Page 1

EYES ON

EUROPE

Transatlantic Relations: Stronger despite the storm?

EYES ON EUROPE #19 Des regards croisĂŠs sur l'Europe hiver 2013 | 84 pages www.eyes-on-europe.eu


The goal of Eyes on Europe has always been to provoke debates by confronting different perspectives. This issue’s aim is to focus on the transatlantic relationship. Over the course of the last few months, the ties between the European Union and the United States have constantly been in the news. They have captured public attention, but not always for the best. While Europeans and Americans are working on the most comprehensive trade agreement ever negotiated in the history of the global economy, the NSA disclosures were sparking a wave of public outcry in Europe. We believe that now is a good time to step back and take a deep breath. We are not interested in judging either side. Instead, we hope to foster debate by opening our columns to various stakeholders in order to discuss current challenges and the history of transatlantic relations. In a continent where youth unemployment rates are going through the roof, we believe that every road to foster growth is worth exploring. But this free trade agreement will do more than addressing economic issues. It will probably shape the future rules in a new world order. As a result, neither the European Union nor the United States should accept a compromise at any cost. Both partners should keep working with all their strength on building bridges. The stakes of negotiating a beneficial deal for both sides of the Atlantic are high and therefore, we believe that this debate deserves more than simple slogans. This issue’s special feature aims to live up to these challenging objectives. Moreover, this 19th issue of Eyes on Europe also touches upon many other topics. For instance, we will look into the social background of MEPs, the future of agriculture or what political theory can tell about migrations in Europe. Written by students, scholars, politicians or EU professionals, all these articles share a common willingness to better understand Europe in all its variety. Almost ten years ago, a handful of students suggested creating a student magazine at the Institut d’études européennes (IEE) in order to bring students closer to the European Union. Today, we are proud to carry on their work built on the achievements of the previous Eyes on Europe teams. This year, one of our main goals is to further develop the web version of our magazine. With a team of more than 10 writers working exclusively for the website, we are glad to emphasize Eyes on Europe’s commitment to foster new forums for constructive debate on European issues. Our new challenge will be to increase the links between the paper version and the website. So, stay tuned!

“So, let us not be blind to our differences — but let us also direct attention to our common interests and to the means by which those differences can be resolved.” John. F. Kennedy

Alexandre Donnersbach and Thibaut L’Ortye Rédacteur-en-chef ― Vice-rédacteur en chef

EYES ON EUROPE

EDITORIAL

3


EN — 03 Editorial EN — 06-07 Tribune Karel de Gucht, EU Trade Commissionner, Transatlantic Trade: Time to Get Down to Business GR — 08-10 Langue invitée — Grec Anni Podimata, Vice-President of the European Parliament, "The Upcoming Greek Presidency: A Promising Challenge"

Dossier : Transatlantic Relationship FR — 13 Introduction — Geopolitique transatlantique FR — 14-16 Obama et l’Europe : de la lune de miel à la déception DE — 17-18 Das lange Streben nach einer gemeinsamen Telefonnummer

Relations internationales FR — 31-32 Les asymétries du lobbying européeen EN — 33-34 The Transatlantic Community — Future prospects of NATO FR — 35-36 Lampedusa au prisme de la sécurité humaine

EN — 19-20 A Free-Trade Agreement between the EU and the USA: Why now? Why not earlier? EN — 21-22 Where is the consumer interest in TTIP? EN — 23-24 Should the EU dilute its relationship with the US in the spying cloud? EN — 25-27 America is watching EU EN — 28 TTIP: full transparency, nothing less

EYES ON EUROPE

SOMMAIRE

4


Citoyenneté FR — 39-40 Politique migratoire et citoyenneté européenne d'un point de vue cosmopolitique DE — 41-42 Europas wirtschaftliche, politische und migrantische Krise: „ein gefundenes Fressen“ für Extremisten EN — 41-42 Give Europe a Face FR — 46-47 Quel avenir pour l'Europe des Nations ? EN — 48-50 Jimmy Jammar, the man who brings Europe closer to the citizen EN — 51-52 Feeding Europe in times of crisis: vers un système agro-alimentaire résilient EN — 53-54 Change the debate and win the elections

EYES ON EUROPE

Économie et social DE — 57-60 Dein Europaabgeordneter: Das unbekannte Wesen EN — 61-62 European sovereign debt: understanding the numbers

Book reviews FR — 72 Europe, amour ou chambre à part ? FR — 73 The EU’s Role in World Politics FR — 74 Europe : défaite ou défis ?

FR — 63-64 Citoyen européen et étudiant : pour une application uniforme du droit communautaire EN — 65-66 How does Norway cooperate with the EU and who of those partners achieves more in their relations? FR — 67-68 Le Parlement européen : entre dialogues et concertations EN — 69 Equal pay: it’s about time! EN — 70 Social crisis; social solutions: too little, but not too late

SOMMAIRE

5


TRANSATLANTIC TRADE

EYES ON EUROPE

Karel De Gucht

TRIBUNE

6


Transatlantic Trade: Time to Get Down to Business Reaching a deal on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership was never going to be easy, but it will certainly be worthwhile, argues Karel De Gucht Since it became clear this year that the European Union and the United States were to launch negotiations for a free trade agreement, the plan has understandably received a great deal of attention. Many people – groups whose interests will be affected, activists and of course politicians – are taking a very welcome interest in the process. Discussion has ranged from the big picture ("Will the agreement change future global geopolitics?") to the microscopic ("What about the chickens?"). We need these conversations. After all, the United States is not just any other trading partner. It remains the most powerful country in the world. Neither are our American colleagues known for shying away from defending their interests, as recent developments appear to demonstrate once again. So if we do not have an open, frank debate about all the concerns on people's minds we will miss our chance either to lay them to rest or, when they are justified, take them on board. However, if we are actually to make any progress, we need to be able to discuss the details while also keeping the overview in mind. In short, we need to remember why we are doing this in the first place. And the reasons are clear: Growth and leadership. First, growth. This deal will have a significant positive impact on growth in both the American and European economies, an impact we sorely need. In the best estimate available to the Commission, a good agreement would produce GDP gains for Europe of at least 0.5%, with similar consequences for the US. That translates into over 500€ per year per household and hundreds of thousands of jobs.

EYES ON EUROPE

Karel De Gucht

"At least" because those figures do not take into the fact that opening an economy to international trade and investment is in fact also a confidence boost to our economies.

democratic political choices which cannot be put up for negotiation. So we need to be clear that our objective is to tune up the system, not to dismantle it. And we need to carry out that job in an open, transparent and above all pragmatic way.

Second, leadership. A good agreement between the EU and the US would do more than most free trade agreements to support the long term health of the multilateral trading system at the World Trade Organisation. That is because it gives us the chance to discuss solutions to problems that affect all trading nations. And because those solutions would have considerable weight given that they would apply in half of the world economy.

Take car safety regulation: both sides' systems deliver very similar safety results, so why can we not formally recognise safety tests in order to facilitate trade? This is the kind of regulatory cooperation –not the chimera of a radical, neo-liberal free-for-all – that these negotiations will focus on.

No bilateral deal can supplant multilateral discussions, but a good EU-US agreement would form a good basis for future global discussions when the time is ripe.

If we can do a deal along these reasonable if complicated lines – and on other important issues like public procurement and services – we will be able to say we have a good agreement, one that can deliver the growth we need and provide leadership towards new global liberalisation.

Of course, the question then becomes: what is a good agreement? This is where things get more challenging and why keeping our focus is so important.

But that will only be possible if all those who can contribute to the success of this trade deal make their voice heard. Let's not be driven to distraction.

But dealing with regulation is both complex and politically sensitive, and for good reason.

Karel De Gucht is European Commissioner for Trade

Because the transatlantic trade and investment relationship already runs pretty smoothly, this deal needs to be more than a traditional free trade agreement. The real barriers to EU-US trade and investment are not at the customs border. They are behind: regulatory barriers can block trade outright, make it too expensive to be viable or just act as a drag on overall economic efficiency. But dealing with regulation is both complex and politically sensitive, and for good reason. Regulation protects people from risks to their health, safety, environment and financial security. It is the result of

TRIBUNE

7


The Upcoming Greek Presidency: A Promising Challenge Τον Ιανουάριο του 2014, η Ελλάδα αναλαμβάνει την εκ περιτροπής προεδρία του Συμβουλίου της Ε.Ε. σε μία εξαιρετικά κρίσιμη περίοδο για ολόκληρη την Ε.Ε. Η άνευ προηγουμένου οικονομική κρίση, η ύφεση, οι συνθήκες κοινωνικής ανασφάλειας και η ανεργία έχουν κλονίσει την εμπιστοσύνη των πολιτών σε εθνικά και ευρωπαϊκά θεσμικά όργανα. Ενισχύεται ο ευρωσκεπτικισμός, οι ακραίες φωνές και οι δυνάμεις που αντιτίθενται στην ιδέα της ενωμένης Ευρώπης. Οι κοινωνικές και πολιτικές επιπτώσεις της κρίσης είναι σε όλους αισθητές ιδιαίτερα στον Νότο αλλά και στον Βορρά. Μέσα σε αυτό το περιβάλλον θα αναλάβει η πέμπτη στην ευρωπαϊκή ιστορία Ελληνική Προεδρία το τιμόνι του Συμβουλίου της Ε.Ε. Σε μια περίοδο που είναι κρίσιμη και μεταβατική για την Ε.Ε με τις ευρωεκλογές το Μάιο του 2014. Γιατί εάν σε αυτές τις εκλογές αποτυπωθεί η άνοδος του ευρωσκεπτικισμού θα βρεθούμε αντιμέτωποι με τον πραγματικό κίνδυνο υπονόμευσης της δημοκρατικής νομιμοποίησης στην Ένωση. Αυτό μπορεί ακόμα και τώρα να αποφευχθεί αυτό, εάν η Ε.Ε. ενισχύσει τις προσπάθειές της για να αποδείξει στους πολίτες ότι είναι ικανή να αντιμετωπίσει την υφιστάμενη κρίση, μέσω ενισχυμένων θεσμών, εργαλείων συνεργασίας και κυρίως αλληλεγγύης. Η Ελληνική Προεδρία θα έχει κεντρικό ρόλο στην προσπάθεια αυτή. Θα κληθεί να χειριστεί την διαμόρφωση ευρωπαϊκής νομοθεσίας κρίσιμης για την μελλοντική σταθερότητα της ευρωζώνης, την έξοδο από την κρίση μέσω ενισχυμένων θεσμών, εργαλείων συνεργασίας και κυρίως αλληλεγγύης. Η επιτυχία της Ελληνικής Προεδρίας πέρα από τα προφανή οφέλη για την σταθερότητα στην Ευρώπη θα δώσει και ένα ισχυρό μήνυμα στους Ευρωπαίους πολίτες ότι η Ευρώπη μπορεί να πάρει δίκαιες αποφάσεις προς όφελος όλων των Ευρωπαίων πολιτών. Θα συμβάλει στην ενίσχυση της αξιοπιστίας των ευρωπαϊκών θεσμών στη

EYES ON EUROPE

Anni Podimata συνείδηση των πολιτών και των προσπαθειών να αποδείξουμε όχι μόνο ότι είναι ικανή να αντιμετωπίσει την υφιστάμενη κρίση αλλά και ότι μόνο η ευρωπαϊκή ολοκλήρωση μπορεί να δώσει πειστική λύση.

Οι βασικοί άξονες της θεματολογίας της περιλαμβάνουν την εμβάθυνση της Οικονομικής και Νομισματικής Ένωσης κυρίως μέσω της ολοκλήρωσης της Τραπεζικής Ένωσης, της δημιουργίας ενιαίου συστήματος και ενιαίου ταμείου εκκαθάρισης τραπεζών. Η δρομολόγηση της δημιουργίας μιας τραπεζικής ένωσης είναι ίσως η σημαντικότερη θεσμική παρέμβαση από συστάσεως της Οικονομικής και Νομισματικής Ένωσης. Η Τραπεζική Ένωση είναι ο μόνος τρόπος για να μειώσουμε τις ανισότητες μεταξύ των τραπεζικών συστημάτων στον Βορρά και στον Νότο. Για να αποσυνδέσουμε τα εθνικά τραπεζικά συστήματα από το λεγόμενο «εθνικό ρίσκο», που οδηγεί σε υψηλότερο κόστος δανεισμού για τις τράπεζες, σε εκροή καταθέσεων στις δυσκολότερες στιγμές για την οικονομία, σε πιστωτική ασφυξία την αγορά και τελικά στην ενίσχυση των ανισορροπιών στην ΕΕ. Η θεσμοθέτηση του νέου πλαισίου έχει ήδη ξεκινήσει, η ολοκλήρωσή του ωστόσο θα πάρει χρόνο και απαιτεί δύσκολες διαπραγματεύσεις. Για την Ελλάδα, που αναλαμβάνει σε λίγους μήνες την προεδρία της Ένωσης, η αποτελεσματική προώθηση αυτού του νομοθετικού πακέτου αποτελεί ίσως τη μεγαλύτερη πρόκληση.

προωθούνται σήμερα στην Ευρώπη τον Φόρο επί των Χρηματοπιστωτικών Συναλλαγών (ΦΧΣ). Η εισαγωγή του ΦΧΣ από 11 Κράτη Μέλη στοχεύει στην μετατόπιση του φορολογικού βάρους από την εργασία και την παραγωγική επιχειρηματικότητα σε εκείνες τις πρακτικές και τα χρηματοπιστωτικά προϊόντα που είναι ακραιφνώς κερδοσκοπικά και που άλλωστε φέρουν το βασικό μερίδιο ευθύνης για την χρηματοπιστωτική κρίση. Προωθώντας τα παραπάνω θέματα γρήγορα και αποτελεσματικά η Ελλάδα θα αποδείξει ότι είναι μια υπεύθυνη ευρωπαϊκή χώρα, μια χώρα της ευρωζώνης που λειτουργεί για το κοινό συμφέρον στη βάση των θεμελιωδών αρχών της Ένωσης. Είναι μια ευκαιρία να βελτιώσει την εικόνα της στο εξωτερικό η οποία έχει πληγεί τα τελευταία χρόνια. Η επίτευξη των δημοσιονομικών στόχων και η επιτυχημένη Ελληνική Προεδρία θα είναι η πραγματική απόδειξη μιας χώρας που προσπαθεί, αγωνίζεται και τα καταφέρνει. Οι δυσκολίες είναι ακόμη μπροστά μας. Αλλά μπροστά μας είναι και η άλλη Ελλάδα, η Ελλάδα της πολιτικής με κεντρικό ρόλο στην ολοκλήρωση της Ενωμένης Ευρώπης της ειρήνης, της δημοκρατίας, της δικαιοσύνης και της ευημερίας. Anni Podimata, Vice-President of the European Parliament See next page for English translation

Η Ελληνική Προεδρία θα αναλάβει επίσης να ολοκληρώσει την εισαγωγή ενός από τα λίγα κοινωνικά δίκαια μέτρα που

INVITED LANGUAGE

8


THE UPCOMING GREEK PRESIDENCY

EYES ON EUROPE

Anni Podimata

INVITED LANGUAGE

9


The Upcoming Greek Presidency: A Promising Challenge In January 2014, Greece will take over the rotating presidency of the Council in an extremely crucial period for the European Union. The unprecedented economic crisis, the recession, social insecurity and unemployment have shaken public confidence in national and European institutions. This reinforces Euroscepticism, extreme voices and forces opposed to the idea of a united Europe. The impact of the social and political crisis is felt across Europe, especially in the South. In this context, Greece will take over for the fifth time the presidency of the EU Council, at a crucial and transitional time for the EU with the European elections in May 2014. If these elections reflect the rise of Euroscepticism, we will face the real danger of undermining the democratic legitimacy of the EU. This can be avoided if the EU strengthens its efforts to prove to the citizens it is capable of dealing with the current crisis, through strengthened institutions, collaboration tools and mainly solidarity. The Greek Presidency will play a key role in this effort. It will have to deal with the development of EU legislation that will be crucial for the stability of the Eurozone and to manage the exit from the crisis. The success of the Greek Presidency – beyond the obvious benefits for stability in Europe – would send a powerful message to European citizens, i.e. that Europe is able to take fair decisions for the benefit of all European citizens. Moreover, it will contribute to enhancing the credibility of European institutions in the minds of the citizens and demonstrate that they are not only able to tackle the current crisis, but also that European integration can provide a convincing solution.

EYES ON EUROPE

Anni Podimata

The key priorities will be the deepening of the Economic and Monetary Union, mainly through the completion of the banking union, the creation of a single system and a single clearing funds for banks. The creation of a banking union may be one of the most important institutional interventions of the Economic and Monetary Union. It is the only

way to reduce inequalities between the banking systems in the North and in the South. The objective is to decouple the banking system of the so-called “national risk”, which leads to higher borrowing costs for banks, deposit outflows in the most difficult times for the economy, credit crunch in the market and, ultimately, strengthens inequalities in the EU.

effective promotion of this legislative package may be the greatest challenge. The Greek Presidency will also have to complete the introduction of one of the few socially equitable measures promoted in Europe today: the financial transaction tax (FTT). The introduction of the FTT in 11 Member States aims at shifting the tax burden from labour and productive entrepreneurship to financial products that are purely speculative and bear the blame for the financial crisis. By promoting these issues quickly and efficiently, Greece will prove to be a responsible European country, a Eurozone country that works for the public interest on the basis of the fundamental principles of the Union. It is an opportunity to improve its image abroad, which has suffered in recent years. The achievement of the budgetary targets and a successful Greek Presidency will be the real proof for a country that tries, struggles and succeeds. The difficulties are still ahead of us. But in front of us and in front of the others, there is Greece, a Greece which plays a key policy role in the integration of a united Europe of peace, democracy, justice and prosperity. Anni Podimata, Vice-President of the European Parliament

The institutionalisation of the new framework already started, yet its completion will take more time and require difficult negotiations. For Greece, which will take over the Presidency of the Council, the

INVITED LANGUAGE

10


Relations transatlantiques Transatlantic Relationship Transatlantische Beziehungen

EYES ON EUROPE

11


Introduction : Géopolitique transatlantique Stefano Messina « Obama et l’Europe : de la lune de miel à la déception » Mario Telò Das lange Streben nach einer gemeinsamen Telefonnummer Kirill Gelmi A Free Trade Area between the EU and the USA: why now? Why not earlier? René Schwok Where is the consumer interest in TTIP? Johannes Kleis Should the EU dilute its relationship with the US in the spying cloud? Manfred Weber America is watching EU Cédric Laurant and Mauro Sanna Full transparency, nothing less. David Hammerstein and Reinhard Bütikofer

EYES ON EUROPE

12


Introduction ― Géopolitique transatlantique L’unipolarité américaine du système international défendue par certains auteurs, après la chute du communisme, ne semble avoir été qu’une parenthèse dans la politique globale. Au contraire, le monde est plus que jamais caractérisé par des interdépendances multiples, ce qui rend la politique internationale à la fois plus riche et plus complexe. Dès avant la fin de la suprématie européenne au XXe siècle, Antonio Gramsci avait prévu l’émergence de l’hégémonie américaine, combinant

leadership intellectuel et militaire pour se stabiliser à la tête du système international. Pourtant, Robert Gilpin remettra en cause ce postulat dans les années 1980, en distinguant les étapes du cycle de vie des grandes puissances. Les États-Unis seraient à l’époque d’ores et déjà rentrés dans une phase de défi où d’autres puissances émergent - notamment la CEE et le Japon d’un point de vue économique - et ne tarderaient pas à atteindre une phase de déclin. Il est actuellement devenu difficile de nier que le système politique international soit devenu multipolaire, menant à une réorganisation substantielle des pôles de pouvoir sur le globe. Même si la domination militaire américaine reste flagrante, il en va autrement concernant son leadership

EYES ON EUROPE

Stefano Messina

moral. Cet état de fait nous donne l’occasion de questionner plus amplement le statut de la relation transatlantique, qui perdure entre les deux anciens maîtres du monde. Nous tenterons en premier lieu de brosser un aperçu général des interactions préexistantes entre ces

deux blocs historiques, en examinant le passé de la relation transatlantique et sa signification dans l’état actuel des choses. Il est actuellement devenu difficile de nier que le système politique international soit devenu multipolaire, menant à une réorganisation substantielle des pôles de pouvoir sur le globe.

Comme un symbole, le traité de « Partenariat transatlantique de commerce et d’investissement » (TTIP en anglais) pourrait marquer un tournant dans les relations que l’on disait à la peine entre les États-Unis et l’Union européenne. Cet accord ne représente rien de moins que le plus vaste accord commercial jamais conclu, concernant près de

DOSSIER

40% du produit intérieur du globe. Nous discuterons des enjeux et des contraintes qui pèsent sur le processus de négociation, afin de comprendre s’il s’agit là d’une stratégie des deux grandes puissances économiques pour garder la mainmise sur le commerce mondial, ainsi que sur la géopolitique globale, ou plutôt la stricte application de la doctrine libérale pour sortir de la crise, stratégie qui devra ensuite être étendue aux autres parties du monde. Il va sans dire que ce traité pose également certaines questions pour les consommateurs des deux côtés de l’Atlantique, enjeux qui seront tout autant mis en évidence dans ce dossier. Sujet tout aussi sensible, le scandale des écoutes américaines nous permettra une mise en perspective de la nature de la relation à l’œuvre entre l’Europe et les États-Unis, qui s’apparente à une dynamique de partenaires en compétition. Même si ces révélations ne semblent pas dans l’immédiat signifier l’arrêt des négociations, le fait est que cette situation accroît indubitablement la pression sur les parties en discussion. Stefano Messina est étudiant à l’Institut d’Etudes Européennes et responsable de la rubrique « Dossier » d’Eyes on Europe.

13


« Obama et l’Europe : de la lune de miel à la déception » Rencontre avec Mario Telò, à l'issue du « IIIe Forum Agora sur les évolutions dans les relations transatlantiques dans un monde multipolaire » ayant eu lieu à l'Institut d'Etudes Européennes, le 22 octobre 2013. Les relations entre les États-Unis et l’Union européenne sont quelque peu tendues en cette période de crise et de changements de polarité, retour sur les liens unissant les deux grands du XXe siècle. Eyes on Europe : Quel bilan pouvez-vous dresser du premier mandat d'Obama et de ses relations avec l'Union européenne ?

Mario Telò : Nous pouvons dresser un bilan controversé. Il y a eu tellement de difficultés pendant la présidence de Georges W. Bush que les attentes en Europe, après les changements et l'élection d'Obama, étaient énormes. C'était la classique situation de « crisis because of too high expectations ». Les premiers discours d'Obama confirmaient un retour au multilatéralisme, au désarmement avec le discours du Caire, et l'envie de créer une atmosphère de dialogue international, en particulier avec l'Union européenne. Cependant il y eut quelques déceptions du côté européen, dues au fait qu'Obama a fait son premier voyage en Orient, au Pacifique, ce qui prouvait un changement graduel des priorités américaines, non pas transatlantiques mais plutôt transpacifiques. Aussi, l'interdépendance financière des États-Unis avec la Chine a atteint un niveau tel (en 2008, c'était 900 milliards de dollars et maintenant nous sommes déjà à 1500 milliards) qu'on a parlé pendant un certain temps, à mon avis de façon abusive, de G-2, c'est-àdire d'un accord préférentiel avec la Chine pour la gouvernance globale qui trouvait sa base dans l'interdépendance financière - créditeurs et débiteurs étant très liés. Il y eut également l'accord anti-européen de Copenhague en 2009 où les ÉtatsUnis et la Chine se sont mis d'accord sur la baisse des standards dans la lutte contre le réchauffement climatique, alors que l'Europe n'était même pas conviée aux discussions.

EYES ON EUROPE

Mario Telò

Ajoutons qu'Obama a manifestement exprimé quelques critiques vis-à-vis du système décisionnel et de représentation externe de l'Union européenne en refusant de participer à un sommet avec l’UE. C'était durant la présidence espagnole, celle-ci souhaitait pratiquer l'ancien système pré-Lisbonne. Obama aurait dû y rencontrer trois présidents, le président du Conseil de l'Union européenne, Herman Van Rompuy, le président de la Commission, JoséManuel Barroso et le président tournant qui était alors José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero. Tout avait commencé par une « honey moon » et ce fut ensuite la déception totale. Petit à petit avec le partenariat transatlantique, on revient aujourd'hui à une relation, à mon avis, plus naturelle dans le sens qu'il est nécessaire pour l'Europe et les États-Unis dans une situation économique grave et après l'échec du Doha Round, de s'interroger à deux sur ce qu'ils peuvent faire pour relancer la négociation et la croissance mondiale. C'est inévitable. Deuxièmement, comme Pascal Lamy l'a dit, étant donné que plusieurs interprétations de cette négociation sont possibles, cela engendre des inquiétudes pour la Chine, pour l’OMC et surtout pour la France inquiète que l'Europe soit soumise aux États-Unis vu la hiérarchie au niveau de la puissance. Ajoutons qu'Obama a manifestement exprimé quelques critiques visà-vis du système décisionnel et de représentation externe de l'Union européenne en refusant de participer à un sommet avec l’UE.

Dans notre forum, nous avons voulu commencer par deux exposés, le premier par le Pr. Robert O. Keohane et le second par moi-même, qui partagent une thèse théorique et analytique fondamentale. Nous sommes d'accord que les États-Unis

DOSSIER

connaissent sur une longue période, un déclin. On ne peut plus parler d'hégémonie américaine au sens d'une combinaison de la capacité de domination militaire et économique avec un soft power qui influence les autres en imposant indirectement par le soft way un mode de vie américain, la vision américaine des normes, etc. Tout cela appartient au passé. Si on partage cette thèse et qu'on prend en compte toute la sociologie américaine à propos de la fragmentation du processus décisionnel américain, institutionnel, le lobbying, le shutdown, etc., il faut en finir avec la peur des ÉtatsUnis. Nous ne sommes pas l'Amérique du Sud ou l'Afrique qui entretiennent des relations asymétriques avec les États-Unis. Les relations entre les États-Unis et l'Europe, avec sa force économique, sont symétriques. L'Europe ne doit plus avoir peur des États-Unis, ne plus avoir peur de négocier avec les ÉtatsUnis, qui ont besoin de nous comme nous avons besoin d'eux pour établir une régulation plus importante permettant la croissance et la création d'emplois. Aussi, l'Europe a une carte à jouer. Les standards élaborés par celle-ci, dans l'environnement ou dans le social par exemple, sont souvent plus sophistiqués. Pourquoi ? Parce que le multilatéralisme interne, entre 28 pays, permet d'élaborer des standards qui sont beaucoup plus faciles à exporter que des standards américains adoptés unilatéralement. Ce sont deux raisons qui incitent l'Europe à négocier. Mais bien entendu, il faut négocier avec la consultation de tous les stakeholders internes, les groupes sociaux, les ONG, et tenir compte de la géographie des intérêts au sein du Conseil européen, du Parlement européen, etc. Il faut être prudent, créer un consensus, élaborer des négociations internes complexes. Et en parallèle, il faut conduire une série de négociations pacifiques sur les investissements avec d'autres Etats. L'Europe, par exemple, a conclu cette semaine un accord avec la Chine, elle peut aussi conduire des

14


« OBAMA ET L’EUROPE : DE LA LUNE DE MIEL À LA DÉCEPTION »

EYES ON EUROPE

DOSSIER

Mario Telò

15


« OBAMA ET L’EUROPE : DE LA LUNE DE MIEL À LA DÉCEPTION »

relations de libre-échange et de coopération économique avec le Brésil, l'Inde, et certains pays de l'ASEAN. Donc l'Europe peut montrer qu'elle est capable de répondre au rayonnement américain par son propre rayonnement et c'est aussi un élément de rééquilibrage qui nous permet d'éviter le chantage ou des ultimatums américains, afin de faire aboutir les négociations. Nous ne sommes pas l'Amérique du Sud ou l'Afrique qui entretiennent des relations asymétriques avec les États-Unis. Les relations entre les États-Unis et l'Europe, avec sa force économique, sont symétriques. Certains prétendent que les négociations euro-américaines n'aboutiront pas, que ce sera une sorte de chantier ouvert pendant quelques années, que ce sera un élément permanent dans les relations internationales car la négociation est compliquée. Sur une série d'éléments, la sensibilité et les valeurs sont différentes, comme sur les questions liées à l'alimentation, à l'environnement ou à la protection des données, sujet extrêmement sensible en Allemagne en raison du passé de la Stasi stalinienne. Les États-Unis veulent un temps négocier sur le TTIP mais les Européens et l'opinion publique soulèvent la question de la protection des données ou ensuite l'Union européenne pousse la négociation et les États-Unis soulèvent la question du border sharing en considérant que l'Union ne contribue pas assez à la sécurité européenne et américaine. Il y a, des deux côtés de l'Atlantique, de potentiels issue linkages qui vont compliquer les choses. En résumé, il y a une complication d’ordre technique, une complication de valeurs et une complication due aux potentiels issue linkages. Pour illustrer cela on a vu, ces jours-ci, Daniel Cohn-Bendit proposer d'interrompre la négociation commerciale avec les Américains en raison de l'espionnage. Les issue linkages représentent une sorte d'épée de Damoclès au-dessus de cette négociation. Eyes on Europe : Y a-t-il une stratégie entre les États-Unis et l'Union européenne pour faire face à la Chine ?

