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Resolution Booklet

Brussels2013 19th National Selection Conference of EYP-Europolis Belgium

5 – 8 March 2013 European Parliament, Brussels


PROGRAMME – ORDER OF THE DEBATES 09:15 – 09:30

Opening of GA

09:30 – 10:15

Debate 1 - SEDE

10:15 – 11:00

Debate 2 - AFCO

11:00 – 11:30

Coffee Break

11:30 – 12:15

Debate 3 - ECON

12:15 – 13:00

Debate 4 - LIBE

13:00 – 13:45

Lunch

13:45 – 14:30

Debate 5 - AGRI

14:30 – 15:15

Debate 6 - JURI

15:15 – 15:30

Coffee Break

15:30 – 16:15

Debate 7 - AFET

16:15 – 17:00

Debate 8 - CULT

17:00 – 17:10

Short Break

17:10 – 18:00

Closing Ceremony


DEBATE PROCEDURE General rules If a committee wants to speak, they should raise the committee placard. The board decides which committee to recognise first and the authority of the board is absolute. Procedure Reading of the operative clauses Points of Information 3 minutes to defend the motion for the resolution (defence speech) 3 minutes to attack the motion for the resolution (attack speech) 1 minute to respond to the attach speech 25 minutes of general debate 3 minutes to sum-up the debate Voting Point of information During points of Information, the committee placard may be raised and delegates can ask the proposing committee to clarify specific words and abbreviations. Note that points of information must ask for a factual answer. All other points must wait until the general debate. Point of personal privilege When a delegate cannot be heard, the point of personal privilege placard can be raised. The board will then ask the delegate to repeat his point. Point of order When the board makes a mistake in the procedure, the point of order placard can be raised. Direct response When a delegate wants to respond to the point made directly beforehand, the direct response placard can be raised. The board will then give priority to this committee and recognise the committee immediately. If more than one committee raises the direct response placard at the same time, the board chooses one and the other committees must then lower their direct response placards. Every committee may use the direct response placard once during each debate.


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DEFENCE

Considering ever-growing budgetary constraints on defence, the role of the NATO and the EU’s normative power, what future for European military capabilities in an increasingly interdependent world? Submitted by:

Inge Arkesteyn (Voorzienigheid Diest), Fien De Doncker (De Pleinschool), Emil Ehnström (FI), Thibault Grégoire (Institut Saint-André), Bavo Kempen (Het College Vilvoorde), Kevin Komocar (SL), Marian Kunz (DE), Yannick Léonard (OLVE-College), Kamiel Peeters (Broederschool Sint-Niklaas), An Tück (KA Pitzemburg), Hans Maes (Chairperson, BE)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Keeping in mind that national defence has been and still is a cornerstone of national pride and countries put their own interests first, B. Realising that decision making power in the area of defence lies with national governments, C. Aware of the European Defence Agency (EDA)1 being governed by Member States and their national agendas, slowing down decision making processes, D. Noting that there is no effective European military institution which includes all Member States, E. Concerned that the unanimous voting system within the EDA and the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP)2 delays the decision making, F.

Emphasising that Member States’ decreasing national defence budgets are used inefficiently,

G. Having observed that 46% of the European citizens are in favour of cutting defence spending, H. Realising the importance of military force in a world with current and future conflicts, especially about limited resources, I.

Bearing in mind that the Berlin Plus agreement3 gives the EU the ability to use the North Atlantic Treaty Organisations (NATO) infrastructures thus making them potentially dependent on NATO,

J.

Realising that Europe relies on NATO for some military aspects,

K. Noting with deep concern that not every Member State is a member of NATO;

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The European Defence Agency (EDA) is a Brussels based EU agency, reporting to the Council of the European Union. Its primary role is to foster European defence cooperation. The Common Security and Defence Policy is the domain of the EU Common Foreign and Security Policy covering defence and military aspects. 3 The Berlin Plus agreement is a comprehensive package of agreements made between NATO and the EU in 2002. It allows the EU to draw on some of NATO’s military assets in its own peacekeeping operations.! 2

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Brussels2013: 19th National Selection Conference of EYP-Europolis Belgium


! ! 1.

Authorises the gradual creation of a United European Army (UEA) by:

a) increasing practices such as pooling and sharing of military resources, b) encouraging small Member States to specialise in certain military areas, c) creating and expanding small groups of Member States cooperating on a military level; 2.

Believes that the mandate of the UEA should be limited to fulfilling the Petersberg Tasks4 and the defence of UEA members;

3.

Emphasises that Member States will have the possibility to launch individual military operations, for which they will have to receive permission of the European Council;

4.

