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Frank Chandler Smith Master of Architecture Candidate Segment II Portfolio January 03, 2011


Frank Chandler Smith Master of Architecture Candidate Segment II Portfolio January 03, 2011


FRANK CHANDLER SMITH 25 Station St Sharon, MA 02067 603-313-5570 frank.smith@the-bac.edu

EDUCATION____________________________________________________________ 2006-present Boston Architectural College Enrolled in Master of Architecture Program x 1998- 2003 Keene State College Bachelor of Arts Psychology x Concentration -Clinical x Minor Business Management x SKILLS_________________________________________________________________ Design & Graphic Communication x x x x x x x x

3D Studio Max 3-D Modeling and Animation AutoCad 2009 2-D & 3-D Modeling SketchUp InDesign Photoshop Orthogonal, Perspective & Freehand Drawing Physical Models Microsoft Office Organizational & Communication Skills

x x x x

Project management; implementing design decisions through collaboration with both the client and contractors/fabricators Product research and purchasing Building and maintaining relationships with current and prospective clients Advertising; including design and distribution of mass mailers as well as design and placement of ads in local markets

EXPERIENCE____________________________________________________________ x x x x

Foster Excavation Machado/Blake Design Mortgage Trust Group Ameriquest Mortgage Company

Manager Design Drafter Account Executive Account Executive

Sept 1998- Present Jan 2008- Feb 2009 April 2005- Sept 2005 June 2004- April 2005

OUTSIDE INTERESTS AND SKILLS__________________________________________ Professional Affiliations: Hobbies Interests:

Boston Society of Architects Guitar, Piano, Photography


1

Studio Flt815- Research Center

15

Inclusive Design Studio- Shopfront Collaboration

23

Inclusive Design Studio- Community Center

35

Generating the Spectacle- Animal Sanctuary

45

Generating the Spectacle- Zoo

57

Concrete Thinking- Crematorium & Chapel

71

Firm Experience

78

Personal Architecture Projects


Large Hadron Collider Research Center C-1 Studio Studio Flt815 Michael Shanbacher Spring 2009 Project Duration: 16 weeks

The studio consisted of one project that lasted the duration of the studio. The project was a Large Hadron Collider Research Center located in Waxahachie, TX. The facility was to house research types of our choosing, but was also to accommodate public access. The degree to which the public was allowed access to the facility and the particular programmatic elements that would be supplied for them were of our choosing. A strong emphasis was placed on understanding the type of research that was likely to take place at a hadron collider and to consider what the architectural expression for those particular branches of the sciences might be. Also, emphasis was placed on the consideration of public and private interaction. To what degree should the public have access to the workings of the labs and how might those interactions be shaped through spatial considerations were question that were posed. Finally, this studio offered forth the concept of diagramming as a basis and grounding for formal exploration.

1


First, each character was diagrammed. Above shows each character’s impact on the island (in blue) and the impact they held in the ‘real’ world.

A simple diagram of the strong overtones of good versus evil on the show and the split that is created in the characters.

Each of the characters were connected in ways that they were not aware. This diagram shows the connected characters and the degree to which they were connected.

The characters were depicted as all sharing a common experience and goals on the island. Over time, it was revealed that the motivation of some were not shared by the group.

Diagramming Lost. Attempts at Finding. As diagramming was to play a crucial role in the shaping of our projects, the initial assignment was to diagram the television show Lost. Specific shows were assigned, the information to diagram and the means of diagramming were left to us. As diagramming was to be an important part of shaping our project, it seemed reasonable to create diagrams in 2-D and the consider them further in three dimensions.

Studio Flt815

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Diagramming

2


THEORETICAL PHYSICS FRINGE THEORIES

PROPOSED THEORIES

MAIN STREAM THEORIES

PA ATH HOLO OGIC CALL SC CIEN NCEES

PUBLIC

FILTER SYSTEM

SCIENTIFIC METHOD

FOUNDATIONALISM

PROTO SCIENCE

PUBLIC

PROTO SCIENCE

Diagramming Reality. The next diagramming exercise was to diagram the branch of science that would be housed in the research facility. These diagrams explore theoretical physics. As the research facility was to provide for the public as well as for the sciences there seemed a need to explore the relationship between these two entities. And, in fact, there is an interesting positive feedback loop that takes place, particularly with theoretical physics. First, there is the public, and from this variegated pool of thought comes much pseudoscience in the form of books, movies, art, etc. These creative forms of expression often inspire the topics that theoretical physics endeavors to explore. Before the rigors of the scientific method are applied, initial theories are considered to be a part of proto science and the theories are considered ‘fringe’ theories. If these theories enter the sphere of interest by enough scientists, they

Studio Flt815

may become proposed theories. This is essentially a filtering system through peer review. If considered worthy, these theories will become mainstream theories and undergo the scrutiny of the scientific method at which point they may be kicked back down the ladder to fringe theories or may be elevated to the level of accepted fact and presented to the public as such. These pieces of scientific information that are offered to the public become part of the fuel for the next round of public exploration that leads to the next round of fringe theories and so on and so on. This could be seen as the way in which people better understand the universe, or it could be seen as the way in which people invent their own reality.

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Diagramming

3


LAB TYPE 3 Fringe theories Grand unification theory LAB TYPE 2 Proposed Theories

Theory of everything

Grand unification theory String theory CENTRAL NODE PUBLIC SPACE AND LIBRARY

LABS BROKEN INTO THREE CATEGORIES

SMALL AND LARGE LECTURE SPACES

Theory of everything

PRACTICE LAB TYPE 1 Mainstream Theories EXAMPLES: Particle physics

THEORY

Standard Model String Theory

Diagramming Program

Diagramming Space.

Following from the previous diagram this diagram is a layout of main components within the facility. This strategy has theory at one end of the building- this is translated into lecture spaces. Next is the filtering system, considering that it is information that ultimately makes the filtering decisions the central node of the building was to be the library. As the last section of the building is practice this is where the labs are laid out. Labs for each of the branches of theoretical physics are to occupy this space, each with different requirements. For instance, mainstream physicists might need equipment to run experiments whereas the spaces for fringe theories would largely be research areas, requiring less space and could possibly be tied in with the library.

Following from the previous diagrams, the next diagram considers qualities of space. Just as the diagram of theoretical physics began with a depiction of fringe theories as a darker, murkier zone filtering to a light transparent end product of information, this diagram depicts the building layout as darker, more solid at the lecture space, where artificial lighting and video presentation would often be required. This leads to the library, or filtering space where the light is moderated depending on level and use and, finally, the labs where most of the day to day activities of the facility take place and should benefit the most from natural light.

Studio Flt815

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Diagramming

44


Interaction

VVV

MEETING POINT- EQUALLY DISPERSED

PATH

VIEW

VIEW WITH ENCLOSURE

One of the main considerations for this project was the manner in which the public would interact with the private areas of the facility. Though certain portions of the program were designated solely for public use, anyone visiting a hadron collider would undoubtedly be interested in the scientific workings of the facility. Conversely, some of the experiments would need to be isolated for security reasons. Additionally, even in the areas that the public could safely have access to, the comfort and privacy of the employees would need to be considered. The diagrams to the left are an exploration of the different ways in which interaction might occur with varying degrees of obscurity. The proposed research center was to be five stories tall, allowing for many forms of interaction involving pathways. The ultimate goal was to create typologies that might be appropriate for a wide range of interactions.

MEETING POINT- CONNECTED PLANE

MEETING POINT- DISCONNECTED PLANE

MEETING POINT- SEPARATE PLANES

Studio Flt815

PATH OBSCURED BY OBJECT

VIEW OBSCURED BY OBJECTS

VIEW OBSCURED BY PLACEMENT OF PATH

PATH OBSCURED BY SEPARATE TRAJECTORIES

VIEW OBSCURED BY TRAJECTORY OF PATH

VIEW IMPLIED

PATH OBSCURED BY SEPARATE PLANES

VIEW OBSCURED BY PLACEMENT OF PATH

VIEW BARRED

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Diagramming

5


The Texas Flatlands The site was located in a town called Waxahachie, TX. The most striking thing about the town was that size and demographic data portrayed it as completely average in relation to other towns and cities across the country. This meant, of course, that the most interesting thing about Waxahachie is that it housed a large hadron collider. At least it housed most of a hadron collider; the funding to complete the facility dried up, leaving the largest incomplete collider in the world. The task of the studio was to envision its completeness. The climate is dry and warm and the terrain at the site was largely flat and prairie like. The most striking feature on the site were the veins of trees that spread across the land, the trees chasing underground veins of water. These fingers of vegetation were accompanied by rare changes in elevation. It was within these natural formations, at the edge of the site boundaries that seemed the most fitting to site the research center. The trees would minimize impact to surrounding farms and provide shade during the summer and the drop in elevation would allow for a five story building that would not tower above the Texas flatlands.

Studio Flt815

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Site

6


2nd FLOOR

1st FLOOR

Studio Flt815

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Plans

7


3rd FLOOR

4thFLOOR

5th FLOOR

8


Public and Private Collide.

TO OUTDOOR PUBLIC

COMMUNAL

As much of this project centered around the degree of interaction between the public and the private functions of the facility, these diagrams were an attempt to understand how these interactions might occur. The public was given access to much of the facility, but this access was mitigated using strategies explored in the ‘interactions’ diagrams. For instance, on the third floor of the library the public access pushes into the lab space and is surrounded by private work areas. In these areas thin strips of glazing allow partial views in to work areas. These are not direct views as the floor levels of the library spaces do not align with lab floor levels, they are offset by three feet. This condition is best illustrated by section cut 3. The goal was to allow the public to experience nearly all of the building, just in varying levels of obscurity.

LABSFRINGE LABSPROPOSED LABS- PROPOSED

LABS- FRINGE

ADMIN.

LIBRARY (OPEN)

LIBRARY ENTRY/ LIBRARY

ENTRY TO LECTURE SPACES

LECTURE- SMALL LECTURE- LARGE

LECTURE- SMALL

FLOOR 2

FLOOR 3

FLOOR 1

GALLERY ACCESS TO GALLERY

LABS- MAINSTREAM LABS- FRINGE

1

PUBLIC GATHERING LIBRARY (SECLUDED)

3

FLOOR 4

FLOOR 5

4

2

2

1

1 5

PUBLIC

Early sketch model

PRIVATE

3

Studio Flt815

5

4

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Sections

9


2

3

Longitudinal section showing the basic layout strategy of; lecture space, library, labs.

Section through labs showing public space surrounded by and offset from lab space.

Studio Flt815

4

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Sections

Section through library showing circulation leaving the main of the building and small glimpses into the private areas.

10


Circulation through lecture space.

Circulation through library space.

Private circulation through lab space.

Let There Be Light. The overriding concepts for circulation were that not only did the public have access to the majority of the building and partial access to the private labs, but also that the public had opportunity to experience the conditions laid forth in ‘diagramming space’. The building graduated from minimal, controlled light and views, to filtered light, to open light and views on the top level, to an ultimate arrival at outdoor platforms. This process was meant to mirror the condition of the scientific process and the means by which we filter information from a state of abstraction to accepted fact.

SCALE: 1/8”=1’

Studio Flt815

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Circulation

11


Public

Collaboration.

Proposed

These diagrams describe the layout of the labs. Just as the proposed theories filter the information between fringe and mainstream theories, the proposed theories lab space lies between fringe and mainstream theory spaces. The goal was to create spaces that allowed for separate working areas and that might house separate equipment, but that were not so divided that interaction between the disciplines would be negated. After all, the scientific processes described earlier do happen in stasis or with clear boundaries. The success of each branch of science depends on the feedback provided by the others.

Fringe

Studio Flt815

Mainstream

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Labratories

12


EAST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

3

Studio Flt815

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Elevations & Interior Views

13


2

3

1

4

Layers Conclusions Many institutions carry with them traditions that include an architectural typology. This studio ultimately became an exploration of a typology for science. I believe that this had a great deal with the encouragement of using diagramming as a conceptual basis. While I have mixed feelings about the degree to which diagrams should shape a building, it undoubtedly lends a greater understanding of issues at play. Maybe it is that diagramming is a way in which to priorities and identify those conditions for which to design.