Mario Telò : Oui et non. Oui dans le sens qu'Américains et Européens

EYES ON EUROPE

Mario Telò

sont d'accord d'inclure la Chine dans le système multilatéral. Les États-Unis ont par exemple plaidé pour l'admission de la Chine dans l’OMC et dans d'autres organisations multilatérales. Aussi Obama reconnaît que le monde est multipolaire. C'est la première fois que les États-Unis admettent cela. Mais l'Europe est en désaccord sur le fait que le dialogue avec la Chine se prête, dans le cas des États-Unis, à des ambiguïtés et des oscillations. Ils veulent d'un côté, inclure (engage) la Chine dans les relations multilatérales mais d'un autre côté, la contenir (contain). Pour illustrer cela, regardons la carte géographique des alliances militaires américaines, les États-Unis sont en train de construire un système d'alliances tout autour de la Chine, ils ont par exemple renforcé l'alliance militaire avec le Japon. Ils ont envoyé deux mille marines en Australie, aussi le Trans-Pacific Partnership (TTP) exclut la Chine. L’OTAN n'est plus une alliance défensive, elle intervient plutôt dans des secteurs au-delà des frontières de l'alliance originelle.

A la différence des États-Unis qui font face à de véritables enjeux de sécurité comme au niveau de sa flotte, de la Mer de Chine méridionale, de la protection de Taïwan, engendrant de potentiels malentendus, l'Europe n'a aucun dilemme de sécurité avec la Chine, ce qui rend les négociations beaucoup plus simples. L'Europe est plutôt dans le civil power alors que les ÉtatsUnis restent une puissance militaire classique.

n'est donc plus une alliance défensive, elle intervient plutôt dans des secteurs au-delà des frontières de l'alliance originelle. Ses interventions ont-elles été appréciées ? Non, en Afghanistan, l’OTAN est en train de se retirer et en Libye, le bilan n'est pas positif. Pour ces raisons, le secrétaire général, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, a dit que de nouvelles interventions en Syrie n'étaient pas envisagées. Comme vous pouvez le voir, les difficultés sont conséquentes. Aussi, comme dit précédemment, les États-Unis souhaitent un border sharing, une augmentation des investissements européens dans le domaine militaire alors que l'Europe est en train de couper, de « démilitariser » le continent. L'Europe est la partie du monde où les budgets militaires sont le plus coupés, et ce bien avant la crise, mais encore plus après. Même la France et la Grande-Bretagne qui ambitionnent d'être de grandes puissances sont en train de couper dans le budget des armées, tout comme le pays « exemple » de l'Europe, l'Allemagne. Tout cela crée un décalage et des malentendus transatlantiques qu'on apprécie ou non. C'est un fait. Les opinions publiques nationales européennes ne sont pas prêtes à renoncer au welfare state et faire des sacrifices pour l'armement. Toutes ces différences créent un problème transatlantique solide et structurel. Mario Telò est Professeur de Relations Internationales à l'ULB et à la LUISS de Rome et Président émérite de l’Institut d’Etudes Européennes. Interview réalisée par Flore Dargent, étudiante en première année de Master

Eyes on Europe : Quelle est la situation actuelle de l'OTAN et d'après vous, quel sera son futur ?

à l’Institut d’études européennes.

Mario Telò : L'OTAN est en crise d'identité depuis la fin de la Guerre froide car l'OTAN a été créée pour la Guerre froide. Une fois que celleci a été gagnée, qu'il n'y a plus eu d'Union soviétique, il n'y a plus eu de menace nucléaire. Dès cette époque, l'OTAN est à la recherche de sa nouvelle identité. Elle a cherché son identité dans ce qu'on appelle les « out of zones missions » en Afghanistan ou en Libye. Ce

DOSSIER

16


Das lange Streben nach einer gemeinsamen Telefonnummer Nach dem Ende des zweiten Weltkrieges entstand eine neue bipolare Weltordnung, die die Geschichte fast 50 Jahre lang prägte. An diesem Scheidepunkt beginnt die Geschichte der Vereinigung Europas, die seit jeher eng mit den Beziehungen zu den USA verflochten ist. Unterhaltung mit Professor Andrew Gamble. Nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg waren die USA bemüht aus dem zerstörten Europa einen Verbündeten zu machen um es so vor dem Einfluss des Kommunismus zu sichern und vor dem Eingriff der damaligen Sowjetunion zu schützen. Dies sollte einerseits durch politischen Einfluss und andererseits durch einen ökonomischen Wohlstand mittels der Marktwirtschaft erreicht werden. Aus diesen Gründen entstand das „European Recovery Program“, besser bekannt unter dem Namen „Marshallplan“: Ein großes Wirtschaftswiederaufbauprogramm für ganz Europa – jedoch wurde es nur in Westeuropa angenommen, da Osteuropa es auf Druck der Sowjetunion ablehnte miteinbezogen zu werden. Zur Verwaltung der Hilfsgelder wurden die ECA (Economic Cooperation Administration) und die Organisation für europäische wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit (OEEC, später die OECD) gegründet. Als Konsequenz – oder eher als Reaktion auf diese Neuverteilung der Macht auf der europäischen Szene – entstand unter dem Antrieb der französischen Regierung innerhalb von 3 Jahren 1951 die Europäische Gemeinschaft für Kohle und Stahl, der Vorläufer der Europäischen Gemeinschaft. Wie wichtig der amerikanische Einfluss für den Anfang des europäischen Integrationsprozesses war ist also eindeutig. Unter diesem Leitmotiv soll nun auch die transatlantische Beziehung analysiert werden. Prof. Andrew Gamble erklärt: „Die USA gelten meistens als Unterstützer eines politisch und wirtschaftlich stärker integrierten Europa. Während des Kalten Krieges war dies so, weil die USA dachten, dass eine solche Vereinigung den Zusammenhalt

EYES ON EUROPE

Kirill Gelmi

sowie die Elastizität Westeuropas in der Konfrontation mit der Sowjetunion und deren Alliierten verstärken würde. Dies erklärt auch wieso sich die USA bereits von Anfang an für die Beteiligung von Großbritannien in dem europäischen Integrationsprozess engagiert haben; Die Briten würden auf diese Weise einen Einfluss auf die von den USA gewünschten Richtung ausüben.“ „Who do I call if I want to speak to Europe“ Wie sich aber weiterhin die bilateralen europäisch-amerikanischen Beziehungen entwickelt haben, kann man in der berühmten Frage Kissingers „Who do I call if I want to speak to Europe?“ zusammenfassen. Ein einzelner Ansprechpartner der EU, besonders in solch traditionellen Bereichen wie die Außenpolitik, hat lange nicht existiert. Erst durch die Unterzeichnung im Jahre 2007 des Vertrages von Lissabon wurden zwei wichtige Elemente für die gemeinsame europäische Außenpolitik geschaffen; Erstens die Rechtspersönlichkeit der Europäischen Union und zweitens das Amt vom Hohen Vertreter für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik. Das Amt des Hohen Vertreters erstand als Ersatz für das im missglückten Vertrag über eine Verfassung Europas vorgesehenen Amt vom Außenminister. Laut dem Lissabonner Vertrag, leitet der Hohe Vortreter „die gemeinsame Außenund Sicherheitspolitik der Union“. Faktisch gesehen, hat der Hohe Vertreter aber wenig Befugnisse, denn Inhalt, bzw. Existenz einer gemeinsamen Außenpolitik sind eine fragliche Angelegenheit. So behauptet Gamble: „Die EU hat 28 Mitgliedsstaaten, jedoch ist sie selbst kein Staat und hat deswegen nicht die selbe Beziehung mit

TITELGESCHICHTE

anderen Staaten im internationalen System. In manchen Bereichen hat sie die Souveränität wohl übernommen, aber nicht in anderen. Die Nationalstaaten bleiben weiterhin sehr mächtig innerhalb der Union, besonders in Bereichen wie der Verteidigung und der Außenpolitik. Im Bereich Handel haben die EU-Mitglieder jedoch zugestimmt ihre Souveränität größtenteils zu übertragen und einigten sich auf einen gemeinsamen Standpunkt bei internationalen Handlungsverhandlungen: In diesem Bereich ist es folglich einfacher, von EU-USA Beziehungen oder EU-China Beziehungen zu sprechen.“ Die Nationalstaaten bleiben weiterhin sehr mächtig innerhalb der Union, besonders in Bereichen wie der Verteidigung und der Außenpolitik.

Es hat nicht immer so ausgesehen. Als historisch und grundlegend für die USA-EU Beziehungen kann man nämlich die Transatlantische Deklaration von 1990 bezeichnen. In dieser Deklaration betonten die Vereinigten Staaten und die damalige Europäische Gemeinschaft (EG) feierlich ihren Willen die historische Partnerschaft zu verstärken. Praktisch wurde aber daraus wenig, zumindest wenn man Spuren einer gemeinsamen europäischen Handlung sucht anstelle von politischer Kooperation jedes einzelnen Staates mit den USA. „Geht man der Frage von der Übertragung von Souveränität nach, bleiben Verteidigung und Außenpolitik die schwächsten Bereiche“ - führt Prof. Gamble fort. „Nach dem Unterzeichnen des Vertrages von Maastricht war sich die EU bei vielen außenpolitischen Kernfragen uneinig wie zum Beispiel dem Zusammenbruch von Jugoslawien, das Einschreiten im Kosovo, dem Irakkrieg und vor kurzem in Libyen und Syrien. Die einzelnen Mitgliedstaaten haben

17


DAS LANGE STREBEN FÜR EINE GEMEINSAME TELEFONNUMMER

jedes Mal ihre eigene Außenpolitik verfolgt. In vielen Punkten ist man sich im Bereich der Außenpolitik doch einig und hat sich auf einen gemeinsamen Standpunkt geeinigt, wie zum Beispiel beim Iran. Allerdings zerfällt die EU oft in seine einzelnen Mitgliedstaaten wenn es zu einer bedeutender Krise kommt. Folglich zwingt dies die USA, sowie andere Mächte dazu, mit den Nationalstaaten statt mit der EU als Ganzes zu verhandeln. Das gleiche Prinzip gilt auch im Falle der Vertretung der EU bei vielen internationalen Organisationen, wie dem Sicherheitsrat der Vereinten Nationen, der G8 und der G20. Die größten Mitgliedsstaaten bestehen darauf, ihre eigene nationale Vertretung zu behalten, anstatt sich auf einen gemeinsamen EU-Sitz zu einigen.“ Dies wirkt sich auch auf die anderen internationalen Partner der EU als verwirrend aus. Und was die Beziehungen mit den USA betreffen, so muss auch die Kooperation innerhalb der NATO hinzugefügt werden. Dies macht die Fragmentierung der Kooperation auf verschiedenen Ebenen noch schlimmer. Ein Bericht des Think Tank European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR) umfasst das Ganze so: „Die europäischen Nationen zeigen gegenüber den USA vielerlei Identitäten. Zuvorderst steht die bilaterale Beziehung eines jeden Landes mit den USA. Zweitens pflegen die meisten Länder eine Verteidigungsbeziehung mit den USA durch die NATO. Mit der EU haben die meisten europäischen Länder nun eine dritte Identität erworben, die jedoch ihrem äußeren Erscheinen nach ein „unfertiges Projekt“ bleibt.“ Laut dem Bericht, hätten die Europäer es seit den neunziger Jahren versäumt, „die transatlantischen Beziehungen an essentielle globale Veränderungen anzupassen“. Künftige Herausforderungen Auf der anderen Seite des Atlantiks war der Prozess der Anpassung weniger langsam. „Nach dem Ende des Kalten Krieges ist das amerikanische Interesse an Europa gesunken“ meint Prof. Gamble. „Trotzdem fördern die USA die Mitgliedschaft ihrer engsten Alliierten im vereinten

EYES ON EUROPE

Kirill Gelmi

Europa weiter.“ Die Frage, die sich jetzt stellt ist folgende: Haben die USA noch immer Interesse den EU-Integrationsprozess weiter zu fördern. Das Machtgehege sowie die strategischen Interessen auf der Weltbühne werden gerade neu geordnet und Reibungen zwischen den zwei beiden Seiten des Atlantiks sind besonders während der Amtszeit von George W. Bush aufgetaucht. Darüber angesprochen antwortet Gamble: „Hier stößt man auf eine gewisse Ambivalenz. Die USA unterstützen ein stärkeres, vereintes, einem souveränem Staat ähnliches Europa, das seine Mitgliedstaaten gemeinsam vertreten kann (und zwar insbesondere im Bereich der Außenpolitik und der Verteidigung). Aber nur wenn die EU die USA als Leader im internationalen System sowie die Ziele der amerikanischen Außenpolitik weitgehend unterstützen wird. Eine mächtigere EU, die auch als beharrlicher Kritiker der USA agiere, wäre nicht so begehrenswert. Gewisse Reibungen in den letzten Jahren zwischen den USA und einigen europäischen Ländern über den Kurs der Außenpolitik (wie im Falle des Iraks) hatte insofern Konsequenzen, dass manche in den USA denken, dass ein gespaltenes und schwaches Europa eigentlich für das amerikanische Interesse besser sein könnte, solange es keine großen Sicherheitsprobleme in Europa gibt.“ Nun wie geht es also weiter? Auf der einen Seite, sind die EU und die USA einer Unterzeichnung des Freihandelsabkommen (TTIP) nahe und auf der anderen Seite, segeln die politischen und strategischen Interessen nicht mehr nur auf dem Atlantischen Ozean. Zu den bereits zitierten Reibungen mit der vergangenen amerikanischen Verwaltung wurde das Konfliktpotential mit der aktuellen NSA-Spionage Affäre noch um eine Facette reicher. Die „besondere Beziehung” die viele europäischen Staaten mit Washington zu unterhalten glauben wird erneut auf die Probe gestellt und neu definiert. Jedoch besitzt die EU die Instrumente noch nicht um den Wandel selbständig und maßgebend beeinflussen zu können und somit die Zerspaltung Europas zu überwinden.

Verhandlungen als ein Probefall für die zukünftigen Beziehungen zwischen der EU und den USA: „Zusammen stellen sie noch immer den größten Teil der Weltwirtschaft dar: der potentielle Gewinn aus einer beidseitigen Beziehung ist also erheblich. Wie man es auch umsetzen mag, es wird ein viel höheres Niveau von innerer Einigkeit brauchen. Nicht nur in der EU, sondern auch in gewissem Grade in der USA, wo der tote Punkt zwischen dem Präsidenten und dem Kongress die Fähigkeit der amerikanischen Verwaltung bedroht, um wichtige internationale Verträge zu schließen. Dieses Freihandelsabkommen wird also auf die Probe stellen, wie stark die EU und die USA die enge Bindung, die sie in den vergangenen sechzig Jahren geschaffen haben, behalten und ausbauen wollen. Streitfälle wie die der NSA-Spionage Affäre wirken als anregendes Mittel, aber genügen alleine nicht für eine eventuelle Entgleisung der Verhandlungen. Ernsthafter und bedenklicher sind hingegen die verschiedenen Lobbys und Interessen auf beiden Seiten des Atlantiks, die bedeutende Hindernisse gegen einen weitumfassenden Vertrag schaffen werden. Zurzeit ist noch vollkommen offen, ob die eine oder andere Seite den politischen Willen und die Kraft besitzt die erforderten innenpolitischen Koalitionen zu schaffen um dieses Abkommen abzuschließen. SHAPIRO, N. WITHNEY; Post-Amerikanisches Europa: Eine Bilanz der EU-US Beziehungen,European Council of Foreign Relations; Abfragedatum: 25. Oktober 2013

Andrew Gamble ist Politikdozent und Mitglied des Queen’s College in Cambridge. Er leitet die Abteilung für Politik und Internationale Studien an der Universität Cambridge. Kirill Gelmi absolviert einen Master in Europäischen Studien an der Freien Universität Brüssel (ULB).

Prof. Gamble sieht die TTIP

TITELGESCHICHTE

18


A Free Trade Area between the EU and the USA: why now? Why not earlier? The United States and the European Union are negotiating the creation of a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Never in history have these two partners gone so far in this direction. Above all, they are not only talking about the removal of customs barriers but also of non-tariff barriers. Is it not curious? Why did it take them so long? And why now? Answering these two questions is not obvious. All that remains quite an enigma, even though hundreds of works from historians, political scientists, economists and former players of this relationship were trying to shed light on this question. A little wake-up call: the concept of an economic rapprochement between the United States and Western Europe is nothing new. This makes just 65 years. Indeed, the idea of ​​a transatlantic solidarity, which would include an economic dimension, already started with the Marshall Plan (1948) and the Organization for European Economic Cooperation (OEEC). Periodically, the subject became news again. Thus, Jean Monnet, the "father of Europe", proposed in June 1959 an Atlantic Economic Association. In 1960, when establishing the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the issue was back on the table. It was quite logical as the OECD was essentially a transformation of the OEEC through the addition of the United States and Canada. This appeal for transatlantic unity was also included in the speech of President Kennedy on July 4th 1962, called Declaration of Interdependence. It mentioned the project of an economic area between Western Europe and the United States. One can find the same idea in June 1974 with the "Declaration on Atlantic Relations", in 1990 with the "Transatlantic Declaration", in 1995 with the "New Transatlantic Agenda", in 1998 with the "Transatlantic Economic Partnership", in 2005

EYES ON EUROPE

René Schwok

with the "EU-US Economic Initiative", in 2007 with the "Framework Agreement on the new economic partnership" and the establishment of the "Transatlantic Economic Council". Theoretical approaches do not explain the failure of a past economic free trade zone This long list of initiatives - although incomplete - demonstrates that the idea of a partnership was up in the air for a long time. However, from a theoretical point of view, the explanation of why those schemes failed is very difficult to give. Economists are generally disappointing. They usually only explain why a particular free trade area would be economically attractive and how protectionism is harmful. However, that does not explain why policy makers did not behave according to this economic rationality. Since the 1990s the world has seen the success of the Uruguay Round and the extension of international free trade.

Lawyers emphasize the illegality of a transcontinental free-trade area - restricted only to the U.S. and the EU - according to GATT / WTO rules which promote a purely global approach for the dismantling of protectionist barriers. Yes, but this makes law compliance the main explanatory factor. An argument that does not seem convincing as countries are well known for not complying with international rules or for reinterpreting them according to their needs. Above all, one can observe that

SPECIAL FEATURE

GATT / WTO did not stop decades of transcontinental free trade agreements between, on the one hand, the U.S. and the EU, and on the other hand, non-regional partners (EU-Latin America, EU-Korea, US-Israel, US-Korea). Political science theories are not convincing either. Take the neorealist theory. In its logic, NATO is the result of the Soviet threat. In order to strengthen the Western bloc, a Euro-Atlantic free trade should have been implemented a long time ago. However, the neorealist theory does not explain this failure. Worse, neorealist scholars like John Mearsheimer had even anticipated the collapse of the transatlantic alliance (and also of the EU) with the demise of the communist enemy that was considered as the single cement of this alliance. Yet, on the contrary, it is precisely after the end of the Cold War that the most serious attempts to put up a transatlantic economic area were ever considered. Another approach, belonging to the “political economy” trend was developed by John Gilpin. He assumed that protectionism had only been combated thanks to the existence of a hegemonic power, namely the United States. The Americans have had interest in securing international free trade through the GATT. In his view, Washington had always tried to avoid regional integration, let alone intercontinental. Gilpin also predicted that there would be a global return to protectionism, because of a so-called U.S. “decline” (early 1990). In fact, it was the opposite that occurred. Since the 1990s the world has seen the success of the Uruguay Round and the extension of international free trade. This decade was also the period when the GATT was upgraded into the WTO, with effective dispute settlement mechanisms to fight against protectionism.

19


A FREE TRADE AREA BETWEEN THE EU AND THE USA...

The 1990s and 2000s also saw the emergence of a myriad of regional free trade areas (NAFTA, MERCOSUR, etc.) and even transcontinental agreements (Korea - USA or Korea - EU). In these conditions, it is difficult to characterise the post-Cold War period protectionist. Constructivists are not of great help either. Especially those who claim to use the concept of "Community of Security". In fact, the father of this approach, Karl Deutsch, already observed the transatlantic area in the 1950s. He predicted that the number of exchanges - not only material but also human and value would naturally lead to a transatlantic community which would include an economic dimension. We can only note that this did not happen. In other words, it is not by counting the number of exchanges that we can predict whether a free trade area will be established or not. The neo-liberal institutionalism approach is also particularly disappointing. Indeed, the main contribution of this theory is to stress that economic cooperation between countries can occur. That it is not a matter of idealism, but of interest and rationalism of the individual states. Specifically, a new transatlantic partnership with new institutions, building norms and standards, would be precisely the model system they envisioned. But again, it did not happen. The explanations of the current revival are also unconvincing To explain the current revival of the Euro-Atlantic Partnership, it is generally presented at least four types of explanations. These can also be complementary. The first approach is rather quantitative. It emphasizes the importance of economic trade between the two sides of the Atlantic. It stresses that the creation of a transatlantic market would include nearly 33% of world trade, 40% of the volume of services and nearly half of global wealth. Indeed, it is almost two billion dollars worth of goods and services that transit daily through

EYES ON EUROPE

René Schwok and Jean Monnet Chair

the Atlantic. Various studies show that a further opening of the markets could generate as much as 180 billion Euros of additional wealth in fifteen years. These figures are certainly impressive, but they are not really new. For nearly a century, the United States and Western Europe shared such a high percentage of world's wealth and international trade. In conclusion, it is not enough to produce statistics in order to give a convincing explanation. Various studies show that a further opening of the markets could generate as much as 180 billion Euros of additional wealth in fifteen years.

The second approach is more geopolitical. It focuses on the defensive reaction of the “Westerners” when they were confronted with the rise of emerging countries, especially China. These new powers cover nearly two fifths of the world economy and South-South trade flows now affect international flows. Eventually, the global redistribution of wealth centres will have its counterpart on the balance of power. Therefore, vis-à-vis the rest of the world, a strengthened transatlantic partnership could enable the “Westerners” to consolidate their normative power and maintain their world pre-eminence. However, this explanation is only partly relevant because it does not explain why the “Westerners” did not establish an economic alliance earlier, when they were confronted by the economic competition from other powers (USSR, Japan). Neither does it not explain why the United States and the European Union are nowadays increasing their attempts to establish new areas of free trade with countries in Asia and Latin America and with precisely the regions of the world that are supposed to be targets of the TTIP. The third approach emphasizes the importance of the prolonged stalemate of the Doha Round. Indeed, the absence of an agreement on global liberalization triggers the drive

SPECIAL FEATURE

towards the development of regional and even transcontinental free trade areas. Again, there is some relevance in this argument. But this explains generally the proliferation of attempts to establish free trade areas around the world, but not the more specific one between the U.S. and the EU. The fourth approach focuses on the personality and the views of Barack Obama. He is credited to be closer to the Europeans because his has a less bellicose conception of international relations and has a more social-oriented approach of economics. His political agenda is supposed to be closer to the social market economy cherished by the Europeans. Therefore, it would be less difficult to negotiate deals with him than with Republicans. It should be recalled however that the dynamics of the current negotiations began in 2007, when George W. Bush was still president (see above). It has been also often emphasized that Barack Obama is more interested in the Pacific region and in Asia than in Europe. In conclusion, it is striking to observe how theories are unsatisfactory for explaining the failure of the myriad attempts to establish a ​​ transatlantic free trade area throughout history. Thus, the mere removal of tariffs should logically have occurred a long time ago. Perhaps it would have been better to study the weight of protectionist lobbies on both sides of the Atlantic to explain these multiple failures. Taking into account this factor, one would certainly better assess the likelihood of success of the current revival than with the current explanations that seem unsatisfactory. Professor René Schwok Jean Monnet Chair Head of Master Programme in European Affairs Global Studies Institute University of Geneva

20


Where is the consumer interest in TTIP? Johannes Kleis Summer 2013 saw the kick-off of major trade negotiations between the world’s biggest economic blocks – the EU and US. The aim of the talks is to reach an agreement to make trade easier on both sides of the Atlantic. These negotiations, known under the acronym TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership), represent a massive exercise in bringing down so-called barriers to trade. Expectations are that a deal will boost the economy, spur growth and create jobs – and resist economic challenges from emerging blocks.

Among TTIP’s numerous facets, many have a direct impact on Europe’s consumer protection system. TTIP can be an excellent opportunity to address shortcomings in the current consumer protection frameworks on both sides of the Atlantic, for instance, as regards the exchange of data and evidence on safety hazards of products, chemicals, food, and pharmaceuticals. It is also an opportunity to provide EU and US consumers with more choice, by opening up domestic markets to products and services that originate from the partner block. TTIP however also bears many potential risks in terms of watering down existing consumer protection measures, in both the EU and the US. This is because both the EU and the US note that trade tariffs in the United States and European Union

are already low, and that the proposed TTIP will focus in particular on "regulatory issues and non-tariff trade barriers". In the context of the current economic crisis, there is a political trend that considers consumer protection rules as being a regulatory burden or barrier. It is in this same vein

EYES ON EUROPE

that many perceive consumer protection as an obstacle, which disrupts transatlantic trade and prevents from boosting the flow of goods and services between the EU and the US. There is therefore a risk that such considerations will underpin the negotiations and lead to a final agreement that would endanger the existing regulatory consumer protection framework. In the context of the current economic crisis, there is a political trend that considers consumer protection rules as being a regulatory burden or barrier.

Transparency of negotiations From the beginning, high-ranking policy-makers and trade officials from both sides of the Atlantic claimed “nothing we will agree under this agreement will lower standards of protection”. However, consumer representatives and civil society in general are wary of such claims for the simple reason that negotiations are happening behind closed doors. Especially because the arguments in favour of secrecy brought forward by the negotiators are flawed to say the least. International agreements reached under the auspices of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), World Health Organisation (WHO) and World Trade Organisation (WTO) happen in a public manner with negotiating texts and progress shared with civil society. The same should apply to TTIP. This negotiation must be conducted in an

SPECIAL FEATURE

open manner, with negotiating texts made public at key points. While TTIP negotiators have made initial efforts to reach out to stakeholders, recently published figures by the transparency lobby group Corporate Europe Observatory indicate that 93% of the meetings of European Commission trade officials are with industry lobbyists. There is a need for equal access to decision makers, and also for more balanced briefing possibilities by a wider variety of stakeholders on the different issues at stake in order to properly prepare the negotiation rounds. To make matters worse, secrecy only applies to some stakeholders. In the US, 600 cleared ‘advisors’ of the Industry Trade Advisory Committees have access to the negotiating documents, nearly all of them represent corporations and industry groups. This unbalance only fuels civil society’s suspicion as regards these trade talks. The EU should consider this carefully. The failed ACTA agreement showed that civil society’s expectations cannot be ignored. Deceitful concept: ‘Regulatory convergence’ Regulatory convergence, being brought forward as one of the key concepts to remove non-tariff trade barriers, boils down to helping corporations to overcome standards and laws which are higher or do not exist in their home country. As a fundamental principle, we believe that an agreement aiming at achieving regulatory convergence will only be acceptable if it lays down high standards of consumer protection, while affording both trading partners the autonomy to adopt stronger non-discriminatory protection measures. This means that a free trade deal must not prevent the US and the EU and its member countries from maintaining, adopting and enforcing standards that provide higher levels of consumer protection than those required by the agreement, including in the face of scientific uncertainty; and such protections must not be subject to challenge under the terms of the agreement.

21


WHERE IS THE CONSUMER INTEREST IN TTIP?

In this context, one often mentioned ‘easy solution’ to boost trade is that of mutual recognition: each block may keep its domestic laws, but should accept products that have been manufactured according to the other block’s standards, even if they do not comply with the domestic ones. From the consumer perspective this is unacceptable. Consumers rightfully expect all products on the market to comply with the same levels of quality and safety. In the short term, this means that there is a risk that products are legally on sale in the EU which do not comply with our standards – without consumers being aware of this. In the long term, domestic producers will put pressure on policy makers to water down their national provisions. The reason for this is the competitive disadvantage they will encounter in this situation as they will have to continue producing according to stricter domestic rules. As an end result, the safety or other standards of products are at a severe risk of being watered down. Relevant consumer sectors There are many sectors where TTIP could provide for improvement of consumer protection rules, but there is also a risk that either EU or US consumers’ provisions are diminished: food quality and safety, emerging technologies, financial protection, data protection and privacy, intellectual property rights, drugs and medical devices, energy and climate change. Without going into detail and to give an example, two sectors should help shed a light on the opportunities and pitfalls of TTIP. In the food sector for instance, there are examples of food-related regulations and policies that serve the protection of consumers, but that may come under threat if these issues are not addressed appropriately during the negotiations. TTIP can help to improve rather than dismantle food safety by setting up animal identification systems for tracing food to its origin, discuss the phase out of antibiotics for non-therapeutic use in animals, and establish a transatlantic food safety alert notification. But the labelling of genetically modified food and

EYES ON EUROPE

Johannes Kleis

ingredients European consumers currently enjoy, does not exist in the US and should not be weakened. When it comes to chemicals, both EU and US chemicals legislation ought to be improved as they currently fail to protect human health and the environment effectively. Ideally, TTIP should offer an opportunity to harmonise two differing standards at the level which provides higher protection for consumers. There is scepticism as to whether this ideal outcome is not misplaced in view of the focus on removing trade barriers. The establishment in the US and the EU of a mandatory reporting scheme to keep track of the introduction into the marketplace of manufactured nanomaterials would certainly benefit consumers but is already under attack as increasing “red tape”.