Requests that the Member State demanding a military mission, will be given the command after the mission has been approved;

5.

Supports a standardisation of basic military training, including a military exchange programme among the EU Member States;

6.

Strongly encourages all Member States to become participating Member States of the EDA;

7.

Authorises the EDA to advise Member States in the field of armament and publish quarterly reports;

8.

Calls for centralised Defence Research and Technology under the guidance of EDA;

9.

Strongly recommends to introduce simple majority voting in the EDA;

10. Welcomes the integration of European defence as a way to increase citizens’ faith in the EDA and other military institutions; 11. Further reminds that European military union will result in one strong voice in NATO debates, balancing the power of the USA; 12. Reaffirms that the UEA will become a full member of NATO, in the long term abrogating the national memberships of EU Member States.

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The Petersberg Tasks, part of the Treaty on European Union and complemented by the Treaty of Lisbon, include: " ‘Joint disarmament operations, " humanitarian and rescue tasks, " military advice and assistance tasks, " conflict prevention and peace-keeping tasks, " tasks of combat forces in crisis management, including peace-making and post-conflict stabilization. All these tasks may contribute to the fight against terrorism, including by supporting third countries in combating terrorism in their territories.’ Source: http://europa.eu/legislation_summaries/glossary/petersberg_tasks_en.htm!

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C O N S T IT U T IO N A L A F F A IR S

In light of steadily decreasing turnout at the European Parliament elections how can the EU reform its electoral system to meet citizens demands for a more European, accessible and modern way of electing the Members of the European Parliament? Submitted by:

Charlie Buyse (Broederschool Sint-Niklaas), Janne Creuwels (Het College Vilvoorde), Justine Decoster (KA Pitzemburg), Sebastien Lefevre (Voorzienigheid Diest), Laure Lemeire (De Pleinschool), David Leng-Fervers (Institut Saint-André), Alexandrine Lindsted (FI), Anne Meerpohl (DE), Bernd Nelis (OLVE-College), Heleen Heysse (Chairperson, BE), Hanna Ollinen (Vice-President, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Bearing in mind that the Member States maintain their rights to coordinate European Parliament elections nationally, B. Deeply concerned by the low voter turnout of 43% in the 2009 European Parliament elections5, C. Further noting the low turnout as a contributor to the democratic deficit within the EU6, D. Recognising the main causes for abstaining from voting being 7: i)

lack of trust in and dissatisfaction with politics in general,

ii)

lack of interest in politics as such,

iii)

lack of belief in the effect of the vote,

iv)

the voter being on holiday or away from home,

E. Realising the need for a more harmonised election procedure of the European Parliament, F.

Emphasising the need for a modernised voting system in order to reach more voters,

G. Recalling the successful introduction of electronic voting in Estonia8;

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EB71.3 – EUROPEAN ELECTIONS 2009, Post-electoral survey, DG for Communication, 2009 Democratic deficit is the idea that institutions of the European Union lack democratic accountability and legitimacy compared to the national governments of its member states. 7 EB71.3 – EUROPEAN ELECTIONS 2009, Post-electoral survey, DG for Communication, 2009 8 Electronic voting is meant to supplement, not to replace, the traditional methods of voting. The idea is to give voters the possibility to vote from the location of their choice (home or office), without the necessity of going to the polling station. 6

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! ! 1.

Suggests compulsory voting in all Member States from the 2019 elections onwards;

2.

Further suggests a nationally regulated penalty for eligible voters who failed to participate in the elections;

3.

Fully supports the following European Parliament election system reforms approved by the European Parliament Constitutional Affairs Committee in January, 20129: a)

creating an EU wide constituency from which 25 extra MEPs will be elected,

b)

allowing electors to vote either for a party list or for an individual candidate from a list (semi-open),

c)

establishing an EU Electoral Authority to set rules and oversee the elections,

d)

bringing forward the election from June to May, amending the 1976 Elections Act10;

4.

Further requests to implement the suggested reforms for the 2019 European Parliament elections;

5.

Affirms the right to decide upon the voting age to remain within the individual Member State;

6.

Calls upon the Member Sates to introduce an electronic voting system;

7.

Urges the electronic voting system to be opened one week prior to the election day;

8.

Trusts the EU Election Authority to ensure a secure electronic voting system;

9.

Recommends each Member State to implement the option of voting electronically for the 2019 elections;

10. Encourages the VoteWatch Europe11 initiative to be available in every official EU language; 11. Welcomes improved festivities on Europe Day 9th of May in all Member States.

