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www.KidsStandard.com

Issue 6, September 2010

Standard Going back to School Standard Maggie Razdar Publisher It’s school time again! You’re probably feeling excited and maybe a little sad that summer is over. Some kids feel nervous or a little scared on the first day of school because of all the new things: new teachers, new friends, and maybe even a new school. Luckily, these “new” worries only stick around for a little while. Let’s find out more about going back to school. Most teachers kick off the school year by introducing themselves and talking about all the stuff you’ll be doing that year. Some teachers give students a chance to tell something about themselves to the rest of the class. When teachers do the talking on the first day, they often go over classroom rules so you’ll know what’s

allowed and what’s not. Pay close attention so you’ll know if you need to raise your hand to ask a

Here are a few final tips for a fantastic Beginning of the month of September: • Get enough sleep. • Eat a healthy breakfast. • Do your best. • Develop good work habits, like writing down your assignments and turning in your homework on time.

• Take your time with school work. If you don’t understand something, ask the teacher. • Keep a sense of humour. One teacher we know shows his new students a picture of himself graduating high school - a grinning ape in a red graduation cap and gown. This usually makes the kids laugh, and it’s a good way to remind them that school is fun!!!:-

Reward a Good Deed Contest Win a Brand New Computer!!! Reward a Good Deed! It seems to us at Preventive Medicine that we hear plenty of bed news and too little good news. Kids In particular hear about bad things all the time seldom do they hear good news or anything about building character, self esteem, good manners etc. We’d like to play some small part in focusing on and rewarding the good things people do. We’re focusing on kids, from the age of 6-19. If you know some youngster who did a kindness, a good deed, a selfless act it doesn’t have

question and what the rules are about visiting the restroom. You might already know a lot of people in your classes on the first day. But it’s a great day to make a new friend, so try to say hello to kids you know and new ones that you don’t. Make the first move and you’ll be glad you did and so will your new friend! Sixth grade often signals a move to middle school or junior high, where you’ll find lockers and maybe a homeroom. This is just what it sounds like - a classroom you’ll go to each morning, kind of like your home in the school. In middle school, you might move from classroom to classroom for each subject. Your teachers know that this is a big change from elementary school and will help you to adjust.

to be something huge and public the kids next door, your granddaughter perhaps? Please submit a short essay telling us about it or give this card to the child so he or she can participate. Once we judge the entries, we will award a brand new computer to the winner Send your essay to: Good Deed Contest Preventive medicine Associates; 5415 West Genesee St; Camillus, NY 1303 315-487-8109

Who was your favorite teacher, and how did they impact your life? This teacher could have been easy or hard. This teacher could have taught you when you were younger. This teacher made a difference in you somehow. How did they make a difference in your life? My sons have had MANY favorite teachers, but there is always one made a strong impression on their life. She

FREE! phone 315.699.5884 email info@KidsStandard.com online www.KidsStandard.com

Save Yourselves… It’s too Late for Your Parents! Dr. Joseph T. Barry, MD Preventive Medicine Associates, Camillus, NY

I’m talking about your hearing most adults eventually have trouble with their hearing by the time they notice it, it’s usually too late to do anything else but get hearing aids. Protecting your hearing starts at the early age, your age. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand that the more loud noise your eardrums are exposed to the more damage will be done over time…Many people were exposed to explosions during wartime. Others stood in front of massive speakers while they rocked the house, others just ran the lawn mower and the leaf blower but all suffered hearing loss. You need confirmation? Look to your grandparents how often do you have to speak up or repeat yourself? Many of you will know what I’m saying. So what to do about it: protect your hearing now, right now. Cut back on the volume on the ear buds; if other people can hear your music even with the speakers jammed in your ears, its too loud. If the dog runs away from the sound its too loud, if your mother and father complain about the noise it’s too loud. It’s simple, loud noise is bad. Soft sounds are good for your health. It’s not just what happens to you its how you prepare yourself for the challenges both physical and mental. If you eat right and get some

made learning fun or went the extra mile. We want to hear from you about your favourite teacher, so tell us Why he or she is one of the reasons you like certain subject or you had improved in that subjects. Learning is being fun and exciting. He or she had a tremendous impact on your life that you will never forget them. You can write something like this: My other favorite teacher i had just this past year. He was new at my school, and totally

exercise. There are rewards and not just showing off the six packs on the beach. But feeling better for longer, not something you think about right now because everyone, not just young people, takes their health for granted. I would write more about your health and how to improve it, but not sure you will pay any attention..Kids today seem to trust their friends and strangers more that their parents. I am not saying every parent is a saint but I think most parents really want the best for their kids and are trying to push them in the right direction but young people must rail against authority. I get it the whole separation from mommy and daddy thing but really.. Why listen to your friends

continued on page 3  awesome. He was funny, and always very helpful and he made everyone in his class eager to learn. He really taught like no other teacher. He like got us to be brutally honest, have no secrets with each other, and he made us see things from a totally different point of view. He was just downright awesome, and funny. We want to reward your favourite teacher, please send it to us and we will send a Thank you note to your teacher and a gift certificate to thank them.


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Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

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History continued from page 1 or care about what some celebrity tweets instead of hearing what your parents are trying to tell you…..that brings up the issue of selective hearing some people Most people? Only hear what they want to hear, that’s why I like to express myself by writing, not email, not texting not tweeting, writing a letter that comes in mail and has to be physically opened and can be kept in a drawer has gravitas look it up. It means something... Not some poorly syntaxes abbreviated nightmare of the text message...It gives you a chance to make a point without the other person immediately jumping to their defense or having to make some response. It’s a lost art that of writing a letter my own kids won’t write a thank you note without the proverbial gun being held to their head. I prefer the tazer because really you can’t threaten to shoot your kids too often. …the tazer on the other hand seems to be employable a lot not yet legal in New York. Well, this article started out about hearing, but it’s ending up about your writing….I will leave you with one of the most powerful tools to get ahead in this world..I give you this information free of charge but its priceless it separates the winners from the losers. It’s part of the insiders guide to getting ahead write thank you notes it takes only a minute or two and people important people in your life both personal and professional will appreciate and take notice it may seem trivial to you but it’s important to the “people in power”. Really so many people lack basic social skills today that if you just follow a few rules you can distance yourself from the competition….. whether you are trying to impress your next boyfriend or girlfriend, or perhaps more importantly their parents later a prospective boss or coach etc., So Many people can’t be bothered….there is your opportunity....that’s how you separate yourself from the herd that’s how you get yourself heard hey, we are back to talking about hearing if I ever write again for this publication I will bring up more obvious tools for success in life. Until then, try writing just one short note to your grandparent or coach or teacher for something they did nice for you notice the response you don’t do it for the response…you do it because it’s the right thing to do success is not an accident you have and can use tools to make a difference for successful life and career…..it’s all up to you are you listening?

John Quincy Adams Tylor F 8TH Grade John Quincy Adams was the sixth President of the USA, serving from 1825 to 1829. His Vice-President was John Calhoun. As President, John Quincy Adams’ political party was “National Republican.” John Quincy Adams’ father, John Adams, was the second president of the United States of America. John Quincy Adams was born in Quincy, Massachusetts, on July 11, 1767. His father was a farmer. Adams graduated from Harvard University in 1787, and went on to

become a lawyer in Boston, Massachusetts. Adams was elected senator from Massachusetts in 1802. Adams later helped negotiate the treaty that ended the War of 1812 (which was fought with Britain). Adams then became Madison’s Secretary of State. He later negotiated the treaty with Canada that placed the US-Canadian border west of the Great Lakes at the 49th parallel (from what is now northwestern Minnesota to Washington state). Adams soon negotiated with Spain, obtaining a treaty that returned Florida to the USA. Adams

also helped draft the Monroe Doctrine, which stopped any future European colonization of North and South America. Adams won the presidency in 1824, beating Andrew Jackson. Adams’ term was a time of prosperity in the United States. Road and canal building (including the Erie Canal, which connected New York City and the Great Lakes) were accelerated. Adams lost the next presi­ dential election (which Jackson won). Adams then served in the House of Representatives until his death (from 1831 until 1848). In Congress, Adams fought against the “gag rule” that prevented the discussion of slavery in Congress (the gag rule had been passed in 1836). The “gag rule” was repealed in 1844.

Why is studying history important? Darian R 9th Grade History should be studied for several reasons. First off, history helps us to understand other cultures. With this knowledge of history you can be able to analyze other cultures. Another reason to study history is because it helps us to understand change. Change comes every day, and without history one doesn’t have anything to prepare them self for it. Lastly, an understanding history is essential for good citizenship. Understanding cultures can be difficult unless you look back at history. To figure out another culture the best idea is to look at the area’s history. For example: If I wanted to know about Mexico’s culture I would research the county’s early history. I would see that the Spanish had conquered the Aztec Empire, and had established settlements in the area. Based on that observation I could come to the conclusion that Mexico’s culture is much like Spain’s. A knowledge of history is also important to recognizing a person’s own culture, which is fundamental for good citizenship. By studying parts of

your country’s history, such as government, you would become familiar with national, state, and local laws. For this reason, I think, American students are told to study history. It is said that history repeats itself; studying history will teach you how to grasp and overcome change. When you encounter a bump in your life what do you do?! What’s smart to do is look back at the past. You may be able to see how you or someone you know or heard of has gotten through change. You may use that as an example for your own life. In addition, history can explain change on a larger scale. For instance, if someone wanted to know why this major rescission occurred, they could research and find the pattern for economic downturns. This may be able to help them understand the trouble that we face today. As you now see history isn’t just a class, history can teach you about so many things. Studying history assists you through change which is happening every day, all around you. It also opens your eyes to other cultures of the world. Furthermore, a knowledge of history is vital for good citizenship. This is why, I think, studying history is important. ☺


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Massachusetts Camron R 8TH Grade Massachusetts becomes 6th state to confirm consti­tution on February 6, 1788. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is a state in the New England region. Most of its populations lives in the Boston metropolitan area. Massachusetts

has been significant throughout American history. Plymouth was the second permanent English settlement in North America. Many of Massa­ chusetts’s towns were foun­ded by colonists from England in the 1620s and 1630s. During the eighteenth century, Boston became known as the “Cradle of

Boston, Massachusetts

Liberty” for the agitation there that led to the American Revolution and the independence of the United States from Great Britain. It was also a center of the temperance movement and abolitionist activity before the American Civil War.