Up or down The TTIP negotiations represent a key moment for transatlantic (but also global) trade. The partnership will set the legal and administrative framework for consumer protection rules for many years to come. It is therefore crucial that the right balance is struck between setting the rules for making trade easier and keeping a high level of consumer protection. Negotiators should therefore pay specific attention to providing balanced consideration to the concerns expressed by all stakeholders, and in particular consumers, and this in spite of the massive presence of industry lobbyists and the huge pressure exerted on their behalf. Johannes Kleis is Head of communications for the European Consumer

No to ‘corporate courts’

Organisation (BEUC).

A serious risk emanates from plans to introduce a system of investorstate dispute resolution (ISD). ISD empowers foreign investors to challenge national authorities in order to claim financial compensations when they deem that their investment potential (and the related profits) are hindered by regulatory or policy changes. We are strictly against empowering investors to sue governments in secretive private tribunals. Experience elsewhere shows how powerful interests from tobacco companies to corporate polluters have used investor-state dispute resolution provisions in trade or investment agreements to challenge and undermine consumer and environmental protections. We are strictly against empowering investors to sue governments in secretive private tribunals.

ISD allows companies to demand financial compensation from taxpayers amounting to billions of dollars and thereby represents significant burdens on States’ public finances. ISD can also be a huge deterrent, especially for smaller countries, to pass legislation to protect consumers and the environment by fear of being challenged by big companies.

SPECIAL FEATURE

22


Should the EU dilute its relationship with the US in the spying cloud? Despite US spying allegations, the EU cannot afford to give up on the transatlantic relationship. We have to rebuild trust, as the current negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) are too high a stake. The basic rule about spying is not to get caught. Once this is done, an avalanche of revelations and allegations usually follow, some of them true some maybe not. This is the awkward situation the US government has found itself towards the EU following the disclosures of Edward Snowden, a fugitive former National Security Agency contractor. Undoubtedly, the worse embarrassment for the US administration derives from the leaks relating to the eavesdropping of world leaders, Presidents and Prime Ministers. The level of the espionage has amounted to a serious breach of trust. The need for changes in tactics and basic rules for data gathe-

ring between America and Europe is more than apparent. Firstly, it should become clear that the abuse of intelligence-gathering is taken seriously and a better attention is given by the US on both intelligence-sharing and data protection as well as on

EYES ON EUROPE

Manfred Weber

the accountability with regards to law breaking over such matters. Secondly, a clearer focus is needed in order to restore trust between the two sides of the Atlantic. Because it is one thing spying on targets suspected of links to terrorism and another tapping the phone of German chancellor Angela Merkel, a close ally to the US. Not to mention that normally such a decision implies a political choice and without a clear aim in mind this should be discarded even before its conception. Admittedly, nobody is expecting the US to give up on spying as no one is expecting the European intelligence services to stop doing their job. However, the means and the results should be examined more thorou-

ghly and the right balance between the protection of citizens and their right to privacy should be well measured. Corrosion of trust between allies and between governments and citizens can breed all sorts of unforeseen consequences.

SPECIAL FEATURE

Admittedly, nobody is expecting the US to give up on spying as no one is expecting the European intelligence services to stop doing their job.

One fundamental achievement in the data protection field would be the renegotiation between the EU and the US of the existing Safe Harbour Agreement for data transfer. The 1998 Safe Harbour Agreement allows US companies operating in the EU to transfer personal data, such as the place of birth, phone numbers or e-mail addresses to the USA. The underlying assumption is that EU data protection provisions are equally adhered to and enforced in the US. The most recent findings about the activities of the US intelligence services strongly suggest that we need a complete overhaul of the data protection conduct between the EU and the US. In this cloud of suspicion it comes as no surprise that some of the EU leaders/negotiators seem to be losing their zeal to proceed with the discussions on the free-trade agreement between the EU and the US, better known as TTIP (the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership), before further clarity to the matter is given. I find this a bad idea, as I believe that trade discussions should be kept separate from the questions emanating from the NSA activities. And it is because of this reason that I find the suggestion by the EP President Martin Schulz, to put the trade talks on hold pending a discussion of data protection very wrong and one that should be avoided. The trade agreement negotiations should be allowed to continue unhindered of any additional requirement at this point. The benefits of such a deal could be substantial in terms of creating jobs, boosting innovation, improving our competitiveness, and ensuring longterm growth and prosperity.

23


SHOULD THE EU DILUTE ITS RELATIONSHIP...

The key to such a new partnership is an agenda for jobs and growth that not only opens transatlantic markets, but simultaneously repositions the U.S.-EU relationship so that both partners can better compete with and engage third countries on the fundamental rules underpinning 21st century trade and investment. The benefits of such a deal could be substantial in terms of creating jobs, boosting innovation, improving our competitiveness, and ensuring long-term growth and prosperity.

And what does TTIP mean for the European citizens in concrete terms? First and foremost: jobs. TTIP means at least 400 000 extra jobs only inside the EU. Similarly, it is expected to generate an equal amount of jobs in the US without mentioning the influence this will have to other countries of the world. The United States and the European Union are each other's most important investment partners. Transatlantic investments have combined annual sales exceeding $4 trillion, which dwarfs any other bilateral trade or trade/investment relationship in the world. Investment from Europe accounts for 74% of total foreign direct investment in the United States. EU investment in the U.S. is 27 times the level of EU investment in China and more than 55 times the level of EU investment in India. There is more European investment in a single U.S. state such as Indiana or Georgia than all U.S. investment in China, Japan and India combined. Investment flows are also strong from the U.S. to Europe. Despite the rise of other markets, Europe continues to account for 60% of U.S. foreign direct investment. An ambitious and new-generation agreement should produce a synergy of strategies across a range of areas, from reducing barriers to transatlantic goods and services; removing restrictions on job-creating investments; overcoming regulatory obstacles; boosting innovation; leading the energy revolution; liberalising services; and encouraging the flow of people and talent

EYES ON EUROPE

Manfred Weber

across the transatlantic space, to facilitating cross-border data flows, which have become essential to global manufacturing and service operations. This agreement also matters because new international standards could be set in terms of professional qualifications and certifications which can only be advantageous for people and goods.

are urgent. But history will judge not only how leaders deal with shortterm crises, but how they position their countries for the future. We should have no illusions about the difficulties involved. But the potential payoff is high, and will translate into jobs and economic opportunity not only for our citizens but for billions around the world.

The positive effects of what such agreements can bring along are to become more obvious following the landmark free-trade agreement, between the EU and Canada signed in October 2013. The deal not only addresses conventional customs barriers-eliminating 99% of tariffs on both sides-but removes regulations in a host of other areas and certainly paves the way for Europe to create an even bigger no-tariff zone with the US that will represent half of the global economy.

Over the next two years, 90% of world demand will be generated outside the EU. That is why it is a key priority for the EU to open up more market opportunities for European business by negotiating new Free Trade Agreements with key countries. If we were to complete all our current free trade talks tomorrow, we would generate up to 2,2 million jobs and add 2.2% to the EU's GDP, or â‚Ź275 billion. This is equivalent of adding a country as big as Austria or Denmark to the EU economy.

It is for all the above reasons that the U.S. and EU should instead forge and implement agreements wherever possible, without allowing contentious issues to block areas of agreement. Too many past attempts to open the transatlantic market have failed because of these issues. At the same time, the framework needs to recognise that the U.S. and EU economies are so integrated that many of the remaining barriers and distortions are deeply embedded in our respective legal, policy and political structures and idiosyncrasies and their resolution may not necessarily fit effectively into the negotiating structure of a transatlantic agreement. Such issues though well respected should not be allowed to deadlock agreement where agreement is possible. Besides, I believe that working with allies on issues where divergent positions exist should be seen as an opportunity and not as an obstacle. It is by working together that the two sides can alleviate the concerns and strengthen the intelligence relationships and move forward.

The EU-US relationship remains the foundation of the global economy and the essential underpinning of a strong rules-based international economic order. We literally cannot afford to neglect it. Manfred Weber is ViceChairman of the EPP Group in the European Parliament. Twitter: @ManfredWeber

The future health of the transatlantic economy is not only dependent on the cyclical economic rebound. It also rests on more proactive, coordinated and forward-looking policy initiatives from policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic. Our current economic challenges

SPECIAL FEATURE

24


America is watching EU Cédric Laurant and Mauro Sanna A lot of ink has been spilled on the NSA affair and new disclosures are continuously breaking in the news. This article summarizes and analyses the most discussed spying scandal in history. On October 23rd the German Chancellor Angela Merkel learned that her mobile phone had been monitored by US intelligence for years. Two days before, the French newspaper “Le Monde” reported that French citizens have been spied on by the United States and the previous day, former Mexican president Felipe Caldéron’s email was also added to the long list of observed subjects. Needless to say that this list could be endless, and as surprising as it may be, we are not in the middle of some James Bond movie: this is reality. In order to clarify what has been going on over the last few years let’s think back to what happened some months ago. On June 6th, The Guardian published an article based on leaked documents from the NSA (National Security Agency), disclosed by an American citizen named Edward Snowden – a former contractor for this agency. The whistleblower explained to the journalist Glenn Greenwald that the acknowledgement of these abuses committed by the agency convinced him that certain “things need to be determined by the public”. The story gave birth to a great scandal: as the British newspaper revealed, NSA was collecting “metadata” on millions of American customers’ phone calls by spying on Verizon, one of the biggest American telecommunications companies.

EYES ON EUROPE

But things got even worse: on June 7th The Guardian and The Washington Post also unveiled the existence of PRISM, a surveillance program designed to gather data on digital communications all over the world. In order to achieve this aim, the United States extracted information from well-known American internet companies such as Microsoft, Yahoo!, Facebook, Google, Apple

and Dropbox. These completely denied or minimized the scope of these procedures. The countries hit by this espionage are numerous and this despite the fact that some of them are classified as “allies” by the United States: Germany, Italy,

SPECIAL FEATURE

France, Japan, South Corea, India, etc. Spying operations were also directed at EU embassies. The American president Barack Obama defended the program in Berlin on June 19th, stating that the United States are not “rifling through the ordinary emails of German citizens or American citizens or French citizens or anybody else”, but are leading operations of great importance in order to fight terrorism. Obama also maintained that “You can't have 100% security and 100% privacy”. But reality is far more complex than the president’s speech. As Cédric Laurant, a lawyer specialized in Internet rights and data protection, explained us in an interview: “Generally, we believe that electronic surveillance is only operated in a restricted number of cases. But the NSA can monitor Internet communications not only to fight against terrorism, but also for political and industrial reasons. (…) This espionage has an enormous scope”. In fact, he explained, “This is made possible by the FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act) Amendments Act of 2008”. As Caspar Bowden, a former privacy adviser at Microsoft, wrote in a briefing note addressed to the European Parliament, this amendment makes “any data of assistance to US foreign policy (…) eligible” to be spied on, “including expressly political surveillance over ordinary lawful democratic activities.” Bowden also noted that the fourth amendment of the American constitution, that guarantees the protection of privacy, does not apply

25


AMERICA IS WATCHING EU

EYES ON EUROPE

Cédric Laurant and Mauro Sanna

SPECIAL FEATURE

26


AMERICA IS WATCHING EU

for non US citizens. European citizens are therefore “particularly fragile” in this context, and “their fundamental rights have been continuously disregarded.” Obama also maintained that “You can't have 100% security and 100% privacy”.

As a matter of fact, on the European shore, the legislative arsenal is totally inadequate. Laurant argues that “the old European directive on data protection did not consider this kind of spying and therefore there is no law strong enough to avoid that”. The European Union “has never considered espionage as extensive as it was revealed by Snowden”. However, the European Union has been working for three years on a new and more effective legislation, which should be approved in the next year. But, as Laurant complained, “The problem is the following: American industrial lobbies have put a lot of pressure on the legislative process, and now we have over 4000 articles, just for this text – a disproportionate number”. This will inevitably slow down the legislative procedure and perhaps make the new rules less efficient. The implications of this “datagate” scandal for the relationship between the United States and the European Union could be enormous. The NSA story will probably be remembered as a diplomatic earthquake: millions of people all over the world realized that their government - and maybe themselves - has been spied upon, but whether this will have tangible consequences on transatlantic relationships is far from being certain. In fact, this story was disclosed at a particularly delicate moment for EU-US business: the two most advanced economies in the world are currently working on a huge trade deal, called Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The agreement might create the biggest free trade area in history, by removing trade barriers in order to facilitate the exchange of goods and services. This could boost the European economy by roughly 120 € billion, the American one by 90 € billion and the rest of the world’s economy by 100 € billion. Politics

EYES ON EUROPE

Cédric Laurant and Mauro Sanna

are driven by economics and as the German member of the European Parliament Axell Voss (EPP) asserted in an interview accorded to EuroparlTV, “When it comes to the actual facts, it doesn’t make sense to hold off transatlantic consultations, because we also benefit from the agreement. Why should we cause ourselves more damages after being spied upon?” A slightly different answer came from the Dutch member of the European Parliament Sophia In ‘T Veld (ALDE), who stated that “until we have full clarifications of the situation and solutions (her) signature will not be on any free trade agreement”. If Europe were in a position of strength, mastering the Internet as the US currently does, the story would be exactly the same, with inverted players.

Besides, “datagate” has some noticeable effects on the cloud industry. As a reminder, the term “cloud” refers to the fact that data are stored on the Internet (the cloud) rather than on physical devices; it is cheaper and more convenient for firms, but as the NSA affair has demonstrated, it is also a lot more risky with regard to data protection. Actually, the scandal had an “impact on European investors, that transmit their doubts on American negotiators” claims Cédric Laurant. In fact, non-US companies do not feel safe leaving sensible data in the hands of American providers. According to the Financial Times, the cloud computing industry could lose up to $35 billion due to NSA disclosures. In this scenario “American companies are stuck between the US and UE” noted Laurant. On the one side, “due to the fact that they are American, they have to obey the national security agency” and on the other side they are obliged to contravene the European laws. “However pressure is currently much stronger in US territory”.

rejected every allegation of spying on allies, insisting that “we and our NATO allies have collected information in defense of our countries and in support of military operations”. Later, on October 31st, Obama “ordered the National Security Agency to stop eavesdropping on the headquarters of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank” according to Reuters. But is there going to be a more profound change after this scandal? This is fairly unlikely: intelligence has always existed and will always exist. “Politics have no relation to moral”, said the politician and diplomat Niccolò Machiavelli about 500 years ago. Oddly enough president Obama has often been defined as Machiavellian, due to his talent to spread the consensus by silently mixing diplomacy and war. Like him, every political leader firstly defends the interests of his nation, regardless of other nations’ welfare. Nothing is going to change in the spying habits of the United States: if Europe were in a position of strength, mastering the Internet as the US currently does, the story would be exactly the same, with inverted players. To conclude, intelligence has always existed and will always exist and “datagate” is unlikely to change that. However, the existence of whistle-blowers such as Snowden is essential to democracy. Thanks to his disclosure, the press has exercised its “fourth estate power” and people can – in theory vote consequently. The principles of democracy are all there. Whether it is effective or not is another debate. Cédric Laurant is a lawyer specialized in Internet rights and data protection. Mauro Sanna is a student in Information and Communication at the ULB.

While writing this article, new details on the spying program are continuously being revealed in the media. On October 29th, the head of the NSA, General Keith B. Alexander

SPECIAL FEATURE

27


Full transparency, nothing less David Hammerstein and Reinhard Bütikofer In the context of the biggest free trade agreement in history, the European Greens expose theirs arguments to allow more transparency during the negotiation process and thus involve all fractions of society. We are in the midst of the mother of all trade negotiations. November 11th in Brussels, the EU and the US have entered the second round of negotiations of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). This is not your ordinary free trade agreement that focuses on tariffs and protectionism, but a game-changing attempt to find common denominators for environmental, health, food, energy and medical regulations on both sides of the Atlantic. It is obviously about issues of the foremost public interest. But as mind-boggling as it may seem, it's precisely the public that is not allowed to find out exactly what the negotiations are about... According to the European Commission “All documents related to the negotiation or development of the TTIP agreement, including negotiating texts, proposals of each side, accompanying explanatory material, discussion papers, emails related to the substance of the negotiations, and other information exchanged in the context of the negotiations (...) will be held in confidence.” But what does “held in confidence” mean? “In confidence” means accepting that the US gives real time access to TTIP negotiating texts and documents to the largest 700 US industries, most of which operate in the EU. It means that these companies can give concrete legal wording suggestions directly to the negotiators while transatlantic civil society organizations and the general public cannot. Even former US chief trade negotiator Robert Zoellick complained about the rationality of this policy: “Frankly, that always surprised me that draft trade texts were seen by hundreds of people anyway

EYES ON EUROPE

– government officials, advisors and lobbyists. So, why not simply put the information online?”A recent article by the New York Times shows how the European Commission consults industry lobby groups in the preparation of the TTIP talks. The basis of the article was internal Commission files requested via the EU access to information laws by the New York Times and Corporate Europe Observatory. The pretty explosive

documents acquired show the incredible privileged access that corporate industry is granted by the Commission over the agenda of the trade negotiations, as well as the big business agenda to use TTIP as an almost revolutionary tool in the way that legislation will be written in the future.

this chapter on the five pillars of the automotive-, chemical-, pharmaceutical, medical, and ICT industries is because these sectors offered input as to what they wanted out of a TTIP deal. It leaves us wondering why other stakeholders have not been involved to that same degree. Both EU and US trade officials are constantly claiming the highest degree of transparency and citizen participation. Nevertheless, the reality is that without texts being made publicly available it is virtually impossible to provide appropriate consumer and citizen input or feedback for these crucial trade negotiations. Without access to precise wording the real social, economic and environmental impacts will remain unknown to the public. And currently, the signs we do get, point in the wrong direction. As the devil is in the details, in TTIP negotiations the public should be given an adequately long spoon to eat with the devil: full transparency, nothing less. An informed debate means that the issues and the texts are on the table for all to see. So far support for TTIP is high in the general public according to a PEW poll. But remember ACTA: the public in the end will not buy a pig in a poke.  David Hammerstein Mintz is a Senior Advisor for the TransAtlantic Consumer Dialogue (TACD), an international consumer advocacy group.

The reality is that without texts being made publicly available it is virtually impossible to provide appropriate consumer and citizen input or feedback for these crucial trade negotiations.

Moreover, EU Trade Commission De Gucht has candidly said that the reason to focus so much on "technical barriers to trade" and to build

SPECIAL FEATURE

He is a former Member of the European Parliament for Los Verdes and part of the European Greens.   Reinhard Bütikofer is a Member of the European Parliament for the German Green Party. He is a member of the Delegation for Relations with the United States as well as of the Delegation for Relations with China.

28


Relations internationales International Relations Internationale Beziehungen

EYES ON EUROPE

29


Les asymétries du lobbying européen Michele Bellavite The Transatlantic Community Dr. Solomon Isaac Passy Lampedusa au prisme de la sécurité humaine Laurent Uyttersprot

EYES ON EUROPE

30


Les asymétries du lobbying européen Michele Bellavite Cette interview va s’arrêter sur un plan particulier de la réalité que vivent les lobbies, celui des relations qu’ils entretiennent avec leurs homologues internationaux. L’entretien que nous a accordé notre interlocuteur, M. Bellavite, nous permet surtout de dégager les asymétries qui peuvent exister entre les lobbies européens, leurs homologues étrangers – principalement américains – et la façon dont l’espace européen est appréhendé par ces mêmes lobbies étrangers. Existe-t-il un exceptionnalisme européen quand il s’agit de défendre ses intérêts ? Eyes on Europe : Tout premièrement nous commencerons par une question d’ordre théorique, pour savoir si cela a du sens de parler de « relations internationales » entre lobbies « étrangers » comme avec cela existe entre les « corps classiques » ? Grosso modo, les « relations internationales » vécues par les corps étatiques classiques ou

EYES ON EUROPE

l’UE ne sont-elles pas symptomatiques d’un fonctionnement plus « archaïque » par rapport à ceux des groupes d’intérêts économiques où l’on peut déceler une synergie plus importante ?

Michele Bellavite : Au regard des différents systèmes politiques de par le monde, il est aisé d’imaginer et surtout de constater, que les groupes d’intérêts doivent s’adapter à ces dits systèmes. Ce faisant, ils intègrent des codes de conduites, des « us et coutumes » liés au creuset politique qui les a vu naître. Pour ce qui est des lobbies européens, et contrairement à ce que l’on pourrait penser de prime abord, le problème principal reste la création d’une véritable synergie. De fait, il est difficile pour les

RELATIONS INTERNATIONALES

lobbies européens d’unir leur(s) force(s) vers des groupes d’intérêts plus unis et cohérents, à l’instar de ce que nous pouvons rencontrer aux États-Unis ou en Amérique latine. Cet état des choses peut être imputé à l’absence de véritables « champions européens » dans plus au moins tous les domaines de l’entreprise. Cela nous permet de revenir sur la question de « l’archaïsme » tel que j’ai pu le saisir dans votre question. Et, dans le même temps, de revenir sur le premier pan de ma réponse. Les lobbies européens sont travaillés – au même titre que les divers lobbies étrangers – par ce que j’ai appelé plus haut le « creuset politique » qui les a vus naître. Dans le cas des lobbies européens, il s’agissait en tout premier lieu de défendre les intérêts de groupes nationaux dans des sphères nationales. Vous voyez ici ce que l’on peut considérer comme la limite du modèle

31


LES ASYMÉTRIES DU LOBBYING EUROPÉEN

européen, puisque l’intégration, que ce soit des Etats ou des entreprises européennes, qui ne se donnent peut-être pas les moyens nécessaires pour se transformer en structure européenne pleinement unifiée ou qui se trouvent limitées par les potentialités offertes par la structure même de l’Union européenne telle qu’elle est pensée à l’heure d’aujourd’hui, conduit à des lobbies européens dont l’efficacité par rapport à leurs homologues étrangers peut parfois être pointée du doigt. Eyes on Europe : Existe-t-il des différences de culture, par là nous entendons « us et coutumes », dans l’exercice du lobbying entre les lobbies européens et les lobbies étrangers ? Si oui, lesquels ? Michele Bellavite : A l’heure d’au-

jourd’hui, les lobbies européens commencent à adopter une ligne de conduite et des « us et coutumes » que je caractériserai comme le propre de « lobbies institutionnalisés ». Cette transformation des lobbies doit aussi être comprise à l’aune de la relative jeunesse de l’Union européenne elle-même. Et ce faisant, je vais bien entendu à l’encontre des clichés qui ont tendance à envahir l’imaginaire populaire lorsqu’il est question de penser la question du lobbying. Cette transformation des lobbies doit aussi être comprise à l’aune de la relative jeunesse de l’Union europénne

A ce sujet, la Commission européenne et le Parlement européen se sont dotés d’un code de conduites auxquels les groupes d’intérêts doivent répondre ; pour avoir le droit d’exercer leur(s) activité(s) et être reconnus comme des acteurs viables et légitimes, il faut désormais que ces lobbies s’inscrivent auprès des autorités compétentes. Ce faisant ils doivent éclairer, et ce de façon précise, leur(s) activité(s) et leur(s) champ(s) d’actions et de compétences. Nous comprenons donc, de facto, que les lobbies européens sont à l’heure actuelle des corps en pleine évolution dans leurs rapports avec les institutions. En comparaison avec les lobbies américains nous pouvons donc arguer qu’ils n’ont

EYES ON EUROPE

Michele Bellavite

pas encore atteint leur pleine maturité. Les appareils qui commencent à être mis en place ici existent depuis bien plus longtemps aux États-Unis. Les groupes d’intérêts outre-Atlantique sont clairement plus structurés et savent user d’une plus grande force. Et contrairement aux idées reçues et – parfois véhiculées à tort – ce n’est pas l’absence de règles dans les rapports qui existent entre les structures étatiques classiques et les lobbies qui rend les lobbies plus aptes à se faire entendre. Cet état de fait implique une asymétrie dans les rapports entre les lobbies européens et les lobbies américains, ces derniers disposant de capacités organisationnelles bien souvent supérieures. Eyes on Europe : La façon dont l’UE encadre et/ou tente d’encadrer les activités de lobbying est-elle une bonne chose eu égard aux façons dont le lobbying fonctionne à l’étranger ? Michele Bellavite : Pour ce qui est

de la question précise de la transparence, disons que la volonté européenne de se montrer plus précise en la matière est un grand pas. A contrario, nous pouvons observer que l’un des gros problèmes de l’Union européenne, si ce n’est son plus gros problème, est celui de l’accountability. La question se pose en effet dans le chef de l’Union européenne de savoir auprès de qui cette dite a accountability s’exerce : les Etats membres, les citoyens, les entreprises, les gouvernements tiers. Il n’est pas toujours très aisé, hormis le cas particulier du marché intérieur, de définir quels sujets l’Union européenne se doit de défendre en premier. Cette problématique a aussi un impact sur le comportement et la façon dont les lobbies étrangers considèrent l’Union européenne et leurs comportements en son sein. Il est courant de voir que pour ces derniers, il n’est pas toujours aisé de décrypter auprès de quel(s) interlocuteur(s) se positionner, ni même de déceler les enjeux de pouvoir qui peuvent exister entre des entités qui sont parfois en conflit entre elles. Il n’est pas rare d’observer chez nos homologues étrangers des questionnements du type : vaut-il mieux faire pression sur les gouvernements des Etats membres

RELATIONS INTERNATIONALES

ou sur les institutions européennes elles-mêmes ? Cet état de fait est symptomatique de ce besoin de clarification ; il s’agit pour l’Union européenne de clarifier l’exercice du lobbying en son sein. Là encore dans le but d’atteindre plus d’efficience. Eyes on Europe : Pour en revenir à un sujet d’actualité, pensez-vous que le traité de libre-échange en négociation entre les USA et l’UE aura des répercussions sur la façon de penser et d’organiser le lobbying en Europe ? Michele Bellavite : Les négociations

à propos de l’ouverture d’un espace de libre échange sont l’un des sujets les plus intéressants à l’heure d’aujourd’hui pour réfléchir sur les rapports entre les lobbies américains et les lobbies européens. De prime abord, nous pouvons nous poser la question suivante : la Commission européenne, qui dispose du pouvoir de négociation en la matière, estelle totalement transparente et/ou indépendante envers les organisations européennes qui ont des intérêts dans la mise en œuvre de cet espace dédié au libre-échange ? En filigrane, cette question nous amène à considérer le fait que le gouvernement américain et les groupes d’intérêts économiques américains ont sûrement des liens plus stricts et disposent d’une stratégie plus claire. La Commission devra nécessairement se questionner sur ce sujet pour parvenir à obtenir des résultats satisfaisants. Ici, de nouveau nous pouvons considérer que c’est le manque de clarté et de lisibilité offerte par la structure même de l’Union européenne qui laisse cette question en suspens. Michele Bellavite est responsable des relations avec la Commission européenne de Telecom Italia. Interview réalisée par Simon Hardy, étudiant en deuxième année de Master à l’Insitut d’études européennes.

32


The Transatlantic Community. Twenty years after The ambitious plan of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between two of the most advanced economies in the world generates a re-newt impetus for the transatlantic community. With the focus set on the next round of TTIP negotiations, an outline must be set for the future vision of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and its relations with the EU as well as other emerging super-powers. In this context, Iliy Naidenoff talked with Dr. Solomon Passy, a former Bulgarian Minister of Foreign Affairs about the future prospects of NATO. Eyes on Europe: Do you think that the concept of a Transatlantic Community will be more or less strengthening by the TTIP?

Solomon Isaac Passy: There is no doubt that the TTIP will transform the Euro-Atlantic area in the biggest single economic unit existing in the modern world, compatible with the current and emerging economic super powers. The treaty will be a logical continuation of the EU concept and a remarkable upgrade from the Marshall Plan. Moreover, it will provoke a new momentum for further deepening the EU-integration and the idea for a United States of Europe. Eyes on Europe: Will the TTIP be a reinforcement of the NATO - EU synergy?

