).

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Figure 1.

The Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland Hosts a range of activities, programs and workshops dedicated to teachers, school groups and individual visitors.1

1. Copernicus Science Centre, [online] Available from: http://www.kopernik.org.pl/en/exhibitions/ thinkatorium/, (accessed 16th December 2015). 2. Figure 1: Copernicus Science Centre, [online] Available from: http://www.kopernik.org.pl/en/exhibitions/ thinkatorium/, (accessed 16th December 2015). 3. The Tech Museum of Innovation, [online] http://www.thetech.org/, (accessed 12th December 2015). 4. Figures 2: The Tech Museum of Innovation, [online] http://www.thetech.org/, (accessed 12th December 2015).

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The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, USA A Community Resource for Innovation and Education. The Tech is a valued community resource for education and innovation, one that in 2015 was awarded the National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the highest honor a United States museum can achieve.1

The Eden Project in Bodelwa, UK It includes programmes inviting students studying subjects such as: -enterprise and innovation. -regeneration and geography. -biology. -conservation. -sustainability. -marketing. -architecture and design. The centre includes community support programmes.2

Figures 2.

Figures 3.

5. Eden Project, [online] Available from: https://www.edenproject.com/learn/further-and-higher-education/ university-and-college-trips, (accessed 12th December 2015). 6. Figures 3: Eden Project, [online] Available from: https://www.edenproject.com/learn/further-and-highereducation/university-and-college-trips, (accessed 12th December 2015).

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DLUGA SITE ANALYSIS Existing site analysis of typology and courtyard possibilities in DĹ‚uga Street neighbourhood.

# reappropriation # re rehabilitation # skills development

Dluga is primarily residential and industrial site south of the Slupsk City Hall, but visually connected and efficient access to the city centre, However the site has poor maintenance of pavements, courtyards and green spaces. The prominent visual typology in Dluga are the streets lined with parked cars and sometimes on the pavements due to privatisation of public space resulting in less room for pedestrians. The site houses a majority of residential buildings which use coal fired heating systems. The coal emissions causes air pollution as well as other fumes emitted by burning domestic rubbish such as plastic bottles. Dluga has the highest benefits value in Slupsk and the largest number of family related crimes. The site houses multiple allotments which are well maintained and spark initiatives and social interactions. In addition the site is in close proximity to a Technology Incubator which could be harnessed by extending the initiatives to support local businesses in Dluga.

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CARS PARKED ON PAVEMENTS

privatisation of public space, less room for pedestrians

COAL HEATING

causes air pollution

COAL HEATING

POOR MAINTENANCE OF COURTYARD’S GREEN AREAS

causes air pollution

CARS PARKED IN VOIDS AND GAPS privatisation of public space, unused land

CARS PARKED ON PAVEMENTS

privatisation of public space, less room for pedestrians

COMMUNITY ALLOTMENTS

sparks initiatives & social interactions

COMMUNITY ALLOTMENTS

COAL HEATING

sparks initiatives & social interactions

causes air pollution

CARS PARKED IN VOIDS AND GAPS privatisation of public space, unused land

POOR MAINTENANCE OF COURTYARD’S GREEN AREAS

NO TREES ON STREET

CARS PARKED ON PAVEMENTS

privatisation of public space, less room for pedestrians

CARS PARKED IN VOIDS AND GAPS privatisation of public space, unused land

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SITE PHOTOS Photo documentation of DĹ‚uga Street neighbourhood.

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# reappropriation # rerehabilitation # skills development


W. POLSKIEGO SITE ANALYSIS Existing site analysis of typology and courtyard possibilities in Wojska Polskiego Street neighbourhood.

# social interaction courtyard

Wojska Polskiego’s sites are situated along the Wojska Polskiego promenade street lined with commercial, offices and residential properties on the floors above. The promenade channels circulation effectively from the train station to the city centre. Along the promenade street are opportunities for social interactions due to suitable meeting spaces and market stalls. In the urban blocks behind the main, ornate frontages, the secondary streets are lined with parked cars and courtyards are utilised mainly for parking and deliveries. The bus station us located behind the main promenade street and is not in such a prominent visual position as the train station at the pinnacle of the west end of Wojska Polskiego street. In addition neighbouring the bus station is a large empty plot of land presenting a neglected site atmosphere. Similarly to Dluga many of the properties are heated by coal fired heating systems. There is a redeveloped courtyard housed next to the NGO centre which has been redesigned by re-appropriating the courtyard with a theatre space, playground, table tennis facilities and an external gym.