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Electoral Reform of the European Parliament by MEP Andrew Duff (for 2004 election) Act of 20 September 1976 concerning the election of the representatives of the European Parliament by direct universal suffrage. E.g. Elections must be held on a date falling within the same period starting on a Thursday morning and ending on the following Sunday; the counting of votes may not begin until after the close of polling in all the Member States. 11 VoteWatch Europe is an independent organisation set up to promote better debates and greater transparency in EU decisionmaking, by providing easy access to, and analysis of, the votes and other activities of the European Parliament and the EU Council of Ministers. 10

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The faulty set-up of the Eurozone: how can the EU compensate for its Member States‘ lost ability to shape monetary policy and create a mechanism to offset macroeconomic imbalances within the union? Submitted by:

Madeline Delelienne (Institut Saint-André), Stijn Gillaerts (Het College Vilvoorde), Daan Hellin (OLVE-College), Olivier Lanoo (KA Pitzemburg), Leo Larjanko (FI), Robert Pretorius (Voorzienigheid Diest), Robyn Hanssens (Broederschool Sint-Niklaas), Lobke Vangansbeke (De Pleinschool), Bram Van Meldert (Chairperson, BE)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Realising that the different economies within the Eurozone are very diverse inter alia in terms of competitiveness, labour cost, employment rate, business cycle and current account, B. Deeply concerned that the one-size-fits-all approach of the Eurozone’s monetary policy12 is not compatible with the diverse economies that comprise it, C. Believing that the current structure of the Economic and Monetary Union 13 (EMU) enhances the differences between EMU economies, D. Noting with regret the lack of solidarity between Member States to level asymmetric shocks14 and diverse macroeconomic factors, E. Convinced that the current EU budget is too small to realise significant transfers and act as a stabiliser, F.

Further believing that severe austerity measures have adverse impacts on the economic performance of Member States while having no positive impact on the debt-to-GDP (Gross Domestic Product15) ratio,

G. Aware of the negative sentiments towards the EU caused by severe austerity measures which undermine the democratic basis of economic policy making at EU level, H. Reaffirming the importance of transparency of and control over Member States’ budgets and debt levels to address the moral hazard16 problem in the EMU, I.

Taking into account that a sustainable solution is needed quickly to avoid potential devastating effects for the EU as a whole;

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The regulation of interest rates and money supply by a central bank in order to achieve macroeconomic stability. The group of policies aimed at converging the economies of EU Member States in three stages so as to allow them to adopt the euro. 14 When an economic supply or demand shock is different from one region to another, or when the shocks do not move in tandem. 15 The monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a country's borders in a year. Often used as a measurement for the size and performance of an economy. 16 In a monetary union, the downsides and risk of additional debt are not only borne by the country that takes up extra debt but also by all other members of the monetary union.! 13

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Calls for further integration of fiscal policy17 making between the Member States;

2.

Requests the enlargement of the EU budget as to allow for fiscal transfers regarding macroeconomic imbalances18 within the Eurozone;

3.

Endorses the implementation of an EU tax on consumer products that replaces the current national taxes on consumer products;

4.

Further requests the introduction of Eurobonds 19 as a means for the EU to issue debt;

5.

Declares accordingly that Member States will be held accountable if the EU fails to repay its debt;

6.

Recommends the inclusion of the competitiveness of Eurozone economies in the objectives of the European Central Bank;

7.

Congratulates Member States and EU institutions on their efforts to ensure the transparency of and control over Member States’ budgets.

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The use of taxation and government spending to achieve macroeconomic stability. Significant deviations from the normal values of the main macroeconomic indicators, such as current accounts, difference in labour cost, employment rate, public and private debt, difference in real estate prices, inflation etc. 19 A bond is a debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity that borrows the funds for a defined period of time at a fixed interest rate. A Eurobond is a bond issued by the EU. 18

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Brussels2013: 19th National Selection Conference of EYP-Europolis Belgium


! ! What is wrong with the set-up of the Eurozone?

IN GENERAL A government has two options to influence its economy, namely monetary and fiscal policy. It uses these tools to stimulate its economy when it is in a down-cycle and to cool it down when it is overheated.

IN THE EMU

MONETARY POLICY The Eurozone countries share a common currency and therefore a common monetary policy.

There is no monetary policy that fits the needs of all the economies of the Eurozone.

BUT The economies of the Eurozone countries are different (inter alia in terms of competitiveness, labour cost, employment rate, business cycle and current account).

+ FISCAL POLICY In general, Member States control their own fiscal policy and can adapt it to the specific needs of their economies.