Solomon Isaac Passy: For many, it is not a secret that one of our first priorities has to be the relationship between NATO and the European Union. Let us be frank. NATO-EU cooperation has fallen far below its potential. For a large part of their existence the two organizations barely spoke to each other and often seemed to deny each other's existence. Yet the historical record clearly demonstrates that the creation of the Alliance and the development of the European Communities were integral parts of the same process. Indeed the latter would not have been possible without the former – the fact that the European process was able to move forward progressively in its earlier years without having to address the East-West security problem, because it was

EYES ON EUROPE

Solomon Isaac Passy

already being addressed in the wider North Atlantic context, can be said to be one of the first great achievements of NATO. More recently there have been formal measures to bring sensible solutions to the nonsensical gulf in the interaction between the two. There have been contacts and some measure of coordination of military activities in relation to peacekeeping roles. NATO support has been provided for EU-led operations. The EU has inherited certain NATO roles. However the synergy between the two organizations that could and should be readily attainable has not only been elusive but its absence has damaged the credibility of both. The TTIP may provide new grounds for the reorganizing the NATO-EU cooperation, but it should not be considered as an ultimate solution to this much more internal lack of synergy. Eyes on Europe: Would you consider NATO to be in need of an image transformation?

Solomon Isaac Passy: This is the first target of any democratic institution. The mightiest Ally in such an Alliance is the public opinion. If it is on your side you may prevent huge, painful and costly battles before even starting them. Part of the solution to the problem of transforming NATO's public image and its image abroad can be found by following the different paths towards a more global future. As public opinion begins to understand the response made by the Alliance to the demands of global interdependence, to witness the progress made and to appreciate the benefits of enhanced security on a much broader canvas than has been contemplated before, the obstacles to many of the difficulties we now face will diminish.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

However, we cannot wait for that to happen. The course I am advocating can only be successful if its overall direction is understood and supported by public opinion. To achieve that, there has to be a sustained program of activities specifically aimed at creating acceptance and ultimately enthusiasm and support for the work that the Alliance needs to undertake in order to fulfill its new mandate. The primary responsibility for conveying positive messages to the public and for winning their confidence, trust and support in mostly difficult circumstances, belongs of course to our own governments. They must not neglect their responsibilities in this hugely important field. NATO is doing excellent job to inform public opinion on its priorities and actions.  But we need to upgrade this soft approach with a more aggressive advocacy launched by the Member States. There is a sharp contrast between the merits of NATO, its achievements and contributions to humanity, on the one hand, and its public image (both, on and out of NATO territory), on the other hand. NATO deserves a Nobel Peace Prize and this should be our criterion for NATO's popularity in future. Eyes on Europe: What step would you prioritise as necessary for improving the relationship between NATO and the European Union?

Solomon Isaac Passy: A few years ago EU requested a seat at the UN General Assembly, which did not happen to the extend that the EU wanted it. Firstly this is a very logical, but nevertheless absent step that must be made: The EU must request a seat on the North-Atlantic Council. It is much easier for EU first to convince the 28 NATO members, sharing common values, that it is acting as an individual actor. After that the 200 members of the UN, (not all of whom share our values) may be more convinced and prepared to recognize EU as an individual actor.

33


THE TRANSATLANTIC COMMUNITY

Eyes on Europe: Where does all this leave China?

Solomon Isaac Passy: It sometimes seems that the evolution of China and its future global influence is on a scale so vast and of such enormous strategic significance that it is too much to contemplate. It is almost as if the awe-inspiring dimensions of China and of her potential impact on the world stage

Solomon Isaac Passy

the better. With that improvement, many other practical results can be anticipated. It will facilitate the identification of willing partners for NATO-led peace-promoting operations; provide a more secure basis for searching for common solutions to problems such as those generated by the situation in Burma or that in Syria; support the Chinese leadership in developing democracy;

Eyes on Europe: What will happen with the Transatlantic Union in the next 20 years?

Solomon Isaac Passy: The current level of transatlantic cooperation was unthinkable just after the WWII, which actually provoked it. However, if we pause our current status, the globalization may create other geopolitical giants, ready to dominate the world. If we accelerate the EU integration process on one hand and the Trans-Atlantic partnership on the other, we will have very good chances to share with the rest of the planet the values of freedom and democracy and the very best practices of market economy. The Euro-Atlantic community has the potential to develop an optimal computer assisted strategy for ideal government of the world. This is the e-democracy outlined in the publications of the Atlantic-Club of Bulgaria. However there must be a strong political will in shaping integration around values and practices. This is what globalization is about. Dr. Solomon Isaac Passy is a former Bulgarian Minister of Foreign

are imponderable factors but ignoring them is of course nonsense. If the global community and China itself do not embrace this potential positively and take practical steps to put their relations on a positive trajectory, they will not only miss huge opportunities but risk endangering their mutual interests irretrievably. So what practical steps can be taken? A joint NATO-China Council designed to provide a basis for dialogue and to generate enhanced mutual understanding in both directions would have immediate benefits. The creation of such a forum alone will not of course provide those benefits unless the forum takes on a meaningful, concrete form and sets itself realistic mutually agreed targets. But if it does that, the whole dynamic of relations within the United Nations Security Council sometimes in recent years the cause of negative tensions - will be changed for

EYES ON EUROPE

and free China and Russia from the problems they have often faced in the context of the UNSC as well as improving their own bilateral relations. From each of these other advantages will begin to flow. Kickstarting this process by entering into a new open-ended relationship facilitated by the creation of a Joint Council is not an over-ambitious project for either the Chinese leadership or the governments of NATO member countries, but it is certainly one that has the potential to take relations forward dramatically within the time frame of a few years. Confucius would approve. Bulgaria's Chairmanship of OSCE in 2004 lead to Mongolia's membership in OSCE, which we believe will evolve into an eventual membership in NATO. This is a clear indicator that relations between NATO and China are not only possible, but also very much needed. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Affairs (2001-2005), an OSCE Chairman-in-Office (2004) and a UN Security Council Chairman (in 2002, 2003). Currently he is the president and founder of the Atlantic Club of Bulgaria (an NGO that promotes Atlantic and European values). Interview conducted by Iliy Naidenoff, political science student at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB)

34


Lampedusa au prisme de la sécurité humaine Laurent Uyttersprot Le naufrage de l'Europe à Lampedusa peut être résolu par la mise en œuvre d'un programme de Désarmement, Démobilisation et Réintégration. Penser le drame de Lampedusa de ce 3 octobre 2013 semble être cantonné à deux alternatives: déterminer la cause en termes d'émigration (pourquoi des migrants quittent leur pays d'origine) ou en termes d'immigration (qu'offrir aux migrants quand ils sonnent aux portes de la forteresse Europe). Ainsi, et d'une part, les flux migratoires vers l'Europe sont pensés en isolant les causes internes aux États fuis par leurs citoyens. L'attention braquée sur l'Erythrée, alors que, la plupart des naufragés de Lampedusa seraient originaires de cet État de la Corne de l'Afrique, ne serait donc que le fruit d'un journalisme instantané. Selon Colette Braeckman qui pose la question de savoir «pourquoi ils quittent l'Erythrée ?», les facteurs explicatifs sont simples: «ils» quittent l'Erythrée, ce bagne de l'Afrique», suite à l'autosuffisance prônée par le régime et suite à la paranoïa sécuritaire du président, la migration étant alors pensée en termes d'émigration. D'autre part, le drame de Lampedusa est pensé en termes de frontières: l'Europe ne parviendrait pas à concevoir ses frontières, hésiterait entre ouverture et fermeture. Dans cette vague, analystes et journalistes ne manquent pas de souligner l'attention médiatique, tardive et éphémère, consacrée aux migrants transméditerranéens ainsi que la mollesse des réponses politiques apportées à la question im-migratoire, la migration étant alors pensée en termes de défis portés au projet politique européen. La différence entre immigration voulue, par l'Europe, et subie, par l'Europe, est en outre dénoncée. Certains n'hésitent pas non plus à souligner l'échéance proche des élections européennes, dans l'objectif – fort illusoire – qu'un sursaut de conscience citoyenne pourrait émerger d’ici-là, marquant l'avènement d'une génération spontanée de citoyens enfin attentifs à la problématique des migrations. L'objectif porté par ces alternatives est d'isoler les facteurs d'émigration et de

EYES ON EUROPE

dénoncer la politique européenne d'immigration. Nul n'est besoin ici de réaffirmer ces deux lieux communs, au risque de les alourdir. Au contraire, une pincée de pragmatisme ne peut qu'être bénéfique. Isoler des facteurs é-migratoires et dénoncer les conditions d'immigration ne servent en effet qu'à alimenter cette fameuse vague médiatique. Au contraire, proposer de résoudre la tension inhérente entre émigration érythréenne et immigration européenne paraît opportun. Au regard de la mobilisation sécuritaire imposée par le régime érythréen à sa population, assurer la sécurité des migrants érythréens pourrait se faire en redéfinissant la dimension spatiale du principe «Désarmement, Démobilisation et Réintégration». Au regard de la mobilisation sécuritaire imposée par le régime érythréen à sa population, assurer la sécurité des migrants érythréens pourrait se faire en redéfinissant la dimension spatiale du principe « Désarmement, Démobilisation et Réintégration ».

Forgé dans le concept général de la sécurité humaine, le concept DDR (Désarmement, Démobilisation et Réintégration) est promu par des institutions internationales à partir de la fin des années 1990 pour répondre aux défis posés par les conflits armés régionaux qui ont commencé à sévir dès la fin de la Guerre froide. Le DDR est ainsi conçu dans le cadre d'un accord de paix qui en constitue la base juridique. La particularité de ces conflits post-Guerre froide étant leur caractère interne aux États, l'objectif recherché par la communauté internationale en promouvant le DDR est de constituer une armée nationale post-conflit, fondée sur une majorité de troupes nationales, et d'y incorporer d'anciens groupes ou factions rebelles qui s'opposaient justement à ces troupes nationales. Un

RELATIONS INTERNATIONALES

nombre de militaires devant composer cette armée nationale est établi par des acteurs internationaux, l'attention étant portée sur les individus que l'on va extraire de milieux armés (les volets Désarmement et Démobilisation). Le DDR, dans sa mise en œuvre par des organisations et bailleurs de fonds internationaux, connaît deux processus de standardisation principaux qui énoncent une série de lignes directrices non-contraignantes: l'Integrated Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration Standards (IDDRS) de l'Organisation des Nations Unies et le Stockholm Initiative on Disarmament Demobilisation Reintegration (SIDDR). La dimension spatiale de la conception d'un programme DDR est internationale alors même que sa mise en œuvre est pensée en termes intra-étatiques: si l'accord de paix est un processus interne à l'État qui a connu un conflit en son sein, des acteurs multilatéraux agissent bel et bien à l'échelle régionale. Dans le cas du Multi-Country Demobilization and Reintegration Program (MDRP), pas moins de douze pays, plus la Commission européenne et la Banque Mondiale, ont contribué financièrement à la démobilisation de plus de 300 000 combattants dans la région des Grands lacs africains, de 2002 à 2009. Cinq organisations internationales, dont l'Union européenne, ont également participé au processus. Il est en outre communément admis que c'est le volet Réintégration des anciens combattants qui pose question dans la mise en œuvre du DDR. En effet, la réintégration d'anciens combattants désarmés et démobilisés doit se faire dans un tissu social qui a pu se transformer entre le début du conflit armé et l'accord de paix. La question qui se pose alors est celle de savoir quels sont les nouveaux besoins de ce tissu social. Dans le cas du MDRP, le cas des jeunes non-qualifiés au sortir du conflit – les mêmes qui étaient considérés comme «enfants soldats» pendant le conflit – a été approché dans le sens d'une formation technique

35


LAMPEDUSA AU PRISME DE LA SÉCURITÉ HUMAINE

offerte à ces combattants désarmés, démobilisés et non-qualifiés. La formation a alors été envisagée dans un cadre local. Dans un autre cas, celui de la constitution de la nouvelle armée nationale congolaise - un mélange de troupes gouvernementales et d'anciens groupes rebelles - une formation délocalisée a été apportée à d'anciens rebelles aux attaches ougandaises: ayant sévi dans le Nord-est du Congo, ils ont été formés et redéployés au Sud du Congo. Il apparaît donc que le volet Réintégration, dans sa mise en œuvre sous la forme d'une formation préalable, peut être pensé en termes de mobilité des populations concernées. Le concept de frontières est envisagé en termes d'ouverture ou de fermeture, le tout revenant à questionner le modèle démocratique européen.

Dans le cas érythréen, et suite à la guerre de libération qui mena à l'indépendance en 1993, et suite également à la guerre qui l'opposa à l'Éthiopie entre 1998 et 2000, une mobilisation permanente s'est enclenchée. Le service militaire, obligatoire, qui semble ne pas connaître de limitation temporelle, pourrait même durer plusieurs décennies. Situation fortement dénoncée par la communauté

EYES ON EUROPE

Laurent Uyttersprot

internationale, cette sur-mobilisation serait l'une des causes du désir é-migratoire de plus en plus de jeunes érythréens. Ces migrants ne choisissent pas l'Europe par hasard ou par commodité géographique, loin s'en faut, la Méditerranée constituant un obstacle de choix. Si cet exode repose bien sur des causes internes à l'Érythrée, des facteurs externes exercent également une pression. La migration d'érythréens en quête de démobilisation est ainsi subie – par euxmêmes en s'exilant, et choisie – par eux-mêmes également en rêvant d'Europe. Le Vieux Continent peut en outre relaxer la tension résidant dans l'accueil de migrants érythréens en redéfinissant le volet Réintégration du DDR. Si l'on estime que le volet Réintégration revient en définitive à insérer dans le corps social érythréen d'anciens mobilisés – anciens combattants de la guerre de libération ainsi que les jeunes mobilisés victimes de la politique sécuritaire du régime, alors, cela peut se faire par une offre de formation professionnelle dispensée en Europe. Si l'on estime en outre, peut-être à bon droit, qu'une réinsertion en Érythrée elle-même s'avère, dans un futur proche, inconcevable, alors cette formation pourrait venir combler des besoins de niche, des besoins spécifiques qui seraient à combler dans certaines régions ou secteurs d'activité européens.

RELATIONS INTERNATIONALES

Le naufrage d'un bateau au large de Lampedusa, et son corollaire, le décès de plusieurs centaines de migrants érythréens, constitue le prétexte saisi par analystes et journalistes pour dénoncer ou questionner le modèle politique européen. Pour ce faire, le concept de frontières est envisagé en termes d'ouverture ou de fermeture, le tout revenant en fait à questionner le modèle démocratique européen. Habile, ou maladroite, cette approche du drame de Lampedusa oublie de penser la sécurité même des naufragés. Les réalités géographique et discursive du territoire européen ne sont pas susceptibles d'être altérées par ce drame. Par contre, la sécurité physique de migrants érythréens fuyant un régime ou la mobilisation sécuritaire est fortement ancrée dans les relations qu'entretient le régime avec sa population, peut être assurée en mobilisant le DDR redimensionné internationalement dans sa mise en œuvre. Puissance normative, l'Europe aurait alors le mérite d'asseoir la cohérence de son modèle social, au centre duquel sont promues les formations qualifiantes. Cet article n'aurait pu voir le jour sans les apports et observations d'Emmanuel Klimis, chercheur en science politique à l'Université Saint-Louis et coordinateur exécutif du GRAPAX. Laurent Uyttersprot est étudiant en Relations Internationales – Sécurité, Paix et Conflit, à l'Université libre de Bruxelles. Il se spécialise dans les questions liées à la Corne de l’Afrique.

36


Citoyenneté Citizenship Bürgerschaft

EYES ON EUROPE

37


Politique migratoire et citoyenneté européenne d'un point de vue cosmopolitique Léo Zylberman Nasrallah Europas wirtschaftliche, politische und migratorische Krise: „ein gefundenes Fressen“ für Extremisten? Gilbert Casasus Give Europe a face Thanassis Gouglas Quel avenir pour l'Europe des Nations ? William Meyer Jimmy Jamar, the man who brings Europe closer to the citizen. Jimmy Jamar Feeding Europe in times of crisis: vers un système agro-alimentaire résistant. Coline Cornélis Change the debate and win the elections Lousewies van der Laan

EYES ON EUROPE

38


Politique migratoire et citoyenneté européenne d'un point de vue cosmopolitique Les coûts humains et financiers toujours plus élevés de politiques migratoires restrictives inefficaces mettent l'UE face à un choix crucial entre repli sécuritaire et ouverture. Rendre possible cette dernière implique une refonte en profondeur de la citoyenneté européenne, dissociée de la citoyenneté nationale et liée au critère de résidence. Le 3 octobre dernier quelques 300 migrants trouvaient la mort au large de Lampedusa dans le naufrage d'un bateau en provenance de Libye. Si l'ampleur du drame frappe les esprits, cela fait pourtant bien longtemps que l'apparition de dépouilles rejetées par la mer est devenu un spectacle habituel sur ces côtes siciliennes. Les morts s'additionnent comme autant de preuves flagrantes de l'incapacité des seuls États à faire face aux défis posés par les flux migratoires, entraînant des appels à un renforcement de la gestion communautaire de ces questions. L'accent est mis sur la nécessaire solidarité des pays du Nord de l'Europe envers ceux possédant des frontières extérieures sensibles, notamment l'Espagne et l'Italie. La mise en place en 2004 de l'Agence Frontex – dont la principale mission est de coordonner les politiques des différents États membres - répondait à ces préoccupations. Si certains observateurs soulignent que le budget de Frontex, pourtant multiplié par quinze entre 2005 et 2011, reste relativement faible, il convient d'interroger la pertinence du financement de politiques dont le rapport coût/efficacité est tout sauf évident. Fermer les frontières, mais à quel prix ? Sur les dix dernières années, les dépenses publiques liées aux politiques migratoires restrictives sont en constante augmentation. Il s'est créé une véritable économie du contrôle des flux migratoires impliquant de nombreuses entreprises privées, depuis la conception de systèmes électroniques de surveillance des frontières jusqu'au rapatriement des expulsés. Le traitement des demandes de visas est lui-même souvent externalisé par

EYES ON EUROPE

Léo Zylberman Nasrallah

la puissance publique, incapable de traiter l'ensemble des dossiers dans des délais raisonnables du fait du durcissement des conditions d'octroi ainsi que de la multiplication des demandes. Cette tendance a peu de chance de s'infléchir si l'on considère par exemple l'évolution démographique probable du continent africain, composé de pays de forte émigration et qui pourrait passer d'un à quatre milliards d'habitants d'ici la fin du siècle. L'espoir formulé par certains pays européens lors de discussions à l'Assemblée Générale de l'ONU en 1979 de voir s'estomper la migration due à la situation économique difficile du pays d'origine a tout du vœu pieux. Il est clair que les États européens ne sont pas prêts à fournir les efforts financiers nécessaires à un rattrapage économique par les pays du Sud. Tout porte à croire qu'une telle politique serait de toute façon contre-productive. Des études montrent en effet que la croissance économique entraîne paradoxalement une augmentation de l'émigration lorsqu'elle ne s'accompagne pas d'une démocratisation de la société. Les politiques qui subordonnent l'aide au développement à une coopération accrue des pays tiers en matière de contrôle des frontières et de réadmission des personnes expulsées relève ainsi de la plus pure schizophrénie. Si la perspective économique est essentielle, elle ne doit pas occulter les coûts humains. La fermeté affichée des politiques migratoires, si elle peine à remplir ses objectifs de régulation des chiffres de l'immigration, n'est toutefois pas sans effets concrets. La restriction de l'accès aux visas classiques pousse les migrants à se tourner vers les procédures humanitaires d'urgence. Dans ce contexte, le rôle des experts médicaux et psychiatriques devient prépondérant. Il y a donc un effet direct sur la santé et le corps

CITOYENNETÉ

des migrants, pour qui handicaps et maladies font office de sésames, devant être intégrés à un récit de leur chemin de croix. La liberté de circulation, bien qu'accompagnée d'une rhétorique anti-immigration et d'efforts spectaculaires pour la restreindre, n'en demeure pas moins une réalité. Comme le souligne Antoine Pécoud - professeur de sociologie à l’Université de Paris XIII « c’est précisément cette négation politique de la libre circulation qui la rend plus rentable sur le plan économique, en privant ceux qui se déplacent des droits auxquels ont accès les nationaux ». Que le procédé soit conscient ou non, cette rhétorique de l'hostilité à l'égard de l'étranger, présenté comme un ennemi et un danger potentiel, peut être vue à la fois comme un instrument et le masque d'une politique qui envisage les migrants comme un stock à gérer. Un repli suicidaire ? Si pouvoir quitter son pays est un droit fondamental des individus, l'entrée sur un territoire national est, elle, toujours envisagée comme une prérogative exclusive de l’État, constitutive de sa souveraineté. Les politiques migratoires furent toujours menées de façon discrétionnaire par les différents gouvernements en Europe. Dans cette optique, l'inefficacité de la volonté actuelle de verrouiller les frontières peut être perçue comme une preuve de faiblesse des États. La puissance qui leur permettrait d'endiguer l'immigration et les risques qui lui seraient associés leur ferait défaut. Il est cependant possible d'adopter un point de vue sur la question qui, bien que très critique envers la politique de l'Union, ouvre des perspectives plus optimistes. On peut en effet avancer que, plus qu'une prise de conscience de l'impuissance des États et une application du principe de subsidiarité, la fédéralisation du système migratoire européen est surtout rendue

39


POLITIQUE MIGRATOIRE ET CITOYENNETÉ EUROPÉENNE...

nécessaire par un double choix stratégique concernant l'avenir de ce dernier : « devenir un vecteur de la puissance européenne ou se trouver en porte-à-faux croissant avec les valeurs par ailleurs défendues par l'Union », selon la formule de Yann Moulier Boutang - professeur de sciences économiques à l'Université de technologie de Compiègne. La politique actuelle de l'UE semble se situer du côté de la seconde option puisqu'elle va à contre-courant du mouvement d'interdiction progressive, de jure et de facto, du recours à la force. Elle empêche également l'Europe de concurrencer les ÉtatsUnis comme pôle d'attraction pour les émigrés du monde entier, alors même que ce facteur a grandement contribué à l'établissement de la puissance américaine. L'exemple des 25 000 jeunes tunisiens arrivés à Lampedusa après le printemps arabe et refoulés est éloquent : les accueillir eut été une façon opportune de soutenir le mouvement démocratique entamé sur l'autre rive de la Méditerranée. Au lieu de cela l'Europe a déçu et manqué une occasion de conforter sa puissance géopolitique, indissociable de son pouvoir d'attraction. Au rang des autres contradictions soulevées par la politique migratoire de l'UE, il faut souligner également le décalage entre la protection revendiquée des données personnelles face à l'espionnage américain d'un côté et les nombreux dispositifs de contrôle servant à la lutte contre l'immigration illégale de l'autre. Il est donc impossible d'occulter la dimension politique des questions de migrations tant les choix effectués par l'UE en la matière constituent pour le reste du monde un indicateur des objectifs et moyens de la politique étrangère européenne, notamment en matière d'aide au développement. Citoyenneté et intégration La volonté affichée de verrouiller les frontières au prix d'une surenchère sécuritaire semble à la fois desservir l'Europe sur le plan géopolitique et l'entraîner sur une pente glissante en matière d'incarnation des valeurs qui ont fait sa spécificité sur la scène internationale. Il paraît donc rationnel d'envisager un assouplissement de la politique migratoire de l'Union. Quelles pourraient alors en

EYES ON EUROPE

Léo Zylberman Nasrallah

être les bases ? Le concept de droit cosmopolitique forgé par Kant à la fin du XVIIIe siècle conserve une force et une pertinence indéniables lorsqu'il s'agit de penser les relations entre les Etats et les individus qui y circulent. Pour Kant, la pacification des relations internationales exige l'avènement d'un niveau juridique distinct du droit international et centré essentiellement sur les droits individuels. Ce droit qu'il nomme cosmopolitique ou droit du citoyen du monde, doit faire naître une république virtuelle, construction juridique qui s'applique à tous ceux qui sont hors de leur pays et qui les rassemble dans une même communauté en les soumettant aux mêmes lois. Le défi est donc d'intéresser l'humanité entière sans pour autant la rassembler dans une entité politique unique non souhaitable car porteuse de germes totalitaires. Pour reprendre la distinction opérée par la Déclaration des Droits de l'Homme et du Citoyen de 1789, on se situe ici dans la sphère des droits de l'homme, axés sur les libertés individuelles, plutôt que dans celle des droits du citoyen dont le concept clé est la participation publique. Dans Le Contrat social, Rousseau remarque que si dans les faits « nous ne commençons proprement à devenir hommes qu’après avoir été citoyens », sur le plan de la raison ce rapport est appelé à être renversé. Le droit cosmopolitique, en tant qu'il « doit se restreindre aux conditions de l'hospitalité universelle », permet de surmonter la subordination d'un niveau de droit à l'autre. Par « conditions de l'hospitalité universelle », Kant entend l'ensemble de droits qui garantissent à tous la possibilité de se proposer à la société de leur choix, c'est à dire d'établir avec elle un commerce, au sens large du terme. Il s'agit donc de la liberté d'entrer sur le territoire et d'y séjourner dans des conditions qui permettent un échange fructueux avec la société locale. Si ces droits trouvent leur source à un niveau situé au-delà des entités politiques existantes, ils ont cependant besoin de la puissance de ces dernières pour s'incarner. La citoyenneté européenne possède des caractéristiques qui en font un laboratoire potentiel pour rebâtir un lien entre ces deux niveaux de droit et tenter

CITOYENNETÉ

d'estomper la dichotomie pointée par Hannah Arendt entre « l'abstraite nudité » des droits de l'Homme et la citoyenneté liée à l'appartenance nationale. Comme le fait remarquer AnneMarie LeGloannec - professeur à Sciences Po Paris et chercheuse au CERI - la citoyenneté européenne est aujourd'hui « plus passive qu'active, liée à des droits plus qu'à des devoirs, à un statut plus qu'à une identité partagée ». En cela elle appartient bien plus au territoire des droits de l'homme qu'à ceux du citoyen. On voit mal alors ce qui empêcherait de rompre avec la volonté exprimée à Maastricht de la lier exclusivement à la citoyenneté d'un pays membre. Octroyer la possibilité de devenir citoyen européen à l'ensemble des êtres humains ne signifie en aucun cas souhaiter l'expansion de l'UE à la Terre entière. Néanmoins, le droit cosmopolitique s'en trouverait réalisé dans la garantie offerte par l'UE de respecter le droit de chacun à se proposer à la société européenne et à terme d'en acquérir la citoyenneté s'il le souhaite. Il n'est pas interdit d'espérer ainsi régénérer à la fois une citoyenneté européenne fantomatique et un processus d'intégration des immigrés qui peine à faire évoluer la participation économique vers une participation politique, objectif dont tout tend à montrer que l'on ne peut se permettre de l'éluder. Il n'est pas question ici d'une ouverture totale et inconditionnelle des frontières et encore moins de leur disparition. Celles-ci sont appelées à être un espace de frottement et d'échanges avec l'extérieur, et non pas la matérialisation d'un ostracisme ethnique et social désastreux. Léo Zylberman Nasrallah est étudiant en première année du Master en études européennes à finalité politique, à l'Institut d'Etudes Européennes

40


Europas wirtschaftliche, politische und migratorische Krise: „ein gefundenes Fressen“ für Extremisten? Eyes on Europe hatte die Gelegenheit mit Pr. Dr. Gilbert Casasus über den Aufstieg von rechtsextremen Parteien in Europa und die daraus resultierenden Konsequenzen zu diskutieren.

Eyes on Europe: Bei der letzten Nationalsratwahl in Österreich hat eine rechtspopulistische Partei (die Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs) viele Sitze gewonnen. Auch in anderen europäischen Ländern werden populistische Parteien populärer. Vor diesem Hintergrund, kann man von einem „Aufstieg“ des Populismus und der rechten Parteien in Europa sprechen?