Battle of New Orleans by Herbert Morton Stoops, 1815

The battle of new Orleans

Brian T 8TH Grade - Fayetteville The battle of new Orleans was a major victory for the Americans. Even though it was after the war, the British thought they could go walking into the United states and claim what they wanted. The British wanted New Orleans back, so they decided to go and claim it not long after a treaty was signed between the United states and Great Britain. When the people in New Orleans found out about this, they turned to Andrew Jackson for help. When Jackson arrived in the late fall of 1814, he brought his own army along to help. He also recruited freed African American slaves and the

militia of New Orleans to help fight. When the British arrived on December 23rd, two American officers came running to Jackson to give him the news. That night, Jackson launched a surprise attack on the British camp. After the attack, the British were so surprised that they delayed their attack plans giving the American army time to recreate. Jackson retreated 3 miles to the Chalmette plantation on the banks of the Rodriguez canal which was basically a big ditch. Here, Jackson’s men constructed a 3/5 mile long rampart. It was the perfect position too because they had the rampart up front, the Mississippi river to the right and the cypress swamp to their left.

As General Pakenham prepared to attack, the Americans dug trenches and settled into their surroundings. On December 28th, the British tried to break through the American defenses but were turned back with the help of a ship called the Louisiana stationed to the right of the troops. Four days later, the British tried to bombard the Americans with their artillery but once again were turned back. On January 4th , 1815, the British received a fresh supply of troops which greatly increased their chance of success. General Pakenham decided to cross the Mississippi river and overwhelm the thin line of defense. Their plan was

simple. They would construct ladders from bundled sticks to get past the ramparts. There was only one problem however. The British had forgotten to bring their ladders so an easy task of climbing a ladder got a whole lot harder. The British had two forces that were to meet up and overwhelm the Americans but the secondary force on the west side of the Mississippi was delayed so the main force had to attack without them to take advantage of the early morning fog. As the British army of more than 10,000 walked across, the badly out numbered U.S. rag tag army were crammed behind narrow fortifications prepared to fight.. Even though

the Americans were outnumber 4,000 to 10,000, the British made easy targets marching across a quarter mile of open ground wearing bright suits, and marching in perfect rhythm like “civilized” men. When the firing started, the British army started falling like dominoes. The two most senior British Generals were killed along with general Pakenham. Before he died he told his successor not to retreat. The man was obviously not a lunatic like Pakenham and gave the order to retreat. In the end, the Americans killed were 8 and 13 wounded; The British on the other hand had well over 2,000 killed or wounded and more than 100 captured.


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Teacher s Corner Welcome to the Teacher’s Corner! In this section we will feature articles of interest written by teachers, and tips to help students to be successful! We will also have a panel of teachers available to answer general questions about school-related issues. Please submit your questions to: teachers@kidsstandard.co

Traveling on the Information Highway

We live in an extremely technological world. Almost everyone has a computer, cell phone or iPod, writes Middle School Teacher from North Syracuse

If you are using technology to communicate with peers (texting, Facebook, Myspace, etc…), you should follow these important rules:  Do not post or send pictures/ videos of yourself or anyone else that are not appropriate or that you don’t want everyone to see  Do not give out your personal information online (last name, age, phone number, address, etc…)  Block all messages from people you don’t know  Tell your parents or another adult if something happens

online or on your cell phone that makes you feel uncomfortable, upset or sad  Do not use technology to “bully” people. Bullying = saying or texting cruel things, posting pictures or videos without the person’s permission, setting up fake profiles, creating or joining a negative fan site  Do not use your cell to cheat on school work.  NEVER text and drive or ride with someone who is texting and driving! Be a responsible traveler on the information highway!

Infinite Light Yoga Adult Ongoing Yoga Classes:

Start anytime, daytime and evening classes appropriate for beginner to advanced at various locations. The first class is free!

Children’s Classes for your group:

Schools, Organizations, Community Centers Recreational Youth Groups, Daycares and PE programs.


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Events: September Wed 25.08 - Sat. 18.09, 2010

Harry Potter’s World:

Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine

In 1997, British author J.K. Rowling introduced the world to Harry Potter and a literary phenomenon was born. Although a fictional story, the “Harry Potter” series is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science, including alchemy, astrology and natural Philosophy. Incorporating the work of several 15th-and 16th-century thinkers, the “Harry Potter” books examine important ethical topics such as the desire for knowledge, the effects of prejudice and the responsibility that comes with power. Exhibit panels feature the works of 15th-and16th-century thinkers such as alchemist Nicolas Flamel. The panels also highlight illustrations from Renaissance texts featured in “Harry Potter” including basilisks, dragons, merpeople and mandrakes. The National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland organized the exhibition. For more information visit www.nlm.nih.gov. The exhibit is co-sponsored by NOPL and the Upstate Medical University Health Sciences Library. NOPL is sponsoring free programs for the public in connection with the exhibition. Contact the library at 699-2032 or visit www.nopl.org for more information. “Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine” will be on display at the Northern Onondaga Public Library August 25-September 18, and at the Golisano Children’s Hospital Family Resource Center from September 20-September 24. Location: NOPL@ Cicero

Wed-Thu 1-30 Sept., 2010

Coming in October:

2nd Annual Fiber Arts Show

A warm display of items made by area knitters and crochet-ers. Bring in your knit or crochet items all this month and let your friends and neighbors see how talented you are. Location: Betts Branch

Wed-Thu 1-30 Sept., 2010

Art Exhibit

The art exhibit for September is paintings and Ukranian eggs by Anna Perun. 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

Wed-Thu 1-30 Sept., 2010

Art Exhibit

by Lucie Wellner

Landscape watercolors by Lucie Wellner of Central New York, the Adirondacks, and the Lofoten islands in Norway. These paintings have been done outdoors on location, “en plein air,” with hopes of capturing the sensation of being in these landscapes. Location: Central Library

Wed-Thu 1-30 Sept., 2010

Art Exhibit

Photography by Pamela Paul

Hazard Library is pleased to host an exhibit by local fine art photographer Pamela Paul during the month of September 2010. The collection of black and white

photographs is on display in the main seating area of Hazard Library. Pamela Paul’s black and white photographs are thought provoking images of the world from her perspective. As a photographer, she wants to show the simple beauty of people, places, and things that are overlooked in the chaos of everyday life. By using the subject, light, tonal range, and many other compositional elements she is able to achieve visual impact and to get her point across to the intended audience. Pamela has been actively involved in photography for the last twenty years. During that time, she has studied the full process and theory of black and white photography. Since 2006, she has been an active member of the Syracuse Camera Club and has won numerous awards for her photography. Also, Pamela specializes in contemporary portrait, wedding, and special event photography. For more information about the photographer, please contact Pamela Paul at pampaulphoto@ yahoo.com or to view more of her work www.pampaulphoto.com Location: Hazard Branch

Wed-Thu 1-30 Sept., 2010

Beauchamp Book Sale Park Hill School Visit

Beauchamp has an on-going book sale at the library. Hardcovers/ Trade paperbacks: $1.00 Market Paperbacks: $.50 Music & Movies: $1.00 Kids & Teen Books: $.25. 435-3395 Location: Beauchamp Branch

Wed-Thu 1-30 Sept., 2010

National Library

Card Sign-up Month

Every year libraries across the country designate September as Library Card Sign-Up Month. As the new school year begins, there is no better time to stop in at Mundy Branch and get a free library card for yourself and your family. It’s your ticket to all of the library’s resources and services, including daily access to computers and the Internet. It’s probably the most important school supply of all! Visit Mundy Branch this month and enter your name in our raffle for a special giveaway! Location: Mundy Branch

Sunday May 9, 2010

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Southwest Wii Wednesday

Test your skills on the Nintendo Wii and have a great time! Free, 671-5814. Location: Southwest CC

Wed 25.08 - Sat. 18.09, 2010

Peter Agnew

Peter enjoys painting with acrylics. His favorite artistic subjects are of animals especially dogs and horses. He does many of these paintings from memory. Peter, 29, moved from Texas with his parents to Syracuse in 2004. He was diagnosed with autism as a young child and later suffered severe burns in an accident. He has undergone lengthy hospitalization and reconstructive surgery through the years but maintains a cheerful disposition. Music and art have always served as his creative outlets. Location: Soule Branch

Wed 25.08 - Sat. 18.09, 2010

Fall Storytimes Register Now!

Starting Monday, September 13th you may register your child for Fall Storytime, age-based programs of stories, fingerplays, songs & crafts. No phone registration on the first day; please come to the library. After the first day, phone registrations will be accepted. Inquire at the children’s desk for more information. Location: Baldwinsville Public

Monday September 13, 2010

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

10:30 AM Story Time

Combined toddler and preschool story hour for children ages 1 1/2 to 5 and their families or caregivers. Includes stories, rhymes, fingerplays, and songs. We ask that daycare centers, nursery schools, preschools, and pre-kindergarten programs please make an appointment for a special story time. Free, 435-3636. Location: Petit Branch

1:00 PM

Card Making And Paper Crafts

In the Sargent Meeting Room. For a materials fee of $15 per class, you will make and take home at least 3 projects. Fee is payable at the time of each class. For adults, and children over 9 years of age, with an adult. Registration required, online at www.LPL.org, phone at 457-0310 X 130, or in person. Location: Liverpool Public

4:00 PM

Tails to Tell: Zoe

Read aloud to the lovable trained dog, Zoe. For ages 6 and up. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

Drop In Mother Goose

4:30 PM

2:00 PM

In the Sargent Meeting Room for grades 7-12. Applications for this program are online at www.Teens. LPL.org. Location: Liverpool Public

In the Carman Community Room. For birth to 3 yrs old with caregiver. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

CNY PC Users Presents Genealogy with Computers

In the Sargent Meeting Room. No registration required. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

3:00 PM

Tails to Tell: Tana

Read aloud to the lovable trained dog, Tana. For ages 6 and up. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

6:00 PM

Second Mondays Club

For Grades 3-6 Free pizza! Fun! Games! Activities! What will we think of next? Meets on the second Monday of each month. 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

6:30 PM

Independent and Foreign Film Series

In the Carman Community Room. Call the Liverpool Library at 4570310 for title of film, or go online at www.LPL.org. Location: Liverpool Public