BUT Because of the risk of moral hazard in a monetary union, there are certain rules that limit the freedom, mainly in terms of deficit and debt levels, of Member States in setting their fiscal policies.

= The individual economies of the Member States of the Eurozone are not governed by economic policies that are adapted to their needs.

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H O M E A F F A IR S

With an increasing number of far right-wing movements entering into national parliaments and the spread of anti-Islamic rhetoric and attitudes threatening Europe‘s social cohesion, what role has the EU in tackling the rise of right-wing populism and nationalism in its Member States? Submitted by:

Loïc Blondeel (Broederschool Sint-Niklaas), Emma Cauwelaers (OLVE-College), Alexis De Schoutheete (Institut Saint-André), Hayat El Kaddouri (De Pleinschool), Alvar Huhtanen (FI), Mari Sewell (Voorzienigheid Diest), Nele Van der Aerschot (KA Pitzemburg), Ann-Sophie Verschaetse (Het College Vilvoorde), Wiebke Wendt (DE), Dimitris Chapizanis (Chairperson, GR)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Noting that nationalism is a threat to basic human rights, such as equal access to housing, freedom of religion, equal treatment, employment and education, B. Aware that the economic crisis gives rise to public doubt and affects political decisions and outcomes of elections, C. Deeply disturbed by the fact that far right parties hold immigrants responsible for alleged growth in unemployment and criminality, D. Bearing in mind the unemployed native population are in competition with immigrants and minorities for jobs, causing xenophobia and prejudice, E. Alarmed by the fact that increasingly nationalistic views lead to a rise in xenophobia sparking a number of hate crimes, F.

Aware that prejudice and xenophobia are making immigrants’ integration into the society of Member States difficult,

G. Believing that there can be a European identity without sacrificing national identities, H. Taking into account that the eradication of intolerance and prejudice is a long process during which immigrants will face many difficulties in becoming a part of cultural society, I.

Noting with concern that populistic and provocative behaviour used by far right-wing movements attract media attention,

J.

Further noting with deep concern that traditional political parties may be tempted to adopt the stance and the demagogical discourse specific to extremist20 parties in order to counter their increasing electoral popularity,

K. Recognising that the rise of far right-wing movements relies on social discontent to propose simplistic solutions to the anxieties and uncertainties felt by certain social groups in the face of the challenges affecting society,

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Extremism, whatever its nature is a form of political activity that overtly or covertly rejects the principles of parliamentary democracy, and very often bases its ideology and its political practices and conduct on intolerance, exclusion, xenophobia and ulta-nationalism.

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! ! L.

Alarmed by the fact that far-right policies use the following means to gain public support: i)

placing blame for the challenges of today’s world on the inability of representative democracy,

ii)

displacing responsibility to elected representatives by highlighting unaddressed citizens’ concerns,

iii)

designating any potential threat to a particular section of the population,

M. Realising that Eurosceptic21 strategies can be attractive to populist far right parties because they present an effective method for gaining support;

1.

Considers that the rules and principles set out in the Charter of Fundamental Rights22 and at the Stockholm Programme23, are basic texts which should guide the Member States in their strategy for fighting discrimination and the rise of xenophobia;

2.

Congratulates the work of European Program on Integration and Migration (EPIM) 24 and the Networks of European Foundations (NEF)25 and further encourages the development of: a)

more educational workshops based on citizens’ rights and duties, social tolerance and respect for difference,

b)

concrete methods to minimise discriminatory actions of nationalist parties;

3.

Further recommends the promotion of interactive workshops and events targeted at native and immigrant families or families with different religions;

4.

Encourages the establishment of exchange programmes for native and immigrant youngsters in the same region;

5.

Suggests that the EU further promotes events which promote European identity, such as Europe Day;

6.

Supports the establishment of closer international cooperation discouraging any propaganda of far-right ideologies, notably through new media technologies;

7.

Recommends the establishment of a new body to exist within the remit of the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA)26 which, in collaboration with national governments, will introduce safeguards against the activity of extremist groups which flout democratic principles and human rights, whose powers will include:

8.

a)

effective penalties where cases of proven damages caused by a far right party or one of its Member States are established,

b)

proportionate penalties against public incitement to violence, racial discrimination and intolerance,

c)

the suspension of public funding for organisations promoting any kind of discrimination;

Calls on Member States to include specific provisions in their national laws to ensure that measures restricting parties cannot be used in an arbitrary manner by the political authorities .