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CARS PARKED ON PAVEMENTS

COAL HEATING

causes air pollution

PROMENADE

social interactions

privatisation of public space, less room for pedestrians

NGO CENTRE

sparks initiatives & activates the neighbourhood

COAL HEATING

causes air pollution

REDESIGNED COURTYARD

EMPTY PLOT

CARS PARKED ON PAVEMENTS

PUBLIC SQUARE social interactions

privatisation of public space, less room for pedestrians

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SITE PHOTOS Photo documentation of Wojska Polskiego Street neighbourhood.

96

# re appropriation # re rehabilitation # skills development


NEW MUSEUM SITE ANALYSIS Existing site analysis of typology and courtyard possibilities in New Museum neighbourhood.

# re appropriation # re rehabilitation # skills development

The New Museum site includes two historic gain stores tiled ‘Red and White’ grain stores. These buildings are architecturally characterful and have the potential to become tourist attractions celebrating their prime River Slupia proximity, internal high ceilings and monolithic morphologies. Also located around the museums is a Youth Cultural Centre, multiple schools and large institution buildings such as the court and Short Stay Male custody prison. In addition there are community allotments and a neighbouring cemetery. The site has also the largest number of retired people. Presently the grain stores are derelict and are proposed to become museums for the city of Slupsk. The land around the two buildings are utilised by a car park and to the rear there is a car body paint workshop with numerous vehicles parked in the urban block and along secondary street pavements.

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PRIVATE GREEN AREA not available to everyone

FORMER WAREHOUSE BUILDINGS

CUSTODY BUILDING

available for rent

COMMUNITY ALLOTMENTS

sparks initiatives & social interactions

COAL HEATING

causes air pollution

CARS PARKED ON PAVEMENTS

privatisation of public space, less room for pedestrians

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SITE PHOTOS Photo documentation of New Museum neighbourhood.

100

# re appropriation # re rehabilitation # skills development


03

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


03

Chapter 3 contains the three modes of designed interventions for the proposal. Two scales of interventions are used in the strategy; small and medium in terms of spatial, social and economic perspectives. The urban rules are designed to re-appropriate the existing fabric ranging from extension, re-appropriation, preservation and demolition. The spatial, social and economical aspects are interlocked to achieve knowledge exchange across two actors, the state and urban commons. The masterplan proposal is developed through five phasing through small and medium scales. In addition the spatial strategy is displayed in layers illustrating how the urban rules mediate the re-appropriation of the urban fabric. The project’s funding is explored as a process starting from gaining a bid for a research development innovation centre via the new museums as the catalysts for European Funding. The process transcends to local authorities, NGOs to re-appropriate and renovate existing structures. As a result the museums can become the research and innovation centre to obtain funds for the project development. In addition local industries will be used to their potential to supply large scale production facilities and investment in innovative solutions. Perspectives of the proposed environment are portrayed illustrating activities and vibrancy. Lastly the future proposals are displayed targeting the initial issues of the lack of dialogue and collaboration between two actors, the state and urban commons. This is by proposing a forum connecting dialogue between multiple institutions and sharing skills across Slupsk. In addition the current problems of significant unemployment ratings after education and the social migration of the public are proposed to be mitigated by introducing greater opportunities for creative participation and apprenticeships to achieve work after graduation from the Polish education system.


THE FRAMEWORK 3 modes of project intervention

# intervention # process # manual

P SS

D I S C OV E

CE

R

RO

IM

PL

EMENT

We devised 3 stages of project intervention- discover, process and implement as a clear manual for the ‘commons’ in which they could address towards the resilience of the city. Precedents are drawn from projects conducted by ‘Made in Tottenham’project1 and ‘Design Thinking Innovation Process’ by Experience Point2. 1. Made in Tottenham, [online] Availble from: https://www.anewdirection.org.uk/asset/959, (accessed 17th Deceber 2015). 2. The University of British Columbia, Design Process, [online] Available from: http://dstudio.ubc.ca/toolkit/ processes/, (accessed 17th December 2015).

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What are the problems to be addressed? Analyse existing context socio-economic issues to re-frame design problems based on user perspectives and experiences. What are the opportunities to present? Identify opportunities for intersection between what people value or need and what organisation can offer within a given time and budget. Who should benefit?