Gilbert Casasus: Erstens plädiere ich dafür, dass die Wissenschaft und auch die Politik sich endlich vom Wort des „Populismus“ verabschieden. Es handelt sich hierbei um ein wissenschaftliches und politisches hoch fragwürdiges Konzept, das leicht zu Verwechslungen führt. Hinter dem Wort „Populismus“ steht das Wort „Volk“, welches in der Geschichte und in der Politik sehr unterschiedlich interpretiert wurde. Die völkische Tradition des Nationalsozialismus ist vom damaligen Begriff der „Volksfront“ meilenwert entfernt, obwohl die Nazis und die Linke sich jeweils in den 30er Jahren auf das Volk beriefen. Selbst der Spruch, wonach die Politik auf das Volk zu hören hätte, ist unseriös und grenzt an eine Art von Demagogie, die heute überall in Europa zu finden, zu hören und deswegen sehr verbreitet ist. Diese Demagogie gehört übrigens zu den meist genutzten Instrumenten rechter und linker Bewegungen, die aufgrund ihrer Regierungsunfähigkeit glauben, im Namen des Volkes reden zu dürfen. Dies trifft zum Beispiel für die FPÖ zu, die nicht als „populistisch“, sondern als „rechte Partei“ zu bezeichnen ist. Ihre eigene Geschichte, ihr ideologischer Ursprung sowie ihre damaligen sowie heutigen Themen gehen auf das völkische Modell des Nationalsozialismus zurück, welches in Österreich jahrzehntelang ungenügend durchleuchtet wurde. Die Österreicher gaben sich mit ihrer angeblichen „Opferrolle“ zufrieden und vergaßen, ihre eigene

EYES ON EUROPE

Gilbert Casasus

Verantwortung anzuerkennen bzw. ihr damaliges Verhalten kritisch zu hinterfragen. Obwohl wir uns im heutigen Österreich in einer neuen Phase befinden ist das rechte Gedankengut nicht verschwunden. Wer glaubte, der österreichische Rechtsextremismus sei mit dem 2008 erfolgten Tod von Jörg Haider endgültig erloschen, der irrte. Das rechte Denken hat Haider überlebt, und der erst 1969 geborene HeinzChristian Strache hat den österreichischen Rechten neuen Aufwind verliehen. Viele Österreicher sind nun davon überzeugt, Strache und seine FPÖ hätten einerseits mit der braunen Vergangenheit ihres Landes nichts mehr zu tun, andererseits wären durchaus berechtigt, eine neue Legitimität für sich und ihr Land zu beanspruchen. Und was hier für Österreich gilt, gilt übrigens auch für ganz Europa. Die rechten Parteien haben es bestens verstanden, sich von der Geschichte des 20. Jahrhunderts zu lösen, welche auch von der heutigen Generation ein wenig in Vergessenheit geraten ist. Die Zeitzeugen des Zweiten Weltkrieges sterben aus, und das damit verbundene Geschichtsbewusstsein ebenfalls. Nutznießer dieses Generationswandels sind die rechten Parteien, die äußerst fähig sind, dieses Vergessen zu ihrem politischen Nutzen bestens zu instrumentalisieren. Deswegen sollte man die Erfolge rechter Parteien nicht nur in sozi-ökonomischer Perspektive analysieren, sondern auch auf andere Kriterien zurückgreifen, die neue und meist intellektuelle Denkanstöße voraussetzen.

Eyes on Europe: Was ist der Grund dieses Anstiegs? Inwiefern ist dieser mit der Eurokrise verbunden? Spielen die Migrantenströme, die die Europaïsche Union erlebt, eine Rolle?

BÜRGERSCHAFT

Gilbert Casasus: Krisen sind „ein gefundenes Fressen“ für Extremisten. Sie brauchen, nicht zu beweisen, dass sie es besser machen könnten, nur dass sie angeblich Recht haben. In einer Krisenzeit fällt die Kritik unheimlich leicht aus, so dass Kritiker es immer einfacher haben. Nun sollte man hier nicht alle Kritiker in einen und denselben Topf werfen. Die Kritik an der Eurokrise oder an einer nicht kontrollierten Migration kann vielseitig sein und zu sehr unterschiedlichen Schlussfolgerungen führen. Dementsprechend sollte man sich bemühen, damit vorsichtig umzugehen, um kein voreiliges Urteil zu fällen. Was die rechten Kritiker von den übrigen Kritikern unterscheidet, ist dennoch der Nationalismus. Sowohl beim Euro als auch bei den „Ausländern“ wird stets auf die Gefahr von außen verwiesen. Den „Eurofanatikern“ und den „Menschenrechtlern“ wird gleichermaßen vorgeworfen, sie würden absichtlich die eigenen nationalen Interessen auf Kosten der einheimischen Bevölkerung opfern und sich demzufolge dem „Diktat vom Ausland“ unterwerfen. Diese Sprüche mögen zwar gut ankommen, aber beweisen wiederum, wie sehr diese Parteien sich von den Herausforderungen unserer Zeit verabschiedet haben und in den nationalistischen Nischen ihres Landes ihr Glück wiederfinden. Folglich taucht hier der Begriff der Souveränität in der Diskussion auf, welcher nun von den rechten – und auch linken – Parteien aufgegriffen wird. Er wird in vollem Bewusstsein als Instrument (miss)braucht, um sich gegen einen angeblichen Angriff von außen zu profilieren. Auch hier sollte es notwendig sein, die Debatte zum Wort „Souveränität“ neu und demokratisch zu artikulieren bzw. zu besetzen, damit diese nicht allein von den extremistischen, hauptsächlich rechten Parteien geführt wird.

41


EUROPAS WIRTSCHAFTLICHE...

Eyes on Europe: Sind diese Parteien eine Drohung für unsere Demokratie?

Gilbert Casasus: Hier fällt die Antwort laut und deutlich aus: Ja! Vergessen wird aber oft folgende Tatsache. Diese Parteien stellen eine weitaus ernstzunehmende Gefahr für die Demokratie dar, als rechtsradikale und gewaltbereite Gruppierungen, welche von der Bevölkerung weitgehend abgelehnt werden. Rechte Parteien mit großer Wählergunst gelten als salonfähig und können sich somit fast risikolos als akzeptable „Parteien im Nadelstreifenanzug“ profilieren. Dies macht sie umso gefährlicher, was leider von der Öffentlichkeit kaum wahrgenommen wird. Eyes on Europe: In Griechenland erinnert die neonazistische Partei Chrysi Avgi (goldene Morgenröte) an ein grauenvolles Kapitel der Geschichte Europas. Ist diese Lage vergleichbar mit dem Aufstieg des Faschismus und Extremismus in den 30er Jahren? Wenn ja, inwiefern? / Wenn nein, was unterschiedet? Oder kann man nicht so kategorisch antworten?

Gilbert Casasus: Man sollte stets mit historischen Vergleichen vorsichtig umgehen. Ähnlichkeiten mit den 30er Jahren sind zwar vorhanden, sollten dennoch nicht überbewertet werden. Die politische Konstellation Europas hat sich grundlegend verändert, und gewisse Lehren aus dem Zweiten Weltkrieg wurden gezogen. Als Faschist bezeichnet sich (fast) niemand mehr. Geschweige als Nazi! Das Erscheinungsbild des Radikalismus entspricht nicht mehr demjenigen der 30er-Jahre, und die damaligen Hassparolen kommen fast nicht mehr an. Dies soll aber nicht darüber hinwegtäuschen, das Feindbilder nun wieder im Aufwind sind und das man sich neue Gegner ausgesucht hat, die, von außen kommend, als Drohung für die „Volksgemeinschaft“ empfunden werden. Insofern profitieren die rechten Parteien von einem Abbauprozess des demokratischen Bewusstseins in Europa, wofür die amtierenden Regierungen Europas ebenfalls eine gewisse Verantwortung tragen müssen.

EYES ON EUROPE

Gilbert Casasus

Eyes on Europe: Schließlich, wenn man an Europas „deutschfranzösischer Motor“ denkt, merkt man, dass in Frankreich die Front National Unterstützung gewonnen hat, und dass in Deutschland eine neue Populisten Partei - Alternative für Deutschland – bei der letzten Bundestagswahl aufgetaucht ist. Denken Sie, dass sie in Zukunft eine entscheidende Rolle spielen werden? Was würde das für Europa bedeuten?

Gilbert Casasus: Zurzeit ist die politische Konstellation Frankreichs viel besorgniserregender als dies der Fall in Deutschland ist. Die von Sarkozy gewollte und eingeleitete Radikalisierung des politischen Diskurses der konservativen UMP trug zweifellos zum Erfolg der Front National bei. Auch linke Politiker lassen sich nun von gewissen Themen der Partei von Marine Le Pen beeinflussen und vergessen dabei, dass es stets die ideologisch tonangebenden Parteien sind, die den Inhalt der politischen Agenda kontrollieren, beherrschen und letztendlich bestimmen. Im Vergleich zu Frankreich sieht es in der Bundesrepublik besser aus, auch wenn der abzeichnende Erfolg der „Alternative für Deutschland“ ernst zu nehmen ist. Dabei hat diese neorechte Partei es bestens verstanden, das sensible Thema des Euros in den Mittelpunkt ihres Diskurses zu setzen und sich als Wortführer einer antieuropäischen Bewegung zu profilieren. Der „Alternative für Deutschland“ ist es absolut bewusst, dass sich die Währung seit dem Zweiten Weltkrieg zum Gründungsfaktor bzw. zum Gründungsmythos des Nachkriegsdeutschlands entwickelt hat – im Nachkriegsdeutschland hat die Währung den Staat gebildet, und nicht der Staat die Währung. Ferner ist folgendes zu beachten: Diese „Alternative für Deutschland“ könnte durchaus von der Konstellation einer „Großen Koalition“ profitieren und ihre Rolle in der Opposition ausnützen, um Themen zu besetzen, die bislang der Union zugeteilt waren. Auch deswegen ist eine „Große Koalition“ mit entsprechender Vorsicht zu genießen, da es sich hier um eine Zwischenlösung handelt, die eine Krise des politischen Systems der Bundesrepublik Deutschland reflektiert. Deutschland braucht keine „österreichischen

BÜRGERSCHAFT

Verhältnisse“ - sowie eine „streitbare Demokratie“ nur dann als funktionsfähig zu bezeichnen ist, wenn es eine glaubwürdige Alternative zwischen linken und konservativen Parteien gibt. Insofern wäre die Bundesrepublik Deutschland sehr gut beraten, dieser „großen Koalition“ nach vier Jahren ein Ende zu setzen, bevor es zu spät ist, d.h., bevor die „Alternative für Deutschland“ genügend Zeit hatte, sich tatsächlich als politische „Alternative für Deutschland“ zu etablieren. Prof. Dr. Gilbert Casasus, schweizerischfranzösischer Staatsbürger, hat Politikwissenschaft, Germanistik, Geschichte und öffentliches Recht in Lyon und München studiert. Er ist ordentlicher Professor für Europastudien an der Universität Freiburg (Schweiz) und Vizedirektor des Zentrums für Europastudien. Das Interview wurde von Grégory Sterck durchgeführt. Er ist Student am Institut d'Etudes Européennes (IEE) in Brüssel.

42


Give Europe a face Thanassis Gouglas In May 2014 about 500 million European citizens will come into the polls to vote for their representatives in the European Parliament (EP). Despite the decreasing turnout, which in 2009 was the lowest (43%) ever since direct elections for the EP started thirty years ago, the importance of European elections is colossal. This is because the European Parliament has progressively gained and currently exercises significant powers, exerting a greater influence over affairs than do the more executive dominated national parliaments, which among others are also more accustomed to rubber stamping the desires of government than exercising real control and supervision of the executive. The 2009 Lisbon Treaty has particularly benefited the EP by further extending its legislative powers and strengthening its budgetary ones. Arguably, the European Parliament today, in a vast number of policy fields, stands on equal footing with the Council of Ministers, since it is centrally involved in the legislative process, co-deciding in important fields of policy under the ordinary legislative procedure. We are far away from the period when the Council of Ministers was the sole law and decision maker in the EU. Moreover, the EP has gained the right to accept or reject the EU budget, as well as make amendments to it, while it elects the President of the European Commission, approves the College of Commissioners and can even dismiss it, as it almost did in 1999. The coming European elections could bring such a new narrative in direct contest to populism and extremism, but also in direct opposition to the status quo of democratic deficit and elite member state driven austerity politics

Not disregarding the importance of the European Parliament’s institutional position in its own right, the coming 2014 elections are of grave importance for two other reasons. First, the coming elections

EYES ON EUROPE

are expected to become a vote of confidence from European citizens to the EU. The economic crisis, erupted in 2008 after the global financial meltdown and continuing today with the Eurozone debt crisis, has led to growing social unrest and unease. Europe’s exit and firefighting strategies, as these are depicted in the various transformations of its economic architecture (Six Pack etc), as well as in the economic adjustment programs of Greece, Portugal, Ireland and Cyprus, has attempted to stabilise the European economies, though at the cost of persistent recession and an unemployment epidemic. Moreover, the moral economy stories about Europe’s south economic performance has divided Europe into heroes and villains, thus leading to a growing wave of populism and in certain cases outright extremism fuelled by rising distrust for Europe. According to a Eurobarometer survey conducted in July 2013, since 2007, just before the global economic crisis, the number of Europeans distrusting the EU has doubled to a record high of 60%. In view of this, many have argued that a new narrative for Europe is urgently needed. The coming European elections could bring such a new narrative in direct contest to populism and extremism, but also in direct opposition to the status quo of democratic deficit and elite member state driven austerity politics. While not at all easy, one of the conditions for this to happen would also be a wide panEuropean debate on these issues, organised around distinct candidates campaigning for the top EU position. This now brings us to the second reason why this time round the European elections are set to be different.

CITIZENSHIP

Choosing a new President for the EU Commission For the first time in Europe’s history, European citizens will be asked to indirectly choose the person who will lead the European Commission for the following five years. Following the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, European political parties have pledged to nominate candidates for the Commission presidency. Turning the European elections into a way to select the next President of the Commission has the advantage of boosting Europe’s democratic legitimacy. It is for the first time in European history that we are taking a significant step towards having a democratically elected leader of a central EU position by a European demos. Moreover, given the centrality of economic issues and the crisis in public discourse across Europe, putting a face to the coming European election will undoubtedly make more visible what is really at stake: economic recovery and the saving of the euro. In view of this, it is easy to imagine an electoral battle where one side of Europe campaigns to maintain rigorous austerity measures and another one that favours spreading the fiscal belttightening over a longer period of time to boost spending, confidence, growth and reduce unemployment. Not disregarding the persistence of national issues creeping into every European election, and this will most certainly happen this time round too, citizens’ preferences at the EU level could be revealed, while two level game strategies on behalf of national executive leaders could be seriously exposed. Finally, giving Europe a face could, under conditions, constitute the European and not the German or French or for that matter any national elections, as the real elections that matter for Europe. Power in the EU could potentially be rebalanced through a transparent pan-European democratic process and not just by the electoral outcomes in the most powerful member states.

43


GIVE EUROPE A FACE

EYES ON EUROPE

Thanassis Gouglas

44


GIVE EUROPE A FACE

If Europe continues with business as usual it risks a permanent rift in its relation with the citizen body

Of course many oppose such an arrangement. Counterarguments in favour of the status quo abound. The status quo noise machine has, though belatedly, started to work to the full. Several status quo arguments are being brought to the fore. According to these, giving Europe a face would result in no increase of democratic legitimacy. On the contrary it risks having outright detrimental effects for certain traditional EU key functions. A partisan Commission would lose its role as honest broker and a mediating referee of high impartiality and technical competence. Moreover, a Commission President nominated by a European political party would also risk being captured by the European Parliament. Finally, such a development could change the inter-institutional balance at EU level, potentially even preventing the EU from exercising its key functions and leading to political deadlock. Even worse, it has been argued that a German’s face on party posters in Spain and Greece could bring out anti-German sentiment. The above mentioned arguments turn a blind eye to the very reality that if Europe continues with business as usual it risks a permanent rift in its relation with the citizen body, while the positions and discourse of nationalism, populism and euroscepticism, and even worse extremism will become entrenched. Starting from the ridiculous argument concerning the probability of a German candidate running for Commission President, it is crucial to highlight the following. Anti-German sentiment has already been on the rise across Europe. As a matter of fact it is easy to predict that the more European politics is dominated by member state’s wheeling and dealing behind closed doors and in particular by the most powerful state’s arm twisting practices, leading to ever growing austerity and national moral character assassinations, the less will such sentiments subside. In this respect, having, a German candidate fighting from another corner might

EYES ON EUROPE

Thanassis Gouglas

even help revert anti German sentiment. Moving to the other arguments set forward by the status quo noise machine, these tend to overlook the political nature of the European Commission’s work in the first place. They totally neglect the check and balance system set in the Treaties and the very functioning of the institutional triangle, where the President of the Commission does not and can never control the European Parliament, or be controlled by it, as this happens in national executive government arrangements. As a matter of fact not even the first party can control European parliamentary politics, since legislation is decided on the basis of coalitions across parties formed according to functional issues. In the meantime, the President of the Commission sits in the middle of an interlocking web of institutions, which resembles more an arrangement of dispersed authority than a national centralised system of power. Recently, a new argument against giving Europe a face has come from the German chancellor Angela Merkel. Arguing on a more institutional line, the German Chancellor posited that there was no “automatic link” between the party that wins next year's EU election and the next European Commission president. "The President of the Commission is elected by the European Parliament after proposal by the European Council. There’s no automatic link between the number of votes and [top positions] to be filled – not to me," she told journalists on October 25th. What the chancellor neglects is the crucial parameter that this very proposal needs to take into account the elections of the European Parliament, according to article 18 of the TEU demands.

Commission, expecting from the European Parliament to only celebratory approve their selection. Giving Europe a face, having a political leader elected through an open democratic process, would seriously damage this practice and delegitimize national state authority in the intra-European balance of power. It is obvious in this respect that the whole debate around the issue of giving Europe a face or not, is not institutional or technical. It is political at the core. It is about national political leaders continuing to run the show, casting the shadow of myopic self-interested national politics over European affairs. They are the true faces of Europe, hiding behind two level games and the EU institutions. Judging from their poor record, a rebalancing of their powers is urgently needed. Thanassis Gouglas is an alumnus of the advanced Master in European Politics and Policies in KU Leuven, Belgium. He is currently a doctoral researcher at the KU Leuven Public Management Institute and the MEPP program’s accreditation assistant.

Conclusion Leaders at the European Council are bound by treaty to respect the outcome of a democratic process in the first place. No doubt they still have the privilege to make the final decision. This shows precisely that the problem is not institutional. The problem here is national leaders losing the power to select on qualified majority the President of the

CITIZENSHIP

45


Quel avenir pour l'Europe des Nations ? Cet article se propose d'interroger le rapport entre l'Union européenne et le concept d' État-nation. Il tente d'évaluer la viabilité du modèle actuel, d'énoncer les facteurs de son érosion et de formuler quelques hypothèses et perspectives afin de renforcer une Union européenne menacée. Les succès électoraux ces dernières années du Front National en France, d' UKIP au Royaume-Uni ou encore du parti Perussuomalaiset ou « Vrais Finlandais » de Timo Soini, soulignent l'influence croissante des partis populistes et nationalistes en Europe. Ils témoignent de l'efficacité de la rhétorique anti-européenne, faisant écho à un sentiment largement partagé de crispation et de frustration identitaires. Ces mouvements réagissent à ce qu'ils considèrent comme une menace pour la nation, pour son identité culturelle et surtout sa souveraineté politique. Ce rejet de l'Europe assorti d'un repli sur soi appelle aux questions suivantes : la nation estelle incompatible avec l'Europe d'aujourd'hui ? Les États-nations sontils appelés à disparaître ? Comment l'Europe peut-elle réagir face à ce qui semble être une menace intérieure ? Rappelons tout d'abord que les nations européennes, États-nations pour la plupart, sont fondées sur des modèles philosophiques et politiques très variés et sont avant tout des idées. Contrairement à ce que peuvent affirmer les mouvements nationalistes, les États-nations ne sont pas le fruit d'un rapprochement

EYES ON EUROPE

William Meyer

naturel des individus et ne reposent ni sur une identité, ni sur une langue, ni sur une ethnie commune. En effet, l'histoire nous montre que, bien souvent, la constitution d'une unité politique précède l'unité culturelle ou identitaire.

L'État-nation, à travers sa réalité constitutionnelle et juridique, se fonde dès lors sur une abstraction et s'appuie sur la construction politique et sociale qu'est la nation, objectivée et institutionnalisée mais observable seulement à travers les sentiments des citoyens. La nation est donc une croyance collective qui forge une identité et affecte les pratiques sociales ; en somme, la nation est un mythe offrant un prisme à travers lequel chacun peut observer la société et agir en conséquence. La pérennité de ce mythe se trouve assurée par un ensemble de symboles, de rites et de normes accompagnées de sanctions. Tout le paradoxe est là : l'État-nation est une construction plus politique qu'identitaire, elle apparaît comme

CITOYENNETÉ

un compromis très récent et fonctionnel, qui se justifie surtout du fait de sa fonction d'intégration et d'assimilation des individus en une unité culturelle créée de toutes pièces : la nation. Remettre en question les modèles et les dysfonctionnements politiques de l'État-nation en Europe entraîne de fait un questionnement sur l'identité de ses citoyens, d'où les violentes expressions de rejet Toutefois, de pareilles interrogations sont justifiées : l'État-nation doit remplir un certain nombre de fonctions parmi lesquelles on retrouve la création d'un effet de communauté, sorte de lien social et culturel garantissant la paix sociale et la réponse à un besoin de protection physique, sociale et économique des individus. Par ailleurs, l'État-nation est fondé sur la fonction d'autorité qui assure la stabilité du système mais aussi et surtout la démocratie, institutionnalisée – il faut le reconnaitre – de manière efficace par cette structure politique. Cependant, ces institutions démocratiques se sont largement appuyées sur l'illusion de la « fameuse » souveraineté nationale qui, en raison de son importance dans les représentations individuelles du politique et de son caractère quasi sacré, participe pleinement à la sclérose des États. La rhétorique anti-européenne est souvent bâtie autour de l'idée d'une

46


QUEL AVENIR POUR L'EUROPE DES NATIONS ?

profanation de celle-ci mais jamais la souveraineté ne fut absolument nationale, au sens où seule la nation, à travers l'État, détiendrait le pouvoir et se gouvernerait de façon autonome. La gouvernance a toujours été influencée, voire déterminée, par des facteurs et des acteurs exogènes. Dans le contexte de la mondialisation, non seulement cette réalité s'est accentuée mais de plus, les États-nations européens ne parviennent plus à remplir leurs fonctions de façon satisfaisante. D'une part, ils ont perdu de leur pouvoir d'assimilation et d'intégration depuis la fin des conflits politiques et militaires internationaux. D'autre part, la plus grande mobilité des individus, l'accroissement des échanges et la réduction des distances et barrières symboliques ont affaibli l'unité culturelle et identitaire sur laquelle s'appuient bon nombre d'États-nations. On remarque aujourd'hui une régionalisation des identités qui se traduit au niveau européen par des actions politiques et des revendications plus localisées. Enfin, d'un point de vue économique, les États-nations seuls paraissent bien incapables de garantir à chaque citoyen la sécurité à laquelle tous aspirent. L'Union économique, premier projet européen, est aujourd'hui une « quasi-obligation » pour chacun de ces États, le seul moyen pour eux d'avoir une influence réelle sur la scène internationale. L'État-nation en Europe semble désormais dos au mur, dans l'impossibilité d'assurer ses fonctions et contraint d'évoluer vers un nouveau paradigme du pouvoir dont la définition reste problématique. Une Union européenne plus intégrée n'est donc pas la cause de l'affaiblissement des États-nations, elle en est la conséquence L'Union européenne dont la vocation fût essentiellement économique pourrait ainsi devenir le lieu d'une refondation du modèle de nation en une société ou un « État européen

EYES ON EUROPE

William Meyer

post-national » tel que défini par J-M. Ferry, aux enjeux nombreux et divers. Cette nouvelle Europe politique ne pourra pas consister en une « simple » adaptation du modèle d'État-nation à une échelle supérieure

En premier lieu, l'exigence de démocratie, pilier de la construction européenne, nécessite un véritable espace public et civique européen. Cela permettra aux citoyens de garder la maîtrise sur les politiques européennes à travers un niveau de gouvernance plus localisé et un exécutif bien plus visible et transparent, ce qui conservera l'attention populaire. Une telle structure politique devra également tenir compte de la variété et de l'hétérogénéité de l'Union européenne et ne pourra le faire qu'en dissociant le territoire et l'identité dans la définition de ses compétences: un même territoire peut abriter plusieurs identités et une même identité peut couvrir plusieurs territoires. Cette nouvelle Europe politique ne pourra dès lors pas consister en une « simple » adaptation du modèle d'État-nation à une échelle supérieure. Cette Europe post-nationale devra être largement décentralisée mais structurante, transnationale et cosmopolite pour achever une véritable « solidarité de fait » (Schuman, 1950). La construction d'une nouvelle formule politique européenne devra pouvoir jeter les bases d'une culture européenne et donc d'une identité nouvelle, pierre d'achoppement et véritable enjeu de ce changement de modèle. Cette identité devra notamment s'appuyer sur une connaissance mutuelle accrue, objectif majeur de certains programmes actuels tels qu'Erasmus, ainsi que sur un arsenal de symboles qui restent à définir. En outre, contrairement au sentiment national, l'identité européenne semble moins impliquer une exclusion de toute autre identité particulière. L'Union étant un processus, cette identité européenne sera plus flexible et tournée vers l'avenir, permettant au groupe de se définir une ambition commune ; chose que les

CITOYENNETÉ

États-nations peinent aujourd'hui à réaliser. En effet, les conceptions de la nation sont souvent figées dans le temps, hermétiques à toute évolution et essentiellement orientées vers le passé et un héritage commun imaginé a posteriori. Ainsi, comme le précisait Renan en 1882, « L'oubli, et je dirai même l'erreur historique, sont un facteur essentiel de la création d'une nation ». L'hybridation inachevée de l'actuel modèle politique européen se trouve dans l'impasse : une autre Europe est possible, celle des citoyens, structure de la société post-nationale. Cette Europe serait plus intégrée et intégrante, compétente et prioritaire dans un nombre élargi de domaines. Ce vaste projet ne marque sans doute pas la fin des nations mais leur régénérescence. Il nécessite un rare courage politique et devra engager une nouvelle légitimité démocratique, reposant sur la décentralisation, mais surtout une légitimité culturelle pour résister aux assauts identitaires. L'Union européenne s'est construite sur les ruines des nationalismes et une telle ambition est nécessaire pour s'assurer que ces derniers ne renaissent pas des cendres de l'Europe. William MEYER est étudiant en première année du Master en études européennes à finalité politique, à l'Institut d'Études Européennes

47


Jimmy Jamar, the man who brings Europe closer to the citizen. Participation in the upcoming European elections is expected to be low. Given the growing mistrust of the European project, many scholars and professionals consider that communicating on Europe and more particularly with its citizens seems of the uttermost importance. Eyes on Europe: Could you describe what is the role of the Representation and its role for the European citizen?

Jimmy Jamar: The representation office of the Commission is sort of an embassy of the Commission in the country where it operates, a key link between the Commission and the main actors in the country: the political and economic actors, the media, civil society and last but not least… the citizens. Because of its proximity with the EU institutions, the Belgian representation has a slightly different role than its counterparts in the other Member States, and is very focused on the citizens and on communicating with them. Working at the Commission representation in Belgium is interesting and unique in the sense that sometimes you have the feeling that you are working with two representations because of the different feelings in the two parts of the country. That is why our political and media teams are divided into two with people focusing on each of the linguistic communities. Eyes on Europe: This year was the European year of the citizens. During this year, the institutions have been encouraging dialogues on Europe and discussions on what Europe should look like in 2020. We are approaching the end of 2013: what are your conclusions and what are the lessons that can be drawn?

Jimmy Jamar: Our approach toward this idea of organising a series of citizens’ dialogue was very strategic in the sense that we took this exercise extremely seriously as a means to establish – or re-establish – contact with the people. The objective was to organize a dialogue in every province in Belgium and, on each occasion, to offer the public the occasion to debate with an EU

EYES ON EUROPE

Jimmy Jamar

Commissioner, a Belgian political figure and, eventually an international contributor. This proved to be very positive and the debates were on the whole extremely lively. We also tried to link each debate to an existing event, often focusing on a specific topic: youth, culture, employment, or the role of structural funds. I would say that there are three major lessons to be drawn from these dialogues: the first is that – unlike what many people might think – people are interested in Europe. You often hear people saying that people are not interested in the EU because they don't understand it, it is too complicated, or it is too far-away… This is not true: if you give people the occasion to debate and express themselves, they will come. This was the case during the entire year: not only during the citizens’ dialogues but also during the events organized at Bozar or during a very fruitful threeday debate organised by the French magazine Le Nouvel Observateur, which brought together over 8000 people! People are not against Europe: they actually want a closer European Union. If we want people to participate in this project, they need to believe that the project is good for them.

The second lesson is that people are not against Europe: they actually want a closer European Union. In that respect, the Liège dialogue was quite interesting as 88% answered positively to the question: “do you want a political union in Europe?”. That was the highest proportion we ever had! At the same time, however, people have the impression that their voice is not heard. Belgium is a bit better placed than the average EU figures, but it is a fact

CITIZENSHIP

that popular support for the EU has dropped in all Member States. Lastly, if people are for a closer European Union, they also want a different Union, which would emphasize more the founding values of the EU project, in particular solidarity and a stronger social Europe. Eyes on Europe: In recent events, Paul Dujardin (Director of Bozar) and Jose Manuel Barosso stated that "We must create a European public space, which will only increase the sense of belonging to a community of values." How can Europe reach that European public space?