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Euroscepticism is the body of criticism of the EU, and opposition to the process of political European integration, existing throughout the political spectrum. 22 The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union enshrines certain political, social, and economic rights for EU citizens and residents into EU law. 23 The Stockholm Programme sets out the EU’s priorities for the area of justice freedom and security for the period 2010-2014. 24 EPIM was created to influence EU policy developments and in advocating for constructive approaches to migrants in Europe. 25 NEF created a collaborative program through EPIM to support the ability of NGOs on migrant issues. 26 FRA assists EU institutions and Member States in understanding and tackling challenges to safeguard the fundamental rights of everyone in the EU.

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RURAL DEVELOPMENT

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) post-2013: building on the European Commission’s reform proposals, which long-term objectives should the EU pursue in this policy area?

Submitted by:

Hendrik Assman (DE), Karolien Buytaert (Broederschool Sint-Niklaas), Zoë Cassady (De Pleinschool), Hadrien Cruyt (Institut Saint-André), William De Catelle (OLVE-College), Marlies Derden (Voorzienigheid Diest), Axel Idström (FI), Noelia Rodriguez Mier (Het College Vilvoorde), Ellen Van der Auwera (KA Pitzemburg), Monika Ghosh (Chairperson, UK)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Aware that 80% of farm aid goes to 25% of EU farmers with the largest holdings, showing that direct subsidies are misdirected in their aims of supporting under funded farmers, B. Recognising that the public has a negative perception regarding the large portion of the EU budget spent on the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP)27, C. Recognising that agriculture has negative environmental harmful effects including but not limited to carbon emissions and the depletion of natural resources, D. Believing that the advantages and the possible environmental impact of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO’s) have still not been fully explored, E. Aware of the negative and uninformed public opinion regarding GMO’s, which can lead to less funding into and less focus on the targeted research, F.

Taking into account that only 6% of farmers are below the age of 3528 and that this leads to a continually ageing workforce,

G. Noting with deep concern the negative environmental impact of the increased use of pesticides and fertilisers occurring because of the modernisation of mass farming, H. Noting with concern Member States’ dependency on food imports from outside the EU29, I.

Alarmed that even though 56% of the EU is rural30, farming is in decline and therefore the existence of rural communities is in peril,

J.

Deeply concerned by the urbanisation of rural areas and the threat caused to natural resources;

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The CAP is a combination of EU policies that control prices and levels of production of agricultural goods and by subside the rural lifestyle in order to safeguard the countryside, it has changed vastly since its creation and now includes many environmental regulations. 28 EU Agricultural Economic Briefs - Structural development in EU agriculture (Brief No. 3 September 2011) - Published by the European Commission. 29 “The EU is the biggest importer of foodstuffs in the world” http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/cap-overview/2012_en.pdf. 30 European Development Policy 2007-2013 Published by the European Commission.

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Strongly urges the European Parliament to pass the Capping proposals that has already been passed by the Council;

2.

Calls for decreased spending in the following aspects within Pillar 231: a)

the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) spending on the preservation of intangible heritage32,

b)

the areas in which the CAP funds policies and organisations already funded by other institutions and EU bodies;

3.

Endorses the already existing green initiatives and the greening proposals33 from the European Commission34;

4.

Reaffirms the current funding into the research of GMO’s;

5.

Urges the EU to create a simplified summary of the effects and advantages of GMO’s, which is understandable for the general public, on the Europa website;

6.

Endorses the subsidy schemes for young farmers;

7.

Urges Member States to establish Agricultural Schools35 within their national education systems;

8.

Calls for the creation of a directive which:

9.

a)

regulates the agricultural chemicals allowed in farming according to surrounding environmental factors,

b)

regulates the methods of applying the pesticides and fertilisers to minimise environmental impact;

Calls for the European Network for Rural Development (EN RD) to promote increased food production by researching and expanding new farming methods;

10. Further invites the EN RD to improve transport links between rural and urban areas; 11. Recommends the European Commission to expand the inclusive growth proposal36 by endorsing funding from the EAFRD for the following: a)

improving infrastructure for rural communities,

b)

facilitating education in rural communities,

c)

incentivising the location of amenities in rural areas;

12. Fully endorses the Balanced Territorial Development proposal37 from the European Commission; 13. Fully endorses the existing EU policy framework for Rural Development Programmes38, both on regional and national levels in Member States.