1

The north face of the building was designed to make clear the layers of space that had been passed through to arrive at the outdoor platforms

2

Studio Flt815

Large Hadron Collider Research Center- Exterior Views

14


Shopfront Collaboration & Community Center C-1 Studio Inclusive Design Studio Gabe Bergeron Fall 2009 Project Duration: Shopfront Collaboration- 8 weeks Community Center- 8 weeks

The studio consisted of two projects evenly split throughout the semester. The Shopfront project was one in which we worked with shop owners in the Four Corners main street area of Dorchester. This project was to be an exercise in working with a real client with all of the budget, practical use considerations, and stylistic issues that accompany a small business project. The goal was to improve the storefronts using information gathered through interviews and with personal research and exploration. The second half of the semester focused on designing a community center for the area. For this we gathered information from multiple meetings with the Four Corners Main Street group, a collaborative initiative composed of residents and business owners intent on improving the neighborhood. The ultimate focus of the studio was to explore how collaboration with the end users of a program can lead to, not only a more practically sound design, but one that is infused with a greater richness of understanding.

15


CULTURAL

SOCIOECONOMIC

AVAILABLE MATERIALS

DEMOCRATIC

VERNACULAR

TEACHING

COLLABORATION

METHOD OF ASSEMBLY

CONTEXT TOPOGRAPHY

CRITICAL REGIONALISM

UTOPIAN AGENDA CLIMATE

APPROPRIATE MATERIALS

RENEWED MODERNISM

Design Theory and Authenticity

CONTEXT

SOCIOECONOMIC

‘FREE SKIN’ ‘TORSION BOX’

CULTURAL

CLIMATE

‘VILLAGE ARCHITECT

WORK WITHIN EXISTING CONTEXT

PROVIDE CONTEXT METHOD OF ASSEMBLY

AVAILABLE MATERIALS

TEACHING

LAYOUT

PROGRAM APPROPRIATE MATERIALS

Inclusive Design Studio

TOPOGRAPHY

PERSONAL DESIGN EXPLORATION/ PRINCIPALS

VERNACULAR COLLABORATION

4-Corners Market- Design Theory

The diagrams above are the result of a study of the work of Brain MacKay-Lyons, an architect who has been linked to participatory or inclusive design. This study began to shape my view of inclusive design as being related to the concept of authenticity; a difficult to define concept. Authenticity seems rarely achieved by single design moves, rather it is an amalgamation of contributing factors, these factors all stemming from loosely related defining qualities of a place. These qualities encompass land, material, people, uses and tradition. Mackay-Lyons has also been associated with Critical Regionalism and Renewed Modernism, two schools of thought that seem linked to Inclusive Design in that each endeavor to enrich design with a degree of authenticity. Though each of the schools of thought place importance on particular issues, each seem to agree that one cannot achieve something authentic to a place without first understanding the qualities of that place.

16


CBC article “disappears” five deaths – Codrington family not mentioned by CBC!

A sleeping family of five died in August of 2007 because somebody built a house over a known cave at Archcot Terrace Britton’s Hill St Michael, Barbados. The land had a prohibition on title to prevent just such an occurrence, but somebody removed that prohibition on the title. Somebody built a house on top of the cave for profit and never lived in the house themselves. Somebody owned the company that built the house. Somebody issued a building permit or maybe somebody built without a permit. Then when cracks appeared in later years – probably aggravated by nearby construction – somebody issued a stop-work order. Then, four days later somebody removed that stop-work order and the construction continued. Somebody or many somebodies killed the Codrington family just as surely as if they had put a gun to the heads of the sleeping

Migration and Identity

Population

From a cultural view point, the Four Corners neighborhood in Dorchester, MA provides a varied example. Though the demographic makeup of the area is generally referred to as being from the ‘Islands’ ( Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Barbados) these islands themselves have a long history of migration that spans the globe. Also the Islands themselves have great range of socioeconomic conditions within themselves, ranging from poverty and destitute living conditions to world class education centers and Olympic athletes. Each island hold strong identities that are rooted in cultural activities such as culinary and the arts. The goal of this study was to become familiar with some of these forms of identities. As a psychology undergraduate student, of great interest to me, are those differences in cultures that have avoided the stigma of politicized incorrectness- these differences often being food, the arts, and, of course, architecture.

Total Population Population Density Population Change Since 1990 Population Change Since 2000 Population Male Population Female Median Age Population by Age Age 0-4 Age 5-9 Age 10-14 Age 15-19 Age 20-24 Age 25-29 Age 30-34 Age 35-39 Age 40-44 Age 45-49 Age 50-54 Age 55-59 Age 60-64 Age 65-69 Age 70-74 Age 75-79 Age 80-84 Age 85+

Information Crime Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA 685,412 6,461,877 5,700 612 3% 7% -1% 2% 48.36% 48.49% 51.64% 51.51% 33.88 37.88 6.74% 5.63% 5.21% 6.39% 8.37% 8.94% 8.94% 8.59% 7.85% 6.89% 5.87% 4.82% 4.17% 3.3% 2.53% 2.11% 1.74% 1.91%

5.93% 5.97% 6.22% 6.72% 6.98% 6.54% 6.31% 6.88% 7.73% 7.98% 7.36% 6.46% 5.2% 3.81% 3% 2.57% 2.08% 2.26%

305,316,813 NA 23% 8% 49.3% 50.7% 35.89 6.76% 6.6% 6.71% 7.03% 7.01% 6.79% 6.55% 6.78% 7.27% 7.47% 7.01% 6.2% 4.98% 3.74% 2.93% 2.43% 1.9% 1.86%

Race American Indian, Eskimo, Aluet Asian or Pacific Islander Black Hawaiian / Pacific Islander Other White Population Hispanic Population Non Hispanic

Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA 0.43% 0.23% 7.53% 5.17% 21.11% 6.34% 0.15% 0.09% 11.67% 5.98% 59.1% 82.19% 18.38% 8.33% 81.62% 91.67%

Information

United States

United States 0.77% 4.6% 12.4% 0.19% 8.53% 73.51% 15.5% 84.5%

Total Crime Risk Index Personal Crime Risk Index Murder Risk Index Rape Risk Index Robbery Risk Index Assault Risk Index Property Crime Risk Index Burglary Risk Index Larceny Risk Index Motor Vehicle Theft Risk Index

Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA 204 75 294 98 174 46 223 88 416 87 242 104 175 72 115 74 150 69 266 81

Weather & Environment

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Information Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA

Average January High Temperature Average January Low Temperature Average July High Temperature Average July Low Temperature Annual Precipitation Earthquake Risk Index Weather Risk Index Hail Index Hurricane Index Tornado Index Wind Index Air Pollution Index Ozone Index Carbon Monoxide Index Lead Index NO2 Index Particulate Matter Index

36 F

35 F

Population

Information Crime

United States

Index score (100 = National Average) for an area is compared to the national average of 100. A score of 200 indicates twice the national average, while 50 indicates half the national risk. Demographic Information FAQ - We encourage you to consult with a knowledgeable local Real Estate agent or contact the local police department for additional information.

United States NA

21 F

17 F

NA

82 F 65 F 44 in. 75 100 81 128 62 125 104 104 94 107 119 97

81 F 61 F 47 in. 70 96 75 127 56 116 99 99 94 103 102 95

NA NA NA 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Index scores (100 = National Average) for an area are compared to the national average of 100. A score of 200 indicates twice the national average, while 50 indicates half the national risk.

Total Population Population Density Population Change Since 1990 Population Change Since 2000 Population Male Population Female Median Age Population by Age Age 0-4 Age 5-9 Age 10-14 Age 15-19 Age 20-24 Age 25-29 Age 30-34 Age 35-39 Age 40-44 Age 45-49 Age 50-54 Age 55-59 Age 60-64 Age 65-69 Age 70-74 Age 75-79 Age 80-84 Age 85+

Suffolk county, MA 685,412 5,700 3% -1% 48.36% 51.64% 33.88

Newton, MA 02458 13,023 6,105 -2% -1% 47.17% 52.83% 38.11

6.74% 5.63% 5.21% 6.39% 8.37% 8.94% 8.94% 8.59% 7.85% 6.89% 5.87% 4.82% 4.17% 3.3% 2.53% 2.11% 1.74% 1.91%

4.48% 4.75% 5.28% 9.42% 5.36% 8.18% 6.96% 6.78% 6.85% 7.79% 7.99% 6.32% 5.28% 3.56% 2.97% 2.38% 2.3% 3.35%

Suffolk county, MA 0.43% 7.53% 21.11% 0.15% 11.67% 59.1% 18.38% 81.62%

Newton, MA 02458 0.11% 10.11% 2.44% 0.08% 2.86% 84.4% 3.33% 96.67%

United States 305,316,813 NA 23% 8% 49.3% 50.7% 35.89 6.76% 6.6% 6.71% 7.03% 7.01% 6.79% 6.55% 6.78% 7.27% 7.47% 7.01% 6.2% 4.98% 3.74% 2.93% 2.43% 1.9% 1.86%

Race American Indian, Eskimo, Aluet Asian or Pacific Islander Black Hawaiian / Pacific Islander Other White Population Hispanic Population Non Hispanic

United States 0.77% 4.6% 12.4% 0.19% 8.53% 73.51% 15.5% 84.5%

Median Household Income Average Household Income Change in Avg. Household Income Since 1990

Households Median Home Sale Price (where available) Median Dwelling Age Average Household Size In Current Residence 5+ Years Annual Residential Turnover Median Years in Residence Households: Family Households: Non-Family Households: With Children Households: No Children Dwellings Vacant Owner-Occupied Renter-Occupied Vehicles by Household No Vehicles Available One Vehicle Available Two or More Vehicles Available Marital Status Never Married Now Married Separated Widowed Divorced

Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA 270,198 2,447,415

United States 113,634,428

$314,105

NA

61 2 31% 18% 3 49.37% 50.63% 25.28% 74.72%

44 3 47% 14% 5 63.84% 36.16% 32.2% 67.8%

29 3 35% 18% 3 66.4% 33.6% 34.17% 65.83%

9.75% 37.86% 52.39%

10.58% 58.94% 30.48%

12.36% 59.23% 28.41%

NA

32% 42% 26%

11% 35% 54%

8% 33% 59%

39.37% 25.18% 6.55% 5.08% 6.15%

25.15% 40.42% 3.87% 5.65% 6.8%

21.17% 41.74% 4.19% 5.13% 7.68%

Occupations: White Collar Occupations: Blue Collar Employees by Job Type: Executives, Managers, Administrators Professional Specialty Occupations Sales Professionals Technologies and Technicians Sales Workers and Clerks Administrative Support Technical, Sales and Administrative: Field Occupations Private Household Protective Services Other Services: Site Based Other Services: Field Based Farming, Forestry, and Fishing Precision, Craft and Repair: Site Based Construction, Repair and Mining: Field Based Machine Operators, Assemblers and Inspectors Transportation Materials Moving Workers Handlers, Helpers and Laborers Employees by Industry: Agricultural, Forestry, Fishing Mining

Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA 85.34% 81.44% 14.66% 18.56%

Construction Manufacturing Transportation and Communications Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Finance, Insurance and Real Estate Services Public Administration Unclassified Transportation to Work: Public Drive / Carpool Walk / Bike / Other Work at Home Median Travel Time to Work (in minutes)

13.03%

7.56%

19.01% 3.15% 4.6% 5.03% 19.72%

10.56% 1.53% 2.25% 4.49% 10.67%

0.29%

0.14%

0% 1.45% 10.26% 0.61% 1.3%

0% 0.91% 7.01% 0.38% 1.04%

4.87%

3.94%

6.28% 0.27% 1.15%

1.64%

1.35%

1.17%

1.14% 1.41%

1.68%

1.26%

1.33%

0.28% 0.02%

0.43% 0.03%

0.5% 0.14%

1.9% 3.9%

2.17% 5.53%

2.16% 4.56%

3.16%

2.13%

2.05%

2.31% 11.1% 13.44% 48.33% 5.95% 1.58%

2.44% 10.79% 4.56% 25.01% 2.77% 0.63%

2.35% 9.79% 3.35% 19.36% 2.97% 0.42%

31% 54% 13% 2%

9% 83% 5% 3%

5% 88% 4% 3%

27.21

22.21

20.65

69%

Newton, MA 02458 33 22 12 20 19 21 47 40 82 31

United States 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Information Suffolk county, MA

Average January High Temperature Average January Low Temperature Average July High Temperature Average July Low Temperature Annual Precipitation Earthquake Risk Index Weather Risk Index Hail Index Hurricane Index Tornado Index Wind Index Air Pollution Index Ozone Index Carbon Monoxide Index Lead Index NO2 Index Particulate Matter Index

36 F

Newton, MA 02458 36 F

United States NA

21 F

22 F

NA

82 F 65 F 44 in. 75 100 81 128 62 125 104 104 94 107 119 97

82 F 66 F 43 in. 73 104 145 127 59 151 105 105 100 108 130 94

NA NA NA 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Index scores (100 = National Average) for an area are compared to the national average of 100. A score of 200 indicates twice the national average, while 50 indicates half the national risk.