Jimmy Jamar: If the results of the European Parliament elections are not good – and I am not sure they will be positive overall – something will have to change in the way we approach the European project. A European public space is important because it should become a framework of discussion where people can express themselves. This can be done either live – by expanding on the citizens’ dialogue experience – or by working with social media. This is certainly something that we intend to do: our plan is to carry out , in each province, in universities and high schools, debates and dialogues to explain to young people in Belgium the importance of the European election in the context of the other elections that will take place on 25 May 2014, at the federal and regional levels. […]. A European public space means also providing people with the occasion to express themselves on a much more regular basis through interactive websites and campaigns. It is therefore important that we are there where people are and this is something that the Representation here in Belgium has been doing for the past years: if you want to meet people, you need to go to festivals, to fairs…this is where you meet people. […] By creating an open space, you restore a sense of ownership for the European citizen, by making them aware that they are part of the process. We should not

48


JIMMY JAMAR, THE MAN...

EYES ON EUROPE

Jimmy Jamar

CITIZENSHIP

49


JIMMY JAMAR, THE MAN...

forget that this process, although it has been carried forward throughout sixty years, is not something that is fossilized and stated once for all… It could go in the other direction! The fact that we have heard recently about countries being eventually forced to leave the Union because they do not respect the common standards – economic, budgetary and so on – or about countries who would take the decision to leave based for instance on a referendum, this is the sign that it is not a linear process. So people have – and will have – a say in the way this project is carried forward. We should not forget either that this is the only project of its kind in the world that influences daily the lives of 508 million people. If people do not relate to it, they will drift away. And it will be difficult to recapture their support. Eyes on Europe: Should Europe reinvent its discourse or rather continue to better promote the current discourse?

Jimmy Jamar: There are two main problems in Europe today. The first is a political one: nobody seems to know who is leading the European project for the moment. Member States have recaptured -or have been trying to recapture - the lead on the process and have very different views about its future. There is clearly a lack of vision, and a strong need for someone to take the lead. The second problem is linked to communication: the visibility of the project is blurred. But here we can identify a number of solutions: firstly, we should communicate on Europe in a much more modest and humble manner. As President Barroso recalled last year in his State of the Union's speech, nobody takes the project for granted anymore. What people are asking is “what is in this process for me? You have to convince me!”. We have to link the European project to people’s daily lives and show them what Europe does for them on a concrete basis. For example, we went last year to the “Vacation fair” in Brussels with four Commission Directorates General. There, we did not try to convince people per se but showed them, with concrete examples, how Europe has improved their lives, through passenger

EYES ON EUROPE

Jimmy Jamar

rights or the quality of bathing waters, for example. We explained in a simple manner how the EU could improve their holidays and I think people appreciated this approach. Secondly, in order to better work on the ground, we need to better use the networks and relays that exist all over the EU, and are totally unexploited today: I'm talking about 3.500 focal local points that operate in nearly every city in Europe, such as Eures, the Europe Direct centres, the Erasmus offices etc… Thirdly, Commissioners should be more personally involved in dialoguing with people. The Commissioners are often blamed for not being “democratically elected”. I do not think it is true: Commissioners are political figures in most of the countries, they are used to discuss with people, they should go to meet people more systematically, and not only in their home country. Lastly, we should improve the corporate identity and corporate communication of the Commission and the European Institutions as a whole. I think we have to learn to work more loosely together within the Commission. We are all working for the same goal so we need to have some kind of calendar of what is happening, we need a more coordinated approach between DGs, and more systematic rules on the use of logos.

how we are going to communicate on it. What changed fundamentally with the crisis is that people in the beginning had the impression that the European project was protecting them and this is not the case anymore. This is something we have to look into and I hope that somebody, someday, will put this debate resolutely on the table. Jimmy Jamar is Head of the European Commission‘s Representation in Belgium. His entire professional career has focused on ways to strengthen communication with citizens. Interview conducted by Janusz Linkowski, secondyear Master’s student at the Institut d’études européennes.

Eyes on Europe: A new Commission will take place after the elections. What are your expectations about this? Which direction should it take?

Jimmy Jamar: I hope somebody one day will wake up and analyse objectively the situation of people drifting away from the European project. In this way, communication is essential. If we want people to participate in this project, they need to believe that the project is good for them. I think the situation has changed since the beginning where almost everybody naturally abided to the project because it was preventing wars on the continent and because basically everybody shared the common values on which the European project was built. The problem is that after all this time we didn’t revisit fundamentally what we want to do with the European project and

CITIZENSHIP

50


Feeding Europe in times of crisis: vers un système agro-alimentaire résistant. Nouveaux modes de production, énergies, mais surtout processus de transition vers les systèmes alimentaires de demain: tels étaient les thèmes de la grande conférence sur le futur agro-alimentaire européen. Eyes on Europe voulait savoir si nous allions devoir troquer notre bon vieux steak contre du tofu bio : nous nous y sommes donc rendus. Au lendemain de la journée mondiale de l’alimentation, le parti vert au Parlement européen (The Greens/ EFA) organisait un important colloque intitulé « Nourrir l’Europe en temps de crise : vers des systèmes alimentaires résilients ». Les intervenants provenaient de milieux bien différents : monde associatif, sphère politique ou académique... Chacun a contribué à ce que la discussion soit riche et fructueuse. Le premier d’entre eux, Yves Cochet, a été l’un des fondateurs du premier parti vert en France. Il tfut d’ailleurs Ministre de l’environnement du gouvernement Jospin. Il est aujourd’hui député européen membre du Green group. Son rôle ce jeudi fut d’introduire le thème de l’après-midi : avec le système industriel qui est le nôtre en Europe, est-il possible de continuer à nourrir une population croissante, tout en continuant à exporter ? Le parcours du jour nous emmènera des vergers aux assiettes, avec un détour par les supermarchés et l’incinérateur de déchets. Le rapport de Pablo Servigne : du système toxique au système résilient Corps La pierre angulaire du débat a été le travail scientifique de Pablo Servigne, agronome et docteur en Sciences, dont l’étude renferme quatre principaux apports. Le premier est de prendre en compte le système alimentaire de façon globale sans se focaliser uniquement sur l’agriculture. L’auteur suit donc le cycle alimentaire dans son ensemble, ce qui permet une grande cohérence dans ses conclusions. Le deuxième est d’avoir pris en compte les autres crises : climat, santé, écosystèmes et économie sont

EYES ON EUROPE

Coline Cornélis

intrinsèquement liés et ce serait faire fi de tout un pan du problème que de considérer ces aspects isolément. Le troisième apport est de proposer l’idée de résilience pour guider les politiques alimentaires et de faire la promotion de structures décentralisées et responsables. Enfin, le dernier apport est d’établir un cadre idéal pour les villes et les campagnes qui devrait guider les choix politiques. À constat accablant… En Europe, l’essentiel de l’alimentation est distribué par un système industriel. Une première observation est que l’on retrouve du gaz naturel ou du pétrole dans chaque étape du schéma de distribution : du champ à la cuisine en passant par le transport, le moins que l’on puisse dire est que ce secteur d’activité est gourmand en énergie. Ce système énergivore que l’auteur qualifie de « toxique » a de graves implications. Tout d’abord, il contribue au réchauffement climatique car l’effet de serre est partiellement causé par l’activité agricole. Deuxièmement, il perturbe les écosystèmes puisqu’il transforme forêts, savanes et mers en surfaces cultivables. Troisièmement, il met un couteau sous la gorge des plus petits agriculteurs : ce système toujours plus exigeant, largement subventionné par la Politique Agricole Commune, condamne les exploitations plus modestes au profit des plus imposantes. Quatrièmement, il met la santé des consommateurs en danger: des substances toxiques sont présentes en grandes proportions dans la nourriture produite par le système industriel. Enfin, il occasionne un gigantesque gaspillage. Ce système, en plus d’être néfaste, est vulnérable. En effet, il pâtit de

CITOYENNETÉ

l’instabilité du climat, du coût toujours croissant de l’énergie, de la raréfaction des minerais et de l’eau potable. De plus, il est très sensible aux crises économiques. Ainsi, il apparaît à l’observation de ces facteurs que le système actuel est effectivement, à terme, soumis à des risques d'effondrement. C’était un parti pris de Pablo Servigne d’adopter un point de vue systémique en soulignant l’interconnexion des crises, l’effet domino qui découle de ces liens et a fortiori la nécessité de résoudre toutes ces crises simultanément. C’est pourquoi le chercheur nous met en garde : il s’agit de se méfier des solutions monodisciplinaires qui ne prennent pas en compte les autres aspects. …proposition originale Puisque les catastrophes ci-dessus sont déjà en cours et que par conséquent les probabilités que le système alimentaire européen s’effondre augmentent, Pablo Servigne avance quelques propositions. Premièrement, il introduit le concept de résilience; c’est la capacité d'un système à se maintenir malgré les chocs. C’est selon lui un principe qui devrait guider une transition. Deuxième postulat, le système que nous connaissons devra se muter en plusieurs petits systèmes locaux décentralisés. Ils seront diversifiés, transparents et basés sur une forte cohésion sociale. L’auteur cite la permaculture, l’aquaponie ou les micro-fermes comme de bons exemples qui vont dans ce sens. Ces « petits systèmes » devront également être cycliques : le recyclage sera une clé de la transition. Il suggère en troisième lieu de passer à une « agriculture de réparation », c’est-à-dire qui se consacrerait à la restauration des écosystèmes dégradés, et une « agriculture solaire », basée uniquement sur les énergies renouvelables.

51


FEEDING EUROPE IN TIMES OF CRISIS...

Quatrièmement, les consommateurs eux-mêmes devront adapter leur demande. Plutôt que de réclamer toujours plus de nourriture à des prix toujours plus bas, ils seront amenés à s’imposer des limites pour maintenir le système viable. Le client ne sera plus uniquement « roi », mais aussi « roi éclairé ». Une cinquième proposition est la révision du système de distribution dans les villes : il existe des systèmes alimentaires alternatifs tels que les systèmes de proximité, les circuits courts, les systèmes domestiques de type familial et les systèmes vivriers qui forment des ceintures autour des villes. Ces initiatives, poussées dans le dos par le mouvement slow-food et le mouvement des Initiatives de transition, devront se multiplier et prendre le pas sur le système actuel. L’agriculture urbaine devra également prendre son essor. On observe déjà des projets tels que des potagers communautaires, ou des « rooftop grange », comme à Berlin, Londres ou New York. Ils ne pourront pas satisfaire à eux seuls la demande des villes, mais leur production constitue un complément alimentaire de grande valeur, non seulement pratique, mais aussi d’un point de vue social. Cependant, la pollution dans les grandes villes met du plomb dans l’aile de ces actions positives. D’où l’intérêt de la proposition suivante de Pablo Servigne : « refaire vivre les campagnes ». Celles-ci redeviendraient des zones autonomes et productrices d’énergie. Il s’agit dès lors de limiter l’expansion des villes afin de protéger au maximum ces espaces productifs. L’auteur va même jusqu’à imaginer, à défaut de pétrole et de toute alternative énergétique crédible, le retour du travail animal et humain. Il préconise l’arrêt progressif de l’utilisation de machines lourdes, ce qui permettrait de préserver l'énergie. On a d’ailleurs vu naître des exemples fructueux de « retours en arrière », tels que la ferme post-industrielle de Mark Shepard, un savant mélange de cultures (animales et végétales) auto-suffisant s’étendant sur quarante hectares.

EYES ON EUROPE

Coline Cornélis

Or, pour ce faire, de nouveaux emplois d’agriculteurs doivent être créés. Le chercheur estime qu’il faudrait en former 117 millions d'ici 15 ans, soit à peu près le double de la population française en moins d'une génération... Cela ne va pas être aisé de faire naître tant de vocations ! Par ailleurs, un climat de plus en plus déstabilisé génèrera de graves problèmes agricoles. Pour réduire ces dommages, il conviendra de

institutionnelles . Sans cette convergence du haut et du bas, la transition sera simplement impossible. Plusieurs scénarios de transition sont envisageables : certains aux trajectoires « douces » et continues, d'autres aux trajectoires brutales et discontinues. Il est impossible de prévoir avec précision le futur, mais il est indispensable que des politiques de transition prévoient les deux types de scénarios. Nous ne sommes jamais à l'abri des catastrophes et des évènements imprévisibles. L’auteur conclut son édifiant rapport par une série de recommandations politiques, résumé structuré des idées abordées tout au long du texte.

diversifier un maximum les cultures et de planter en priorité des plantes vivaces. En effet, ces dernières nécessitent moins de travail de la part des cultivateurs. Les arbres sont à cet égard une voie à exploiter: ils s’enracinent et restructurent le sol, ils tempèrent le climat et produisent beaucoup d'énergie. La fameuse ferme du Wisconsin dont nous parlions plus haut l’a d’ailleurs bien compris. L’inévitable transition Phrase-clé tirée de ce pragraphe: Cette transition sera portée par la base, c’est-à-dire les gens, et par le haut, à savoir le pouvoir politique et les mesures institutionnelles . Sans cette convergence du haut et du bas, la transition sera simplement impossible. Le passage d’un système industriel vers un système résilient passera tout d’abord par la prise de conscience collective que le vieux système qui conditionne aujourd’hui la façon dont nous mangeons est obsolète. Nous devons favoriser l’émergence de petits systèmes à taille humaine. Cette transition sera portée par la base, c’est-à-dire les gens, et par le haut, à savoir le pouvoir politique et les mesures

CITOYENNETÉ

Si d’aucuns qualifieront ses propositions d’utopiques, Pablo Servigne répond au contraire que l’utopie est désormais de croire que le statu quo est toujours possible. Apéro time Les autres intervenants du jour abondent dans le sens de Pablo Servigne : Azul Valérie Thome, initiatrice du projet Food from the sky, Jean-Pierre de Leener, responsable de Saveurs paysanes, Perrine HervéGruyer, gérante d’une ferme expérimentale en permaculture et Bart Staes, eurodéputé pour le groupe des Verts, sont eux aussi partisans et artisans d’une véritable transition du système alimentaire. Un peu abasourdis, nous finirons cette journée autour d’un petit buffet truffé de produits biologiques, preuve supplémentaire - si besoin était - qu’en plus d’être nécessaire pour la planète, la transition ravira sans aucun doute nos papilles. Coline Cornélis est étudiante en première année de Master en relations internationales à l'ULB

52


Change the debate and win the elections The European Liberals and Democrats are working on concrete policy proposals to change Europe for the better. In 2014, they will try to convince citizens that Europe can be both simpler and stronger. Lousewies van der Laan sheds light on what makes ALDE different from the other political groups in the European Parliament. In the 2009 European Parliament elections, the Liberals and Democrats retained their position as the third largest group. The coming elections will be as crucial for the liberal group as it is for Europe. In the last couple of years, the narrative about the EU has changed fundamentally. A recent Pew survey found that the favourability figures of the EU have fallen from 60% in 2012 to 45% in 2013. For the first time, more Europeans think negatively about the EU than positively. This is not a fact we can ignore or, worse, blame on the voters or on “misinformation” or some other external factor. If we do that, it is not unthinkable that a collection of nationalist, Eurosceptic, anti-establishment and single-issue parties will tip the balance in the EP, change the direction of the EU for the worse and cause even more discontent. It is not unthinkable that a collection of nationalist, Eurosceptic, anti-establishment and singleissue parties will tip the balance in the EP, change the direction of the EU for the worse and cause even more discontent.

Credit where credit is due: Eurosceptic have feverishly sharpened and updated their narrative in the last years and now stand to reap the benefits. We, and I include myself, have at times been complacent, believing that our classic narrative would be sufficient despite changing circumstances. Instead of defending our ideas on how to fix Europe and the urgency of it, too often we found ourselves defending the very idea of Europe. And while that idea is very much

EYES ON EUROPE

Lousewies van der Laan

worth defending, this may not actually be the most effective defence. We should be asking ourselves: should not some of the people who are dissatisfied with the way Europe currently works be voting for us? As a matter of fact, liberals have always been on the forefront of EU reform. It is us who want to make our complex and intricate EU more accountable, democratic and transparent. Of course, the liberal manifesto contains many concrete proposals that will tell the voters about our policy priorities for the coming term. Ambitious, the manifesto certainly is: we want to reform the common agricultural policy to enable EU farmers to compete in a free global market, to meet increasing global demand for food in an environmentally responsible way, to direct funding for research in renewable energies, including sustainable new generation bio-fuels, and to guarantee long-term food supplies. We want businesses to benefit fully from the internal market so that they can create jobs, rather than getting caught up in bureaucracy. We have fought for a balance between security and freedom, voting for antiterrorist measures only if they are really effective and do not undermine human rights. If it were up to us, we would end the European Parlimament’s wasteful, monthly travelling circus to Strasbourg. But we would be fooling ourselves if we believe that policy plans are enough to win elections. Elections are not won on policy, but on narrative. Most of our member parties cannot win elections with the exact same narrative we have used for so long now. We should no longer let others force us to be the defenders of the EU. In fact, any discussion with the premise “for or against Europe” is ludicrous: Europe is a continent and the existence of the EU is a reality that is not up for

CITIZENSHIP

debate. What we can decide is if we want Europe to be weak or strong. The only reason why the “for or against Europe” frame keeps popping up, is because it plays into the hands of some parties, because many journalists do not know any better, and because we play along much too nicely. Change of a political narrative comes through conscious, consistent and clear repeating of the frame that most accurately describes reality as we see it. She who determines what the debate is about, wins. Of course each country and each party’s situation is different, but as liberal family we do have the power to shift the narrative if we work together. How does the current “for or against Europe” frame work? Ask yourself the following question: a politician who is against the EU, what is she for? Her home country, obviously. Any voter will understand this. Unfortunately, by accepting that frame, the voter will also accept the opposite: a politician in favour of the EU is working against her home country. Simply by reinforcing the “for or against” frame, we strengthen the Eurosceptic. It forces liberals to point out some concrete advantages of the EU, or to re-explain a historic imperative that simply does not resonate in many places anymore, whether we like that or not. Calling our opponents nationalist or anti-European merely reinforces their frame to our own detriment. Perhaps most importantly, this non-debate sucks all the oxygen away from the real question: do we want Europe to be strong or weak? Luckily, also in this framing, voters already know which parties stand for which. This will work to our advantage. We should be much more mindful of the words we choose to accept. For example, do we defend the “transfer of powers to Brussels”? This means that countries currently have powers that they are about to lose if

53


CHANGE THE DEBATE AND WIN THE ELECTIONS

“Europe” gets its way. Just because it does not make sense, does not mean it is not convincing. Instead of letting us be forced into frames like that, we should attack nationalists who “want to stand alone in the world”, ask them how they will “pay for their retreat from Europe”, simply because they are “too immature to share responsibilities”. Not only is this a very different narrative, it also happens to be the truth. As in all political families, there are some variations in the ideas of our member parties on how to move

Lousewies van der Laan

Europe forward. I honestly believe that these matter far less than we think they do, as they are mainly tied to old and false frames. They certainly matter less now than they did in the past. In essence, all liberals are reformers. We all want an EU that is leaner, more meaningful, transparent, logical, democratic and accountable. We, as drafting committee, have tried to find a concept that summarises this shared ambition. Like any metaphor, its purpose is not be the complete and ultimate summary of our ideas; it is a tool that allow us to break into the

debate and give enough of energy to actually make an impact. We should not allow the campaign to be a game between ‘Europe vs. the home team’. The question that is on the table is whether voters want to live in a weak or strong Europe. Do they choose the complex, unaccountable and often bureaucratic Europe that we have today, or do they want to make it transparent and accountable? That is what we mean when we say we want a simpler Europe. Elections are not won on policy, but on narrative.

This is the narrative that allows us to tell our compelling story. We want a Europe that focuses on our priorities: jobs and security, and not waste most of its energy on fighting over budgets. A simpler Europe is a stronger Europe. Only a simpler and therefore stronger Europe will create jobs, enable longterm prosperity and earn back the confidence of the people. Our ambitious manifesto, and our voting records that support it, show that Liberals and Democrats are not satisfied with Europe as it is. Voters have three options: keep the EU we have by voting for the big groups. Voice discontent by choosing one of the new parties that want to tear down the EU. Or change Europe for the better, by making the Liberals and Democrats stronger. Lousewies van der Laan, Vice-president of the ALDE Party and chair of the drafting committee for the manifesto for the European elections of May 2014.

EYES ON EUROPE

CITIZENSHIP

54


Économie et social Economy & Social Wirtschaft und Soziales

EYES ON EUROPE

55


Dein Europaabgeordneter – Das unbekannte Wesen Christian Staat European sovereign debt: understanding the numbers Juan Equiza Citoyen européen et étudiant : pour une application uniforme du droit communautaire Hélène Gire How does Norway cooperate with the EU and who of those partners achieves more in their relations? Julia Rokicka Le Parlement européen : entre dialogues et concertations Clément Jadot Equal Pay, it’s about time! Zita Gurmai Social crisis - social solutions: Too little, but not too late Klaus Heeger

EYES ON EUROPE

56


Dein Europaabgeordneter: Das unbekannte Wesen Das Europäische Parlament (EP) ist ein Ort an dem national gewählte Politiker zusammen kommen um Europäische Politik zu gestalten. Unter gewissen Annahmen ermöglicht dieses Parlament das einmalige Experiment, Politikerkarrieren aus unterschiedlichen nationalen Staaten zu vergleichen, und damit die Bedeutung unterschiedlicher Rekrutierungs- und Auswahlsysteme für Politiker zu beschreiben. Bevor wir dies beantworten, wollen wir erst der folgenden Frage nachgehen: Was macht ein Mitglied des Europäischen Parlaments (MdEP) aus und wie unterscheidet es sich in seiner Herkunft, Sozialisation und Motivation von seinen Kollegen? Dieser Artikel wird den Start weiterer Analysen von Eyes on Europe sein und einen Ausblick auf das Abgeordnetendossier des nächsten Magazins pünktlich zu den Europawahlen 2014 geben. Wissen Sie wer Ihr MdEP ist und glauben Sie viele Ihrer Landsleute kennen das MdEP aus ihrer Region? Wäre Ihnen ein lokal verwurzelter Abgeordneter, der Ihre Region in bescheidenem Maße vertritt lieber als ein europagewandter Abgeordneter, der Experte auf einem europaspezifischen Thema ist? Angesichts der unterschiedlichen Aufgaben und Kompetenzen im EP wäre es verständlich, wenn sich Europaabgeordnete und Abgeordnete nationaler Parlamente unterscheiden. Dennoch werden beide über die gleichen Kanäle der national Parteien rekrutiert und ausgewählt. Über die Zusammensetzung nationaler Parlamente ist derzeit noch mehr bekannt als über das Europäische Parlament. Dieser Artikel soll versuchen diese Lücke zu verkleinern. Die Mitglieder des Europäischen Parlaments werden durch eine Europawahl bestimmt, allerdings wird das genaue Wahlsystem in jedem Mitgliedsstaat durch nationale Regelungen festgelegt. So wird beispielsweise der Wahltag, das Wahlalter, eventuelle Sperrklauseln oder etwa eine Wahlpflicht durch die einzelnen Mitgliedsstaaten geregelt. Einheitlich ist, dass seit 2004 die Europawahl in jedem Land nach dem Verhältnisw-ahlrecht durchgeführt wird.

EYES ON EUROPE

Christian Staat Die Europawahl 2014 wird von Donnerstag den 22. bis Sonntag den 25. Mai stattfinden. Hohe Anzahl ausgeschiedener und nachgerückter MdEP

Bei so unterschiedlichen Regelungen ist es nicht verwunderlich, dass die aktuell 766 Abgeordneten aus 28 Ländern einen unterschiedlichen politischen Karriereverlauf hinter sich haben. Die Tabelle verdeutlicht die Zusammensetzung des EP nach Mitgliedsstaaten und Fraktionen. Die Zahl der Abgeordneten hat sich 2013 um 12 neue Abgeordnete aus Kroatien erhöht, wird sich jedoch nach der Europawahl 2014 wieder auf die festgelegten 751 reduzieren. Unsere eigenen Recherchen basieren auf etwa 840 MdEP aus dem 7. EP, was die bis zum Sommer 2013 nachgerückten MdEP einschließt 1 . Die meisten der MdEP, die das EP verlassen haben, sind in die nationale Politik ihres Landes aufgestiegen oder zurückgekehrt. Wir wollen untersuchen, ob diese hohe Rate mit den Karriereverläufen der Politiker in ihren jeweiligen Heimatstaaten zusammenhängt. Das Durchschnittsalter der 766 im Sommer 2013 aktiven MdEP ist 55 Jahre. Die jüngste Abgeordnete ist die Schwedin Amelia Andersdotter die mit 26 Jahren für die Piratpartiet im EP sitzt. Ältester Abgeordneter mit 85 Jahren ist Luigi Ciriaco de Mita, ehemaliger Ministerpräsident Italiens (1988/89). Der Anteil der weiblichen Abgeordneten im EP beträgt 31% und ist besonders hoch bei MdEP

WIRTSCHAFT UND SOZIALES

aus nordischen Mitgliedsstaaten. Die wenigsten Frauen gibt es unter den Abgeordneten aus den Osteuropäischen Mitgliedsstaaten. Nach Bale und Talgert (2006) hat vor allem die Osterweiterung 2004 dazu geführt, dass der Anteil der Frauen wieder etwas gedrückt wurde, nachdem er über die Jahre angestiegen war. Fragt man sich, ob es eher linke oder rechte Parteien sind, die junge oder weibliche Abgeordnete nach Brüssel/Straßburg schicken, dann lohnt sich der Blick auf die Regressionsanalyse. Zur Auswertung des Parteispektrums wird Gschwend et al. (2013) zur Hilfe genommen 2 . Dort wurden 162 nationale Parteien Europas in einem gemeinsamen links/rechts Spektrum klassifiziert. Die Ergebnisse der Auswertung sind schwach, deuten allerdings darauf hin, dass es rechte Parteien sind, die eher Männer aber auch im Schnitt leicht jüngere Abgeordnete ins EP entsenden. Nur wenige Europaabgeordnete sind europaweit bekannt, was an dem Fehlen einer Europäischen Öffentlichkeit liegen mag. Dennoch gibt es noch einen Abgeordneten, der von Beginn des Europäischen Parlaments (1979 noch mit 410 Abgeordneten aus 9 Ländern) dabei war: Hans-Gert Pöttering (CDU). Er ist seit 1979 MdEP, dicht gefolgt von Elmar Brok, der seit 1980 (ebenfalls für die CDU) im EP sitzt. Die Hälfte der MdEP wurden neu ins 7. EP gewählt Sieht man sich die Zusammensetzung des EPs genauer an, so stellt man fest, dass viele Abgeordnete nach der Europawahl 2009 neu ins EP eingezogen sind. Von den jetzt aktiven 766 Parlamentariern waren 2009 zum Beginn der Legislaturperiode 401 zum ersten mal im EP. Zwei Abgeordnete sitzen seit dem 1. Parlament, fünf seit dem 2., 13 seit dem 3., 42 seit dem 4., 96 seit dem 5. und 180 seit dem 6.

57


DEIN EUROPAABGEORDNETER...

Parlament in Straßburg bzw. Brüssel. Diese hohe Anzahl von Neulingen im EP könnte mit den generellen Karriereverläufen von Politikern in ihrem Heimatland zu tun haben. Eine Legislaturperiode im EP beträgt fünf Jahre. Die durchschnittliche Verweildauer im EP beträgt daher auch etwas weniger als zwei Legislaturperioden. Im Gegensatz zum Deutschen Bundestag sind dies ungewöhnlich hohe Zahlen. Dort schieden 2005 nur 23% der Abgeordneten aus und die Verweildauer hat sich in den letzten Jahren erhöht 3. Was die bisherige Literatur zu den sozialen Hintergründen und den Karriereverläufen der MdEPs herausgefunden hat, ist alles andere als umfassend. Johansson (2010) unterscheidet nicht nach dem Typ der politischen Karriere vor dem EP und lässt Karrieren nach dem EP unerwähnt 4 . Hauptsächlich konzentriert Johansson sich auf den ethnischen Hintergrund der MdEP und muss feststellen, dass ein verschwindend kleiner Anteil der MdEP multiethnisch geprägt ist. Wesentlich genauer in der Betrachtung der politischen Karrieren von MdEP vor bzw. nach dem EP ist Scarrow (1997) 5. Er teilt die Karrieren nach der ersten Legislaturperiode im EP in europäische, nationale oder politisch endende Karrieren ein. Leider beschränkt sich die Studie auf Deutschland, Frankreich, Italien und das Vereinigte Königreich. Hix, Hobold und Hoyland (2012, 2013) greifen dies auf und klassifizieren Europaabgeordnete in drei Gruppen: a) Abgeordnete, die eine Europäische Karriere anstreben, b) Abgeordnete, die eine nationale Karriere anstreben und c) Abgeordnete, die ihre Karriere im EP zu Ende bringen möchten. Anhand der Klassifizierung weisen Hix, Hobold und Hoyland nach, dass das Abstimmungsverhalten und die Art des Engagements im EP sich signifikant unterscheiden können 6. Insgesamt lässt sich feststellen, dass in der Literatur eine Mikroperspektive auf die individuellen Entscheidungsträger, die MdEP, noch fehlt 7.