Mon-Fri May 10-14, 2010

Tuesday September 14, 2010

After school

9:00 AM

Children’s Book Week is the time to celebrate the amazing reading choices found at the library. From comics to mysteries, from magic to history...you can find anything between the pages of a book. Throughout the week, children will enjoy a different activity each day after school. We’ll have puzzles, word searches, and story starters all relating to a popular children’s book or famous children’s author. Join us as we help celebrate books and reading. Free, 435-3519. Location: White Branch

Catch these study sessions designed to help those interested in obtaining their General Equivalency Diploma, comparable to a high school diploma. Call 4353519 for information. Location: White Branch

Children’s Book Week

speaking in an informal, relaxed atmosphere. No registration necessary for this free program. 435-3519 Location: White Branch

GED Classes

10:30 AM

Adult English Language Conversation Group

Learn to speak English at this free drop-in conversation group that is designed to give adult English language learners practice

Teen Library Council

Certified Childbirth Educator, Massage Therapist, Cook for New Mom, Prenatal Yoga Instructor, Lamaze Instructor and Obstetrician. Registration Required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s DCL Friends Meeting Room

Wednesday Sept 15, 2010

10:00 AM

Knitting Made Easy

Continuation of our adult learn-toknit class, participants will help each other learn knitting tips and enjoy the camaraderie. Open to all interested regardless of skill. Registration required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s Buckland Community Room

10:00 AM

Teddy Bear Story Times

(There is no program on 9/29) Children ages 2 to 5 and their families are invited to enjoy picture books, puppets, finger plays, flannel boards and more. Please register by calling 435-5442 or by visiting the branch. Location: Paine Branch

10:30 AM

Story Times

Bring your toddler or preschooler and enjoy books, songs, dance and fun! A wonderful introduction to books and reading! Free, 4353395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

1:30 PM

Wired Wednesdays

Email Basics 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

6:00 PM

6:30 PM

Professor Emeritus Ernest Hemphill from the department of Biology at Syracuse University will discuss some of the legendary plants in the Harry Potter series that have for centuries been associated with witchcraft, shamanism and medicine. Older children and adults will enjoy this presentation. Register: 699-2032 Location: NOPL@ Cicero

For teens in grades 7-9, in the Sargent Meeting Room. Registration begins Aug. 30. Online at www.LPL.org, in person or by phone at 457-0310 X 120. Location: Liverpool Public

Harry Potter Herbology

6:30 PM

Managing Investments With Computers

In the Sargent Meeting Room. Keeping your money “Going in the Right Direction” is really a challenge in today’s tough economy. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

6:30 PM

S.U.N. Southside

Syracuse United Neighbors For more information, please call 476-7475. Location: Beauchamp Branch

7:00 PM

Developing Your Birth Plan

Pregnant? Hoping to become pregnant? Find information you can use at this free panel discussion. Hear suggestions for developing a birth plan for your special day and beyond. Developing a birth plan is a helpful way to stay in touch with your needs from labor and delivery to bringing your child home. Not all labors are the same, and special circumstances may necessitate changes to your wishes. However, making sure that your labor and delivery caregivers and assisting medical professionals understand your birthing wishes is an important part of the birthing process. Panelists include a Doula,

TAG Team Book Discussion

7:00 PM

OFL Book Club

City of Thieves by David Benioff. Enjoy a discussion about the book and light refreshments at each meeting. Also, at each meeting, the library will have several copies of the following month’s book club selection. *Please visit or call the library to sign up. 4921727 Location: Onondaga Free

7:00 PM

Open Mike Night

Music & stories for all who will! Hosted by Merry Mischief; performer sign-in begins at 6:30 pm. Free, 635-5631. Location: Baldwinsville Public

Thursday Sept 16, 2010

10:00 AM

BPL Friends Present: Frog In My Soup

Judy Allen, retired teacher and member of the Friends, will describe her experiences of living, teaching and traveling in Taiwan during the summer of 1998. Suggested $1 donation for the library Friends group is requested. 635-5631

10:00 AM

Preschool Story Time

Stories, songs and finger play for three to five year olds and their families to enjoy. Free, 435-5320. Location: Soule Branch


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

10:30 AM

Story Time With Miss Mandy

A lively mix of stories, songs, and rhymes to make this a special time for you and your child. Story times are a fun way to help your child develop skills they will need to be ready to read. Free, 4351940. Location: Betts Branch

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Afternoon Game Time

Afternoon game time will be switched from Tuesday afternoons to Thursday after­noons. We will play various multiplayer Wii games on the big screen. Free, 435-1940. Location: Betts Branch

3:30 PM

Onondaga Otaku

Join us on 3rd Thursdays for anime and a side of ramen. 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

4:00 PM

Tails to Tell: Tootsie, Chi and Harmon

Read aloud to the lovable trained dogs, Tootsie, Chi and Harmon. For ages 6 and up. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

6:30 PM

Book Discussion Group

The Petit Branch Book Discussion Group will discuss The Septembers of Shiraz by Dalia Sofer. Our next meeting is scheduled for Thursday, October 21, at 6:30 p.m., when we will discuss Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay. Refreshments served. New members are always welcome. No registration required. For more information call 435-3636. Location: Petit Branch

6:30 PM

Live Music: The Boys of Wexford

Irish band traveling the NYS canal system to Rochester to perform as the featured band of the 2010 World Canals Conference. Their boat will dock in Brewerton to perform at the library. FREE. Call 676-7484 to reserve your seat(s). Location: NOPL@Brewerton

7:00 PM

Happy Anniversary Series: Mexico Declares Independence!

In the Carman Community Room. Cazenovia College’s Julia Sloan will present a program on the history of Mexico in celebration of the 200th Anniversary of Mexico’s declaration of independence. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

Friday September 17, 2010

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Computer Classes

Are available by appointment on select Friday and Saturday mornings. Free, 435-1940 Location: Betts Branch

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Toastmasters

Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

3:00 PM

Wii And Game Fun

Test your skills on the Nintendo Wii and enjoy an assortment of games. And while you’re waiting to play the Wii, enjoy a range of different board games. Ages 6-12. Free, 435-3395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Theatre Club

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Kids ages 13-17 are invited to read, discuss and perform both their own poetry, as well as timeless poets from the past to present. Free, 435-1900. Location: Central Library

3:00 PM

3:30 PM

3:30 PM

Teen Friday Flix

In the Teens Room for teens in grades 7-12. This program is based on books made into movies. We will discuss the similarities between the two. Popcorn and drink provided. Seating is limited. Registration begins 9/1/10, online at LPL.org, in person or by phone at 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

Saturday September 18, 2010

Ready, Set, Parent! Workshops

Maybe you want a no-fuss bedtime...or to make more play time...Whatever questions you may have (from potty training to patience) let Ready, Set, Parent! support you at their workshops for parents of infants and toddlers (birth to age 3). Registration is required. For information and to register call 471-8331 or email Isapio@ childrensconsortium.org. Participants are encouraged to attend all 8 workshops for full program benefits. There is a $65 fee for the entire eight weeks. This covers materials and snacks. Scholarships are available. childrensconsortium.org. Location: Liverpool Public

Sunday September 19, 2010

11:30 AM - 6:00 PM Annual Book Sale

Visit Petit’s Annual Book Sale at the Westcott Street Cultural Fair. Items for sale include thousands of excellent quality books, music, CDs, DVDs and videocassettes. The sale offers something for everyone at great prices! For the week following the sale, September 20-24, remaining items will be sold at half price. Location: Petit Branch

12:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Friends of LPL Annual Book Sale Down Under 9am-5pm on the 18th and 12-3pm on the 19th. 457-0310 Location: Liverpool Public

2:00 PM

DCL Music Series

Piano Music Ann Barnes is back at the DCL by popular demand. Enjoy popular tunes and more. Attendees can even request tunes! Registration encouraged, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s DCL Friends Meeting Room

2:00 PM

Talk Like A Pirate Day Party

We’ve got librarrry carrrrrds. And we know how to use them, matey! The Pirates of CHAOS Productions sail into port as the Bville Library BOOKANEERS! Free, 635-5631. Location: Baldwinsville Public

Monday September 20, 2010

9:00 AM

Yin Yoga Class

Walk in, $7 per person per class. Taught by certified yoga instructor Tina Ramsden. Bring a yoga mat, if possible. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

Tails to Tell: Tana

Read aloud to the lovable trained dog, Tana. For ages 6 and up. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

Mundy Knights

Calling all chess players. Whether you’ve played before or are new to the game, join us after school as we challenge each other. Open to all school-age children. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

6:00 PM

University Hospital Health Link

In the Carman Community Room. Quality health related topics presented by the University Hospital staff. Call 464-8668 for info and registration required. Location: Liverpool Public

6:30 PM

Knitting Club

Bring a current project and come share techniques and new inspirations. Walk-ins and new knitters always welcome.673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

7:00 PM

Rotary Exchange Information Meeting

Families interested in hosting a guest from a foreign country or teens interested in trying this experience in a foreign country, come learn more from Rotary International, District 7150. Free, 635-5631. Location: Baldwinsville Public

7:00 PM

Teen Book Discussion

Teens entering 6th and up, are invited to join the DeWitt Community Library’s Teen Book Discussion Club. Please register for this program and share great stories with your peers. Registration Required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community

Tuesday September 21, 2010

9:00 AM

Books for Breakfast

September’s book is Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann. Refreshments will be served. New members are welcome. 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

9:00 AM

GED Classes

Catch these study sessions designed to help those interested in obtaining their General Equivalency Diploma, comparable to a high school diploma. Call 4353519 for information. Location: White Branch

9:30 AM

NECC Preschool Story Time

free drop-in conversation group that is designed to give adult English language learners practice spea­king in an informal, relaxed atmos­phere. No registration necessary for this free program. 435-3519 Location: White Branch

10:30 AM

Preschool Story Time

Stories, crafts and fun for children ages 4-6. Registration required. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

10:30 AM Story Time

Combined toddler and preschool story hour for children ages 1 1/2 to 5 and their families or caregivers. Includes stories, rhymes, fingerplays, and songs. We ask that daycare centers, nursery schools, preschools, and pre-kindergarten programs please make an appointment for a special story time. Free, 435-3636. Location: Petit Branch

10:30 AM

Toddler Time

For ages 19 months to 36 months. This fun and active storytime is for toddlers and their caregivers. Encourage their activity by joining us for stories, rhymes, and songs. Each session lasts about 20 minutes followed by coloring and playtime. Hosted by our very own Children’s Librarian Jenny Burke. Registration required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s Buckland Community Room