United States

75%

23%

25%

$32,282 $51,679

$26,464 $44,384

7.23% 3.74% 4.52% 4.24% 3.93% 4.41% 4.03% 4.24% 4.16% 7.7% 10.36% 13.44% 9.69% 6.15% 5.74% 2.06% 2.49% 1.88%

7.59% 4.14% 5.09% 5.17% 5.01% 5.49% 4.93% 5.05% 4.83% 8.61% 10.67% 12.4% 7.87% 4.6% 4.06% 1.41% 1.65% 1.42%

$24,663 $55,019 $52,576 $56,201 $50,156 $35,537 $28,855

$31,261 $56,499 $71,304 $81,584 $72,006 $48,039 $33,562

$28,988 $47,682 $60,306 $69,357 $61,074 $43,336 $33,046

Information

Educational Climate Index (1-5) Highest Education Level Attained Less than 9th Grade Some High School High School Graduate Some College Associate Degree Bachelors Degree Graduate Degree

Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA 4 NA 6% 5.44% 18.57% 7.83% 3.2% 15.1% 11.53%

3.21% 4.42% 19.41% 9.81% 5.31% 14.97% 11.05%

Median Household Income Average Household Income Change in Avg. Household Income Since 1990

$52,683 $68,953

22%

13.26% 4.98% 5.2% 4.77% 4.56% 5.25% 4.48% 4.61% 4.52% 7.72% 9.33% 11.28% 7.27% 4.34% 3.84% 1.25% 1.55% 1.81%

Education

United States NA 4.09% 5.75% 20.17% 12.5% 5.09% 11.57% 6.73%

Households & Dwellings Households Median Home Sale Price (where available) Median Dwelling Age Average Household Size In Current Residence 5+ Years Annual Residential Turnover Median Years in Residence Households: Family Households: Non-Family Households: With Children Households: No Children Dwellings Vacant Owner-Occupied Renter-Occupied Vehicles by Household No Vehicles Available One Vehicle Available Two or More Vehicles Available Marital Status Never Married Now Married Separated Widowed Divorced

Suffolk county, MA 270,198

Newton, MA 02458 4,979

$314,105

$561,000

NA

61 2 31% 18% 3 49.37% 50.63% 25.28% 74.72%

71 2 40% 22% 4 57.16% 42.84% 27.23% 72.71%

29 3 35% 18% 3 66.4% 33.6% 34.17% 65.83%

9.75% 37.86% 52.39%

7.58% 54.05% 38.38%

12.36% 59.23% 28.41%

32% 42% 26%

11% 37% 52%

8% 33% 59%

39.37% 25.18% 6.55% 5.08% 6.15%

34.45% 37.68% 2.65% 4.85% 5.53%

21.17% 41.74% 4.19% 5.13% 7.68%

Expenditures Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA 5% NA

United States NA

$61,143

$53,788

114 119 118 114 120 114 112 111

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

116

100

114 117 112 113 114 107 112 111 118

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Assets & Debt

4.13%

2.02%

1.33%

63%

$29,175 $41,129

Average Total Household $54,853 Expenditure Average Annual Household Expense Index Total Household Expenditure 102 Contributions 101 Personal Insurance 101 Information Apparel 103 Education 107 United States Entertainment 101 77.74% Food and Beverages 103 22.26% Health Care 103 Household Furnishings and 101 Equipment 5.56% Shelter 102 7.61% Household Operations 101 1.22% Miscellaneous Expenses 103 1.75% Personal Care 103 4.35% Reading 103 8.85% Tobacco 103 0.12% Transportation 100 Utilities 104 0% Gifts 102 0.71%

1.44% 1.93%

Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA $48,208 $62,423 $71,001 $82,629

Change in Avg. Household Income Since 2000 Per-capita Income Median Disposable Income Household Incomes $0 - $10,000 $10,000 - $15,000 $15,000 - $20,000 $20,000 - $25,000 $25,000 - $30,000 $30,000 - $35,000 $35,000 - $40,000 $40,000 - $45,000 $45,000 - $50,000 $50,000 - $60,000 $60,000 - $75,000 $75,000 - $100,000 $100,000 - $125,000 $125,000 - $150,000 $150,000 - $200,000 $200,000 - $250,000 $250,000 - $500,000 $500,000 + Median Income by Age Age < 25 Age 25 - 34 Age 35 - 44 Age 45 - 54 Age 55 - 64 Age 65 - 74 Age 75 +

Sales Tax Rate

Occupation & Industry

Information Suffolk county, MA 204 294 174 223 416 242 175 115 150 266

Weather & Environment

Income

Income

Households & Dwellings

Total Crime Risk Index Personal Crime Risk Index Murder Risk Index Rape Risk Index Robbery Risk Index Assault Risk Index Property Crime Risk Index Burglary Risk Index Larceny Risk Index Motor Vehicle Theft Risk Index

Index score (100 = National Average) for an area is compared to the national average of 100. A score of 200 indicates twice the national average, while 50 indicates half the national risk. Demographic Information FAQ - We encourage you to consult with a knowledgeable local Real Estate agent or contact the local police department for additional information.

Average Household Net Worth Median Debt Mortgage Debt Installment Loan Debt Lines of Credit Debt Credit Card Debt Investment Real Estate Debt

Suffolk county, Massachusetts MA $458,171 $597,180 $56,669 $7,252 $649 $8,484 $2,218

$71,330 $9,535 $822 $9,364 $2,475

United States $514,884 $64,663 $8,028 $688 $8,898 $2,377

Lifestyle Information provided by Nielsen Claritas © 2008. Neighborhood Information provided by Onboard Informatics © 2009. Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

Occupation & Industry Occupations: White Collar Occupations: Blue Collar Employees by Job Type: Executives, Managers, Administrators Professional Specialty Occupations Sales Professionals Technologies and Technicians Sales Workers and Clerks Administrative Support Technical, Sales and Administrative: Field Occupations Private Household Protective Services Other Services: Site Based Other Services: Field Based Farming, Forestry, and Fishing Precision, Craft and Repair: Site Based Construction, Repair and Mining: Field Based Machine Operators, Assemblers and Inspectors Transportation Materials Moving Workers Handlers, Helpers and Laborers Employees by Industry: Agricultural, Forestry, Fishing Mining

Construction Manufacturing Transportation and Communications Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Finance, Insurance and Real Estate Services Public Administration Unclassified Transportation to Work: Public Drive / Carpool Walk / Bike / Other Work at Home Median Travel Time to Work (in minutes)

Suffolk county, MA 85.34% 14.66%

Newton, MA 02458 81.93% 18.07%

13.03%

6.86%

19.01% 3.15% 4.6% 5.03% 19.72%

10.27% 1.14% 2% 3.64% 10.38%

0.29% 0% 1.45% 10.26% 0.61% 1.3% 4.87% 2.02% 1.44% 1.93% 1.68%

0.28% 0% 0.68% 5.85% 0.51% 0.9% 3.62% 1.7% 0.85% 1.05% 1.05%

United States 113,634,428

Change in Avg. Household Income Since 2000 Per-capita Income Median Disposable Income Household Incomes $0 - $10,000 $10,000 - $15,000 $15,000 - $20,000 $20,000 - $25,000 $25,000 - $30,000 $30,000 - $35,000 $35,000 - $40,000 $40,000 - $45,000 $45,000 - $50,000 $50,000 - $60,000 $60,000 - $75,000 $75,000 - $100,000 $100,000 - $125,000 $125,000 - $150,000 $150,000 - $200,000 $200,000 - $250,000 $250,000 - $500,000 $500,000 + Median Income by Age Age < 25 Age 25 - 34 Age 35 - 44 Age 45 - 54 Age 55 - 64 Age 65 - 74 Age 75 +

Suffolk county, MA $48,208 $71,001 63%

0.25% 0.02%

0.5% 0.14%

1.9% 3.9%

3.12% 1.84%

2.16% 4.56%

3.16%

1.04%

2.05%

2.31% 11.1% 13.44% 48.33% 5.95% 1.58%

2.25% 8.8% 3.89% 29.23% 0.33% 0.35%

2.35% 9.79% 3.35% 19.36% 2.97% 0.42%

31% 54% 13% 2%

14% 74% 6% 5%

5% 88% 4% 3%

27.21

22.34

20.65

80%

$52,683 $68,953 75%

25% $26,464 $44,384

4.28% 3.27% 4.18% 2.61% 1.63% 2.51% 3.09% 3.45% 2.85% 5.6% 8.96% 11.05% 10.5% 6.31% 9.96% 5.58% 8.38% 5.72%

7.59% 4.14% 5.09% 5.17% 5.01% 5.49% 4.93% 5.05% 4.83% 8.61% 10.67% 12.4% 7.87% 4.6% 4.06% 1.41% 1.65% 1.42%

$24,663 $55,019 $52,576 $56,201 $50,156 $35,537 $28,855

$53,077 $75,307 $103,214 $121,986 $115,086 $68,598 $44,500

Suffolk county, MA 4

Newton, MA 02458 5

6% 5.44% 18.57% 7.83% 3.2% 15.1% 11.53%

1.65% 2.11% 9.78% 5.41% 3.07% 22.73% 25.96%

Education Educational Climate Index (1-5) Highest Education Level Attained Less than 9th Grade Some High School High School Graduate Some College Associate Degree Bachelors Degree Graduate Degree

United States

25% $54,565 $71,789

13.26% 4.98% 5.2% 4.77% 4.56% 5.25% 4.48% 4.61% 4.52% 7.72% 9.33% 11.28% 7.27% 4.34% 3.84% 1.25% 1.55% 1.81%

$28,988 $47,682 $60,306 $69,357 $61,074 $43,336 $33,046

Information United States NA 4.09% 5.75% 20.17% 12.5% 5.09% 11.57% 6.73%

Expenditures

Suffolk county, MA Sales Tax Rate 5% Average Total Household $54,853 Expenditure Average Annual Household Expense Index Total Household Expenditure 102 Contributions 101 Personal Insurance 101 Information Apparel 103 Education 107 United States Entertainment 101 77.74% Food and Beverages 103 22.26% Health Care 103 Household Furnishings and 101 Equipment 5.56% Shelter 102 7.61% Household Operations 101 1.22% Miscellaneous Expenses 103 1.75% Personal Care 103 4.35% Reading 103 8.85% Tobacco 103 0.12% Transportation 100 Utilities 104 0% Gifts 102 0.71% 6.28% 0.27% Assets & Debt 1.15% Suffolk county, MA 4.13% Average Household Net Worth $458,171 1.35% Median Debt Mortgage Debt $56,669 1.14% Installment Loan Debt $7,252 Lines of Credit Debt $649 1.41% Credit Card Debt $8,484 Investment Real Estate Debt $2,218 1.33%

0.28% 0.02%

Newton, MA 02458 $91,618 $132,206

22% $29,175 $41,129

Newton, MA 02458 5%

United States NA

$86,499

$53,788

161 198 186 164 196 163 153 147

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

169

100

163 181 153 158 162 128 152 147 186

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Newton, MA 02458 $923,666 $90,652 $15,652 $1,346 $10,539 $2,647

United States $514,884 $64,663 $8,028 $688 $8,898 $2,377

Lifestyle Information provided by Nielsen Claritas © 2008. Neighborhood Information provided by Onboard Informatics © 2009. Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

Number of Establishments by Employment-size class Code Industry Code Description Total Estab 1-4 5-9 10-19 20-49 50-99 100249 250-499 500-999 1000 or more -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Total 495 258 89 70 48 17 9 3 1 0 23---- Construction 43 25 5 6 5 2 0 0 0 0 31---- Manufacturing 13 5 3 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 42---- Wholesale trade 22 14 4 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 44---- Retail trade 40 24 7 2 3 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48---- Transportation & warehousing 7 5 1 1 51---- Information 11 5 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 52---- Finance & insurance 32 17 6 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 53---- Real estate & rental & leasing 26 20 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 54---- Professional, scientific & technical servi 98 59 15 14 6 2 0 2 0 0 55---- Management of companies & enterprises 6 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 56---- Admin, support, waste mgt, remediation ser 28 12 6 5 4 0 1 0 0 0 61---- Educational services 16 1 5 2 4 2 2 0 0 0 62---- Health care and social assistance 64 30 13 11 5 3 1 1 0 0 71---- Arts, entertainment & recreation 9 2 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 72---- Accommodation & food services 29 9 4 8 5 2 0 0 1 0 81---- Other services (except public administration 51 30 9 8 4 0 0 0 0 0

NEWTON, MA Number of Establishments by Employment-size class

This study also included a comparison between the Four Corners area and other cities who are considered to be more economically viable. The aim here was to identify characteristics that lead to a stronger economic foothold, as our work with the Four Corners Main Street group was primarily a business focused initiative.