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The CAP is split into two pillars, the first is based on direct payments to farmers, and the second is centred around rural development. Intangible heritage is the counterpart of touchable heritage which includes song, music, drama, skills, crafts and other parts of culture and heritage that can be recorded but not touched or interacted with. 33 To strengthen the environmental sustainability of agriculture and enhance the efforts of farmers, the Commission is proposing to spend 30% of direct payments specifically for the improved use of natural resources. Farmers would be obliged to fulfil certain criteria such as crop diversification, maintenance of permanent pasture, the preservation of environmental reservoirs and landscapes. 34 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions “The Cap towards 2020”. 35 Agricultural schools are aimed at teaching both the practical and theoretical basis of all land management and animal handling vocations. 36 Inclusive growth proposal looks to unlock economic potential in rural areas, develop local markets and jobs, accompany the restructuring of agriculture and supporting farmers' income to maintain a sustainable agriculture throughout Europe. 37 The Balanced Territorial Development proposal is about empowering people in local areas, building capacity and improving local conditions and links between rural and urban areas. 38 The Rural Development Programmes analyse the situation of rural areas in terms of strengths and weaknesses and find strategies to meet them, there are several targeted at the balancing development and preservation of natural resources. 32

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Intellectual Property Rights enforcement after the European Parliament’s ‘no’ to the AntiCounterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA): how can the EU strike a balance between guaranteeing the competitive advantage of Europe’s knowledge and creativity economies and protecting citizens’ rights to privacy, data protection and freedom of expression?

Submitted by:

Emma Bernolet (De Pleinschool), Sofie Bournons (KA Pitzemburg), Liesbeth Claes (Voorzienigheid Diest), Merel Jordens (Broederschool Sint-Niklaas), Claire Seredynski (Institut Saint-André), Alisa Thierij (DE), Kristof Van Cappellen (Het College Vilvoorde), Sophie Van de Vorst (OLVE-College), Lorenzo Van de Pol (Chairperson, BE), Kerstin Mathias (President, DE)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Deeply disturbed by the fact that counterfeiting can demotivate creators due to the lack of compensation for their work, B. Realising that the lack of knowledge concerning Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) 39 has facilitated the establishment of a certain sense of immorality among citizens surrounding that issue, C. Alarmed by the differences in IPR legislation across Member States resulting in difficulties impeding its enforcement, D. Fully aware that a complete protection of a creator’s work also requires its safeguarding outside of the EU, E. Emphasising that fundamental rights for citizens such as the right to privacy should be taken into account when defining measures to successfully enforce IPR, F.

Noting with deep concern that rigorous and lengthy protection of industrial creations leads to the obstruction of advancements as well to monopolies and high prices,

G. Noting with regret that a lot of counterfeit goods40 enter the EU because customs: i)

are insufficiently informed about the characteristics of genuine products,

ii)

lack human resources,

iii) lack necessary funds, iv) fail to communicate with other Member States, H. Recognising the difficulty in distinguishing genuine and counterfeit goods, I.

Taking into account that there is great interest in counterfeit goods because of their low prices,

J.

Having examined that counterfeit goods may contain health and safety risks for consumers,

K. Keeping in mind the difficulty in tackling illegal file sharing since online activity can be erased and tracing the source of piracy is very difficult;

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 39!Rights

given to persons over the creations of their minds. They usually give the creator an exclusive right over the use and marketing of his/her creation for a certain period of time. IPR can include copyright, patents, trademarks, etc. 40 Counterfeit goods are by definition goods infringing the rights of a trade mark holder by displaying a trade mark which is either identical to a protected trade mark or by using an identification mark which cannot be distinguished in its essential aspects from such trade mark.

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Has resolved to incentivising cultural and creative innovation as the main reason for strict IPR enforcement;

2.

Requests the European Commission to allocate parts of their own resources to the support of initiatives geared to allowing citizens to access media, such as music and movies, legally in innovative ways;

3.

Calls upon Member States to launch advertising campaigns to increase awareness on: a)

IPRs in general,

b)

consequences of IPR violations for creators and citizens,

c)

the advantages of genuine goods,

d)

the health and safety risks of counterfeit goods;

4.

Calls for increased cooperation, joint negotiations and mutual help among Member States to reach an agreement on common IPR legislation and enforcement on the European level;

5.

Trusts the European Commission to negotiate bilateral agreements with non-EU Member States on IPR protection incentivising them to better follow up on on-going IPR infringements;

6.

Urges Member States to further improve custom border controls by: a)

training employees to better identity counterfeit goods,

b)

strengthening operative cooperation between national customs services and the producing sector;

7.

Supports companies in establishing more factory outlets and offering sales to reduce the production of counterfeit goods;

8.

Endorses cooperation between pan-European Non Governmental Organisations fighting illegal downloading by providing them with financial support;

9.

Encourages Member States to increase penalties on counterfeiting and piracy.