12:00 PM

Alzheimer’s Caregiver Series: 10 Warning Signs to Know

Join us for a talk on the 10 Warning Signs to Know to identify Alzheimer’s disease. Please bring your lunch and something to drink. Presented by Michael Massurin of the CNY Alzheimer’s Assocation. Registration Encouraged, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s DCL Friends Meeting Room

1:00 PM

NECC Preschool Story Time

Our monthly morning/afternoon preschool story time continues. We’ll have stories, rhymes and occasional games. Youngsters will learn group listening and participation skills. Bring along a friend and enjoy the stories together. Free, 472-6343 X 208. Location: Northeast CC

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM LEGO Builders Club

For ages 8 and up in the Carman Community Room. Registration begins 9/6/10, online at LPL.org, in person or by phone at 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

Our monthly morning/afternoon preschool story time continues. We’ll have stories, rhymes and occasional games. Youngsters will learn group listening and participation skills. Bring along a friend and enjoy the stories together. Free, 472-6343 X 208. Location: Northeast CC

6:00 PM

10:00 AM

SAT Score-back Seminar

Betts Book Club

Betts Book Club will resume mee­ ting this month to discuss Up Till Now by William Shatner (yes, that William Shatner). Free, 435-1940. Location: Betts Branch

10:30 AM

Adult English Language Conversation Group

Learn to speak English at this

Family Movie Fun

Tuesday, September 7 Spirited Away Tuesday, September 21 Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride Free, 435-3395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

6:30 PM

A follow-up to the Saturday, September 18 SAT Practice Proctored Test. An SAT teacher will talk more about the test and hand back scores. This seminar is open to parents and students. Location: Marcellus Free

7:00 PM

Composting: Go Green Everyday Join Rick Kolceski, Hydroponic

Shops of America, as he shares tips on composting and gardening with compositing. Q&A follows the talk. Registration Encouraged, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s DCL Friends Meeting Room

7:00 PM

Open Writer’s Group

Local writers support each other and share their progress.635-5631. Location: Baldwinsville Public

Wednesday Sept 22, 2010

Internet Instruction

By appointment. Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

9:00 AM

GED Classes

Catch these study sessions designed to help those interested in obtaining their General Equivalency Diploma, comparable to a high school diploma. Call 4353519 for information. Location: White Branch

9:30 AM

Toddler Story Time

Stories, crafts and fun for children ages 2-3, accompanied by adult. Registration required. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

10:00 AM

Knitting Made Easy

Continuation of our adult learn-toknit class, participants will help each other learn knitting tips and enjoy the camaraderie. Open to all interested regardless of skill. Registration required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s Buckland Community Room

10:00 AM

Teddy Bear Story Times

(There is no program on 9/29) Children ages 2 to 5 and their families are invited to enjoy picture books, puppets, finger plays, flannel boards and more. Please register by calling 435-5442 or by visiting the branch. Location: Paine Branch

10:15 AM

Toddler Story Time

Stories, crafts and fun for children ages 2-3, accompanied by adult. Registration required. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

10:30 AM

Preschool Storytimes

For ages 3 to 6 years old. Join Miss Jenny for an entertaining storytime! Each 30-minute session includes themed-stories, fingerplays, and songs with a simple craft to follow. Younger siblings are welcome! Registration required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s Buckland Community Room

10:30 AM

Story Times

Bring your toddler or preschooler and enjoy books, songs, dance and fun! A wonderful introduction to books and reading! Free, 4353395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Friends of The Marcellus Free Library Luncheon Meeting

Friends of The Marcellus Free Library Luncheon Meeting Contact: 673-3221 Brown Bag Lunch Dessert and beverage provided. * Program: On Selecting Books to Recommend. Presenter: Mary Beth Bronk.


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

8

Events: September Come Be Bibliophilistic With Us. Location: Marcellus Free

11:00 AM

1:30 PM

In the Sargent Meeting Room. We will discuss the book, Open: An Autobiography by Andre Agassi. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

Preschool Story Time

Stories, crafts and fun for children ages 4-6. Registration required. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

1:30 PM

Wired Wednesdays

Your Security Online 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

4:15 PM

YogaKids

Yoga isn’t just for adults, children benefit from the powers of yoga too. Whether you need to relieve sports strain, school pressures, or just want to have fun, yoga poses will leave you feeling relaxed, refreshed, and rejuvenated. Celebrate National Yoga Month by taking part in this free yoga class taught by certified YogaKids facilitator and trainer Julie Daniel. For children ages 6 and up. Registration is required. 435-3519 Location: White Branch

Thursday Morning Book Klatch

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Afternoon Game Time

Afternoon game time will be switched from Tuesday afternoons to Thursday afternoons. We will play various multiplayer Wii games on the big screen. Free, 435-1940. Location: Betts Branch

3:30 PM

Fiesta Latina Join us after school as we share a story, make microwave quesadillas and complete a craft that you can take home. For children ages 6 and up. Free, 4353797. Location: Mundy Branch

6:30 PM

Calm, Comfortable Conversation

Bring your needlework, crochet, or knitting and join others with an interest in stitchery. 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

The tools and techniques from the timeless best-seller How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie will be used. Presented by Leslie English, Managing Partner of Dale Carnegie Training in Syracuse, NY. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

7:00 PM

7:00 PM

In the Carman Community Room. Watch movies and tv on your computer. Don Ristagno from CNY PC Users Group will demonstrate how to use the web to watch television prgrams and movies. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

In the Carman Community Room. “Freedom of Speech in CNY,” presented by Barbara Fought, a Newhouse (SU) professor and Director of the Tully Center for Free Speech. Kick off Banned Book Week with this fascinating program! Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

7:00 PM

In Stitches

Web Wednesdays

Thursday September 23, 2010

10:00 AM

Preschool Story Time

Stories, songs and finger play for three to five year olds and their families to enjoy. Free, 435-5320. Location: Soule Branch

10:30 AM Baby Bop

For ages birth to 18 months old. This lively storytime is appropriate for babies and their caregivers. Come ready to participate and help your child develop essential early literacy skills as we share books, enjoy music and movement, and sing songs and nursery rhymes. Each session lasts 15 - 20 minutes followed by playtime. Hosted by our very own Children’s Librarian Jenny Burke. Registration required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s Buckland Community Room

10:30 AM

Story Time With Miss Mandy

A lively mix of stories, songs, and rhymes to make this a special time for you and your child. Story times are a fun way to help your child develop skills they will need to be ready to read. Free, 4351940. Location: Betts Branch

11:00 AM

Computer-Ease

Also at noon. Are you new to the Internet? Don’t know a mouse from a mole? Take advantage of one-on-one instruction on Internet basics, e-mail and online research tools. For information and registration, please call the library at 435-5442. Location: Paine Branch

Fall History Series

7:00 PM

Scrapbooking

Learn to make a wall-hanging calendar, scrapbook style! A $20 materials fee and registration are required. 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

7:00 PM

Spanish Dancing

Sevillanas is a delightful Spanish folk dance - learn a bit about its history, see a demonstration with costumed dancers and then try a bit of dancing! Presented by Marisa Guzman, who has been a part of the Central New York dance community for many years. She teaches at Guzman’s Dance Studio, and is a former adjunct professor at Syracuse University. She has performed with the Syracuse Contemporary Dance Company, Syracuse Opera Company and with the Syracuse Symphony. Registration encouraged, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s DCL Friends Meeting Room

year with an amazing library race. Learn what the library has to offer. All ages; parents welcome. Location: Carman Community Room. Registration starts Sept. 3 at 9am. Free, 4570310. Location: Liverpool Public

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM TGIF Teen Drop-In

Stuff to do, and stuff to eat. 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

3:00 PM

Wii And Game Fun

Test your skills on the Nintendo Wii and enjoy an assortment of games. And while you’re waiting to play the Wii, enjoy a range of different board games. Ages 6-12. Free, 435-3395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Theatre Club

Kids ages 13-17 are invited to read, discuss and perform both their own poetry, as well as timeless poets from the past to present. Free, 435-1900. Location: Central Library

3:30 PM

The Reading Room OnDance

Dance stories will be read and shared, basic dance poses, word searches, and computer exploration related to dance. Free, 435-3395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Fun With Fiber Art

After School Workshops for Children (Grades 3 & 4) Fridays 3:30PM-4:30PM beginning Friday, Sept 24 and completing Friday, Dec 17 (excluding Nov 26). Free. Registration requested online at www.library.marcellusny.com or by phone at 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

Saturday September 25, 2010

Ready, Set, Parent! Workshops

Maybe you want a no-fuss bedtime...or to make more play time...Whatever questions you may have (from potty training to patience) let Ready, Set, Parent! support you at their workshops for parents of infants and toddlers (birth to age 3). Registration is required. For information and to register call 471-8331 or email Isapio@ childrensconsortium.org. Participants are encouraged to attend all 8 workshops for full program benefits. There is a $65 fee for the entire eight weeks. This covers materials and snacks. Scholarships are available. childrensconsortium.org. Location: Liverpool Public

9:00 AM

and get a chance to network with each other. All children must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Free, 435-3519. Location: White Branch

11:00 AM - 5:00 PM Bonsai Club of CNY

Carman Community Room. 124pm on the 26th. Get advice on watering, potting and trimming Bonsai. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

1:30 PM

Story Times

Bring your toddler or preschooler and enjoy books, songs, dance and fun! A wonderful introduction to books and reading! Free, 4353395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

2:00 PM - 2:30 PM

CNY Reads Presents: A Memoir Writing Seminar

Rebecca Sernett is a former trade magazine editor and community journalist. She currently teaches at the YMCA’s downtown writer’s center. Ms. Sernett will help you tell your story by teaching the craft of memoir writing in this 90 minute seminar. There will be a drawing for the 2010 CNY Reads book selection: Water For Elephants. Free, 435-1940. Location: Betts Branch

2:30 PM

Toddler’s Tango

Dance your way through songs and allow your little musician to play a range of instruments. Bring in your toddlers to sing, dance and move! Free, 435-3395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Read To Maggie

Come into Petit Library to spend time with Maggie, a Canine Good Citizen. Children will spend 30 minutes reading to Maggie, the dog. Limited space available. Registration required. 435-3636 Location: Petit Branch