Lifestyle Segment - Bohemian Mix A collection of mobile urbanites, Bohemian Mix represents the nation's most liberal lifestyles. Its residents are an ethnically diverse, progressive mix of young singles, couples, and families ranging from students to professionals. In their funky rowhouses and apartments, Bohemian Mixers are the early adopters who are quick to check out the latest movie, nightclub, laptop, and microbrew. Social Group: Urban Uptown Lifestage Group: Young Achievers 2008 Statistics: US Households: 2,025,853 (1.766%) Median HH Income: $54,237.00 Lifestyle Traits Eat at Au Bon Pain Buy Spanish/Latin music Read The Economist Watch soccer Audi A4

Lifestyle Segment Young Digerati Young Digerati are techsavvy and live in fashionable neighborhoods on the urban fringe. Affluent, highly educated, and ethnically mixed, Young Digerati communities are typically filled with trendy apartments and condos, fitness clubs and clothing boutiques, casual restaurants and all types of bars--from juice to coffee to microbrew.

Lifestyle Segment - Urban Achievers Concentrated in the nation's port cities, Urban Achievers is often the first stop for up-and-coming immigrants from Asia, South America, and Europe. These young singles, couples, and families are typically college-educated and ethnically diverse: about a third are foreign-born, and even more speak a language other than English.

Lifestyle Segment Urban Elders For Urban Elders--a segment located in the downtown neighborhoods of such metros as New York, Chicago, Las Vegas, and Miami--life is often an economic struggle. These communities have high concentrations of Hispanics and African-Americans and tend to be downscale, with singles living in older apartment rentals.

Lifestyle Segment - American Dreams American Dreams is a living example of how ethnically diverse the nation has become: just under half the residents are Hispanic, Asian, or African-American. In these multilingual neighborhoods-one in ten speaks a language other than English--middleaged immigrants and their children live in upper-middleclass comfort.

Social Group: Urban Uptown Lifestage Group: Young Achievers

Social Group: Midtown Mix Lifestage Group: Young Achievers

Social Group: Urban Cores Lifestage Group: Sustaining Seniors

Social Group: Urban Uptown Lifestage Group: Young Accumulators

2008 Statistics: US Households: 1,383,073 (1.206%) Median HH Income: $85,671.00

2008 Statistics: US Households: 1,716,916 (1.497%) Median HH Income: $35,409.00

2008 Statistics: US Households: 1,486,582 (1.296%) Median HH Income: $24,535.00

2008 Statistics: US Households: 2,432,512 (2.121%) Median HH Income: $55,497.00

Lifestyle Traits Shop at Banana Republic Go snowboarding Read Elle Décor Watch Independent Film Channel Toyota Prius

Lifestyle Traits Shop at Rite-Aid Download music from web Read Latina Watch BET Toyota Yaris

Lifestyle Traits Dine out infrequently Domestic travel by railroad Read Selecciones (RD) Watch Spanish soap operas Toyota Corolla

Lifestyle Traits Shop at Old Navy Buy motivational tapes Read Black Enterprise Watch Telefutura Toyota Scion

Source: Nielsen Claritas, 2008 Demographic Traits: Urbanicity: Urban Income: Lower-Mid Income Producing Assets: Low Age Ranges: Age <35 Presence of Kids: Family Mix Homeownership: Renters Employment Levels: White Collar, Service, Mix Education Levels: Some College Ethnic Diversity: White, Black, Asian, Hispanic

Source: Nielsen Claritas, 2008 Demographic Traits: Urbanicity: Urban Income: Low Income Income Producing Assets: Below Average Age Ranges: Age 55+ Presence of Kids: Mostly w/o Kids Homeownership: Renters Employment Levels: Mostly Retired Education Levels: Some High School Ethnic Diversity: White, Black, Asian, Hispanic

Source: Nielsen Claritas, 2008 Demographic Traits: Urbanicity: Urban Income: Upper-Mid Income Producing Assets: Above Average Age Ranges: Age 35-54 Presence of Kids: Family Mix Homeownership: Homeowners Employment Levels: White Collar, Mix Education Levels: College Graduate Ethnic Diversity: White, Black, Asian, Hispanic

Source: Nielsen Claritas, 2008 Source: Nielsen Claritas, 2008 Demographic Traits: Urbanicity: Urban Demographic Traits: Income: Upscale Urbanicity: Urban Income Producing Income: Upper-Mid Assets: High Income Producing AsAge Ranges: Age 25-44 sets: Moderate Presence of Kids: Family Mix Age Ranges: Age <55 Presence of Kids: Family Mix Homeownership: Mix, Owners Homeownership: Renters Employment Levels: Employment Levels: White Management Collar, Mix Education Levels: Education Levels: ColGraduate Plus lege Graduate Ethnic Diversity: White, Ethnic Diversity: White, Asian, Hispanic, Mix Black, Asian, Hispanic

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Market- Demographics Study

Code Industry Code Description Total Estab 1-4 5-9 10-19 20-49 50-99 100-249 250-499 500-999 1000 or more -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Total 503 288 97 59 40 11 7 0 0 1 23---- Construction 55 39 8 4 2 1 1 0 0 0 31---- Manufacturing 8 4 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 42---- Wholesale trade 5 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 44---- Retail trade 77 45 15 10 5 1 1 0 0 0 48---- Transportation & warehousing 7 4 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 51---- Information 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 52---- Finance & insurance 23 11 4 5 3 0 0 0 0 0 53---- Real estate & rental & leasing 29 23 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 54---- Professional, scientific & technical servi 24 17 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 55---- Management of companies & enterprises 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 56---- Admin, support, waste mgt, remediation ser 13 7 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 61---- Educational services 15 5 1 3 5 0 1 0 0 0 62---- Health care and social assistance 89 38 20 13 9 5 3 0 0 1 71---- Arts, entertainment & recreation 8 5 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 72---- Accommodation & food services 48 25 10 6 5 1 1 0 0 0 81---- Other services (except public administration 96 60 19 9 7 1 0 0 0 0 99---- Unclassified establishments 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BLUE HILL AVE

Number of Establishments by Employment-size class Code Industry Code Description Total Estab 1-4 5-9 10-19 20-49 50-99 100-249 250-499 500-999 1000 or more -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Total 172 101 33 20 8 4 6 0 0 0 23---- Construction 21 13 4 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 31---- Manufacturing 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 44---- Retail trade 28 18 5 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 48---- Transportation & warehousing 5 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 52---- Finance & insurance 5 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 53---- Real estate & rental & leasing 18 10 6 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 54---- Professional, scientific & technical servi 8 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 56---- Admin, support, waste mgt, remediation ser 5 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 61---- Educational services 4 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 62---- Health care and social assistance 31 10 5 10 1 3 2 0 0 0 71---- Arts, entertainment & recreation 4 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 72---- Accommodation & food services 17 12 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 81---- Other services (except public administration 23 16 5 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

FOUR CORNERS

17


Rendering of the 4 Corners Market at night, illustrating the proportion of fenestration to solid mass.

Drawing of traditional fishing vessels of the Islands- light framework of operable nets supported by solid, unadorned mass.

The 4 Corners Market is located at the direct center of the Four Corners Main Street district. This central location means that the Market shares a strong responsibility in shaping the character of the neighborhood.

Weight

Transition

Nodes, Connecting Points

Formal tone of area defined in part materials

History- Change in demographics Demographics- close association to migration Current State...New State

Stores are clustered groups supported by radiating pathways that connect each node of shops.

Shop fronts create a pattern of glazed first floors supporting more dense residential space above

Material/ Color

Composition

Light framework supporting weight

Alteration in repetition Radial Organization

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Market- Design Principals

18


Signage CONTRASTING INTERIOR + EXTERIOR

One consistent problem throughout the 4 Corners shops is the manner in which advertisements were displayed. They were placed ad hoc over the entirety of the windows and were in varying stages of disrepair and discoloration. From the exterior it would be impossible to tell the great lengths that many of the shop owners (the one that I worked with included) went to carefully organize their goods.

KEY ISSUES SECURITY - CONSIDER WINDOWS SECURITY GRATE UNIFORMITY -CONSIDER MATERIAL COLOR ORGANIZATION LIGHTING

Another consideration beyond the signage specific to each shop was the degree of uniformity of signage across multiple shops. The owner of the 4 Corners Market indicated that the shop nearby had been renovated and that he would like his shop to blend in with this renovation. The shops below were pointed out as an example of a desirable outcome.

UNIFORMITY

After

Before

-CONSIDER ARTIFICIAL-COST/EFFICIENCY NATURAL- DISCOLORATION OF PRODUCTS COST -CONSIDER PRIORITIZE MAXIMUM IMPACT SOLUTIONS

The demographics study of the Islands indicated that some of the defining aspects of these places were its art work (known for its bright vivid qualities) and its markets that were more than places to purchase goods, but were also social focal points for communities.

CONNECTION TO PLACE

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Market- Shopkeeper Interview

19


STOREFRONT COMPONENTS FLAT

BLADE (HORIZ./VERT.)

WINDOW

RAISED LETTERING

CLOTH

BLADE

DOOR (TRANSPARENT)

DOOR (TRANSLUCENT)

DOOR (OPAQUE)

TRANSPARENT

TRANSLUCENT

TEXTURED

RECESSED

PROTRUDING

DIFFUSED

BENCHES

CHAIRS

SOLID

CABLE/DIVIDED

FREESTANDING

ATTACHED TO BUILDING

WOOD

BRICK

STONE

METAL

WOOD

BRICK

STONE

METAL

AWNING

ICON

MARQEE/MOTION

SIGNAGE

Creating a Basis For an Architectural Discussion

AWNING THRESHOLD (RECESSED) THRESHOLD (PROTRUDING)

ENTRY

WINDOWS SPOTLIGHT

LIGHTING

SEATING TRANSLUCENT

RAILING

VEGETATION

TRIM

CLADDING

Board created in preparation for the interview with the shop owner. The goal was to create a grid of shop front components that typically influence the character and usability of shop fronts. Accompanying each component type are examples of various arrangements.

The goal of this board was to create a matrix in which decisions made from the first board could be quickly recorded and categorized as the discussion took place. The hope was to have a recording of desired general characteristics for shop front components with the ability to discover trends.

Abstract Diagram Checkered background depicts the vacant lots that are the backdrop for the main intersecting pathways- the main business district pathway acting as the one streak of vibrant activity in the neighborhood.

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Market -Shopkeeper Interview

20


Configurations and Pattern Making

Re-Use

Component Within an Assembly

Security Grating

Awning System

Signage

As part of our considerations in this studio, we were asked to explore cost effective materials and assemblies as well as the possible re-use of materials. For this, I fell upon my experience with my familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business, in which we occasionally work with local highway departments. We have noticed that there are often piles of various materials that have been considered to out live their usefulness. Of these are the perforated cold formed steel bars that are the supports for most small scale road signs. As these posts are galvanized and intended for outdoor conditions, the signs they support often reach the end of their lifespan before the posts, but typically both are swapped out, leaving a surplus of galvanized material that is perforated throughout its length leaving it open to many types of assemblies.

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Market- Material Considerations

21


3 2 Renewal of Existing

Community Signage After considering the demographics study, it seemed as if the markets in the 4 Corners area were not serving as a central social hub for residents, as compared with Island markets. This scheme explores using a blank wall for the display of art and community information.

Design Strategy

3

The strategy for the overall design of the 4 Corners Market was to approach it from two positions. First, the goal was simply to revitalize and renew the existing building using strategies that came directly from the shop owner. A photo realistic rendering program was used to convey a unified color scheme with the adjacent shop and also to show what the shop would look like if the existing components and materials were cleaned or painted. The second part of the strategy was to show alternate schemes that incorporated information from the previous research which included; the use of recycled sign posts (1), an integrated signage display system that would remove the signage from the windows and organize them in a deliberate way that would allow for easy alteration or removal (2), and an allotted area for the display of community events and information (3).

1

Material Addition

1,2

Signage Organization

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Market- Store Front Design

22


How interesting is this building to look at? 1

3

4

5 very interesting

not interesting at all Could you imagine a building like this in your neighborhood? 1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Could you imagine a building like this in your neighborhood?

How much would you like to spend time in or be around this building?

How inspirational is this building?