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F O R E IG N A F F A IR S

The EU‘s eternal candidate state: what priorities must be set in order to move past the current stalemate in the accession negotiations with Turkey?

Submitted by:

Claire Davaux (Institut Saint-André), Claire Finaut (De Pleinschool), Lien Franssen (Voorzienigheid Diest), Pauline Menten (Het College Vilvoorde), Julie Swerts (OLVE-College), Elina Tuomikoski (FI), Sara Van Rompaey (KA Pitzemburg), Kristoffer Vullgraf (DE), Olivia Wittock (Broederschool SintNiklaas), Lara Niamh Eckert Reinfelds (Chairperson, CH), Petya Koleva (VicePresident, BG)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Expressing with satisfaction that accession negotiations with Turkey commenced in 2005, following the fulfilment of the Copenhagen Criteria41, B. Recognising that Turkey has made substantial progress to come into line with the acquis communautaire42 mandated by the Copenhagen Criteria, C. Acknowledging that the prolonged negotiations are the result of diverse opinions among Member States towards Turkey’s accession, D. Noting the European Commission’s chief role in overseeing the progress of accession negotiations, E. Keeping in mind that the opening of 8 chapters of the acquis will remained blocked until Turkey complies with the Additional Protocol43 with regards to Cyprus, F.

Reaffirming the ability of Member States to reserve the right to block the opening of further chapters of the acquis,

G. Noting with regret Turkey’s failure to recognise Cyprus as a sovereign state, H. Emphasising the need for a stronger commitment to the protection of human rights by Turkey in regards to: i)

freedom of speech

ii)

the rights of ethnic, social, and religious minorities

iii) religious freedom,

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Copenhagen Criteria: Any country that wishes to join the Union must meet the accession criteria, also known as the Copenhagen Criteria. For the European Council to decide to open negotiations, the political criterion must be satisfied. It was laid down in 1993 at the European Council in Copenhagen, which is from where it derives its name. 42 Acquis communautaire: A French term referring to the cumulative body of EU laws, comprising the EU’s objectives, substantive rules, policies and, in particular, the primary and secondary legislation and case law – all of which form part of the legal order of the EU. The term is most often used in connection with preparations by candidate countries to join the EU. They must adopt, implement and enforce all the acquis, which is made up of several chapters, to be allowed to join the EU. 43 Additional Protocol to the Ankara Agreement: Additional Protocol to the Ankara Agreement from 1963 initiating a three-step process toward creating a Customs Union which would help secure Turkey’s full membership to the EEC (European Economic Community). The Additional Protocol contains technical adaptations necessary for the Ankara Agreement, institutional provisions and provisions concerning the EC-Turkey customs unit, to extend this provisions to all Member States, including Cyprus. Turkey has not yet applied this additional protocol to Cyprus, this hindering its accession negotiations. !

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Brussels2013: 19th National Selection Conference of EYP-Europolis Belgium


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Bearing in mind that scepticism with regards to Turkey’s accession to the EU is further fuelled by: i)

the spread of Islamophobia44 throughout Member States,

ii)

the fear of a large influx of illegal immigrants following Turkey’s prospective accession,

iii) the increasing popular support for conservative right-wing parties, J.

Alarmed by the drop in public support in Turkey with regards to the country’s prospective accession to the EU from 63% to 44% in latest polls as a result of: i)

the prolonged accession process,

ii)

the current economic crisis within the EU;

1.

Emphasises that the proposed ‘privileged’ partnership with Turkey is not a viable alternative to a full membership;

2.

Calls upon Member States to develop an unequivocal stance regarding Turkey’s prospective accession;

3.

Condemns Turkey’s continuous aggressive behaviour towards Cyprus;

4.

Urges Turkey to recognise Cyprus as a sovereign state;

5.

Reaffirms the Member States right to veto any decisions;

6.

Requires Turkey to respect human rights and ensure their protection;

7.

Calls for more respect towards minorities and religions by introducing educational systems as well as getting schools to educate their students on different religions and human rights;

8.

Endorses the introduction of classes in religious education, focusing on a diverse spectrum of faiths to school curricula in Member States;

9.

Expresses the need for stricter border control of the EU’s external borders;

10. Encourages the European Commission to facilitate the continuation of negotiations with Turkey despite the current stalemate.

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Islamophobia: A term first used in the 1991 Runnymede Trust Report to describe „unfounded hostility towards Muslims, and therefore fear or dislike of all or most Muslims”. It also refers to the practice of discrimination against Muslims by excluding them from the economic, social and public life of a nation or territory.

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Brussels2013: 19th National Selection Conference of EYP-Europolis Belgium


! !