Sunday September 26, 2010

12:00 AM - 4:00 PM Bonsai Club of CNY

Will be in the Carman Community Room at 11-5 on the 25th and 124pm on the 26th. Get advice on watering, potting and trimming Bonsai. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

Monday September 27, 2010

9:00 AM

Yin Yoga Class

Walk in, $7 per person per class. Taught by certified yoga instructor Tina Ramsden. Bring a yoga mat, if possible. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

Knitting

3:00 PM

Friday September 24, 2010

Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

10:00 AM

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Setting Goals (Interactive Workshop) With Librarian Julia Schult. No registration needed, just show up! 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

Are available by appointment on select Friday and Saturday mornings. Free, 435-1940 Location: Betts Branch

Read aloud to the lovable trained dog, Tana. For ages 6 and up. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

Jobseekers’ Lifeline

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Toastmasters

Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

10:30 AM

Amazing Library Race

Homeschoolers, kickoff the school

Computer Classes

10:30 AM

Family Story Time

Bring the whole family to the library and enjoy some wonderful stories together. There’ll be stories, songs, finger plays, and craft activities for moms, dads, caregivers, and children ages 4-7. Parents will learn techniques for reading to children at home

Tails to Tell: Tana

3:30 PM

Banned Book Scavenger Hunt

Celebrate your freedom to read by participating in the library’s Banned Book Scavenger Hunt. Participants will follow clues and try to find books on the library shelves that have been banned or challenged in the United States. Then, enjoy a snack while discussing why the books were challenged. For students ages 12 to 16. Free, 435-3519. Location: White Branch

3:30 PM

Mundy Knights

Calling all chess players. Whether you’ve played before or are new to the game, join us after school as we challenge each other. Open to all school-age children. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

4:00 PM

Creative Writing Sampler

In the Sargent Meeting Room. As summer ends, writers are invited to dip a toe into the deep pool of creativity and experience poetry, short-short fiction, and memoir. We’ll conclude with a session on sub­mission-how to write the query letter and find a publisher. Registration starts August 15. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

7:00 PM

Banned! Huckleberry Finn

In the Carman Community Room. Celebrate your freedom to read during Banned Books Week! Join LeMoyne College’s Ann Ryan for this presentation on one of the most challenged books of all time: Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. This program is in conjunction with LeMoyne’s “Year of Twain” honoring the 100th anniversary of Mark Twain’s death. Free, 4570310. Location: Liverpool Public

Tuesday September 28, 2010

9:00 AM

GED Classes

Catch these study sessions designed to help those interested in obtaining their General Equivalency Diploma, comparable to a high school diploma. Call 4353519 for information. Location: White Branch

10:30 AM

Adult English Language Conversation Group

Learn to speak English at this free drop-in conversation group that is designed to give adult English language learners practice speaking in an informal, relaxed atmosphere. No registration necessary for this free program. 435-3519 Location: White Branch

10:30 AM

Preschool Story Time

Stories, crafts and fun for children ages 4-6. Registration required. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

10:30 AM Story Time

Combined toddler and preschool story hour for children ages 1 1/2 to 5 and their families or caregivers. Includes stories, rhymes, fingerplays, and songs. We ask that daycare centers, nursery schools, preschools, and pre-kindergarten programs please make an appointment for a special story time. Free, 435-3636. Location: Petit Branch

10:30 AM

Toddler Time

For ages 19 months to 36 months. This fun and active storytime is for toddlers and their caregivers. Encourage their activity by joining us for stories, rhymes, and songs. Each session lasts about 20 minutes followed by coloring and playtime. Hosted by our very own Children’s Librarian Jenny Burke. Registration required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s Buckland Community Room

continued on page 13 


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

9

YogaKids is a unique approach to integrative learning using yoga as a pathway. Reading, storytelling, music, creative arts and earth care blend seamlessly with yoga movements to educate the “Whole” child. The YogaKids curriculum provides children with an exciting new way to explore and appreciate their creative potential. Children learn invaluable skills that set the groundwork for meeting challenges and growing strong physically, mentally and emotionally, cultivating self-esteem for a lifetime of successful achievement. Julie Daniel, a Certified YogaKids Teacher/Trainer, is offering classes for families, children and teens here in the Central New York area. Classes in the summer are at the CNY Yoga Center in Liverpool and downtown Syracuse. To learn more about this unique program and to see class listings, visit the website: www.yogakidsofcny.com or email Julie: jdaniel4@twcny.rr.com


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

10

A Healthy Fitness programs for KiDs CrossFit DeWitt KiDs, were fun meets fitness. Local KiDs of all ages have found a national fitness program endorsed by local physicians as the place where kids can safely and physically develop fitness as a life style. CrossFit DeWitt is located inside Sports Center 481, home of Lil’ Kickers. Located at exit 7 off RT 481, conveniently located to Cicero, East Syracuse, Fayetteville, De Witt, North Syracuse. CrossFit DeWitt KiDs is ideal for ages 3-18. CrossFit DeWitt Kids learn proper form with exercises, nutrition, social skills, accountability and the understanding that fitness can be very exciting. The staff at CrossFit Dewitt has been working with children for the past 10 yrs with great success. Now it’s your turn to experience what some KiDs say is the best thing to do all week. Call 437-1558 or visit us on the web at www.crossfitdewitt.com.

want to seeyour name in print? Advertise in Kids Standard... We’re reaching more and more people every day! Call now and find out how to advertise in a new target market! Email: advertising@kidsstandard.com; Phone: 315-699-5884

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Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

11

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Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

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Kids LOVE our food!

But we’ve got great foods for parents too

Bring everybody! Ph: 315- 458-5188 412 North Main Street, North Syracuse, NY 13212


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

13

Events: September continued from page 8

1:30 PM

New Release Film Series

In the Carman Community Room. Newly released films shown at a matinee on Tuesday afternoon and again on Thursday September 30 at 6:30 pm. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

3:30 PM

Reader’s Theater

Calling all future movie stars! Join us as we read scripts, practice parts and perform. Open to all school-age children. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

4:00 PM

Tails to Tell: Zoe

Read aloud to the lovable trained dog, Zoe. For ages 6 and up. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

6:00 PM

Friends Of Beauchamp Meeting Beauchamp Library invites all members of the South Side community to be a party of the Beauchamp Library Friends group. Please stop in! Free, 4353395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

Wednesday Sept 29, 2010

Internet Instruction

By appointment. Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

9:00 AM

GED Classes

Catch these study sessions designed to help those interested in obtaining their General Equivalency Diploma, comparable to a high school diploma. Call 435-3519 for information. Location: White Branch

9:30 AM

Toddler Story Time

Stories, crafts and fun for children ages 2-3, accompanied by adult. Registration required. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

10:15 AM

Toddler Story Time

Stories, crafts and fun for children ages 2-3, accompanied by adult. Registration required. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

10:30 AM

Preschool Storytimes

For ages 3 to 6 years old. Join Miss Jenny for an entertaining storytime! Each 30-minute session includes themed-stories, fingerplays, and songs with a simple craft to follow. Younger siblings are welcome! Registration required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s Buckland Community Room

10:30 AM

Story Times

Bring your toddler or preschooler and enjoy books, songs, dance and fun! A wonderful introduction to books and reading! Free, 4353395. Location: Beauchamp Branch

1:30 PM

Preschool Story Time

Stories, crafts and fun for children ages 4-6. Registration required. 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

1:30 PM

Wired Wednesdays

Web Basics 635-5631 Location: Baldwinsville Public

4:30 PM

Latino Rhythms with Jorge Cuevas

Join in the fun with Jorge Cuevas as he introduces percussion instruments and creates the afrolatin rhythms of salsa, merengue, bomba and plena. For children ages 6 and up. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

7:00 PM

S.U. Basketball: a Special Book Event

Syracuse Post-Standard writers Sean Kirst and Mike Waters talk basketball at the DeWitt Community Library. Kirst is the co-author of Moonfixer: The Journey of Earl Lloyd. “Lloyd is a trailblazing figure,…the first African-American to play in the NBA, suiting up for the Washington Capitols for the 1950 season.” – New York Post. Waters takes readers through S.U. basketball history in Syracuse University Basketball Vault ®: The History of The Orange, which includes never-before published photographs, artwork, and memorabilia. Q&A and book signing follow the discussion. Registration Encouraged, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community DCL Friends Meeting Room

7:00 PM

TAG Team Book Discussion

For teens in grades 7-9, in the Sargent Meeting Room. Registration requested. 457-0310 X 120. Location: Liverpool Public

Thursday September 30, 2010

10:00 AM

Preschool Story Time

Stories, songs and finger play for three to five year olds and their families to enjoy. Free, 435-5320. Location: Soule Branch

10:30 AM Baby Bop

For ages birth to 18 months old. This lively storytime is appropriate for babies and their caregivers. Come ready to participate and help your child develop essential early literacy skills as we share books, enjoy music and movement, and sing songs and nursery rhymes. Each session lasts 15 - 20 minutes followed by playtime. Hosted by our very own Children’s Librarian Jenny Burke. Registration required, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s Buckland Community Room

10:30 AM

Story Time With Miss Mandy

A lively mix of stories, songs, and rhymes to make this a special time for you and your child. Story times are a fun way to help your child develop skills they will need to be ready to read. Free, 4351940. Location: Betts Branch

11:00 AM

Computer-Ease

Also at noon. Are you new to the Internet? Don’t know a mouse from a mole? Take advantage of one-onone instruction on Internet basics, e-mail and online research tools. For information and registration, please call the library at 435-5442. Location: Paine Branch

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Afternoon Game Time

Afternoon game time will be switched from Tuesday afternoons

to Thursday afternoons. We will play various multiplayer Wii games on the big screen. Free, 435-1940. Location: Betts Branch

4:00 PM

Punto De Cruz Creativa

Westside resident Lupita Mathews will display her cross-stitch creations and demonstrate her needlework art. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

4:00 PM

Tails to Tell: Tootsie, Chi and Harmon

Read aloud to the lovable trained dogs, Tootsie, Chi and Harmon. For ages 6 and up. Free, 435-3797. Location: Mundy Branch

4:00 PM - 4:45 PM Kids Zine

In the Sargent Meeting Room. Artists and writers, ages 9-12, join us for a weekly writing and art prompts as we work together to create our own library zine. Registration required starting Sept. 13 for LCSD residents and Sept. 14 for non residents. Limited to 15 people. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