Christian Staat

nicht erst seit kurzem für deren Karriereverläufe. Eine wichtige Variable ist dabei die Bezahlung der Abgeordneten 8. Seit 2009 erhält jeder Europaabgeordnete eine gleich hohe Entschädigung 9. Ein MdEP erhält ein monatliches Grundgehalt von 7.956,87 EUR brutto, was 38,5 % der Grundbezüge eines Richters am Europäischen Gerichtshof entspricht. Davon ist eine EU-Steuer und ein Unfallversicherungsbeitrag zu leisten, was netto 6.200,72 EUR übrig lässt, worauf noch innerstaatliche Steuern des jeweiligen Mitgliedstaats erhoben werden und wovon oft noch ein Teil an die Partei abgeführt wird 10. Daneben erhält ein MdEP eine pauschale monatliche Spesenvergütung von 4.299 EUR. Zudem gibt es ein Tagegeld von 304 EUR für jeden Tag der Teilnahme an offiziellen Sitzungen der Gremien des Europäischen Parlaments. Die Anstellung von Assistenten auf Kosten der EU bis maximal 19.709 EUR monatlich inklusive Spesen wird übernommen. Wie eingangs erwähnt, wird von den meisten Europaabgeordneten ein Spagat zwischen der Vertretung der Interessen einer Region und der Sachkenntnis zu spezifischen europäischen Themen erwartet. Dies hat die Konsequenz, dass der Beruf sehr reiseintensiv ist. Ein mal im Monat wandern die Abgeordneten samt einigen Mitarbeitern nach Straßburg zum eigentlichen Sitz des Europäischen Parlaments (Brüssel ist lediglich ein Arbeitssitz), um dort abzustimmen. Daneben richten sich die Abgeordneten oft ein Mal im Monat eine Wahlkreiswoche (Grüne Woche) in ihrem Terminkalender ein. In dieser Zeit kümmern sie sich intensiv um die Belange ihrer Region. Inwieweit die Reisetätigkeiten, die Veränderung der Abgeordnetenentschädigung, die Erweiterung der EU die Zusammensetzung des Europäischen Parlaments veränderten, wird in der nächsten Ausgabe von Eyes On Europe untersucht.

1: Das EP ist hier sehr transparent und veröffentlicht ausführliche Informationen zu seinen Mitgliedern unter: http://www.europarl. europa.eu/meps 2: Gschwend, T., J. Lo, and S.-O. Proksch (2010): “Europe’s common ideological space,” in final PIREDEU conference, Brussels, Nov, pp. 18–19. 3: Wissenschaftliche Dienste im Deutschen Bundestag (2007): 10.2007:6 4: Johansson, J. (2010): „Who are the Members of the European Parliament?“, OEiC Organization for European Interstate Cooperation 5: Scarrow, S. E. (1997): “Political career paths and the European Parliament,” Legislative Studies Quarterly, pp. 253–263. 6: Hix, S., S. B. Hobolt, and B. Hoyland (2012): “Career Paths and Legislative Activities of Members of the European Parliament,” in Annual Conference of the American Political Science Association, New Orleans, August 30th-September 2nd. 7: Bale, T., and P. Taggart (2006): First-timers yes, virgins no: the roles and backgrounds of new members of the European Parliament. Sussex European Institute. 8: Keane, M. P., and A. Merlo (2010): “Money, political ambition, and the career decisions of politicians,” American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, pp. 186–215. 9: Zuvor wurden die Europaabgeordneten von ihren entsendeten Staaten bezahlt, was zu hohen Entlohnungsunterschieden bei gleich hohen Lebenshaltungskosten in Brüssel und Straßburg führte. 10: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/aboutparliament/de/0081ddfaa4/Abgeordnete.html

Christian Staat promoviert zu Wettbewerbsfragen am European Center for Advanced Research in Economics and Statistics (ECARES) an der Université libre de Bruxelles.

Ökonomen betrachten den Beruf des Politikers wie jeden anderen auch und interessieren sich

EYES ON EUROPE

WIRTSCHAFT UND SOZIALES

58


DEIN EUROPAABGEORDNETER...

EYES ON EUROPE

Christian Staat

WIRTSCHAFT UND SOZIALES

59


DEIN EUROPAABGEORDNETER...

Christian Staat

Tabelle: Mitglieder je Mitgliedsstaat und Fraktion in der 7. Wahlperiode Mitgliedss-EVP taat/Fraktion

S&D

ALDE

Gr端ne/EFA ECR

AT

6

5

1

2

BE

5

5

5

4

BG

7

4

5

CY

2

2

CZ

2

7

DE

42

23

12

14

DK

1

5

3

1

EE

1

1

3

1

ES

25

23

2

2

FI

4

2

4

2

FR

30

13

6

16

13

12

5

1

1

GB

1

insgesamt

5

19

1

1

22

1

1

18 6

9

4

22

1

8

99

1

1

13 6

1

1 1

27

54 13

5

1

3

74

1

9

6

73

1

3

2

1

1

7

8

HR

5

5

HU

14

4

IE

4

2

4

2

IT

34

22

5

1

LT

4

3

2

LU

3

1

1

1

LV

4

1

1

1

MT

2

4

NL

5

3

PL

29

7

PT

10

7

RO

14

11

5

SE

5

6

4

SI

4

2

2

SK

6

5

1

194

85

EYES ON EUROPE

NI

2

GR

insgesamt 275

GUE/NGL EFD

22 12

1 8

3

22

1

12

2

73

2

12

1

6 1

9 6

6

3

1

2

11 1

1

5

4

51

4

22 3

4

26

1

33 20 8

1 58

56

WIRTSCHAFT UND SOZIALES

35

13

32

31

60

766


European sovereign debt: understanding the numbers Researchers in academia and policy institutions, politicians, journalists, business managers… everyone in Europe keeps an eye nowadays on the evolution of public debt as a share of GDP. Movements of this indicator can induce big stress in financial markets and painful policy responses. But what does this ratio exactly mean? Useful as it is, it also leaves aside many relevant issues. This article describes some keys to understand what the debt-to-GDP ratio exactly means and where its limitations lie. As the European debt crisis has developed, European countries have become increasingly conscious of the need to keep national sovereign finances under control. Otherwise, the common project of a currency and monetary union has shown itself as rather dysfunctional. Consequently, the Fiscal Stability Treaty (also known as “Fiscal Compact”) entered into force in 2013 to enhance provisions from the Stability and Growth Pact. In particular, steps were taken to apply preventive and corrective fiscal measures (including disciplinary penalties) more consistently than in the past. The Excessive Deficit Procedure (EDP) is launched when one or both of the following rules are breached by a Member State: the deficit must not exceed 3% of GDP and public debt must not exceed 60% of GDP (or at least diminish sufficiently towards this value). Simultaneously, researchers in academia and institutions have debated more intensely about the effects of high sovereign debt on output growth. The damaging effects for debt levels higher than 85 or 90% of GDP – claimed by Reinhart and Rogoff (2010), Kumar and Woo (2010) and Cecchetti, Mohanti and Zampolli (2011), among others – brought renewed interest in the share of debt to GDP. This ratio probably became a “trending word” in the economic blogosphere after Herndon, Ash and Pollin published in April 2013 a strong critique of the methodology and results of Reinhart and Rogoff’s work.

EYES ON EUROPE

Juan Equiza

Despite considering it very interesting and necessary, it is not the purpose of this article to debate further the effects of high debt on growth; neither the effectiveness of rules like the ones incorporated in the “Fiscal Compact”. The analysis focuses instead on this indicator that – in one way or another – has always been involved in the discussion: the debtto-GDP ratio. My objective is to explain the meaning of this number as a useful (but rather simplistic) indicator of the government’s solvency, as well as its limitations. But our government’s ability to pay creditors back depends also on the size of our country’s future wealth and, consequently, debt figures should be “read” in relative terms.

First of all, understanding the economic implications of debt figures by looking at them in absolute terms is quite difficult. If we worry about the size of government debt – better said, if our creditors are concerned about the size of our government debt – it is because higher debt lowers future wealth available for repayment. But our government’s ability to pay creditors back depends also on the size of our country’s future wealth and, consequently, debt figures should be “read” in relative terms. Therefore, ideally, a country’s future payment obligations should be compared with disposable future government income. However, to avoid obtaining values for the latter – which is much more complicated than for the former –, we would like to approximate it by using current government income, or just some measure of national income, like GDP. So, as one can see, we sacrifice conceptual

ECONOMY & SOCIAL

rigour for the benefit of using a wellconstructed measure, as it is the case of GDP. Regarding the numerator – government debt – we find that choosing an easily quantifiable measure implies leaving aside relevant information. To begin with, notice that the concept of government needs to be defined explicitly. For EDP, it is the debt of the general government that matters; that is, it includes debt issued by central, state and local government levels, as well as Social Security funds. Since it is possible that the liabilities issued by one government level are held by another, the Euro area institutions monitor consolidated debt figures. As a result, debt instruments that are simultaneously a liability for one government level and an asset for another are excluded because they do not represent an obligation of government in general with other sectors of the economy. A typical example is when Social Security funds invest their savings in central government treasury bonds. However, this consolidating practice is not exempt of criticism because the savings of Social Security funds come from receipts that pay future (partly accrued) pensions. And the latter constitutes a commitment that – although not explicitly made by law or contract – contributors expect to be honored. The Eurostat/ECB Task Force on Pensions estimates that accrued-to-date pension entitlements in the Euro area are already over 300% of GDP. Nevertheless, our pay-as-you-go social security systems require that this impressive figure be paid for with future contributions and therefore it is excluded from the EDP debt concept. Economists look at two concepts of general government (consolidated) debt: gross and net debt. EDP provisions refer to the gross concept, which is the stock of outstanding government debt in the form of mainly securities and loans. Net debt is the difference between gross debt and the financial assets that

61


EUROPEAN SOVEREIGN DEBT...

Juan Equiza

the government holds (issued by sectors different from the general government). Table 1 shows that from 2007 to 2012 the increase of gross debt for some European countries have been much larger than the increase for net debt. In fact the former is roughly twice the latter in the case of Belgium, Germany, Greece, Luxembourg and the Netherlands. Measures to stabilise the financial sector during the crisis are largely responsible for the increase in assets implied by these figures. Since these assets might be sold to meet debt repayments in the future, it is sometimes claimed that net debt would be more appropriate to evaluate debt sustainability. However, it is very difficult to evaluate how much these assets will be worth in the future, a major reason for the use of the gross concept. In addition, gross debt can be measured at face (also called nominal) value or market prices. European rules refer to nominal values. If a government issues 10 bonds in 2013 and each of them promises the repayment of 1000 euros after 5 years (for simplicity, there are no coupon payments); then the face value of that government’s obligation is 10x1000 euros. However, the market value of its debt in 2003 will be 10 x P, where P is the price of the bond, generally lower than 1000 euros. The difference 10x(1000-P) is the compensation paid to creditors for providing the capital 10xP for a period of 5 years. In terms of government solvency, it is correct to look at the market value of debt, since that is the payment necessary for a government to liquidate its obligation today. Moreover, given that the denominator (GDP) is measured in euros of 2013, it makes sense to value the numerator in the same units (and not in euros of 2018). However, the presence of non-marketable or very illiquid debt liabilities makes it difficult to value debt at market prices and, as a result, EDP rules use nominal values. So, again, we give up some rigour for the benefit of using more easily measured indicators.

EYES ON EUROPE

consolidation, financial and non-financial assets, and the valuation of assets and liabilities at market prices. If they can come up with reasonable estimates, they should even incorporate the non-financial assets of a country in the analysis. Finally, the extension of government guarantees to secure bank liabilities or the activity of public deposit insurance funds during the crisis has led to a rapid growth of contingent liabilities in Europe. These obligations of uncertain realization are not included in the balance sheet of governments (or in the EDP debt concept); however they may increase their risk exposure substantially. The independent fiscal authorities must monitor the management of these new risks and inform about their evolution. Otherwise we risk that our politicians ignore other threats not observable by looking at changes in the debt-to-GDP ratio. Cecchetti, S.G., Mohanti, M.S. and F. Zampolli. “The Real Effects of Debt”. No. 352 BIS Working Papers (2011)

Economists know that debt-to-GDP ratios are useful indicators but they are also aware that a lot of information on the fiscal situation of a country is left aside

Economists know that debt-toGDP ratios are useful indicators but they are also aware that a lot of information on the fiscal situation of a country is left aside. The Fiscal Compact’s provisions have increased the role of independent bodies, which are given the task of monitoring compliance with fiscal rules. In my opinion, these fiscal councils could also play the role of performing and disseminating more elaborated assessments of the fiscal “health” of a country’s government sector. In its evaluation, they must take into consideration all the information contained in the balance sheet of the government, including the impact of intra-government

ECONOMY & SOCIAL

Herndon, T., Ash, M. and R. Pollin. "Does High Public Debt Consistently Stifle Economic Growth? A Critique of Reinhart and Rogoff". Political Economy Research Institute (2013) Kumar, M.S. and J. Woo. “Public Debt and Growth”. IMF Working Papers (2010) Reinhart, C.M. and K.S. Rogoff. “Growth in a Time of Debt”. The American Economic Review 100.2 (2010): 573-78

Juan Equiza is a Ph.D. student at the European Centre for Advanced Research in Economics and Statistics (Université libre de Bruxelles).

62


Citoyen européen et étudiant : pour une application uniforme du droit communautaire En matière d'accès aux bourses d'études, les étudiants travailleurs ressortissants de l'Union européenne (UE) ne reçoivent pas le même traitement que les nationaux dans les Etats membres. La Cour Européenne de Justice (CEJ) précise les conditions d'éligibilité aux bourses nationales pour les ressortissants de l'Union européenne qui étudient dans un autre Etat membre. En dépit des nombreux règlements visant à coordonner les systèmes de protection et d'aides sociales, il subsiste des incertitudes quant à l'application du droit communautaire lorsqu'il s'agit de traiter les résidents UE de la même manière que les nationaux. C'est notamment le cas en matière d'attribution de bourses aux étudiants de l'enseignement supérieur pour les ressortissants européen résidant dans un autre Etat membre. Enoncée dans son principe dans le traité sur l'Union européenne, les effets de la citoyenneté européenne sont régulièrement précisés par la CEJ et le domaine de l'éducation, bien qu'étant de la responsabilité des Etats membres, ne fait pas exception. La CEJ dispose d'un grand potentiel d'influence par son interprétation des dispositions contre la discrimination liée à la nationalité d'une part et d'autre part à la liberté de circulation pour tout citoyen européen sur le territoire de l'UE.

Hélène Gire

Education and Skills (C-209/03), la Cour avait statué en mars 2005 que les étudiants qui font la preuve d'un certain degré d'intégration dans l'Etat membre devraient avoir les mêmes droits que les étudiants nationaux. Puis, en novembre 2008, dans l'arrêt Jacqueline Förster / Hoofddirectie van de Informatie Beheer Groep (C-158/07), la Cour confirmait l'exigence d'un lien authentique avec l'Etat d'accueil et précisait qu'une période de cinq années consécutives de résidence constituait une durée appropriée pour considérer qu'un individu était intégré à la société. Disposer d'un titre de séjour permanent.

Les textes européens indiquent clairement que tous les citoyens de l'UE, résidant depuis au moins cinq ans dans un Etat membre dont il n'est pas ressortissant, a droit à une bourse d'étude au même titre que les citoyens de l'Etat membre en question. Cette condition s'explique par le fait que cette période

minimale de résidence correspond au moment où un citoyen UE reçoit un titre de séjour permanent ce qui suppose de fait l'exercice d'une activité rémunérée (ou d'autres sources de revenus). Or, cette exigence de ressources suffisantes disparaît lorsqu'un individu obtient un titre de séjour permanent et c'est en vertu de sa citoyenneté européenne qu'un ressortissant non-national a droit à l'égalité de traitement avec les nationaux, notamment en matière d'aide sociales (bourses pour étudiants comprises). Avoir le statut de travailleur.

Dans les arrêts présentés ci-après, la Cour semble revenir sur cette condition de période minimale de résidence permanente pour l'ouverture du droit à une bourse d'études. Dans l'arrêt Elodie Giersch et autres c. Grand-Duché du Luxembourg (C-20/12), du 20 juin 2013, la Cour indique que les citoyens EU y ont droit dans un autre Etat membre, même sans y avoir résidé, dans la mesure où l'un de leurs parents a travaillé dans cet Etat pendant une période minimum. Dans les affaires jointes Lawrence Prinz c. Région

En matière de bourses pour étudiants en particulier, la jurisprudence de la Cour a eu l'opportunité de définir les critères d'éligibilité acceptables : disposer d'un titre de séjour permanent ; avoir le statut de travailleur. La jurisprudence européenne Tout d'abord dans l'arrêt The Queen, à la demande de Dany Bidar / London Borough of Ealing & Secretary of State for

EYES ON EUROPE

ÉCONOMIE ET SOCIAL

63


CITOYEN EUROPÉEN ET ÉTUDIANT...

d'Hanovre et Philipp Seeberger c. Studentenwerk Heidelberg (C-523/11), la CEJ a stipulé le 18 juillet dernier que l'Allemagne ne peut exiger, pour l'octroi d'une bourse pour étudier un an dans un autre Etat membre, une période de résidence de trois années consécutives avant le commencement des études en Allemagne. Ainsi, la Cour a laissé de côté l'exigence de période minimale de résidence au profit d'autres liens de nature sociale et économique à la société d'accueil. Posséder un titre de séjour permanent n'apparaît plus nécessaire à l'obtention d'une bourse d'études. C'est ce qu'il ressort de l'arrêt L.N. c. Styrelsen for Videregående Uddannelser og Uddannelsesstøtte (C-46/12) prononcé le 21 février 2013. Monsieur L.N. est un citoyen européen qui entre au Danemark en juin 2009. Avant son arrivée, en mars 2009, il s'était inscrit dans une école supérieure de commerce de Copenhague. Il trouve très vite un travail à temps plein et s'enregistre auprès du registre de la population en tant que travailleur salarié. En août, il demande une bourse pour étudiant à compter du mois de septembre, moment où il commence ses cours, renonce à son contrat à temps plein et retrouve un emploi à temps partiel. Interpellée dans cette affaire, la CEJ indique dans son dispositif qu'« un citoyen de l’Union qui poursuit des études dans un État membre d’accueil et y exerce en parallèle une activité salariée réelle et effective de nature à lui conférer la qualité de « travailleur » au sens de l’article 45 TFUE ne peut se voir refuser des aides d’entretien aux études accordées aux ressortissants de cet État membre ». Ainsi, bien que n'ayant pas séjourné cinq ans au Danemark et ne travaillant qu'à temps partiel, un citoyen européen a bien le droit à une bourse d'étude. En Belgique francophone, la persistance d'un critère d'éligibilité discriminatoire A cet égard, la Fédération WallonieBruxelles, autorité régionale belge exclusivement compétente en matière d'enseignement, accepte d'octroyer des bourses aux résidents UE mais à la condition que l'un des parents de l'étudiant

EYES ON EUROPE

Hélène Gire

ait travaillé au moins un an en Belgique. Il apparaît qu'au regard des décisions de la CEJ et des prescriptions européennes, ce critère établi en Belgique francophone contrevient clairement aux principes en vigueur. En effet, ne sont pris en compte ni la durée de résidence permanente ni la qualité de travailleur des ressortissants UE. Ce critère est particulièrement discriminatoire dans la mesure où les citoyens UE résidant en Belgique francophone (à moins d'inviter l'un de leurs parents à s'installer et travailler en Belgique dans le cas où ce dernier serait vivant, valide et toujours en âge de travailler) ne peuvent pas remédier à leur situation et ne pourront donc jamais prétendre à une bourse de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, quant bien même ceux-ci sont intégrés à la société belge, travaillent et résident en Belgique, et ce même depuis plus de cinq ans. Le cas de cet Etat membre apparaît unique au sein de l'Union européenne et il est étonnant que ce manque de respect des engagements en matière de non-discrimination sur base de la nationalité et d'égalité de traitement des citoyens UE n'ait pas suscité d'émoi jusqu'ici. Des situations variables selon les Etats membres Cependant, les précisions apportées par la CEJ devraient amener plusieurs autres Etats membres à revoir leurs conditions d'octroi qui apparaissent dès lors nonconformes. A l'heure actuelle, les Etats membres ont chacun établi leurs critères d'éligibilité. Parmi eux, certains ont adopté cette exigence de période minimale de cinq ans de résidence (Belgique néerlandophone, Danemark, Irlande, PaysBas) et ne prennent pas en considération le fait que l'étudiant travaille depuis son arrivée sur le territoire. D'autres Etats membres n'ont pas de condition de durée minimale de résidence mais exigent en revanche que l'étudiant (ou l'un de ses parents) travaille (Autriche, Allemagne, Finlande).

France et en Suède. En effet, soit le ressortissant de l'UE s'est installé récemment dans un Etat membre et ne doit pas constituer une charge financière déraisonnable pour le système d'assistance sociale de l'Etat d'accueil (statut de travailleur), soit celui-ci est considéré comme intégré dans l'Etat membre d'accueil et dispose dès lors du droit à un traitement égal (titre de séjour permanent). Les deux cas devraient donner accès aux bourses d'études. Les disparités entre les Etats membres sont l'illustration de la situation actuellement confuse autour de la notion de « ressources suffisantes » dès lors qu'il s'agit d'aider financièrement les étudiants non-nationaux. Qu'en est-il exactement dans la mesure où les études ne permettent en principe pas l'exercice d'un emploi à temps complet et qu'une demande de bourse constitue en soi un aveu de ressources insuffisantes ? Plusieurs dizaines de milliers d'étudiants en Europe sont concernés et la CEJ ne saurait statuer pour chacun d'eux. Dans la mesure où l'UE a placé l'éducation et la formation professionnelle tout au long de la vie au cœur de sa stratégie Europe 2020, il est plus que nécessaire d'établir au plus vite des règles précises applicables partout en matière d'attribution de bourses aux étudiants européens. Les Etats membres, qui sont responsables de leurs budgets en matière d'éducation, doivent connaître et appliquer des dispositions fiables dans le temps et les ressortissants de l'UE sont en droit de savoir précisément à quoi s'attendre lorsque, ayant exercé leur droit à la libre-circulation, ils souhaitent étudier dans leur Etat de résidence. Hélène Gire est étudiante en Master à l’Institut d’études européennes.

Au regard des arrêts prononcés par la CEJ, il apparaît que ces Etats membres n'appliquent que l'un des deux principes énoncés alors que ceux-ci devraient s'appliquer alternativement comme c'est le cas en

ÉCONOMIE ET SOCIAL

64


How does Norway cooperate with the EU and who of those partners achieves more A wave of inspirations from Norway stimulates in their relations? more and more ecological ideas and innovations in the European Union, which can be used to positively affect our lives and our future. In this article, we will take a look how these two partners interact with each other and how society can benefit from it.

As we know, Norway refused to join the European Union twice by a majority of electorate referendum vote, but since 1994 it has become an almost fully integrated member of the EU’s internal market for instance through the European Economic Area (EEA) and European Free Trade Association (EFTA). Many in Norway insist that joining the European Union would be a threat to the sovereignty of their country, that the fishing would suffer and that there would be less favourable conditions for its welfare state. Though we can observe that the European Union and Norway are cooperating closely on many initiatives like research programmes and the student exchange programme ‘Erasmus’. However, it is even more interesting to analyse how the European Union imitates and derives from Norwegian innovations and ideas Integrated, low emission, cross-border transport systems and ecological cars In the European Union, there are attempts to create clean and energy efficient vehicles as well as integrated low emission and cross-border systems. This needs money, time, a lot of political willingness and determination, because the interests of companies are various and it is quite challenging to promote green growth in mostly urban areas. In Brussels only, roughly 6000 lobby groups represent the different interests of companies and all sorts of organisations. Since the last few years, the common aim within the European Union has been to minimize the impact of roads on nature. For instance, new ideas such as intelligent traffic management are helping people to reach their destinations faster and safer, while having the preservation of nature in mind.

EYES ON EUROPE

Julia Rokicka

Specialists also focus on the reduction of CO2 emissions for road vehicles, renewable and non-polluting energy sources as well as safety and traffic fluidity, which are supported by the Green Car Initiative. New technologies include, amongst others, electric and hybrid cars and as well as the development of necessary infrastructure. Another aim is to reduce the negative effects of borders between member states (whether they are administrative, legal or physical barriers) and thus helping to manage common problems. In Norway, approximately 87% of all waste was recovered in 2011.

In Sweden and Norway, local and regional authorities are working closely with enterpreneurs to create the world's first 'green highway'- a fossilfree transport corridor across midScandinavia by 2020. The European Union considerates Norwegian ideas as a way to create a similar project between regions and eventually expand it to the whole union in order to achieve a faster and more ecological development. Another project called Infragreen is aimed at promoting the use of biogas fuel and ensuring the development of an infrastructure for electronic vehicle charging stations in the cross-border area between southern Sweden and Norway. These countries are actively trying to reduce their dependence on fossil fuels by improving new sources of energy and establishing the needed infrastructure. Generally, when it comes to energy Norway as well as the whole Scandinavian region are again pioneers, wheter it is in the segregation of waste, recycling of old materials or transforming trash into fuels. In order to illustrate this, in Norway approximately 87% of all waste was recovered in 2011 and this percentage has only continued to rise since then.

ECONOMY & SOCIAL

In April 2013 The New York Times published an article on how Norway is re-using trash and turning it into heat and electricity. But the most interesting detail is that Norway is the biggest importer of garbage from the EU and even wants to import rubbish from the United States. Norway really is a protector of nature and therefore it seems that they have discovered a secret of the future. Norwegians say that the European waste market is huge and still growing, even though for the time being it is not advantageous for Norwegians to import their waste, but in the long perspective it might be. One may ask how does it look like today in Norway? For instance, in Oslo around half of the city and most of schools are heated by burning garbage. Norwegians have separated bags for organic waste, glass, plastic etc. Those bags can be found for free at groceries and other shops. Such a strict separation of organic garbage enables Oslo to produce biogas, which it is now using to power many aspects of city and society, for instance the city‘s buses. Can high taxes stimulate development? Norway has the highest oil tax in the world - currently 78%. This fact stimulates companies to search for other possibilities to save money. Firms can get a special tax credit on research and development as well as 78 percent rebate on exploration costs. Thus companies can write off much of their investment costs. Probably this is the reason why Norway is so innovative – recently they invented a drillship that cuts through two metres of ice, radar that detects oil spills in Arctic darkness and a drill that burrows through rock with the ease of a mole. Moreover, Stavanger’s Ziebel has designed a fibre-optic rod that can take thousands of images per

65


HOW DOES NORWAY COOPERATE...

second along the entire length of oil wells, which can extend hundreds or thousands of feet, detecting leaks that can reduce flows and pose a risk to the environment. But the greatest leap in technologies are provided by Statoil – the biggest Parrafin firm in Norway. An intriguing fact is that Norway's oil industry spent around 4 billion

Crowns (486 million euros) on research in 2012 and Statoil alone spend 2.8 billion Crowns (340 million euros). Statoil awarded a contract to Inocean to design a drillship to search for oil in the toughest parts of the Arctic and what they came back with is the ability to cut through two meters of ice. The specialist say that: “The challenge is in health and safety and (in) reaching zero discharge, zero footprint”. Many can benefit from Norwegian innovations and take it as an example to follow, by using the same methods to encourage modernization and constant development. Norway has the highest oil tax in the world - currently 78%.

Ideas for the future Another project worth mentionning is the Seed bank on the Barents Sea whose goal is it to keep and preserve gene diversity of all seeds and major food crops. The Seed Bank called “Doomsday Seed

EYES ON EUROPE

Julia Rokicka

bank” is financed by Bill Gates, the Rockefeller Foundation, Monsanto Corporation, Syngenta Foundation and the Government of Norway, among others and it ensures that the genetic diversity of the world's food crops is preserved for future generations. It can be a small step for a few investors, but a giant leap for future populations of the world.