Q1

2

How interesting is this building to look at? 5 4 3

2

3

4

not at all

5 yes, easily

2 1

How much would you like to spend time in or be around this building? 1

2

3

4

5

5

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

4 very much

not at all

2

How inspirational is this building? 1

2

3 1

3

4

no inspiration at all

5 I am inspired

Community Center

Additional Thoughts

EXTREME ANSWERS

+ 10 - 6

+6 - 21

+ 16 - 3

+ 20 - 10

+8 - 2

C-1 Studio Inclusive Design Studio Gabe Bergeron

PHARMACY

LIBRARY

COFFEE SHOP

POST OFFICE

BANK

RETAIL SHOP

RESIDENTIAL

MIXED USE

SUPER MARKET

MARKET

FARMERS MARKET

DOCTORS OFFICE

GAS STATION

GYM

COMMUNITY CENTER

BARBER SHOP

THEATER

SCHOOL

LAUNDROMAT

STREET VENDOR

RESTAURANT

PUB

PUB

Inclusive Design Studio

After interviewing shop owners of the area and designing upgrades to existing shop fronts, the next phase of the studio was to meet with Four Corners Main Street, a group of business owners and residents committed to reviving the Four Corners main street business district. With information gathered from these meetings we were to then to design a community center which was to be sited on an existing vacant lot at the center of the Four Corners area. The vacant lot had already received consideration by the group, as well as outside architects who had considered the lot as an individual parcel and as a part of a master plan for the Four Corners area. The program for the community center was left to each of us to consider, but the core of the program was to be derived from the meetings with the Four Corners group. One event that we attended was the annual meeting of the group. As a way to gather as much information as possible and to engage directly with residents, we were assigned to design activities for the evening. To the left are the activities that I had direct involvement in; one is a questionnaire that explores the idea of architectural style, the impact of the style and the perceived appropriateness of the style for the neighborhood. Of interest from this study was the disconnect between a favorable reaction to a building but the notion that it was not suitable for the area. For instance, the building that was perceived to be most â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;inspirationalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; was also perceived as being least suitable for the area. At bottom left is a programming exercise in which cards depicting market types were handed out to be placed on the board, which depicted the main of the Four Corners business district. This information became valuable later, not only in deciding which programmatic elements to include in the community center, but what weight they should carry.

4-Corners Community Center- Main Street Workshop

23


DOES ONE CENTRALLY LOCATED MULTI-MARKET TURN ITS BACK AND IGNORE THE REST OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD OR BECOME THE DRIVING LIFE FORCE?

CORE COMMUNITY VS. PROGRAMS

SUPPORTING ELEMENTS

ARTIST RESIDENTS

Food Market

Coffee shop

Adult Education Center

Restaurant

Youth Center

NEIGHBORHOOD DRIVING ELEMENTS

BROAD APPEAL PROGRAMS

Art Gallery

Bank

Bakery

Pharmacy

Gym General Retail

SOCIAL FUNCTIONS PREDICTING FOR FUTURE USE FLEXIBLE SPACE FREE PUBLIC SPACE (INT./ EXT)

CROSS OVER SPACE

YOUTH CENTER

INVERTED SATELLITE ENTITIES

RELATED HIVE?

TIME COMPRESSION = SOLUTION COMPRESSION

P1

TS

EE

P2

Tentative Error Problem Solution Eradication 2

P3

EE

TS

P1

TS

EE

P2

VS.

TS

EE

TS

EE

P2

TS

EE

P2

2

P

P1

Inclusive Design Studio

TS

EE

P2

TS

EE

P2

4-Corners Community Center- Programming

Green Space

How does a core community function become a broad appeal market function?

Universal Solutions to Specific Problems There is a relationship between the steps and logic inherent to problem solving and the creation of a vibrant downtown. Michael Brawne’s theory of problem solving states that after identifying a problem there is first a tentative solution, followed by a period of error eradication which ultimately leads to perceiving the problem in a new light which leads to another tentative solution and so on and so on. If this is the case, then perhaps one of the fundamental problems with creating large single facilities that are intended to be centers for communities, such as ‘lifestyle’ centers is that the time cycle of error eradication and the evolution of new problems occurs in an overly compressed time period. Given the complexity of a center that would house multiple market enterprises as well as community services, no single design phase could predict the needs of the center in following years. This would suggest that one solution would be to design flexibility into the program and layout of the building. The design of a program is typically outside the realm of architects, with translation of a given program being the normative condition. However, this studio proposed that we create a program based on information that we gathered during the Four Corners Main Street meetings. It can be debated whether it is the position of the architect to take the central role of that aspect of design, but there is no doubt that the creating of a complex program brings to very sharp focus the contradicting needs and pitfalls inherent to universal solutions. It is probably of little surprise that most of the program sketches and explorations are captioned with questions.

24


BOSTON VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL

IN-STORE BANK

SATELLITE FACILITY

COMMUNITY

The Existing Market Layout

ONLINE MICRO-LENDING

ADULT EDUCATION CENTER

To the end of discerning what surrounding businesses might be drawn upon or bolstered by the multi-use facility, the diagram below maps out existing shops and destination points. They are divided into market and non-market categories and are sized proportionally to the degree to which residents indicated additional need in polling done during the community workshops.

FINANCE

Creating an Internally Driven and Internally Reflective Market Due to the complexities involved with the design of a multi-use facility, it seemed necessary to separate and understand the programmatic relationships before considering the spatial relationships. As many of the meetings that we had with Four Corners residents were with business owners, and arguably, some of the problems that the Four Corners area is facing are vacancies in its commercial district; it seemed that a market component to the facility needed to be considered. However, in order for the market component to thrive, there needed to be strong community integration. This goes beyond a philosophical debate over authenticity of a place verses the blanket uniformity of chain and big box business. The fact is that the chains and national brand businesses are not interested in establishing branches in the Four Corners area. Population and income data do not fit into the models of profitability for these businesses and as economic conditions continue this will be the case for an increasing number of areas. This means that the ultimate viability of individual downtown main streets will increasingly depend on internal driving forces. The rough sketch above was laid out after general research, interviews with business owners, and an interview with a vocational school employee indicated that the components for an internally driven marketplace were already in place- the question is whether a framework could be provided that would create a cycle of positive feedback between each of the components, with an ultimate goal of an entity whose whole was greater than the sum of its parts.

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Community Center- Programming

25


YOUTH CENTER YOUTH CENTER

MARKET M

CROSS OVER ACTIVITY

Art could be both a youth center activity and a market activity Co-op with local Voc-Tech School

FREE PUBLIC ART

ADULT TRAINING SATELLITE ENTITIES?

VERTICALLY THROUGH DESIGN OF STRUCTURE?

YOUTH CENTER

MARKET

SHRINK

F L E X I B I L I T Y

YOUTH CENTER

CROSS OVER ACTIVITY

OVERLAP AREA BECOMES NEW ENTITY BANKING

HIGH SENSORY

Enhances both Youth Center and Market

MARKET MA

FREE PUBLIC

MARKET

FREE PUBLIC int.

ADULT TRAINING

HIGH SENSORY

ext.

Boundary condition between ext. free public space and int. free public space

Boundary condition between market and free public.

MARKET AS CENTRAL HUB

example- how might green space flow from ext. free space to int. free space to a florist shop?

YOUTH CENTER

MARKET

CROSS OVER ACTIVITY

MARKET M MARKE KE ET

REDISTRIBUTION OF BOUNDARIES?

ADULT TRAINING

Inclusive Design Studio

High sensory shops could enhance free public space - art - coffee shop - bakery -music - florist (green space)

Need interacts with Want

A Adds to Authenticity

GROW ART

Creates two unique boundary conditions - how open are these boundaries?

FREE PUBLIC

MARKET COPY CENTER OFFICE STORE LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING MICRO LENDING

Shops that require work that is similar to the adult training

Creates two unique boundary conditions - how open are these boundaries?

ADULT TRAINING

4-Corners Community Center- Programming

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1st fl

HIGH SENSORY MARKET

PERFORMANCE MARKET

High Sensory. Market. Place. 2nd fl

1st and 2nd Floor with enlarged courtyard layout

Inclusive Design Studio

The idea of a high sensory market was an important one to the design of the community center. Of course, any business aims for its shop to engage the senses, but in this instance the ultimate goal was one of recognition of culture and past. As the demographics study indicated, many sections of the Islands still carry on the tradition of the old world marketplace. A place in which the branding of individual stores and items is far less important than the experience of the whole. These markets were, and are, a loosely organized mass of people and goods. No clear beginning or end, an opportunity to become fully immersed in the experience.

MARKET COMMUNITY

ARTISAN/ TRADE COMPUTER/ FINANCE

For the community center, the aim was to create a central core which led from exterior to interior to exterior again, and was defined by market activity with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;high sensoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; markets bordering the main pathway. The idea of high sensory includes such items as food, music and art, but also more practical items such as cabinets and furniture- goods that could be created in part by students from local voc-tech schools, students who, through the course of their education in their trade, often create more pieces than they have need for and would like to sell but often have no outlet for them (according to a voc-tech school source). This would tie the idea of the market, not only to the old world markets of the islands, but to the residents of the community as well.

4-Corners Community Center- Adjacencies

27


The chosen site with immediately surrounding activities.

BREAK IN STREET WALL VEHICULAR TRAFFIC PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC

Site. Closing Street Wall Breaks. The site was a large parcel located at the central node of the Four Corners area. Monitoring showed that pedestrian traffic was heaviest on the street that shared most frontage with the lot, as the street leads to a residential neighborhood. This street face of the site oriented to the south and the combination of light and circulation, as well as geometry of the site, suggested orienting the long side of the building toward the street. This one empty parcel also created a particularly long break in the street wall and by occupying the space the ‘Main Street’ character of Four Corners would be reinforced.

BIRD’S EYE VIEW (building no longer on site)

Inclusive Design Studio

SURROUNDING VIEWS

4-Corners Community Center- Site

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PERFORMANCE LOBBY

SET DESIGN

OPEN MARKET

FOOD MARKET

KIOSKS WOOD SHOP

FLORIST

CABINET/ FURNITURE MARKET COMMUNITY MARKET

BUSINESS RESOURCE MICROLENDING

MIXED CERAMICS MARKET SEATING SEATING CERAMICS SHOP

TRAINING INFORMAL OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE/ MARKET

KIOSKS

COFFEE SHOP/ BAKERY

KITCHEN

RESTAURANT

BANK BUSINESS RESOURCE OFFICE

HIGH SENSORY MARKET

1st Fl

BACK STAGE

STAGE

Layers of Activity

CLASS ROOM/ WORKSHOP

MEETING

CLASS ROOM/ WORKSHOP

CLASS ROOM/ WORKSHOP

CLASS ROOM/ WORKSHOP

CLASS ROOM/ WORKSHOP COMPUTER LABS NEWSPAPER

MEETING

The plans indicate the general layout of the program and their adjacencies. There is also an additional layer of information involving the program strategy and the use of ‘crossover activities’. Purely community activities are labeled in blue and purely market activities are labeled in yellow. An even mix of the two is labeled in green, however, the majority of the program is created from elements that have both market and community aspects to them, often with the weight of the programmatic activity leaning more heavily towards market or activity. For instance, the restaurant is a market activity that would be expected to create a profit, however, considering earlier explorations of voc-tech schools and considering that culinary is a common voc-tech offering, typically with a strong outplacement component; the restaurant market activity would have a community aspect to it. Conversely, the performance space is primarily a community activity and might not be expected to turn a profit, but ticket or rental sales would make it a partially market activity.

2nd Fl

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Community Center- Plan Diagrams

29


Form. Parts to Whole. A Whole to a Larger Whole. The search for form was particularly challenging. On the one hand, the community center is comprised of many constituent parts, each with its own needs in terms of space, circulation, and daylighting. The goal was to try and serve these needs while creating a building that had a cohesive identity of its own. One strategy utilized was the use of stepped roofs and a courtyard so as to maximize daylighting. The stepped roofs also help to define individual programmatic spaces. Also weighing on formal decisions was the degree to which any of the studies on the Islands should directly effect formal composition. Ultimately, the feedback from residents overwhelming supported a building type that was representative of New England typologies. To that end, institutional and even religious building types were considered in order to create a building that would represent the Four Corners neighborhood as a distinct entity amongst a network of brick tax block buildings that represented the expansion of Boston over the past two hundred years.

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Community Center- Sections

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STREET ELEV

COURTYARD ELEV

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Community Center- Elevations

31


A Public Institution The main public face of the community center, seen from the street, housing the majority of the community-rich activities.

Procession View from street with exterior high sensory market to the left. Shown are display board fences.

Amongst the display items with view of performance space wing in background.

View of performance space wing with one open facade for small scale outdoor performances.

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Community Center- Exterior Views

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Expressing Activity Interior view of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;high sensoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; market. This is the central node for market activity. This area was given the greatest interior architectural expression, the goal being that the architecture would mirror the high sensory market activities and show the activity that was taking place on multiple levels.