Organise a team of mediators to collaborate with other actors. Understand who are our primary user, their backgrounds and who can change or influence in the process? Where should we focus?

Understand the provision of location in terms of impact and cost. Understand the scale of project and which location would be best suited to be undertaken.

What is the best way to respond to these problems?

Assemble the initiative by combining different techniques such as prototyping, co-design and action planning to explore possible responses throughout the design process. How to translate the design in delivery?

Assemble techniques through delivery of accessible, tangible instruments such as workshops, test beds and fabrication labs. How to consolidate funding?

Understand what is the startup cost; how to divert funds, track savings and long term payment incentives to ensure the success of project delivery. What is the outcome of the project?

Evaluate the viability and likelihood of making successful implementation and adoption of project what are the potential benefits and consequences? What is the resilience on the outcome of project?

Evaluate new implementation of project whether can it adapt or change the socio-economic issues faced. Evaluate the next step of project to be revised or move on to a bigger scale intervention.

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SCALE OF INTERVENTION Two scales of intervention used in strategy with mutual correlation.

These modes of intervention does not occur only in a linear pattern but continuously in a circular transition through different scale of intervention. Development proposals are continuously being implemented in a cycle and may repeat itself to build resilience towards different socio-economic issues. We define scale of interventions as to the difference in the level of influence and system change in terms of spatial, social and economic perspectives. There is also a tendency within these modes of interventions, development proposal could occur in various mixtures of scale depending on the opportunities available on site. For example, a small scale community project in Wojska Polskiego may have medium scale benefits by it’s neighbouring networks of NGOs, technical school facilities and partnership with local authorities.

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# transition # correlation # cycle

M

Scale Intervention

S

Scale Intervention

M

Scale Intervention

S

Scale Intervention


CORRELATION

D

Actors & networks correlations

M S

Actors in medium (M) scale role of influences

Overlaps of actors and networks in different scales

J S K A P O LS

KI E G

RT Y A P

A

WO

Z A N TO W

Actors in small (S) scale role of influences

G UL

O Understanding social complexity of actors and networks within the 3 proposed site. Different sites might have overlaps on community interest, opportunities, participants, operative environment, activities and funding resources. These overlaps highlights possible correlations; create stronger relationships; and allowing more collaborative linkages with one another.

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UBRAN RULES Urban rules of spatial intervention

EXTENTION

Hybrid Connection

Existing blocks

Connection between two buildings

Creating public-oriented spaces

Connection between two buildings & multiple levels, encourage social & business interactions.

Maximising spaces above while enhancing social inclusive space below.

Transitional Space, DIY Installation Gallery

Transitional Space, Market Vendors

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Developed spaces Effective use of vacant spaces.

DIY Workshop, Fabrication Labs, Test beds, Retail spaces


EXTENTION

Adaptive Upper-croft Courtyard

Existing blocks

Collaborative spaces Existing buildings redefine as collaborative spaces, allocated for communal activities in courtyard.

Adaptive courtyard Multi-functional public spaces, bridging social inclusivity and allocation of storage, garage and workshop spaces below

Terrace Extended balconies, allocating additional gardening space and storage space below

Consultation rooms, Research Labs

Allotment Space, Beds Outdoor Theatre

Terrace Garden, Viewing deck

Test

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REAPPROPRIATION

Adaptive Reuse Internal Spaces

Existing blocks

Reappropriate vacant & existing spaces

Open-plan Spaces

Vacant & existing spaces can be redefined as micro and macro spaces for different size of collaborative projects.

Multi-functional customised spaces to cater for different types of events.

Consultation Rooms, Design Studio, Conference room

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collaborative

Consultation rooms, Research Labs

Reappropriate spaces

roof

Existing roof can be reused to utilise natural light and ventilation

Roof top garden, Offices


REAPPROPRIATION

Adaptive Ground Floor Courtyard

Existing blocks

Reappropriate courtyard spaces

existing

Improve courtyard spaces into a more public-oriented spaces, sharable among the ‘commons’.

Green Amenities

Public Allotments

DIY Narrative Courtyards

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REAPPROPRIATION

Maximise shop frontage

Existing blocks

Divided vehicular circulation Reappropriate vehicular and pedestrian circulations to enhance social inclusivity and security.