6:30 PM

New Release Film Series

In the Carman Community Room. Newly released films shown at a matinee on Tuesday afternoon and again on Thursday September 30 at 6:30 pm. Free, 457-0310. Location: Liverpool Public

7:00 PM

Historic Aviation Disasters: Amelia Earhart

Join historian and librarian Cheryl Pula for a talk on the disappearance of Amelia Earhart, called ‘Lady Lindy’ by the press, was the most well known aviatrix of the 1930’s. She and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared on a round the world flight in 1937. What could have happened to them? Where did they go? Registration Encouraged, 446-3578. Location: DeWitt Community Library’s DCL Friends Meeting Room

7:00 PM

Lebanese Cuisine with Julie Taboulie

Julie has selected two of the most popular personal pies enjoyed throughout Lebanon, “Lahme bi Ajeen” also called “Sfeeha,” a mouthwatering meat pie enjoyed as part of the mezze or as a main dish, and the almighty “Manoush” also called “Zubba” the ultimate breakfast dish that is created using an earthy & zesty

herb mixture commonly known as zaatar. This is a hands-on make, taste & take home cooking class. The fee is $15 per person. Advanced sign-up & payment is required at time of registration, 673-3221. Location: Marcellus Free

Fri Oct 1 - Sun Oct 31, 2010

Art Exhibit:

Joan N. Carlon

Drawings from a series based on the artist’s collected stories of the experiences of recent refugees to the US. Many men, women and children are fleeing war and violence in their homelands. Location: Central Library

Fri Oct 1 - Sun Oct 31, 2010 IntroductoryComputer Classes

Individual instruction will be offered on Tuesdays and Fridays by appointment and a 10 week class will begin Wednesday, October 6, 2010 and run through Wednesday, December 15, 2010 at 1:00 pm. - Central Library The classes are designed to help individuals who have little or no knowledge of computers or computer programs. The topics that will be covered are: Computer Basics: Learn the different parts of the computer and become familiar with the Windows operating system. Navigating the Web: How to navigate the World Wide Web, and Web safety. Introduction to Microsoft Word: Hands-on class teaching the basics of how to set up, write and print a document. Email Basics: How to set up a free email account and how to receive email, open attachments, attach a document, sort email and more. Please contact the library at 435-1900 to register for a class or one-on-one instruction. Location: Central Library

Friday October 1, 2010

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Toastmasters

Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

Saturday October 2, 2010

Ready, Set, Parent! Workshops

Maybe you want a no-fuss bedtime...or to make more play time...Whatever questions you may have (from potty training to patience) let Ready, Set, Parent! support you at their workshops

for parents of infants and toddlers (birth to age 3). Registration is required. For information and to register call 471-8331 or email Isapio@ childrensconsortium.org. Participants are encouraged to attend all 8 workshops for full program benefits. There is a $65 fee for the entire eight weeks. This covers materials and snacks. Scholarships are available. childrensconsortium.org. Location: Liverpool Public

9:00 AM Knitting

Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

Wednesday October 6, 2010

Computer Instruction By appointment.

Learn basic computer skills, Email, Internet, Word, Excel. One-on-one instruction. FREE, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

Thursday October 7, 2010

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM Foreign Film

For details call 435-5326 or email us at moviesathazard@yahoo.com Location: Hazard Branch

Friday October 8, 2010

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Toastmasters

Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

Saturday October 9, 2010

Ready, Set, Parent! Workshops

Maybe you want a no-fuss bedtime...or to make more play time...Whatever questions you may have (from potty training to patience) let Ready, Set, Parent! support you at their workshops for parents of infants and toddlers (birth to age 3). Registration is required. For information and to register call 471-8331 or email Isapio@childrensconsortium.org. Participants are encouraged to attend all 8 workshops for full program benefits. There is a $65 fee for the entire eight weeks. This covers materials and snacks. Scholarships are available. childrensconsortium.org. Location: Liverpool Public

9:00 AM Knitting

Free, 435-5326. Location: Hazard Branch

want to seeyour name in print? Standard You don’t need any experience, just send us some work you are proud of. This is your newspaper! Submit your work via email to kids@KidsStandard.com

Standard


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

14

Events: September

Rosh Hashanah Erin S 8TH Grade - Fayetteville Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of Tishri. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means, literally, “head of the year” or “first of the year.” Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year. This name is somewhat deceptive, because there is little similarity between Rosh Hashanah, one of the holiest days of the year, and the American midnight drinking bash and daytime football game. There is, however, one important similarity between the Jewish New Year and the American one: Many Americans use the New Year as a time to plan a better life, making “resolutions.” Likewise, the Jewish New Year is a time to begin introspection, looking The “shofar” is used in the special prayers at Rosh Hashanah

back at the mistakes of the past year and planning the changes to make in the New Year. No work is permitted on Rosh Hashanah. In fact, there is a special prayer book called the machzor used for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur because of the extensive liturgical changes for these holidays. Yom Kippur is probably the most important holiday of the Jewish year. Many Jews who do not observe any other Jewish custom will refrain from work, fast. The name “Yom Kippur” means “Day of Atonement,” and that pretty much explains what the holiday is. Yom Kippur comes ten days after the celebration of the New Year. It is our chance for a new beginning. This sacred day is spent worshipping and fasting. On Yom Kippur, God forgives us and we forgive each other. This year (2010) it begins on the evening of Friday, September 17th.

Yun Kimbul 9TH Grade - Manlius On September 11, 2001, there was an attack on America. There are some men that decided that they didn’t like what America stands for: freedom, liberty, and the rights of men and women of all races, backgrounds, and beliefs. So on the morning of September 11, 2001, they hijacked four planes and attacked America in a terrible way. Two of the airplanes were crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. The third plane was crashed into the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. The last plane was going to crash into another building in Washington, D.C., but

Las Vegas – and Beyond Gracie K. 5TH Grade - Gillette Middle School My family and I go to Las Vegas almost every year over winter break. It is a very fun place to visit. The temperature is EXTREMLY high at times, but it’s nice because I get to go swimming over winter break!

The September 11th Attack on America In Las Vegas there are lots of fancy hotels. Each hotel has something fun to do or see. While we were there we visited the Luxor, the Excalibur, Caesar’s Palace, and Treasure Island. The Luxor is shaped like an Egyptian pyramid. The Excalibur looks like a giant castle. Caesar’s Palace has restaurants, a mall, and is the site of several popular shows. Treasure Island is a pirate themed hotel, complete with a pirate ship battle in front of the hotel every night. Apart from being a buzzing city, Las Vegas is really a beautiful place with lots to do beyond the city. It is surrounded by mountains,

canyons and blue skies. There are several AMAZING tourist sites near Las Vegas. One of the best is also one of the 7 wonders of the world. THE GRAND CANYON!!! The Grand Canyon is a whopping 277 miles long and has depth of one mile! The Grand Canyon is a great family spot. It is about a 6 hour drive from Las Vegas, but it is totally worth it. Another canyon in Las Vegas (this one is actually in Las Vegas) is the Red Rock Canyon!! I have visited this place too and it is also beautiful and exciting. This canyon isn’t as deep as the Grand Canyon, so you can actually go INSIDE it. You can go down and hike

the passengers stopped the hijackers, and the plane crashed into a field instead. Thousands of people lost their lives through these attacks. Hundreds of people were on the planes. Thousands died in the buildings that were hit by those planes. The men that arranged this terrible attack want Americans to feel afraid and disorganized. They want to make people who live in this country do what they say by threatening us. Basically they’re big bullies. 9 years had passed and the people of the United States are a strong group of people. Keep faith in who we are and what our country stands for and we will become even stronger than before. the rough, red, rock. When I was there, we found a caved in spot that had drawings and smelled like rotten fish. Another fun place to visit near Las Vegas is Hoover Dam. It was named after Herbert Hoover the 31st president of the United States. It took five years to build the Hoover dam and it was a dangerous job. Ninety six people died on the construction site during the building of the dam! The dam is 726.4 feet tall, 1,244 feet long, and 8 to 10 million people visit it each year. Las Vegas is a fun place to visit. I hope you get the chance to visit like I did!


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

15

Fun and Games / Kid ,s Corner

Fun Facts Have you heard of a sheep with blue wool? Well, a couple of animal breeders from Russia had claimed sometime ago that they bred sheep with natural blue wool. • “Moo, moo,” says the cow everywhere in the world; and a pig says “Moo, moo” in Japan. • The eyesight of dogs are better than that of human beings. • Animal accents! The accent of a cow’s mooing depends on the region it belongs to. • On an average a hen lays 19 dozen eggs in a year. • The small intestine of an ostrich measures upto 46-feet in length. • Your pet cat can scare a black bear. The big fellow will run up a tree to save itself from the little domestic creature. Meow, meow! • Sleeping beauties! Gorillas sleep upto fourteen hours, a day. • While the male lion rests in its den, it is the females that have go out and get the food. • Simon says Jump! No point an elephant simply cannot jump to even save its life. • No right turn! The bats do not need any boards, for its always the left turn for them when exiting a cave. • Sharks are the only known species to never suffer from cancer. • Heavyweights! The tongue of a blue whale could weigh more than a fullgrown adult elephant. • Oysters change from male to female gender several times during their lifespan. • Every shrimp is actually born a male and then become females as they mature. • An elephant can smell water from a distance of three miles. • A storage bin! The duckbill platypus is known to store upto six hundred worms in its cheek pouches. • Music lovers! Make a cow listen to music and there will be more milk in the bucket!

Crossword: Countries of the world 1

2

Down

3 4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11 12

Across

2. The beaches in the northwest of this country where invaded on D-Day. The capital and largest city in is know as “The City of Love. 5. In this country baseball is the national past time. It is home to the Statue of Liberty and Mount Rushmore. 8. This country is home to over 1 billion people. Its most famous landmark is the

Taj Mahal. 10. is the largest country in South America. It is renowned for Rio de Janerio, and for the Amazon rainforest. 12. This European country was once home to the Roman Empire. This country is probably most famous for the the Colosseum and lamborghini’s.

1. The 2010 World Cup was hosted in this country. It is located on the southern tip of Africa. 3. This country is formerly know as the U.S.S.R. It’s is the largest country in the world and has the deepest lake in the world as well. 4. This country is know for castles, royalty, and its largest city; London. 6. The largest city in this country, Istanbul, is the only city in the world that is in 2 continents; Europe and Asia. 7. This is one of Great Britain’s 54 commonwealths. Its is the only country that is also a continent. 9. is made up of many islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It has the largest Muslim population in the world. 11. is home to the worlds largest city, Tokyo. This Asian country is home to Nintendo, and Toyota.