Inclusive Design Studio

4-Corners Community Center- Interior Views

33


Conclusions This is one of the most thought provoking studios I have taken. While it may not be the role of the architect to design programs, doing so and doing so in a collaborative manner with the people who would use it, created a far greater investment in the project as a whole. Also, while architects may not create programs, the decision architects do make have a great effect over them. Because of this, I believe having delved so deeply into the people and the uses involved in this project has bettered my understanding of one of the fundamental and founding principals of architecture- the way in which people use buildings.

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Animal Sanctuary & Zoo C-2 Studio Generating the Spectacle Kelly Jean Ard Fall 2010 Project Duration: Single Animal Sanctuary- 8 wks Zoo- 8 wks The studio consisted of two projects equally divided over the semester. The site that we were working with was Boston’s Greenway, park space near Boston’s shore that reclaimed the dividing highway that cut through and separated some of Boston’s most vital neighborhoods neighborhood. This Greenway now connects the North End, the Wharf District, and Chinatown. We were to explore The Greenway and choose to work with any plot or plots that most suited our projects. The first project was to create a sanctuary and public interface for one animal. The second project was to build upon the first- to take lessons learned and create a full fledged zoo for three animals. Emphasis was placed on an understanding of the Greenway which was to be reconciled with the needs of our chosen animals. And, finally, to translate these two worlds into spectacle.

35


Generating a Spectacle within a Spectacle. These Diagrams illustrate those aspects of the Greenway that has the largest impact upon first visit. The greenway consists of multiple small parks, each divided by roadways. However, it seemed as if certain roads had a greater effect of dividing the parks than others, creating a condition where the green way seemed to blend together as one continuous experience in some areas and act as single divided parks in others. Also weighing upon the transitional quality of the parks is the change in street wall from one district to the next. In the north end the buildings are consistently two-three stories with a commercial front on the lower levels and are comprised of traditional heavy masonry brick. As the park way transitions into the Wharf district these buildings give way to towering skyscrapers of varying modern materials and assembly methods. Finally, the transition into Chinatown is varied, with smaller buildings punctuated with a few skyscrapers. From the onset, there was one parcel along the Greenway that resonated during the visits. This park is centrally located and amidst the tallest buildings yet it seemed to have the strongest degree of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;relative introversionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of any of the parks. Of course, the introversion is relative to the other parks, after all, the Greenway is in one of the most dense sections of Boston. What lent this park this more isolated quality was a combination of plantings along the perimeter, a slight raising of the street on the north west side, and one of the only occurrences of a grade in any of the parks. It was this combination of being fully immersed in the city but in a place with itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own distinct boundaries that set this parcel apart from the rest.

Generating The Spectacle

Single Animal Sanctuary- Site

36


Built

Transport

Approach and Immersion Visits to the site allowed for a close scrutiny of single parcels at a time, but to understand each park as a constituent part of the Greenway and to understand the Greenway within the greater fabric of the city a site model was necessary. The massings for the model came from the BRA website onto which information has been overlaid.

Landscape

Hardscape

These diagrams illustrate more accurately the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;tunnelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; quality of the parks and the manner in which this effect increases from the North end parks to the Wharf Districts. This stretch of parkway also allows for a partial realization of the city as a whole. Often the most striking views of cities are from an approach on a highway (consider 93 North into Boston). This is because the width of the highway is such that it allows for a broader view, whereas the ratio of road width to building height within the city consumes any prospect of wholistic views. However, as the Greenway is built upon an old highway system, users are able to stop and appreciate an experience at their own pace, as opposed to at 70 miles and hour.

Streets Flow

It is this ability to see and anticipate the density of the city before you arrive within it that makes the chosen parcel (highlighted in red) so alluring.

Initially considered sites

Generating The Spectacle

Single Animal Sanctuary- Site

37


Diagram of the Greenway illustrating the separation of districts, green space, density, and the relationship to the shore.

Generating The Spectacle

Single Si l A Animal i lS Sanctuary- Si Site

38


Horizontal Planes

Irregular Volume

Vertical Stacking

Captivating or Cage? Maybe Both. After choosing the site next we were to choose the animal that we would work with. I chose to work birds due not only to the built in spectacle of flight but also because of the open ended nature of possible enclosure (also due to interesting precedentsconsider Cederic Priceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s London Aviary). Also, an aviary type enclosure seemed to reflect the tunnel and immersion qualities of the Greenway and chosen site, as previously described. As I considered overall strategies for housing the birds, I struggled with the contradiction of a captivating display for people verses appropriate enclose for the animals. Consider the vertical stacking concept, which I came to think of as a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;billboard for birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. It is ultimately ludicrous, but if pure appropriateness were the driving

Generating The Spectacle

principle, animals would likely not be brought to center of a city. Ultimately the choice was consider the project on theoretical or conceptual grounds and in the spirit of spectacle. Having said this, further pages will show that through research of pier reviewed journals, a consideration of ideal habitats were considered. The final product for the bird sanctuary was ultimately a combination of the vertical stacking and open volume concepts. The vertical stacking allowed for spaces that both birds and people could inhabit (as well as a heightening of the effects of the grade change on the site), while the open volume allowed for flight for the bird and immersion on the part of people.

Single Animal Sanctuary- Concept Strategies

39


Generating The Spectacle

Single Animal Sanctuary- Interior View

40


UNIT TYPES Scale Enclosure

UNIT ASSEMBLY Steel Angle Wood Clad Nylon Mesh Plastic Panels

The Size of Small Things. The section fragment illustrates the concept of a structure that is inhabited by both birds and people, it also depicts the area, on the third level in which the vertical stack is blended into the open volume, allowing people to experience it from within. The renderings above depict form and materials used in the vertical stack. They are a close translation of the diagrams of enclosure and scale to the far left. The modular qualities of the units (depending on interior partitions) would allow for all of the configurations shown in the diagrams. The idea of scale is important to these concepts, the experience of a large, flightless ground bird up close is much different than the experiencing of pattern and movement of a flock of birds. The hope was that a combining of scalar conditions could allow for both simultaneously.

Section Fragment 3/16â&#x20AC;?= 1â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Generating The Spectacle

Single Animal Sanctuary- Diagrams

41


S2

Form and Frame Work.

1

2

Multiple configurations were considered for the framework that would support the open, netted volumes. The goal was that the framework would be light and unimposing, of the same qualities of the netting, but slender supporting members seemed out of proportion with the span. Upon review, the possibility of using the tubes that meet the ground as a means of sharing the load could have been explored.

S1

3

Plan 1â&#x20AC;?= 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Site sections showing the influence of the stepped building to the west on the staggering of the vertical stacks.

Generating The Spectacle

Single Animal Sanctuary- Site Sections

42


Birds and Arches. The concept of the open volume was shaped largely by the tunnel qualities of the Greenway as a whole, but a more specific form considered was the arch that serves as a gateway to the wharfs (shown in the view to the right and image above). The uses of the nylon mesh, which has the property of being translucent when view directly and white when viewed from an oblique angle was inspired by the image of a cardinal amongst snow laden trees. Interestingly, upon closer inspection, it was revealed that birds were also fond of the arch as many had nested within.

Generating The Spectacle

Single Animal Sanctuary- Generative Factors

43


Approach from South

View from vertical stack path, looking to the north

Generating The Spectacle

View from across the street to the east

Single Animal Sanctuary- Views

View from within vertical stack that joins the open volume

44


Zoo C-2 Studio Generating the Spectacle Kelly Jean Ard Fall 2010 Project Duration: 8 wks For the second half of the semester we were to expand the scope of the project into a complete zoo of three animals. The zoo was not an expansion of the earlier project, though the site remained the same. For the initial project, much of our site analysis was of the Greenway as a whole with the goal being the selection of the site that we wished to work with. To begin the next project we looked more closely at the site we had chosen to uncover previously ignored characteristics.

Massing and Voids

Generating The Spectacle

Relating to Intercontinental Colonnade

Framework for Bird Spaces

Greenway Zoo- Site

Circulation

Central Activity Nodes

45


125 High St

Intercontinental Hotel

Weight,

Time, and Type.

Perhaps the single most impactful entities upon the site were the adjacent buildings. Both are tall, commanding buildings with very contrasting characteristics. 125 High St. is a renovated heavy masonry building utilizing both stone and brick and portraying the qualities of many traditional Boston buildings. To the east is the Intercontinental Hotel, a more contemporary, glass curtain walled structure. It seemed that this contrast should be considered for a proposed structure that lie directly between the two. From this, a material language of stone and heavy timbers contrasted with steel framework and glass emerged.

The diagram at the center top of the page illustrated an aim to mirror the material and structural logic of the adjacent buildings. Not just a mater of material, the building reflect effect of time on the city and the resulting amalgamation of structure, material, time, and use.

Material Relationship With Intercontinental

Generating The Spectacle

Contrast

Zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have few preconceived notions of typologies and it seemed they could pull from any number of types or even combination of types. Weight

Material Relationship With 125 High St

Time

Vehicular Circulation and Impact

Greenway Zoo- Site

Impact of Adjacent Buildings

Main Activity Node

46


Snake Space- damp, dark and heavy minimal and heavily controlled light

Viverrid Space- Light, but fully enclosed. Weather and temperature need be controlled.

Bird Space- Light, open. Thin framework, less need for controlling temperature and weather.

For Things That Crawl, Climb and Coast. ENCLOSURE

This diagram explores material and structural qualities and how they might relate to experience and procession as well as how they might relate to ideal forms for the animals. The animals chosen were; birds, snakes and viverrids. Birds and snakes, and their characteristics, need little introduction. Viverrids are a little less known. They were chosen because they completed a full spectrum of animal activity. Birds occupy the skies and snakes occupy the ground, viverrids occupy the middle ground, they are tree dwellers. In addition to their habitat, they are also quick and active, with a playful disposition.

ION

ESS PROC

The thinking is that having a combination with a full range of habitats and activities would not only lead to a more interesting group of animals to experience, but also that the range of activities would lead to a wider range of architecture expression to both house them and display them. For instance, the idea of a tree dweller raises the question of how to get people into the trees. The idea of a ground dweller raises the question of how the barrier between animal and person might be eroded. The ultimate goal was to match material and spatial needs and appropriateness for the animals with the contrasting material logic set forth by the adjacent buildings.

Generating The Spectacle

Greenway Zoo- Typologies

47


People Surrounding Viverrids Surrounding People. Circulation. The diagrams on this page are a consideration of how spatial arrangements and circulation might affect the experience of both people and the animals. One question that arose is the degree to which exhibits are given freely to the public. The diagrams to the left shows a scenario in which the snake and viverrid spaces are divided so as to allow the existing circulation pattern of the park to remain. This decision was made in consideration of the fact that the Greenway was conceived as a way to connect places and people, it seemed unwise to disrupt the flow of one park to the next. Besides, if a Zoo is placed in public space, it seems that the public should have some access to it. To this end the diagrams consider how the facades of the buildings might be shaped so as allow passersby to view some of the activity within. Diagram 2 was considered ideal as it allows for multiple viewing platforms and created a sheltered cove along the path. The diagrams to the right show different configurations of the interior of the zoo, of both the snake space and the viverrid space. The focus of the snake space was to create a configuration that not only allowed for a single path with different spatial qualities for the display of different snake types- swimming, stationary and climbing, but also create a path that directed people to viverrid space. The snake diagram highlighted in red is closest to the final configuration. The viverrid diagrams show multiple configurations, the two that came to the forefront were a concept that placed people at the core of the room, with viverrids surrounding. The other choice was to have the viverrids at the core with people surrounding. The final choice was a bit of a combination; a core of viverrids, a circulation of people with an outer core of viverrids. This allowed for people to be fully immersed in the experience and allow the outside public to view the viverrids.

Public Passage

Generating The Spectacle

Greenway Zoo- Spatial Diagrams

48


Plan- Ground Level

Generating The Spectacle

Plan- 1st Fl

Greenway Zoo- Plans

49


Roof Plan

Plan- 2nd Fl

Generating The Spectacle

Greenway Zoo- Plans

50


Bridging the Gap. The Cross Sectional Area of a Snake and Highly Arboreal Birds. To the left are diagrams exploring possibilities for the bird space that is woven into the main exterior circulation of the viverrid space. Accompanying the diagrams are excerpts from two journal articles that helped to guide certain spatial considerations for the bird and snake spaces. The bird article contains information about bird flight types, determined by size and wing structure. This article suggested that birds best suited for flight within a closed container are birds with an elliptical wing type, as they have superior maneuverability. The article also illustrated that regardless of bird type, right or acute angles should be avoided. ASPECT RATIO AFFECTS THE RELATIVE MAGNITUDE OF INDUCED AND PROFILE DRAG; IF MASS, WING AREA, AND OTHER WING SHAPE PARAMETERS REMAIN CONSTANT, A LONG, THIN HIGH-ASPECT RATIO WING REDUCES THE COST OF FLIGHT AND EXTENDS RANGE. HOWEVER, HIGH ASPECT RATIO IS NOT NECESSARILY ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH SPEED (FAVORED BY SMALLER WINGS). ELLIPTICAL WINGS (LOW ASPECT RATIO) CAN MAXIMIZE THRUST FROM FLAPPING, WHEREAS AS `MUST BE FLAPPED AT HIGH FREQUENCY TO PROVIDE SUFFICIENT THRUST.