Primary vehicular roads, pedestrian & cycle paths

114

Pedestrian-oriented Streets

Start-up Incentives

Maximised shared spaces for the ‘commons’ to conduct pedestrian activities and circulation space.

Offers low cost & tax free incentives to smallmedium enterprises on retail spaces for DIY projects.

Market vendors

Incubators, retail spaces


PRESERVATION

Preserve historical facades

Enhance mixed-used typology

Maintaining skyline profile

Maintaining historical link, enhance cultural identity of Slupsk.

Improving existing spaces with more mixed-used typology for greater social interactions.

Ensures buildings do not overshadow courtyard spaces and provide visibility towards historical buildings.

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DEMOLITION

Enhance permeability

Existing blocks

Permeability of Sight & Circulations Demolish existing space to allow more permeability through existing built fabric, creating landmark sightlines and social inclusive space.

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‘

The first thing to understand is that the public peace - the sidewalk and street peace - of cities is not kept primarily by the police, necessary as police are. It is kept primarily by an intricate, almost unconscious, network of voluntary controls and standards among the people themselves, and enforced by the people themselves. The Death and Life of Great American Cities - Jane Jacobs

’

URBAN STRATEGY DIY INITIATIVE

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DESIGN INTENTIONS Spatial, social intentions

and

economic

The aim of our strategy is to instill a two-way collaborative approach (process of knowledge exchange) upon both urban ‘commons’ and state interventions to share ideas, experiences and learning. Our urban strategy and masterplan proposals concern spatial, social and economic perspectives which can be explained as follows: -

Spatial

Territorial Cohesion: Revitalising spaces in order to maintain balance distribution of social and economic resources by implementing constraints and benefits imposed upon deprived areas with the support of financial framework. Mechanical Learning Elements: Improve one’s collaborative capabilities by enriching learning process and technology-aided approach. Biological Learning Elements: Improve surrounding context with rich green and cultural spaces that can enhance one’s learning ability1.

Social

Social Groups: Provide DIY projects that cater to range of participants derived from individual, communal, industry and state interventions. Social Complexity: Analyses social networks in Slupsk from small to large perspectives, understanding patterns of deprivation areas in terms of poor economy, social security and green poverty. Attitudes: Instill sense of ownership upon the local communities to conform and be motivated to develop projects in order to respond to current issues of Slupsk.

Economy

Innovation and Creativity: Promoting hybrid ideas and new prototypes when cooperative design and discussions between participants from different backgrounds and industries are initiated. New prototypes can enhance conditions of local economy. Networking and Collaborations: Providing a platform that connects people from different locations who can offer help and solutions. Interdisciplinary Learning Approach: Instill the public to explore various ways to conduct learning process through different means of media and social interactions.

1. Prashnig. B. The Power of Diversity : New Ways of Learning and Teaching Through Learning Styles, (2004, A&C Black).

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119


MASTERPLAN PROPOSAL Dulga Masterplan in Medium (S) Scale Intervention

Within these 3 proposed zones, Dluga site was used as a case study to provide an example of future in depth masterplan proposals. Using DIY initiatives to help improve the urban conditions, the masterplan proposals illustrate a series of phases highlighting spatial interventions and processes in different scale of influences (from small to medium scale interventions). Different series of projects were developed using the example of the framework (refer to page 132 for descriptive format). Phase 1: Project started by drawing the attention of NGOs to act as mediators of the project to steer the precariats for the improvement of Dluga and DIY approach. Existing NGO spaces will be used as collaborative discussions to plan for development of DIY projects.

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Phase 2: NGOs and precariats can be mediators to draw attention in wider audiences to be part of the cause, performing DIY prototypes and workshops to enhance personal skill sets such as car maintenance and creative ways of growing food. Vacant spaces are proposed to be re-appropriate for more workshop and collaborative spaces. Phase 3: Wider collaborations are conducted with City Planners to discuss common grounds on urban planning and changing local planning policies. Involvement of stakeholders will initiate future funding opportunities for DIY projects of wider ambitions. Permeability within sites of Dluga are further enhanced with plants and DIY green infrastructure, enhancing social inclusivity and pedestrian-oriented spaces.