Mini Tree Houses

Stranger Danger Hailey W 5TH Grade - Camillus Kids all over the world have been affected by stran­ger danger families too! Stranger danger is NOT some­ thing to joke about under any circumstances. Kids of all ages have been kidnapped because of bad mistakes. Some kids are held for randsom in other words held against their will for money. Some kids are kidnapped just so some people can torture them for their own reasons

and some are kidnapped for many other reasons. If you should ever get in a situation where someone you don’t know asks you to come over to his/her car to look at something or to get alone to talk privately or anything that sounds strange say “NO” then yell at the tippy top of your lungs “HELP” over and over again while running as fast as the wind until you get help. Teachers and parents are trying to teach kids how

important Stranger Danger is and how to protect themselves so that they’ll know what to do if stranger danger occurs. Records show that there have been over 2 dozen missing children in only a couple of months and currently high-profile. Mis­ sing children reports have caught the nation’s attention. So be VERY careful and remember what I told you. In other words be smart about kidnapping!

Ahjeia B 5TH Grade - Liverpool BASCOL at Soule Road choose to make mini tree houses. The kids were very creative and put their imagination in to it. Some kids struggled and some didn’t but as long as we kept trying we were able to build a mini tree house. There are several steps you need to get there and stretch your ima­gi­nation and you need different materials to build the tree house. For the steps and materials please go to the family fun website which is www. familyfun.go.com/crafts/tinytree-houses-844543/. Hope you have fun with the tree houses!


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

16

English Language & Art

Fighting Dinosaurs

Poems

Kraken by Zerbie (5th grade) Oh, great mysterious Kraken, Where do you come from? Why do you come? Why do you serve the Starman, Oh great Mysterious Kraken? I don’t quite understand you, but I equip the Franklin badge grab the Home run Bat, and warp to your chamber (Now if only Jeff had the Bag of Dragonite with him. And equipped the Running shoes.) You’ll be curb stomped in two combat rounds, ya hear? I’m at level 100! I go on to the next dungeon, and the next after that, But I never forget you, oh, great, mysterious Kraken. Fennec Fox by Evelyn (7th grade) Fennec fox, Fennec fox How do you jump at night? You’re as fast as lightning, through the dark sky night. Fennec fox, Fennec fox Why do you have big ears? They’re as big as the Tundra, and as long as a peer. Fennec Fox, Fennec fox Why are you so tan? You’re the color of desert sand, and you look so tiny from a hawk’s eye view you look like a small pigeon. Fennec fox, Fennec fox How do you jump at night? You’re as fast as lightning through the dark sky night. Horses by Sam (5th grade) Horses Horses all the way

Owen F 5TH Grade - North Syracuse Deep in the Gobi desert of Mongolia, a protoceratops and a velociraptor were locked in a death fight. Then, without warning, they were wiped out by an unknown adversary. Now, 80 million years later, their tomb is unsealed…. In 1971, paleontologists found something remarkable: a protoceratops and a velociraptor, in the middle of a death duel. The raptor’s arm was grasping the herbivore’s frill, while its killing claw sank into its stomach.

How do you get there, Do you really like hay And why do you neigh? A fleet on foot speeding through Tell me, tell me, is it you? Why do you come in many breeds, yet have so little needs Why don’t you like to be ridden Why is it like I am forbidden from you? Wolf by Martin (4th grade) Running in the cold winter night Past the pine trees, past the stream where the fish used to jump Running, running. Past the snowy meadow, past the forest where the bear used to climb. Running, running Past the cold rock, past the field where the fawns used to play. Running, prancing, jumping, hunting the deer leaping, thrashing, grabbing, hunting the deer. The Early Sunset by Savannah (5th grade) As orange comes in red fades away, Red is charming but orange takes over the sky. Gentle purple comes with pink and blends everything together; fierce yellow comes and blends, making the sky burn. A big gray fog covers the sky and fades the colors.

The bone crushing jaws of the protoceratops were clamped the predator’s arm. To scientists, the find was amazing in the way it was preserved. The fossils were brought to the Natural History Museum for temporary display. The dinosaurs were buried in sandy sediment, which was useful in the fossilization process. The bones were found in rock 80 million years old. While digging they also found crocodiles, lizards, mammals, and other dinosaurs. An important piece to this puzzle is finding out how the

I like to watch the colors come and go, I go away as the colors fade in to the dark scary sky. Noise Poem by Kenny (5th grade) The conductor sat there, tap tapping his head off Suddenly, the piano and the trumpet started mixing their music together. A bass drum started in and the piano dropped out, and it sounded like elephants stamping and trumpeting. A snare drum and a tuba mingled in at the right time. Then the other two fell out. ROC OH ROC by Bobby (4th grade) Roc oh Roc How did you get here? Why do you want me? Where did you get your wings? How is your brain working? Why do you have symmetry? Your back is golden straight You are gold all over. You are gold art. Will you kill me? Why do you want my history? Why do you want to be unstopable? Why do you need me for it? Roc oh Roc why do you do this to me? Why are you invisible? Why do you grab me by the head? How can I stop you? How can I save my self? I am going to have friends to help Are you going to take my heart and brain out? Can you hurt us forever? Stop, oh stop Why can’t you stop? Why will you not stop?

animals died. The most believed theory is that rain from a day before had made sand unstable. The commotion caused by the fighting dinosaurs would have been enough to collapse a dune, right on top of them. This find may be a useful insight to the world of dinosaurs. The behavior of each animal could help us understand how the dinosaurs lived. It might also help us understand the offensive and defensive ways of a dinosaur. In the Gobi, a fight of life and death was fought where no animal escaped alive.

Why are you not stopping until you get me? UNICORN UNICORN by Emmy (4th grade) Unicorn unicorn you are so white? For a unicorn that color is just right. Unicorn unicorn you have a horn. I’ve had it since the day I was born Unicorn unicorn what do you eat? Silver and gold dust is a treat. Unicorn unicorn you look like a horse. Horses are very gentle of course THE ISLAND OF FIJI by Adam (6th grade) The feeling of Fiji. The water brings a nice light blue to my mind. The sand I have to go with tan. The jungle brings dark green that I really mean. The palm trees bark brings a nice brown just like the tropical ground. The leaping dolphins that rise from the blue water remind me of a dark blue. Looking at the sky at sunset looks amazing as the nice orange cuts through the clouds. Animals come in many shapes by Nick Russell As blue as the sky as red as fire fast as lightning as slow as a leaf as tall as a tree as small as a crumb. Animals come in many shapes and sizes and colors too.


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

17

Parent ,s Corner

Bullying Claire McCarthy, MD paediatrician Over the past few months, I’ve started asking the patients in my primary care practice about bullying. I’m asking them all sorts of questions anyway, about their health and their habits and their daily lives, so it’s not so strange when I ask: “Does anyone pick on you at school?” A surprising (and heartbreaking) number of children tell me someone is picking on them. Although, given that it’s estimated that up to a quarter of kids experience some sort of bullying, it really shouldn’t be surprising. But what really worries me is that most of the time when a kid tells me they are being bullied, their parents had no idea. It worries me not just as a doctor, but as a mom. My middle daughter is an awkward, artistic, often moody pre-teen who is more of a loner than I like. She seems to me like just the kind of kid bullies might target. “Does anyone pick on you at school?” I ask her. “I’m not being bullied, Mom,” she says. But I still worry. There’s been a lot of media attention recently on bullying, in the wake of the suicide of Phoebe Prince, a South Hadley high school freshman who committed suicide after being persistently bullied. Some of that attention has been on the adults in her life. Some had no idea anything was happening. Some knew something was happening, but didn’t realize how bad it was. Some knew something was happening, and spoke up, but it didn’t help. So what is it about bullying that makes it so hard for adults to see—and help? It’s hidden. Bullies aren’t stupid; they hide what they are doing, so that they don’t get in trouble. And victims hide it because they are embarrassed— and because they worry that

telling about it might make things worse (which sometimes happens). Cyberbullying, in which the bullying takes place on the internet or through text messaging, is even harder for adults to see; it’s silent, can happen when the victim is entirely alone, and occurs within a world and context that most adults don’t know about. This means that parents, teachers, coaches and other adults who are involved with kids need to have their antennae way up. They need to watch for changes in behavior (anxiety, sadness, poor selfesteem, loss of appetite, for example), dropping grades, unexplained injuries, or coming home with damaged belongings (www. s t o p b u l l y i n g n o w. hrsa.gov has information on these and other possible warning signs that a child is being bullied). Direct questioning may not work; indirect questions (how do they spend their day, who do they eat lunch with, etc) may yield more clues. And if questioning doesn’t go anywhere, adults should check in with each other to find out what’s going on at school, home, in the locker room (I check in with my daughter’s teachers and guidance counselor regularly). People don’t want to see it. We all want our children to be popular, to fit in. It’s hard to think that it’s our child, or our student, who is being picked on. Maybe it brings back memories from our own childhood of being picked on, times we’d just as soon forget. So when a child denies being bullied, says everything is fine (as a bullied child often

Why do parents miss it?

does), we breathe a sigh of relief and take them at their word. That’s if we get up the nerve to ask. And if it’s our child who is the bully—well, nobody wants to think of their child that way. Nobody wants to think about what this might mean about them as parents; research shows that bullies often come from families who are uninvolved, overly permissive, overly harsh, or who role model bullying behavior. Since bullies are often popular students, it’s easy for parents to think: my kid is great, they would never do something like that. Confronting bullying is really uncomfortable. But it’s something that adults need to do. Suicide is a rare consequence, but victims can carry emotional scars that can last a lifetime. And not only can being a bully be a sign of mental health problems, bullies are more likely to be aggressive or violent as adults. For example, bullies identified by age 8 are six times more likely to have a criminal conviction by age 24. This isn’t just a phase that will pass. People don’t know what to do when they discover bullying.