SO, RELATIVELY SHORT, POINTED WINGS ALLOW RAPID

WING-BEATS WITH REDUCED INERTIA AND THAT TRANSLATES INTO GREATER SPEED (E.G., SHOREBIRDS, AUKS, AND DUCKS).

MORE ROUNDED (CONVEX) WINGS PRODUCE MORE LIFT TOWARD THE WINGTIP (WHERE THE WING MOVES FASTER) AND ARE PARTICULARLY EFFECTIVE FOR BIRDS THAT FLY AT SLOW SPEEDS (E.G., TAKING OFF FROM THE GROUND) OR NEED HIGH LEVELS OF ACCELERATION.

MANY SMALL PASSERINES OFTEN

FLY SLOWLY OR IN ‘CLUTTERED’ HABITATS, OR NEED RAPID ACCELERATION TO ESCAPE PREDATORS.

THE SAME IS TRUE

FOR BIRDS LIKE ACCIPITERS AND CORVIDS (CROWS AND JAYS;

LOCKWOOD ET AL. 1998).

Scale: 1-1/2”= 1’

Generating The Spectacle

SCALING OF THE AXIAL MORPHOLOGY AND GAP-BRIDGING ABILITY OF THE BROWN TREE SNAKE, BOIGA IRREGULARIS Bruce C. Jayne1,* and Michael A. Riley2 1 Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cincinnati, PO Box 210006, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0006, USA 2 Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, PO Box 210376, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0376, USA Accepted 6 February 2007 Networks of branches in arboreal environments create many functional challenges for animals, including traversing gaps between perches. Many snakes are arboreal and their elongate bodies are theoretically well suited for bridging gaps. However, only two studies have previously investigated gap bridging in snakes, and the effects of size are poorly understood. Thus, we videotaped and quantified maximal gap-bridging ability in a highly arboreal species of snake (Boiga irregularis), for which we were able to obtain a large range in snout–vent length (SVL=43–188 cm) and mass (10–1391 g). We expected smaller snakes to bridge relatively larger gaps than larger individuals because of their proportionately higher ratio of muscle cross-sectional area to mass. The maximal length of the gaps spanned by B. irregularis had negative allometry, indicating that smaller snakes could span a greater proportion of their length than larger snakes. The greatest relative gap distance spanned (64% SVL) was by the smallest individual. The majority of snakes (85%) simply crawled slowly to cross a gap. Most of the suspended portion of the body and the path traveled by the head were below the perch that supported the posterior body, which may decrease the tendency of the snake to roll. Some (15%) of the snakes used another behavior in which the neck inclined as much as 45° and then rapidly lunged towards the anterior perch, and this enabled them to cross larger gaps than those using the crawling behavior. Perhaps the launching behavior of the gliding tree snakes (Chrysopelea sp.) evolved from an ancestral behavior of lunging to bridge gaps analogous to that of the brown tree snakes. An estimate of the muscle strain required to prevent the body of the snake from buckling suggests that, despite being light-bodied, brown tree snakes bridging a gap may be at the limit of the physiological capacity of their epaxial muscles.

The snake article explains that the gap bridging ability of a snake is directly proportional to the cross sectional area of it’s body. This would allow for a mathematical formula that would suggest a necessary void between humans and snakes if traditional methods of glass or net partitions were not used (section to the left). This would allow for fuller immersion into he snake space. Imagine a large room with multiple snake exhibits, with no nets or glass cages.

Scale: 1/4”= 1’

Greenway Zoo- Section Fragment

51


Dark to Light. High to Low. These sections illustrate a desired processional experience in which one would enter into the snake space, slowly ascending through a ramped three story space. The space is comprised of horizontally orientated stone stacking with small slivers of light between the stones. The area is dark and humid, an area for snakes. After ascending three stories, the space opens to the glassed height of the viverrid area, at tree top level. From here the path circumnavigates through vegetation, light, and viverrids. This ultimately leads to the exterior of the building and along a netted public pathway of flighted birds (next page).

Generating The Spectacle

Greenway Zoo- Sections

52


East Elevation

Stepped qualities from the previous projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vertical stacking are worked into the main of the zoo, mirroring the stepping back of 125 High St.

Strictly For The Birds. Netted bird spaces laces throughout the northern section of the park. Most intersect areas along the public pathway, save for an area over the graded portion of the site that people do not have access to.

Views of the same area within the bird space. Framework of structure aligns with the colonnaded trellis element that defines the street level of the intercontinental hotel. In this area, zoo and free public space combine.

Bird Space

Generating The Spectacle

Greenway Zoo- Bird Space

53


Core Circulation

Circulation diagram illustration the procession described on ‘Sections’ page.

Generating The Spectacle

Greenway Zoo- Circulation

54


Inside Out. Showing the horizontal banding of the materials. Banding dimensionally similar throughout stone and glass portions of the building. The drawing is also showing the accessible space beneath the viverrid space. One of the goals of the project was to create a building that was configured in such a way that the public had access to many portions of the building with small glimpses of the activity within.

Views from North.

Generating The Spectacle

Greenway Zoo- Exterior Views

55


Conclusions For most architectural projects the experiences and use of a space is always considered through the lens of one end user, people. The greatest challenge in this studio was to consider other perspectives, those of the animals, and to try and combine these shared perspectives into one cohesive place. While considering these perspectives, I sought guidance from the existing conditions of the sight. Conditions, due to the location, that provided so much information that isolating the core information became a task as well. Above all, I strove for a project that would live up to the studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fundamental principal, to generate a spectacle of experience for users of both the park and zoo.

Generating The Spectacle

Greenway Zoo- Conclusion

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Mt. Auburn Cemetery Crematorium & Chapel C-2 Studio Concrete Thinking Kevin Losso Fall 2010 Project Duration: 16 weeks

The studio consisted of one project that lasted the duration of the studio. The project was for a crematorium and chapel at Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Watertown, MA. The cemetery is a large 250 acre parcel of plots and park space connected by a labyrinth of roadways, all located in the relatively dense and suburban town of Watertown. The studio began with the exploration of on means of founding a conceptual basis for architecture, specifically, we were to translate the poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonnets to Orpheusâ&#x20AC;? into concept and imagery. The studio also focused on a particular material; concrete. We were encouraged to explore the possible uses of this versatile material. Above all there was a focus on the qualities of place. The site was one that we had access to and held a rich character do to history, tradition, and use.

57


An Open Web. The poem, “Sonnets to Orpheus” was assigned reading. From this poem we were to choose a stanza or fragment that might serve as a starting point for a conceptual basis for the project. For me it was the short phrase ‘Solitary Wave’ that resonated most strongly. I was struck by the impossibility of the notion. Within our material environment, waves are never solitary they are always preceded or followed by some activity or consequence. From this, I began to imagine environments that might support a solitary wave, such an environment would need be a closed system. One classification within science is the classification of closed or open systems, however, a closed system is a largely theoretical condition. For instance, the earth is often considered a closed system, the atmosphere and materials are bound to the planet and separated from the vacuum of space. However, even this system casts of particles and ions and receives debris from space. In a closed system, material might not decay, might not follow the constant unyielding principles of destruction inherent to ideas like chaos theory. But they would also not change, transform and be re-invented. Perhaps perfection is, in fact, the antithesis of architecture.

Bagsvaerd Church Jorn Utzon Kresge Chapel Eero Saarinen

Treptow Crematorium Axel Schultes with Charlotte Frank

Precedents

The diagram to the left is an exploration of systems that are considered to be largely open or closed. Their are varying examples; the human body serves as an example of both. The respiratory system is in constant exchange with it’s environment while the circulatory system travels in a (somewhat) closed loop. The human mind is, with any luck, the most commanding of open systems, with the ability to exchange energy and direct material change. Or consider a spiders web, an open system by design and for purpose. Architecture creates, willfully or not, systems. These systems often follow the patterns in nature of falling on either the open or closed end of the spectrum. My interest, at the onset of this project, was considering these systems and their interactions.

Solitary Wave Closed Vs. Open Systems

Concrete Thinking

Tadoa Ando 4X4 House

Temppeliaukio Kirkko (Rock Church), Helsinki Timo and Tuomo Suomalainen Parish Church Complex of Marco de Canevezes, Portugal Alvaro Siza

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Abstract Diagramming

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Designing For The Land. The was an existing chapel near the main entrance of the cemetery. We were to treat the site as if the existing building were gone but that the trees and other natural conditions remained. The site has a sharp grade, sloping down to the north, entrance side of the site and is surrounded by large, and at times, dense trees. Images depicting the duality of the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use. First an ornate headstone, a monument to death. Then, the tower, six stories and views of the city and entire cemetery, the center of recreational use on the site.

Due to the grade and dense trees sheltering the site as well as the fact that pathways circumnavigated itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entirety, I decided to document the site by circling it and documenting conditions as I went. In this diagram, the lighter rays indicate stronger views into the site, while longer rays measure impact. While this is a somewhat subjective means of analysis. A fair amount of the project was spent illustrating why these views had more impact.

Galaxies. Two systems colliding.

Designing For The Living. The idea of two systems coincided with my thoughts regarding the use of the site. On the one hand, Mt. Auburn Cemetery plays the traditional role as a back drop for the ritual of death. However, more than any other cemetery I have experienced, it is also a place for recreation, for living. Early in the morning bird watchers arrive (the site is 250 acres, within the dense suburban fabric of Watertown), later joggers and walkers, later still families and groups. Users flock to one of the last bastions of nature amongst the sprawl. Beyond the demands of the program it was for this group of users that I became intent on designing for. It is a rare thing to find people so at ease, not solemn, but laughing and joyful amidst a monumental reminder of death.

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Site

59


Weighing the Open and Closed When considering the layout for the main programmatic elements- the crematorium, the chapel and a memorial space, my first inclination was to divide these elements into separate buildings. In doing so, create and tap into the existing network of pathways that define the labyrinth like cemetery.

The sketch diagram above illustrates an early concept of a place in which the exterior is largely sheltered by large objects (a reflection of the trees that guard the site) and the excitement and activity of the place occur between these objects. The orientation of the objects is a response to the previous site diagram that illustrates the main axis of the site, determined largely by the shape of the site and views.

Shows degree of seclusion, by layout or material. Darker shades indicate more secluded. Grey tones are building, yellow tones are open space.

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- The Spaces In Between

To this end, a gridded system was used. Typically, there are stronger cues to pull from than a grid when considering a general layout, but considering the desire to evenly weigh the program spaces against the public spaces in between, the grid proved useful. Blocks of 20 ftX20 ft were used as this both (roughly) evenly divided the site and because many of the programmatic square ft. requirements were divisible by or into 400 sq. ft.

60


From East From South (Chapel Ave) Main Entry

Building Windows. Building Walls. Diagrams focusing on qualities of the buildings that might reinforce or better display exterior qualities to the users of the park. The solid/void diagrams are a consideration how different levels of exposure could highlight the core between the buildings in some instances and provide a more sheltered experience in others.

Form? A Search For Soundness. The search for appropriate form continues. The sketches below show formal exploration, some based on the circular images that emerged from the early systems and site diagrams. Ultimately, I chose to allow the later gridded diagrams to more actively influence form. This was largely due to a desire for simplicity. Considering the nature of the site and of the program, I ultimately wanted to create a building and spaces that were, above all, approachable. This began to mean a simple more monumental geometry accompanying simple, earthen materials. A place of material and structural logic not so unlike the headstones and stone tombs, trees, and pavement underfoot. The initial considerations of the duality of two systems also seemed to favor simple geometry. Heightened intricacy and irregular forms blur boundaries. Instead I searched for soundness, this project felt to be one that should not seek to confuse the senses but instead assure them. To invite them through tactility and resolute form.