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S

Scale Intervention

DLUGA Step-by-step DIY Initiatives

Surveys, Interviews, Seminars, DIY research

NGOs (Mediators) Precariats

The steer of the project

Phase 1

DIY Testing, Research Development, Community Practice Exhibitions

NGOs & Precariats v(Mediators) General Public

Prototyping DIY projects

Phase 2

NGOs, Precariats & General public (Mediators)

Forum, Conference, Stakeholder dialogue, Action planning

Mayor, Stakeholder, City planners

Urban planning & funding opportunity

Phase 3

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Phase 1

Surveys, Interviews, Seminars, DIY research, Discussions

NGOs (Mediators) Precariats

The steer of the project

Initiate project with NGOs as mediators to steer the precariats

Develop start-up projects with common interest on DIY approach

Analyse current issues and search for potential volunteers in the neighbourhood Reusing NGO spaces for seminars and project discussions Conducting surveys and interview

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Phase 2

Allotment spaces Community Practice, Narrative courtyard and pocket spaces

NGOs & Precariats (Mediators) General Public

Prototyping DIY projects Improving permeability into Dulga street with DIY green infrastructure Exploring new methods of growing in relation to technolog and permaculture

Propose more allotment spaces

Establish green links

Allocating spaces for workshops and design studios.

Teaching the public on enhance skillsets such as maintenance, plumbings, growing and electrical appliances

Reappropriate vacant spaces through selffund initiatives Demonstrate visuals and installations on creative DIY approach Trails of narrative courtyard and pocket spaces

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Phase 3

NGOs, Precariats & General public (Mediators)

Forum, Conference, Stakeholder dialogue, Action planning

Mayor, Stakeholder, City planners

Collaborate with city planners to improve local issues and planning policy

Action planing on revitalising Dulga

Discuss future collaborative funding opportunities

Stakeholder dialogue

Urban planning & funding opportunity Discussion on the improvement of DIY project to the next level

Expanding conference, forum spaces Enhance permeability into Dulga street with DIY green infrastructure Establish green links

Collaborate with local industries to develop DIY prototypes in larger scale

Industrial fabrication labs

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MASTERPLAN PROPOSAL Dluga Masterplan in Medium (M) Scale Intervention

# large DIY projects # relationships # infrastructure

Phase 4: With proper funding resources, materials can be invested into making large DIY projects such as solar panels, wind farms, operative facades and green infrastructures. Regional conferences are held to explore alternative ways to produce clean energy and enhance relationships within City Center of Slupsk. Developed green links enhance the characters of Dluga as pedestrian-oriented spaces and improves social security. Public spaces are allocated for the urban ‘commons’ to conduct communal activities such as knowledge fairs and street vendors. Phase 5: Solar panels, wind farms, insulation panels and operative facades are proposed to enhance the urban fabric of Dluga, supporting the local community through micro-generation of energy and other DIY initiatives. Research on DIY approach never stops, further analysis such as DIY microbial fuel cells and other projects can be developed in response to further resilience of the city.

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M

Scale Intervention

DLUGA Step-by-step DIY Initiatives

NGOs, Precariats & General public (Mediators)

Regional Conference, Opensource Knowledge Fair, Focus Group

Mayor, Stakeholder, City planners

City Networkings & collaborations

Phase 4

NGOs, Precariats & General public (Mediators)

Test beds, Research Development, Co-design & production, Demonstration

Education Institution, Technology Incubators

City planners

DIY Implementation, micro-generation

Phase 5

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Phase 4 NGOs, Precariats & General public (Mediators)

Regional Conference, Opensource Knowledge Fair, Focus Group, constructing new spaces

Mayor, Stakeholder, City planners

City Networkings & collaborations

Collaborative planning with NGOs Explore creative topic on energy poverty and deprivation issues

Debate and explore new DIY approach Rented Consultation spaces

Regional Conference

Improving mix-use typology & develop business incubators

Design and test DIY solar panels, wind turbines and insulation panels

Proposed new conference spaces Knowledge fair

Proposed new production spaces Initiating construction of upper-croft courtyard

Improving green links Improving green parks

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Phase 5

NGOs, Precariats & General public (Mediators)

Test beds, Research Development, Co-design & production, Demonstration

Education Institution, Technology Incubators

City planners

DIY Implementation, micro-generation

Explore new prototypes regarding micro-generation

DIY wind farms Research Development Market spaces DIY allotment spaces

Celebrative space

Design Studio Collaborative involvement with community in the production process

Co-production

Testing DIY microbial fuel cell

Test beds

DIY solar panels Improving mixeduse typology & develop more business incubators Improve and develop more workshop spaces with enhanced technology