Indeed, it can be hard to figure out how to help. Victims may be bullied worse when the bullies are disciplined, unless the adults are watching closely— but they can’t watch every minute. Some parents, some teachers, some school officials or coaches are more helpful than others. Some schools have rules and consequences, some don’t (although the recent law will help with that). Some victims are lucky enough to have kids stand up for them— others aren’t so lucky. See, that’s the thing: we all need to fight this together. To make a difference, we need to change the culture of our schools, our teams, our communities; we need to create a culture that doesn’t tolerate bullying. This means education, lots of it, empowerment of kids to stand up against bullying, as well as clear and consistent consequences for anyone who bullies. But we have to start somewhere. So as adults, let’s start by asking the hard questions—of our kids, of our communities and of ourselves. Let’s get involved, so that we can see what’s going on—and keep trying to find ways to help.


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

18

Kids Need Flu Vaccine Too!

Nutrition Basics for Healthy Vision

Newsletter Article Most people think of senior citizens when they think about who should get an annual flu shot. However, even healthy children are at a high risk of getting the flu. The Centers for Disease Control recommend annual flu shots for all children 6 months to 18 years of age. This year, the seasonal flu vaccine will include protection from H1N1 vaccine, doing away with the need for two separate vaccines. Children who are under 9 years old and get a flu shot for the first time this flu season will need two doses, 1 month apart. Also, if they did not receive any H1N1 doses last year and are under 9, it is recommended that they get two

this year. If your child dislikes needles, a vaccine that can be inhaled through the nose is now available for healthy children over two years of age. Protect your family from flu! Call your child’s healthcare provider to make an appointment to get a flu shot. If you don’t have a provider or your provider does not have a supply of flu vaccine, the Onondaga County Health Department will be offering four family flu clinics for children 6 months and over and their families. No one will be turned away, even if they are unable to pay for the shot. Watch the local news or call 435-3280 for more information on clinic dates and locations coming soon!

Dr Marc Grossman Nutrition is a key factor in keeping a healthy visual system during life. The eyes and brain contain millions of cells, which have specific nutritional requirements. You can help prevent eye diseases and promote healthy, clear vision by making wise choices such as eating well, reducing stress, and exercising regularly.

Nutrition Basics for Healthy Vision

1. As we begin the process

of improving our vision naturally, it is helpful to look closely at how we are nourishing ourselves. We need foods that are fresh, as close to the natural state as possible, and whose water content is high. Gradually changing from the typical North American diet consisting of white bread, pasta, meat, cakes, pastries, soft drinks and coffee, to a diet of fresh fruits and vegetables (organic if possible), whole grains, healthy fats and proteins and lots of pure water, can make a

huge difference to the way we feel and the way we see. 2. Supplement your diet with a good multi-vitamin to get the minerals and vitamins you may not get from your food. Our soil is greatly depleted of the minerals it once held. Therefore supplementation is more important than it was years ago. Sea vegetables are also an excellent source of minerals. 3. Incorporate anti-oxidants into your diet. Research shows that antioxidants can be very helpful in keeping healthy eyes and vision. 4. If you are diagnosed with an eye disease, research the nutritional aspects of the disease and adjust your diet accordingly. Consult with a nutritionist or doctor who specializes in healing with nutrition and detoxification. 5. Remember that natural sunlight is a nutrient that we all need. Ideally, spend an hour outside in natural light each day. Take a walk in the morning or evening and enjoy the added benefit of exercise, too! Healthy nutritional habits lay the foundation for healthy eyes and vision all your life. Enjoy those carrots and their healthy cousins from the garden and health food store! If you feel you need supplements, it is a good idea to consult a naturopath or nutritionist to make sure that the supplements are right for you. If you have any eye disease, it is especially important that you look into nutritional support for your particular condition. Eating for Good Nutrition Instead of for Comfort


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

19

Science & Tech / Sports

Celery

Sakisha B 9TH Grade - Syracuse Celery, many household eat it as an appetizer or snack, either way, this beloved vegetable has made its way into millions of households over the years. Celery has its roots in sixteenth

century northern Euro­pean history. Celery is related to anise, carrots, parsley and parsnips. Celery is often sold in loose stalks and also pre-packaged celery hearts. Celery hearts are the inner ribs of the celery. Today celery is grown domestically in California and Florida with many different varieties on the market. A member of the carrot family, celery was first recorded

as a plant in France in 1623 and was probably developed either there or in Italy. Its seed was brought to Kalamazoo, Michigan, in the 1850s from Scotland, and it became a commercial crop there. Celery provides an excellent source of vitamin C and fiber. It is a very good source of folic acid, potassium, and

vitamins B1 and B6. Celery also offers a good source of vitamin B2 and calcium. Even though celery contains more sodium than most other vegetables, the sodium is offset by it’s high levels of potassium. I like to eat Celery raw with peanut butter; some people like to use it in the potato salad that gives a yummy taste to potato salad.

 Water  Kitchen sink or large water basin

9. Measure the volume of air your lungs had in them. 10. Make sure you clean up the area to finish.

Instructions:

What is Your Lung Volume? Alexis 9TH Grade - Manlius Do you think you’re fit and healthy? Let’s test your lung volume to find out. Just how much air can your lungs can hold? With the help of a few simple household objects,

some scientific know how and a dash of curiosity you can make this experiment look easy.

What you’ll need:  

Clean plastic tubing A large plastic bottle

1. Make sure the plastic tubing is clean 2. Put about 10cm of water into your kitchen sink. 3. Fill the plastic bottle right to the top with water. 4. Put your hand over the top of the bottle to stop water escaping when you turn it upside down. 5. Turn the bottle upside down. Place the top of the bottle under the water in the sink before removing your hand. 6. Push one end of the plastic tube into the bottle. 7. Take a big breath in. 8. Breathe out as much air as you can through the tube.

What’s happening?

As you breathe out through the tube, the air from your lungs takes the place of the water in the bottle. If you made sure you took a big breath in and breathed out fully then the resulting volume of water you pushed out is equivalent to how much air your lungs can hold. Having a big air capacity in your lungs means you can distribute oxygen around your body at a faster rate. The air capacity of lungs (or VO2 max) increases naturally as children grow up but can also be increased with regular exercise.

+ Ways to Go Green + Elizabeth M 5TH Grade - Gillette Middle School Many people are trying to help save the world and stop global warming. If you want to be one of those people just follow these easy instructions. 1. Recycle- Did you know that 1 ton of paper in the landfill could have saved 17 trees? All you have to do is get a blue bin,

put paper and bottles in it and take it out with your garbage. Did you know that bottle caps and food containers are not recyclable? Some of the items from the table have special handling instructions, so ask you local recycling office what to do if you aren’t sure. 2. Reduce- If you turn off a

This is a list of things you can recycle or reuse: Acid Batteries Paint Aluminum Cans Paper Building Materials Plastic Bags Cardboard Plastic Bottles Chemicals Steel Cans Electronic equipment Tires Glass (particularly bottles/jars) White Goods (Appliances) Lead Wood Metal Writing/Copy Paper Newspaper Yard Waste Oil

light or TV when you leave a room or hang your clothes outside to dry, you can save a lot of energy. Also, switch your light bulbs to the curly ones. When you switch your light bulb you can save 85% of the electricity your old light bulbs used. Also unplug

The FIFA World Cup

appliances when you’re done using them. Most of the energy lost comes from plugged in appliances that are not being used. It’s actually called phantom energy. Another thing you can do is refuse plastic and paper bags you get in the store. Instead you can use a cloth or reusable bag. 3. Reuse – instead of using paper towels every time your hands are wet, you can try using a cloth towel. That way you aren’t wasting paper towels because you can’t recycle them. Also, use real or washable plates for parties instead of paper or Styrofoam. 4. If you want more information about going green, visit the following websites: www.factmonster.com http://kids.niehs.nih. gov/recycle.htm\ w w w. e p a . g o v / k i d s / garbage.htm/

Pearlanne 5TH grade - Gillette Middle School The FIFA World Cup is a soccer tournament held every 4 years. This tournament started in 1930. Today it is very widely viewed. About 700 million people around the world tune in to watch the World Cup tournament. This year it will be held in South Africa. It will start on June 11th and last about a month. 32 countries from around the world will compete against each other for the title. Each game a team will be eliminated from the tournament. The last 2 teams will go against each other to see who gets the FIFA World Cup!!!

The Trophy

Silvio Gazzaniga designed the world cup trophy. The trophy is 36 centimeters (14.4 inches) tall and is made of 11 lbs of 18 carat solid gold! The trophy is designed to look like two humans holding up the world.

Winning streak

In previous years, Brazil has won the cup 5 times, Italy has won the cup 4 times, and Germany has won the cup 3 times. The only years the event was not held was in 1942 and 1946 because of World War 2. The United States has never won the World Cup before. However, the team is very new to soccer compared to the rest of the teams! Tune in this June to watch the world cup and see which country will win the trophy!


Kids Standard www.KidsStandard.com • Issue 06, September 2010

20

Index

your favorite player. No sport offers this sense of camaraderie and class.

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Polo On horseback

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Polo on horseback Matt 9TH grade - Skaneateles Polo is a team sport played on horseback in which the objective is to score goals against an opposing team. Players score by driving a small white plastic or wooden ball into the opposing team’s goal using a long-handled mallet. The traditional sport of polo is played at speed on a large grass

field up to 300 yards in length, and each polo team consists of four riders and their mounts. There are four players to a team and each carries a number on the back of his/ her jersey. Each player has a certain position that they maintain on the field, and can usually be found there. Part of team strategy is to position you favorably in order to maximize

scoring opportunities. Defen­ sive strategy works basically the same, as players try to neutralize the offensive attack. Polo is one big family that is why spectators are always invited to the post-match trophy presentation. It’s a great way to get a true sense of sports­ manship, make the most of photo opportunities, obtain autographs and mingle with

Hit a Home Run!

A game first played in Persia (Iran) at dates given from the 5th century BC, or much earlier, to the 1st century AD and originated there, polo was at first a training game for cavalry units, usually the king’s guard or other elite troops Later on Polo was passed from Persia to other parts of Asia including the Indian and China. Polo has been known in the East as the Game of Kings. The name polo is said to have been derived from the Tibetan word “pulu”, meaning ball. The modern game of polo though formalized and popularized by the British. There are four players to a team and each carries a number on the back of his/her jersey. Each player has a certain position that they maintain on the field, and can usually be found there. Part of team strategy is to position you favourably in order to maximize scoring opportunities. Defen­ sive strategy works basically the same, as players try to neutralize the offensive attack. I will look forward to seeing you at a future polo match See you there!

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