M O T IO N THE

C O M M IT T E E

FOR A ON

R E S O L U T IO N

CULTURE

AND

BY

E D U C A T IO N

The role of the media in the creation of a European public sphere: how can European decisionmakers in tandem with the ‘fourth estate‘ improve cross-border media coverage and co-operation?

Submitted by:

Maxime De Cock (Het College Vilvoorde), Christina De Witte (KA Pitzemburg), Esther Duerinck (Broederschool Sint-Niklaas), Alena Imgrund (DE), Sam Maas (OLVE-College), Sana Saeed Pervaiz (Institut Saint-André), Aksel Rytsölä (FI), Elise Van Crombruggen (De Pleinschool), Malou Vandevorst (Voorzienigheid Diest), Anar Kučera (Chairperson, CZ)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Recognising the lack of a European public sphere45, B. Realising that the creation of a European public sphere requires active participation of the media, politicians and citizens, C. Observing that cross-border media46 is not widely distributed in the EU, D. Taking into account the gradual shift from traditional media, such as newspapers to modern digital media, E. Bearing in mind that access to all media is not always possible and that there are differences in media preferences between age groups, F.

Deeply regretting that media’s contribution to the creation of a European public sphere is insufficient,

G. Fully aware that media prefer reporting on politicians and issues in their own country, rather than providing a European perspective on issues, H. Noting with deep concern the unsatisfactory co-operation between European decision makers and the media, when it comes to the creation and promotion of a European public sphere, I.

Keeping in mind that government interference in running and funding of the media might impact the freedom of the press,

J.

Aware of limited presence of European identity amongst European citizens,

K. Realising that the knowledge of foreign languages in the EU is not sufficient, thus creating a barrier to establish cross-border media which everyone can access fully, L.

Further noting that the lack of interest in European issues among citizens causes a general lack of knowledge about the EU and prevents the creation of a European public sphere;

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The public sphere is an area of social life where citizens can freely discuss social issues and influence political actions. It is a base for forming common values and ideas. 46 Media that is active in more than one country, providing the same or very similar content that is produced in all participating countries.

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Brussels2013: 19th National Selection Conference of EYP-Europolis Belgium


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Calls for the creation of the European Publishing and Broadcasting Company (EPBC) as an independent public entity, to incorporate existing pan-European media, such as Euronews47;

2.

Requires the EPBC to provide full news coverage to citizens of all Member States in all official languages of the EU;

3.

Further requests the EPBC to utilise different available media models, such as printed press, radio and television broadcast, online services and social networks;

4.

Recommends the EPBC to co-operate with existing public and commercial media, especially in the fields of exchange of information and news coverage between Member States;

5.

Calls upon the EPBC to actively involve politicians on the EU level in a dialogue with the citizens;

6.

Supports closer links of the Eurobarometer48 and the EPBC in promoting surveys and polls among the citizens of all Member States;

7.

Further reminds the European Commission of the importance of funding for both newly established and already existing cross-border media such as Arte49;

8.

Desires that Member States promote language education and ensures that every high-school graduate masters at least two additional languages;

9.

Urges the European Commission to focus on an exchange programme for graduated and experienced journalists in the Erasmus50 and Grundtvig51 programmes;

10. Encourages the European Commission to promote pan-European events, such as the 9th of May celebrations more widely across the EU.

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Euronews is a European, multilingual news television channel, headquartered in Lyon, France. Created in 1993, it claims to be covering world news from a Pan-European perspective. It broadcasts in 14 languages. 48 Eurobarometer is a series of surveys regularly performed on behalf of the European Commission since 1973. It produces reports of public opinion on certain issues relating to the EU across the Member States. 49 Arte is a Franco-German TV network, a European channel that promotes programming in the areas of culture and the arts. Its facilities are in Issy-les-Moulineaux, south of Paris, and it is jointly headquartered in Strasbourg, France, and Baden-Baden, Germany. As an international joint venture (an EEIG), its programs cater technically to audiences from both France and Germany. This implies double titling, opposite-language subtitling, dubbing, hosts who speak both languages alternately, and two separate audio tracks. 50 Erasmus is EU student exchange programme established in 1987. It forms a major part of the EU Lifelong Learning Programme 2007–2013, and is the operational framework for the European Commission's initiatives on higher education. 51 Grundtvig is a European funding programme that is part of the European Commission’s Lifelong Learning Programme 2007-2013 and aims to strengthen the European dimension in adult education and lifelong learning across Europe.

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Brussels2013: 19th National Selection Conference of EYP-Europolis Belgium



Brussels2013 - Resolution Booklet