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SPATIAL INTERVENTION Extension

Adaptive upper-croft courtyard

Extension Hybrid connection

Upper-croft courtyards, allotment space Under-croft DIY workshop, garage, storage Conference room, design studios, offices, research labs

Re-appropriation

Maximise shop frontage

Fabrication & production labs, test beds Residential area

Mix use housing typology

Re-appropriation

Adaptive reuse internal spaces

Preservation

Enhance mixedused tyopology

Re-appropriation

Adaptive grid floor courtyard spaces

Demolition

Enhance permeability of street

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D

CORRELATIONS UL

GA

M •

S • • •

Social & cultural associations & NGOS. Limited accessible green spaces.

Presence of existing allotment spaces. Commercial. Religious typologies.

E TH •

JSK A P O

GO

Presence of mixed use typologies. Resedential properties on top floors. Voids in the existing building fabric. Mixed relious typologies: Catholic church, mosque, synagogue.

LS K IE

M U SEU M

WO

• •

Presence of existing technical schools. Presence of mixused typology.

3 proposed sites showed correlations towards energy poverty, social migration demonstrated by derelict housing and ill maintained structures, and unemployment with regard to the multitude of empty shops and businesses.

131


FUNDING PROPOSAL View of New Museum from the river.

Since the City of Slupsk is currently facing 300miln zl debt in their budget, it is down to existing public institutions and local NGO’s to take the lead in implementation of the strategy. The Museum of the Middle Pomerania in Słupsk would serve as a financially strategic starting point. With the asset of the existing historical buildings, the red and the white grain stores, that the institution has received from the local authorities, and the dedicated budget for re-appropriation of those buildings, the museum in collaboration with local NGO’s and Slupsk Technology incubators would form a bid for additional European Funds. Initial funds for revitalization would serve as base point for the bid. The collaborative bid would refer to the revitalisation and development of the region funds, with particular stress on research and testing of renewable energy sources. Those funds would be used to create interactive and flexible museum and visitors centre. At the same time renovation of city centre social housing will have place. The city council will spend 3,4mln zl on the appropriate repairs and improvements of existing council housing (in this proposal shown as Dluga Street and Wojska Polskiego Street development) according to the future planned additions to the structures and development of DIY and production spaces. Once visitors centre develops and form attractive and strong element of the strategy, it will serve as promotional centre, facilitate thematically talks and conferences, as well as, free users feedback centre. When locally designed and produced DIY good will be distributed, improving situation of local employment and economy, the framework and analogical build structure principles would be applied in other urban blocks and areas of the city. It is expected along the whole process, existing local industries would take active participation in the strategy - by financial contribution, as well as, investment of time, particularly skilled human recourses and sharing parts of their manufacturing facilities.

132


133


STREET ATMOSPHERE Proposed view of Długa Street.

# live & work # courtyard activities # re-appropriate

SITE LOCATION

PROPOSED SOCIAL INTERVENTIONS ON THE STREET

134


135


STREET ATMOSPHERE Proposed view of Wojska Polskiego Street.

# dialogue centres# backyard workshops # local retail

SITE LOCATION

PROPOSED SOCIAL INTERVENTIONS ON THE STREET

138


139


STREET ATMOSPHERE View of New Museum from the river.

# catalyst for change # creative display # present

SITE LOCATION

PROPOSED SOCIAL INTERVENTIONS ON THE STREET

PROPOSED SOCIAL INTERVENTIONS ON THE STREET

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143


FUTURE PROPOSAL View of New Museum from the river.

# forum # autonomous # set up local businesses

CONTINUOUS POLITICAL MEDIATION PROCESS

Addressing the existing issue of lack of collaboration between the state institution actors and urban commons actors by linking top-down and bottom-up actors to participate and share skills and knowledge.

AUTONOMOUS EDUCATION AND LOCAL ECONOMY PROGRAMME

Addressing the current problems of significant unemployment ratings after education and the social migration of public due to lack of opportunities.

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- Where do you see Słupsk in 2020? - Near river Słupia, but it will look completely different. For sure it will be nicer and more beautiful.1

Robert Biedroń in the interview.


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DIY Initiative Group Urban Strategy project