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Form

61


Dividing Factors. The diagrams below illustrate site and desired qualities that influenced the layout and fragmentation of the program and associated buildings. For instance, diagram three shows what I considered to be one of the most impactful views into the site, created by the framing of two large oak trees. It is within the division of these trees that a building split occurs allowing and framing a view of the activities inside.

Private

Public

Seclusion

HOLDING AREA

MISC.

STOR.

OFFICE

OFFICE

REMEM. AREA REMEM. AREA

CHAPEL

SCALE 3/32”=1’

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Site Influence

62


OFFICE

1

RESTROOMS

2

STORAGE/MISC

3

HOLDING ROOM

4

RETORTS

5

CHAPEL

6

WAITING ROOM

7

MEM. SPACE

8

V1

S1 S2 V6 V

V5

8

5

A Path To Guide.

4

The plan serves as a site plan and as a legend for the following views. The plan is integrated with site information because to topography, trees and vegetation are such defining qualities of the site and project as a whole.

3

V

2

V22

3 2

V4

1

1 7

Main Approach

6

S1 S2

Concrete Thinking

V3

Considerable time was spent documenting actual tree locations and type and much of the exterior portion of the project was designed for the limited views available into the site. The goal was to make, not only the presence of the buildings, but of the public spaces in between understandable from first arrival into the cemetery with increasing accessibility into different portions of the in between spaces increasingly expressed as people pushed further into the cemetery.

Site Plan

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Site Plan

63


Wood Cladding Light hardwood, maple or sim in color. Horizontal orientation with 1/8th in. gap between boards to strengthen horizontality. Grain pattern and some knots, slightly more rusticated than many contemporary ext. wood cladding finishes.

Ground Plane Example shown is of wood board stamped concrete. The desired characteristics for ground plane are the tone, texture, and color variation. If stamped pattern does not prove uniform enough for accessibility, then brushed texture as illustrated in inset.

Concrete Walls Example shown is of brushed and grooved concrete precast panels. Intention for project walls are similar, but with grooves and brushed texture lines both oriented vertically.

Wood Finishes All wood in project to be similar to ext. wood cladding except for the wood finishes at the remembrance space memorial and accompanying walls and at the overhead wood and concrete baffling which are to be finished with a dark stain (or clear stained dark wood).

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Materials

64


View 7- From Int. Courtyard Section 1

Set Stage. The dual material logic was reinforced by their orientation. The concrete tilt up panels show vertical grooved connection with a vertical brushed texture while the wood slats are hung horizontally. The crematorium (shown in section 1) serves as a backdrop and as the strongest representation of the material choices and orientation. Section 2

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Site Sections

65


View 6- From Platform Courtyard View showing the memorial space to the left, to the right is an area of seclusion created by two exterior wall and the addition of plantings that are a continuation of existing trees. The creation of a secluded outdoor room was for those who might wish to accompany the body to the retorts. This space is immediately adjacent to the exit of the retort room and might serve as an intermediary space of reflection.

Axon shown without trees for clarity.

North Elevation

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Exterior Views

66


View 3- Front Approach South Elevation Scale: 3/16â&#x20AC;?= 1â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

View 4- Memorial Space Entry

Green, Building, Green. The east elevation depicts the moment of framing described on the site influence page. The goal was for a layering and depth to the view. First the large oak trees, then the buildings with the break that exposes the courtyard within and, finally, the tallest walls of the buildings, the concrete walls of the crematorium adorned with a vertical garden. The goal of the front approach was to give some intimation of inner workings of the chapel but also to guide people into the courtyard. Upon approach the glazed doors of the chapel lead to a small entryway with glazing on the opposite allow people at the exterior to see in to the courtyard space. Upon entering, one would pass through the conditions depicted on the following page, ultimately arriving at view 4, in which the courtyard space is revealed with a choice of paths that lead further into the courtyard or through the memorial space.

Concrete Thinking

View 2- From Stairs East Elevation

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Procession

67


COURTYARD

CHAPEL

Approach

Light. The diagram above, in yellow, describes the path through the narthex of the chapel and into the courtyard. The darker shade represents a tighter enclosure due to the narrowing of fenestration to small 4â&#x20AC;? slots built into the concrete panels and the disappearance of the skylight above. The main of the chapel is defined largely by light. Religious building has a long tradition of using light to evoke the spiritual. Within the chapel, natural light is used from above, artificial light from a clerestory space to highlight the joining two main chosen materials of the site, wood and concrete. The drawing to the left is a more technical depiction of the materials and assembly method. In the clerestory space, channel glass and boards of the same width are alternated to reinforce the light filtering qualities of the wood and concrete baffles.

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Chapel

68


View 5- Memorial Space

Formwork and Filters. The memorial space was inspired by the twists and turns and unexpected findings that exist throughout the cemetery. The addition of a third built form allowed the courtyard to become a path with more distinct spaces, as opposed to one amorphous space. The desired character and experiential quality of the memorial space comes from one experience in the cemetery, in particular. Non-native beech trees exist in a few places in the cemetery, these trees have wildly irregular branches and dense foliage. Most striking is that the branches sweep down and touch the ground allowing you to push through to a space surrounding the trunk that is completely enclosed by foliage, with the leaves filtering bits of light through into the enclosure. The memorial space is two rooms of baffled walls with a similarly constructed memorial between them. Once in the space the light and views out are filtered by the layers of wood cross hatches. The memorial structure is meant to be a series of formwork that would allow for memorial plaques to be poured into them. This idea was inspired by earlier concrete studies that showed the intricacies possible in pored formwork- each plaque could be created unique to the individual.

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Memorial Space

69


Conclusions For me, this studio became very much about the defining qualities of a place. The characteristics of the site were both unique and unusual, but also sacred and timeless. It was perhaps the only studio I have taken in which innovation was not the ever present and overriding influencer. Instead of focusing solely at the new creation, I strove to understand and translate what was already there.

Concrete Thinking

Mt. Auburn Crematorium- Conclusion

70


FIRM EXPERIENCE

Machado Blake Design

I spent nearly two years at Machado Blake Design. I began as a drafter and was very fortunate to work in an environment in which my responsibilities increased for the entire duration of my stay. Drafting work lead to an increased role in design which lead to site visits and collaboration with contractors and fabricators. The principal of the firm, Christopher Blake, always placed careful design and the consideration of detail at the forefront of every project. Even as the economy staggered and budgets thinned, an allowance for full consideration of all aspects of the project was always given. This allowance has undoubtedly shaped all of the work in this portfolio.

71


LEXINGTON,MA RESIDENCE

LEXINGTON, MA RESIDENCE- FENCE

72


LEXINGTON, MA RESIDENCE- TRELLIS

LEXINGTON, MA RESIDENCE- ROOF DECK This project involved the renovation and additions to an existing TAC house. This required a strong understanding of the existing conditions and qualities that defined the home and property, ideas explored most thouroughly in the Concrete Thinking studio. The additions involved a trellis and fence the creation of a threshhold and a procession from the public face of the property and the private yard and gardens within. These processional qualities were explored in both the Generating the Spectacle and Flt815 Studio, though the framework quality of the Zoo diagrams are probably most reflective. The roof deck was meant to be more monumental. Solid and integrated, much like the Crematorium project.

73


VACATION RESIDENCE, SEBASCO, ME

VACATION RESIDENCE, SEBASCO, ME- INTERIOR FINISHING There is a connection between the horizontally oriented shiplapped bords that define the interior charecter of the vacation home and the banding of wood in the Crematorium project. The underlying idea is that material qualities can be enhanced and defined by formal arrangement.

74


VACATION RESIDENCE, SEBASCO, ME- INTERIOR FINISHING

VACATION RESIDENCE, SEBASCO, ME- INTERIOR FINISHING

75


CONCORD, MA RENOVATION

CONCORD, MA RENOVATION

The most challenging aspect of this project was taking the most awkward moment in the building, the foyer that joins the house and garage and turning it into major circulation route. The client’s hope was not only to convert the top level of the garage into living space, but also turn this ‘knuckle’ into vertical circulation. It seems the constant goal of design to take awkward or disjointed moments and turn them into focal points.

76


BEACON HILL, MA RENOVATION

BEACON HILL, MA RENOVATION

77


Personal Arch. Projects

The design work in this section is my own and for some of the projects I did the construction work as well. It has been a year and a half since I have been employed at a firm. This section illustrates how I have been spending that time. I am fortunate that I have construction work in ny background and even more fortunate to utilizing it. This image is of me on Dec. 15th. My finals this semester fell on the 22nd. The deadline for the project is the 22nd. Oh, and there is the matter of a portfolio review... I have begun to seach more intently for a job at a firm, as design is a consuming interest, but for the time being I feel quite fortunate to design in whatever capacity I can, and to build.

78


ASHBURNHAM, MA

RENOVATION

ASHBURNHAM, MA

RENOVATION

This is the largest project that I have designed and built to date. The project consisted of a complete tear down of four rooms to build a bedroom, an in-law suite, and a bathroom. The project also called for rebuilding the existing porch and adding an accessible ramp as well providing accessible accommodations in the in-law suite and bathroom. The work was done myself and members of my family’s business. The considerations for accessibility were considerable and ranged from the slope of the ramp, ease of access into the bathroom and other areas, and even the switching of lights. Much of the information that I needed to approach these concerns came from Programming and Codes.

Material

Quanity

Cost

1

$58.00

1

$28.00

1

$198.00

1

$49.00

2@$23.96

$47.92

2@28.97

$57.94

BATHROOM Vanity http://www.homedepot.com/BathͲBathroomͲVanitiesͲVanityͲTopsͲVanityͲTopͲCombo/h_d1/NͲ5yc1vZ1xh3Zbask/RͲ100527212/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=Ͳ1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

Faucet

12’ RAMP

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/NͲ5yc1vZ1xh3/RͲ202043766/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=Ͳ1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

Toilet http://www.homedepot.com/BathͲToiletsͲOneͲTwoͲPieceͲToiletsͲTwoͲPieceͲToilets/h_d1/NͲ5yc1vZ1xh3Zaqvm/RͲ202017635/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=Ͳ1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

MedicineCab http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/NͲ5yc1vZ1xh3/RͲ100559539/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=Ͳ1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

GrabBars http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/NͲ5yc1vZ1xh3/RͲ202204952/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=Ͳ1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

VanityandGenerallighting

24’ RAMP

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/NͲ5yc1vZ5z655/RͲ100686825/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=Ͳ1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

HandShower

$39.97

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/NͲ5yc1vZ1xh3/RͲ100618148/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=Ͳ1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

Floor CeramicTile ?

.99/sq.ft.@55sq.ft

$54.45

30’ RAMP

Backerboard http://www.homedepot.com/FlooringͲFlooringͲToolsͲAccessoriesͲTileͲToolsͲAccessoriesͲBackerͲBoard/h_d1/NͲ5yc1vZ1xh3Zbngc/RͲ100183556/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=Ͳ1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

3/4"Plywood

4shts@10.37

$41.48

3shts@18.97

$56.91

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ARIZONA

VACATION RESIDENCE

NEW IPSWICH, NH

EQUIPMENT STORAGE

This is a design for a vacation home in Arizona. It is currently at the schematic stage of design. The client called for a simple and cost effective design that, while small, would provide ample outdoor space on both levels. This project called for the storage of a dimensionally specific piece of machinery, in this case, an excavator. It also called for a code compliant stairway so that the top level could be later converted to living space.

80


NEW IPSWICH, NH

SAUNA

New Ipswich, NH has a large Finnish community who have a long tradition of taking Saunas. Though this project is quite simple and of a small scale, the joy of the project was working with rusticated materials, including true one inch oak, cherry and maple boards that were sawn from trees that I harvested.

LOWELL, MA

KITCHEN RENOVATION

Options for a bathroom renovation that is due to begin in the spring. The challenges were providing a code worthy layout in a house that was designed 100 years ago.

81


NEW IPSWICH, NH

KITCHEN RENOVATION

SHARON, NH

BARN

Design for a kitchen island that is to be constructed using 3’’ slabs of cherry.

Barn design (unbuilt) for a client that required a top level that would accommodate multiple uses.

82


STODDARD, NH

LAKE RESIDENCE

LEOMINSTER

PORCH ADDITION

83


SHARON, MA

KITCHEN RENOVATION

SHARON, MA

MASTER BATH RENOVATION

Existing

Proposed Hardline Layout

Rendered in 3D Studio Max

Rendered in 3D Studio Max

Completed Project

Resposibilities included both design and construction work on these renovations to a Sharon, MA residence. Both rooms were completly torn down and rebuilt, new plumbing and electric were required for both. Much was learned about the construction difficulties caused by retrofitting old plumbing with a properly vented system.

84


85

BAC Segment II Portfolio  

Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Academic, Firm, and Personal Architecture

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