Cooperation between Norway and European Union Norwegian participation in EU policies is most important in energy, in marine science, technology and in environmental areas, since those are fast developing and very influencial fields. Norway also participates in initiatives like the European Research Area and other European organisations and institutions for research and development: ESA (European Space Agency), COST (the European organisation for scientific and technological cooperation), EUREKA (the European network for market oriented research and development), CERN (European Centre for Particle Physics) and EMBL (European Molecular Biology Laboratory). Many initiatives in which Norway supports countries from the EU are provided within the International Development Norway organization and International Energy Agency (IEA).

our northern neighbour, since this country is mainly looking to the future and focuses on ecological stability which is so crucial for our current and prospective existence and prosperity. It could seem like the European Union avails itself more from Norwegian innovations and that Norway does not need to be a member of the EU. However the EU is still the most relevant trade partner - 65 percent of Norway's imported goods come from the EU. Taking all this into account, it is difficult to point out the bigger beneficiary of this relationship, but one fact remains – both partners need each other and achieve a lot thanks to this cooperation. Personally, I think that the European Union should target more ecological issues, because this sector is developing fast, is beneficial to many parts of society and most importantly it becomes indispensable in the future. Our natural partner Norway is really prospective and necessary for the EU. Now are the relations between Norway and the European Union going to be even more tight? Or will it remain the same or even get more complicated with the rising number of member states? It seems that much of it depends on the future shape of the European Union, its coherency as well as on the Norwegian and the European Union possibilities for better partners. José Palma Andres, „Promoting sustainable, clean and energy efficient transport can strengthen the EU economy“, www.theparliament.com, 8.10.2013 Balazs Koranyi and Stephen Eisenhammer, „Norway’s innovators help oil industry move to harsher climes”, www.the-european.eu, 27.09.2013 John Tagliabue, A City That Turns Garbage Into Energy Copes With a Shortage, www.nytimes. com, 29.04.2013

Julia Rokicka is a Political Science student at Université libre de Bruxelles and a trainee at the European Parliament.

As citizens of the European Union, we can benefit and learn a lot from

ECONOMY & SOCIAL

66


Le Parlement européen : entre dialogues et concertations A l'approche des élections européennes de 2014, les initiatives fleurissent pour tenter de construire une Europe citoyenne et sociale. D'ailleurs, les journées de l'Europe qui ont eu lieu à Bruxelles du 10 au 12 octobre le prouvent : les citoyens européens nourrissent beaucoup d'aspirations pour l'Europe. Une récente enquête publiée également en octobre répertoriait les 28 propositions les plus importantes établies par les citoyens pour améliorer le fonctionnement de l'Europe. Parmi elles figurait le besoin de rendre les institutions plus visibles et surtout plus transparentes. C'est dans ce souci de transparence que nous vous proposons aujourd'hui un aperçu du fonctionnement du parlement européen à travers l'interview de Clément Jadot, chercheur en Sciences politiques à l'Université Libre de Bruxelles. Cette interview a été conduite par Alice Ringot. Eyes on Europe : On se fait parfois une fausse idée sur le fonctionnement du Parlement européen. Les citoyens ont parfois tendance à croire que le Parlement européen est constitué de la même manière que leur Parlement national. Mais est-ce vraiment le cas ?

Clément Jadot : Tout d'abord, tous les parlements nationaux ne se ressemblent pas. Ils ne fonctionnent pas non plus de la même façon. Prenez le parlement français par exemple. L’Assemblée nationale est souvent présentée comme un « Talking Parliament », un espace de débat où il n’est pas rare que le ton monte entre les députés de l’opposition et ceux de la majorité. Dans le cas du Parlement européen, une logique similaire est difficilement transposable. Le temps de parole attribué y est très court, il s’agit d’un environnement multilingue et, surtout, la dynamique est très différente. Contrairement aux schémas qui nous sont familiers en Europe, il n’y a ni majorité, ni opposition, en ce sens qu’il n’y a pas d’exécutif unifié responsable devant le Parlement européen, même si ce dernier peut par exemple forcer la Commission à démissionner sous certaines conditions. Au Parlement

EYES ON EUROPE

Clément Jadot européen, les majorités sont souvent constituées en fonction des dossiers. Qui plus est, l’activité du Parlement européen s’incarne prioritairement dans son travail de législateur en commission, ce qui contribue à son image de « Working Parliament ». Eyes on Europe : qu'entendezvous par travail de législateur en commission ?

Clément Jadot : Comme c’est le cas ailleurs, un projet n’arrive pas directement en plénière, il est d’abord préparé dans une commission où un petit nombre de députés se chargent d’établir un rapport qui servira de base. Concrètement, lorsqu’un dossier arrive en commission, un député appelé le « rapporteur » est désigné pour en assurer le suivi, son instruction et sa présentation ultérieure en plénière. En plus des éventuelles commissions spéciales, il existe ainsi une vingtaine de commissions parlementaires qui couvrent chacune un domaine d’action respectif tel que, par exemple, les affaires étrangères, le contrôle budgétaire ou encore l’agriculture et le développement rural. La plupart du temps, l’attribution d’une proposition à une commission parlementaire plutôt qu’à une autre est déterminée en fonction de la Direction Générale de la Commission européenne à l’initiative de la proposition. Au sein du Parlement européen, cette division du travail en interne permet ainsi une spécialisation et une plus grande efficacité.

ÉCONOMIE ET SOCIAL

Eyes on Europe : On entend souvent parler de partis européens. Remplissent-ils le même rôle que les partis nationaux ?

Clément Jadot : Non pas du tout. Au niveau européen, les missions traditionnellement remplies par les partis politiques sont partagées entre trois pôles. Primo, les partis nationaux, en parallèle de leur activité au niveau national, sont en charge d'organiser les campagnes européennes ainsi que de former et de sélectionner les hommes politiques envoyés au niveau européen. Deuxio, il y a les groupes au sein du Parlement européen, qui rassemblent des députés venant des 28 États membres sur des bases idéologiques. Au sein du Parlement Européen, la vie s’organise ainsi autour des familles politiques usuelles en Europe (gauche radicale, écologistes et régionalistes, socio-démocrates, libéraux, démocrates-chrétiens et conservateurs, populistes, nationalistes). À l’instar des groupes au sein des parlements nationaux, ils sont chargés des missions de leur institution, à savoir, au sein du Parlement européen, légiférer, délibérer, voter le budget et contrôler l’action de la Commission. Enfin, tertio, on retrouve les fédérations transnationales de partis, aussi appelées ‘Europartis’ où l’on retrouve les différents partis issus des Etats membres, rassemblés sur une base idéologique, ainsi qu’audelà de l’Union européenne, souvent à titre d’observateurs. Ces fédérations remplissent plusieurs fonctions, comme par exemple la définition d’un programme et de symboles communs qu’il revient ensuite aux partis nationaux de mobiliser dans leurs campagnes dans la mesure où les fédérations n’ont pas de pouvoir contraignant. Au-delà de cette fonction programmatique, elles sont également un lieu privilégié de socialisation, où les petites formations peuvent côtoyer les plus grandes et échanger sur des problématiques de premier plan. De même, les fédérations font le relais entre les partis au gouvernement et qui détiennent à ce

67


LE PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN...

titre des postes clés, comme une présence au Conseil, et les formations dans l’opposition. Eyes on Europe : Qui a l'initiative en matière de législation au sein du Parlement européen ?

Clément Jadot : C’est la Commission, elle détient le monopole de l’initiative. Elle est donc à l’origine de toute chose. Depuis peu, il existe un mécanisme, l’« initiative citoyenne européenne » qui permet aux citoyens de l’UE, s’ils récoltent un million de signatures réparties entre au minimum sept États membres, de suggérer des propositions à la Commission. Mais il s’agit bien de suggestions, qui, si elles pressurisent la Commission, ne l’obligent en rien. Eyes on Europe : A l'heure actuelle, on entend beaucoup parler du rôle des lobbies au sein du Parlement européen, notamment avec la

EYES ON EUROPE

Alice Ringot et Clément Jadot

récente affaire des cigarettes aromatisées. A quels moments du processus décisionnel européen les lobbies interviennent-ils exactement ? Est-ce que, selon vous, le lobbying occupe une place importante dans certaines des décisions prises par le Parlement européen ?

Clément Jadot : On touche ici à tout autre chose. Pour faire simple, disons que les institutions européennes, lorsqu’elles prennent des décisions, sont demandeuses d’un grand nombre d’informations. Quels sont les sujets que la société souhaite voir traités ? Quelles sont les priorités de tel ou tel secteur d’activité ? Comment sera reçue une directive ? Faut-il amender une proposition ? Etc. A chaque étape du processus décisionnel – de ses débuts à la Commission au vote en plénière mais aussi, au niveau des Etats membres, dans la transposition d’une directive par exemple – des rounds de consultation sont organisés avec des représentants

ÉCONOMIE ET SOCIAL

d’intérêts, des lobbies. Ils sont donc présents tout du long. De même, il n’est pas rare qu’ils se manifestent spontanément. A bien des égards, ils sont une précieuse source d’information (expertise, feedbacks, etc.). Toute la question est cependant de ménager un juste pluralisme dans la possibilité pour tout un chacun de se faire entendre, car tout le monde ne bataille pas à armes égales. Clément Jadot, chercheur en Sciences politiques à l'Université Libre de Bruxelles Alice Ringot, étudiante en bachelier de sciences politiques à l'Université Libre de Bruxelles.

68


Equal Pay, it’s about time! Zita Gurmai PES Women launched its campaign in June 2013 on closing the gender pay gap under the motto “Gender Pay Gap, it’s about time!”, re-activating its successful campaign of 2007 “Gender Pay Gap, shut it!”. Together with the PES and its member parties, this campaign will be an integral part of the PES 2014 European Elections Campaign. With the ‘Equal Pay it’s about time’ campaign, PES Women wants focus on three demands to finally ensure equal pay for women and men: The introduction of a Gender Pay Gap Audit to check that all Member States engage on reducing the gender pay gap for all age groups by 2% per year and per Member States until equality in wages has been reached. In parallel, the EU should improve the monitoring of the implementation of anti discrimination and gender equality legislation, including through the application of clear and dissuasive sanctions, both at national and at European level. PES Women urges the EU to appoint a specific Commissioner for Gender Equality and Women’s Rights to engage on this as of 2014. The PES and PES Women are highlighting the issue of the gender pay gap because still today women earn 16,2% less than men across Europe. In other words, women have to work 59 days or 2 months extra to earn the same salary as their male counter parts. The recent European Commission Report on “Progress on equality between women and men in 2012”, acknowledges that in the coming months the gender pay gap will widen even more due to the current crisis. Indeed, the current crisis that has hit the EU has a particular impact on women and their socio-economic situation due to the so-called “fiscal consolidation” – measures introduced through budgetary restrictions and cuts in the public sector. This approach reduces the prospect of a swift recovery for female employment in several countries, as the public sector across Europe is still female dominated; be it because these sectors mostly employ women (women

EYES ON EUROPE

constitute on average 69.2% of public sector workers in the EU) and provide services which primarily benefit women (education, healthcare, social services, etc). This is doubly true in countries already harshly hit by the crisis. Unfortunately, despite the disproportionate effect on women, this remains still invisible in the official statistics. Hence why I often refer to the “silent” crisis. Reductions in the public sector push women towards precarious employment. For instance, as an alternative to lay-offs, part-time work (including forced part-time work) has risen during the crisis and remains a much more common feature of female employment (32.1% in 2012 and 30.8% in 2007) – and this has risen among men as well. Austerity policies have not only led to job-cutting in the public sector but also regarding wages and thus the negative predictions with respect to the gender pay gap. Moreover, we should not neglect the closely linked issue of the pension gap. The average pension gap of 39% in Europe is more than twice as large as the gender pay gap. Consequently, if poverty still has a woman’s face in Europe today (63.8 million of women experienced a risk of poverty and exclusion in the European Union in 2011), a considerable increase in the risk of poverty is visible in the last two years for which data are available (2010 and 2011). Phrase de rappel: The average pension gap of 39% in Europe is more than twice as large as the gender pay gap. In order to give women the same rights and access to employment, it is also crucial to provide access to good, affordable and accessible childcare, as already endorsed by the PES in 2007. But due to the austerity measures, childcare facilities have been cut as well, making most families come back to a traditional model

ECONOMY & SOCIAL

of care. The state’s role is being dismantled, putting the burden back on the household - in particularly on women - and endangering women’s economic independence. As a result of an increase in unemployment of women and men, EU’s headline target to reach a 75% employment rate for women and men by 2020 is being challenged. Also, EU’s efforts to increase women’s employment rate have been undermined in 22 EU Member States, although we were just above 60% of employment for women a few years ago. Women are no longer the ‘buffer’ of the labour market, called in when demand is high, but sent back home when demand contracts: both rates converge now. The right-wing responses to the crisis as described above have also resulted in cuts in programmes for women’s rights and gender equality. Consequently, austerity is silencing women’s voices, whereas the current crisis makes women’s concerns more important than ever. We have witnessed gender equality institutions being abolished in Spain, while in Czech Republic they have been merged with other institutions or had their funding cut in a drastic manner, such as in the United Kingdom and Greece. Furthermore, certain governments’ core funding for NGOs has been cut or removed, and public authorities and private donors have reduced project funding for gender issues. It is thus time for women and men to stand up and make the right choice for their future. If European women want to keep their economic independence, their active role in the labour market, progress socially and politically, ensure that the future European societies promote and defend gender equality, we cannot longer let right-wing governance decide on our future. Women have been actors of change and should remain so. Zita Gurmai is Member of the European Parliament and President of PES Women

69


Social crisis — social solutions: Too little, but not too late The economic crisis has defined and dominated the EU’s political agenda since 2008. Economic problems have required economic solutions. However, what decisionmakers and policymakers in Brussels and beyond seem to have forgotten is that economic problems lead directly to social problems. These social problems, indeed this social crisis, call for social solutions. Five years down the line and only now are proposals being put on the table to address the social crisis. Finally, the European Commission has decided the time is right to integrate a social dimension into the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), meaning that these concerns are being taken seriously. New social indicators on unemployment, poverty and inequalities would be linked to the current economic indicators allowing member states to be better alerted to the dangers ahead in facing employment and social challenges. ‘Too little, too late’ is a tempting mantra to adopt in reacting to the Commission’s latest proposal for reforming EMU. Yet, this approach would be unconstructive and would benefit no one. Instead, we should be asking why discussions on the social dimension have arrived so late. We should demand to know and understand why the social dimension is always playing catch-up. It is never too late to change direction or call for more to be done. In the same way as coordination in economic policy is developing further and deeper dimensions, the social sphere needs to match this pace. Only time will tell if the proposed indicators will be more than just another exercise of monitoring and benchmarking at EU level or if it will lead to the creation of a genuine social dimension to rebalance the EMU. Phrase de rappel: It is never too late to change direction or call for more to be done. Common social indicators will always be welcomed by the social partners. Exchanging best practices and moving forward on common foundations is a good place to start.

EYES ON EUROPE

Klaus Heeger

However, there is room to go further. There is a need to go further. Social and economic issues are inextricably intertwined. The social implications of economic policies on the EU, for example, are clear. A social crisis has stemmed from the economic crisis. The same social crisis will prevent the economic crisis from being overcome. And so the vicious circle continues. To break this trend, national governments and EU officials need to award social policies at the European level with as much prestige as they pin on economic policies. The European Semester has shown that there is room to act beyond the initial competences of the EU Treaties through better coordination of certain national policies and this is an area that needs to be better understood. Calls for a more social Europe cannot always end with reference to the limited competence of the EU, the responsibilities of member states and the major diversity of social policies and systems at national level. Although hard to dismiss, these arguments will always impede the emergence of a genuine social dimension to complement the economic and monetary union. Phrase de rappel: Calls for a more social Europe cannot always end with reference to the limited competence of the EU. In this context, the possibilities of the European Semester should be further explored, taking into account social aspects, yet subjecting it to closer monitoring and democratic control. An intense discussion should take place among Member States, European Institutions and social partners about the actual meaning of an EU social dimension. What are the concrete answers to be given at EU level - despite the fact that social policies mainly belong to Member States competences?

ECONOMY & SOCIAL

Alongside that debate, some institutional adjustments should be made: The European Parliament needs to be more involved to give more impetus and democratic legitimacy to the process. More actors from different corners of civil society must help in administering financial assistance programmes. Involving more social partners would bring a necessary democratic and social balance, and, even more importantly, would make the process better known and better accepted. The troika, under pressure in recent days from the European Parliament for its lack of legitimacy and accountability, and indeed for its misguided policies as a result of incorrect calculations, must be transformed. Currently accused of being a narrowminded and miscalculating economic technocracy, the troika badly needs a makeover, from its name to its nature. Involving the European Parliament and the social partners, it could efficiently sanction social dumping and promote social progress - not only budgetary cuts. Transparency, legitimacy, accountability and social are words which need to come to define the European Semester. Only in this way will its processes and procedure finally become acceptable. The social dimension is currently no more than words on a piece of paper. This piece of paper was presented by Lázló Andor, Commissioner for Employment and Social Affairs as the start of a new phase. This new phase needs to be less about words and more about actions. Klaus Heeger, Secretary General of the European Confederation of Independent Trade Unions

70


Critique de livre Book Review Buchkritik

EYES ON EUROPE

71


Europe, amour ou chambre à part ? Sylvie Goulard L’ouvrage de Sylvie Goulard consiste en une réflexion générale et argumentée sur l’état actuel de l’Union Européenne, les raisons ayant mené à la situation décrite et les perspectives d’un tel projet. L’auteur commence par dresser un portrait – assez noir – de l’Europe telle qu’elle la voit aujourd’hui et qui, selon elle, n’est pas en train de se faire mais bien de se défaire. En effet, bien que quelques élans positifs subsistent dans l’ouvrage – le projet reste un succès sans équivalent –, l’auteur tire la sonnette d’alarme d’une Europe qu’elle voit partir à la dérive. Les causes de cette situation insoutenable doivent, selon Sylvie Goulard, être cherchées du côté des dirigeants nationaux qui nationalisent la gestion de l’Europe. Ainsi, de manière hypocrite, ceuxci détruisent ce qu’ils prétendent construire, ils veulent l’union en organisant la désunion : ils vantent l’amour en faisant chambre à part. Les responsables politiques nationaux « font les choses à moitié ». Ainsi, pour ne citer que quelques paradoxes, les dirigeants acceptent l’euro mais refusent le partage de souveraineté qu’il implique, ou encore disent vouloir créer un « gouvernement économique » alors que tel qu’il est pensé, il ne s’en rapproche aucunement. Dans la deuxième partie de l’ouvrage, loin de s’arrêter à l’unique critique de la situation actuelle, Silvie Goulard propose une réelle solution qu’elle dépeint comme la seule alternative possible : l’Europe parlementaire, dans une version hybride et européenne, avec un exécutif fort « à la française » et un contrôle parlementaire « à l’allemande ». Ainsi, selon l’auteur, nous nous trouvons à la fin d’une époque. Cette situation désastreuse, il faut l’admettre pour pouvoir agir en reconnaissant que la seule alternative est une souveraineté nationale largement réduite aux apparences. Il faut oser le saut et prendre le risque de défendre une Union plus étroite, à contre-courant du repli national aujourd’hui en hausse dans de nombreux pays et qui mènerait incontestablement à brève échéance à une insignifiance totale des pays européens sur l’échiquier mondial. Ce sursaut consiste en un passage vers une Europe à caractère fédéral, que l’auteur ne voit pas comme une menace mais bien comme une opportunité : celle de rendre à l’Union le dynamisme qui était le sien à ses débuts. Ce fédéralisme, elle le définit comme une forme d’organisation des pouvoirs publics qui permet à des individus d’exercer

EYES ON EUROPE

BOOK REVIEW

certaines prérogatives avec d’autres, dans des domaines identifiés, tout en préservant une capacité de décision autonome dans d’autres domaines. Cet essai a deux mérites : tout d’abord, bien que démarrant par un avis très pessimiste sur la situation actuelle, il est – et ce n’est pas coutume – assorti d’un réel espoir, d’une grande motivation et d’une certitude en la possibilité d’un avenir meilleur. Deuxièmement – quel que soit l’avis de chacun sur la solution prônée par l’auteur –, cet essai a également le mérite de soulever – ou de rappeler –, de vraies questions sujettes à approfondissement telles que le nombre de commissaires ne reflétant en rien le caractère dit « supranational » de la Commission. Un questionnement fondamental subsiste cependant à la lecture de l’ouvrage : l’auteur semble mettre la responsabilité de la crise actuelle principalement – et quasi totalement – sur les épaules des dirigeants nationaux. Ainsi, elle dresse le portrait d’un citoyen européen intrinsèquement en faveur de l’idée de la construction d’une Europe vivante mais dont « l’élan européen » serait bloqué par les dirigeants qui restreignent les possibilités d’une telle construction. Ce postulat de départ peut à son tour être fortement discuté et mener rapidement à l’effondrement par la base de la thèse ici défendue : le principemême de l’Union Européenne est-il réellement par nature soutenu par le citoyen ? Sylvie Goulard a été élue députée européenne sur la liste du MoDem en juin 2009 et siège au sein du groupe ALDE. Elle a été une des fondatrices, avec Daniel CohnBendit, Guy Verhofstadt et Isabelle Durant, du groupe Spinelli en 2010. Elodie Ladrière, étudiante à l’Institut d’études européennes

72


The EU’s Role in World Politics: A Retreat from Liberal Internationalism Richard Youngs A l’heure de l’ouverture des négociations visant à la création d’un espace de libre échange entre les États-Unis et l’Union européenne (UE), la lecture de l’ouvrage de Richard Youngs peut-être éclairante. De fait, cet ouvrage pose la question du rôle et du positionnement de l’Union européenne en tant que gardienne du libéralisme politique dans le monde d’aujourd’hui. En filigrane, ce travail de recherche permet d’interroger la nature de l’UE et vise à éclairer sa place vis-à-vis des autres entités politiques. Cet ouvrage démontre que l’UE est en train de se retirer d’une logique « cosmopolite » – pour en revenir au projet kantien. Pour ce faire, Richard Youngs place son argumentation aux dehors de deux pans classiques qui servent à décrypter l’UE et son action : d’un côté, le libéralisme européen comme une force pour se positionner sur l’échiquier mondial et, de l’autre, le rejet de ce « soft power » européen qui serait inefficace et ne permettrait pas à l’Union de trouver sa place et de faire valoir sa voix dans le concert des nations. Pour Richard Youngs, réfléchir à l’action de l’UE en ces termes n’est pas un gage de performance. A contrario, l’UE doit reconsidérer sa politique étrangère et se concentrer de façon plus précise sur la voix – et non plus les voix – qu’elle veut porter à l’extérieur. Voix qu’elle doit utiliser pour la défense du monde libéral, à la fois pour préserver, voire améliorer, l’ordre mondial tel qu’il s’est institué ces dernières décennies. De plus, pose Richard Youngs, les européens ne réussiront à défendre leur projet politique qu’à cette seule condition. En d’autres termes, l’auteur tente de mettre en avant la synergie entre le besoin de s’exprimer sur les questions de politiques internationales – et ce dans des champs d’actions divers mis en évidence au fil du livre – et l’approfondissement du modèle proposé par l’UE. A notre avis, cet ouvrage s’inscrit dans la lignée d’autres travaux (« The EU’s Foreign Policy. What Kind of Power and Diplomatic action ? » édité par Mario Telo et Frederik Ponjaert, dont une critique avait été réalisée dans le dernier numéro de ce magazine est un bon exemple) et d’un questionnement profond de la part de la communauté universitaire quant au positionnement de l’UE sur les questions internationales. Le travail proposé par l’auteur est

EYES ON EUROPE

BOOK REVIEW

de fait symptomatique d’une Europe qui cherche à saisir les nouveaux enjeux qui émergent et le(s) meilleur(s) positionnement(s) que l’UE pourrait adopter pour y répondre. Les récentes évolutions, dont le printemps arabe est l’un des exemples, encouragent la vision proposée par Richard Youngs quant à la place que doit prendre l’UE sur la scène internationale. De fait, les valeurs qu’elle défend – par là nous entendons son modèle cosmopolite – à toute sa place au niveau mondiale et ce particulièrement en ce qui concerne la vocation de l’Union à défendre les valeurs de la démocratie et des droits humains. La lecture de cet ouvrage permet aussi de nous pencher sur la problématique centrale de ce numéro, le Partenariat transatlantique de commerce et d’investissement. De fait, ce traité en cours de négociation pourrait permettre à l’Union Européenne et à son allié américain de mettre en place une nouvelle dynamique commerciale entre les deux plus puissantes économies du monde. Fautil y voir les prémices d’une Union qui commence à se recentrer sur des questions internationales ou, a contrario, l’image d’une Europe en « dévitalisation » qui perdrait de vue ce que, une fois encore, l’auteur présente comme sa vocation, le cosmopolitisme de son projet. Sur ce sujet, seules les négociations et leur(s) déroulement(s) pourront nous éclairer sur ce que veut et peut faire l’UE quant à son positionnement international. Richard Youngs est Professeur de Relations Internationales à l’Université de Warwick. Il est spécialisé dans les questions ayant trait à la politique étrangère de l’Union européenne. Il est, par ailleurs, associé au « Democracy and Rule of Law Program ». Simon Hardy est étudiant en deuxième année de Master à l’Institut d’études européennes (finalité politique).

73


L’Europe : défaite ou défis Gilles Le Bail «Crise» est un terme courant ces dernières années. On le trouve partout, employé dans la presse et les journaux télévisés, comme dans les conversations quotidiennes. Parfois, il perd son sens originel et semble devenir une sorte de fétiche de notre époque.Mais « crise » signifie pas mal de choses, tout d’abord, « défi ». Quelle que soit la réelle portée de la crise, elle représente le point de départ pour revigorer le processus d’intégration européenne,lequel demeure encore inachevé. La nature de la crise européenne n’est pas seulement économique, mais aussi politique et identitaire. Cela a renforcé les mouvements et les partis eurosceptiques de la droite populiste au détriment de tous les autres qui agissent pour que la coopération interétatique et l’union fédérale soient un jour une authentique réalité. Les susdits partis basent leur propagande sur un nationalisme visant à s’imposer aux autres et qui de facto divise et isole le pays en question. Ce nationalisme comporte d’ailleurs souvent des actes xénophobes. En revenant à la crise multidimensionnelle qui affecte le continent, l’auteur propose plusieurs démarches afin de résoudre certains problèmes structurels. Avant tout, il suggère l’élaboration d’une citoyenneté européenne qui ne soit pas seulement de jure mais aussi effective. Il y a lieu de relancer la participation des citoyens à travers la société civile tout en remédiant au manque de pratiques démocratiques au sein de la politique européenne. Or, la seule connaissance mutuelle des citoyens de cette Europe « unie dans la diversité » est insuffisante pour dépasser la crise économique. Evidemment, les enjeux économiques comptent autant que les autres. Pour avancer vers un rétablissement effectif de l’économie européenne, il convient de repartir équitablement les coûts et les bénéfices ainsi que de réduire la disproportion entre les Etats les plus riches et les plus pauvres. D’une part, les économies fortes de la zone euro doivent dépasser leurs a priori sur la manière dont les économies faibles gèrent leurs finances. D’autre part, la tâche incombe à ces dernières de mettre en ordre leurs comptes, de limiter l’endettement et de lutter contre la corruption, l’évasion fiscale et le corporatisme. Une fois ces résultats atteints, l’union bancaire et fiscale des économies des vingt-huit Etats de l’Union européenne semblera acceptable, même aux plus réticents. Par ailleurs, sous la pression de la crise, l’Europe, ou plutôt son intégration, a fait de considérables avancements. De fait, ses organes travaillent à un

EYES ON EUROPE

BOOK REVIEW

rythme soutenu dans l’espoir de trouver la panacée aux blessures d’une entité politique, économique et social encore jeune. Mais ces blessures ont d’ores et déjà commencé à s’infecter et à changer les opinions de la majorité des citoyens de l’Union. Les sondages montrent que la plupart des Européens considèrent l’avènement de l’Euro et de l’intégration économique comme un indubitable dégât pour leurs économies nationales respectives, ayant perdu ainsi un incontournable instrument de politique monétaire. Si à cela on ajoute le mécontentement généré par les politiques d’austérité imposées à certains pays, le cadre est complet. Néanmoins, les Etats européens ont besoin les uns des autres pour rester compétitifs à l’époque de la mondialisation, c'est-à-dire qu’il est nécessaire de construire une « colonne vertébrale » solide pour l’Union européenne. Cet apparat, plus connu sous le nom de fédéralisme, se profile comme le régime politique parfait. Coordonner le projet d’intégration de Bruxelles, ainsi que les étapes successives, permettra d’en augmenter la vitesse et d’exploiter au mieux les atouts européens, alors que le renforcement des relations entre citoyens et corps intermédiaires empêchera un affaiblissement substantiel de la démocratie. A la lumière de ces acquis, Le Bail se penche finalement sur un point crucial de notre avenir: les conditions de travail des jeunes européens. Comme le souligne une étude de la Commission Européenne de 2012, le chômage des 15-24 ans a augmenté de 50% depuis quatre ans. A cause de la crise et du vieillissement de la population, dans de nombreux pays les gouvernements sont contraints de choisir entre les générations. Etant donnéque les jeunes affichent un attachement à l’Union bien plus marqué, les nations ayant l’intention de poursuivre l’intégration devraient porter leurs choix d’investissements sur cette frange de la population. En un mot, il ne faut pas marcher à contre-courant, « après avoir européanisé le monde, il est temps de mondialiser l’Europe ». Gilles Le Bail est un auteur français, déterminé depuis sa prime jeunesse à promouvoir les valeurs humanistes. Il est actuellement membre consultatif du Conseil Economique et Social de l’ONU à Genève. Il a résumé ses propositions sur le futur de l’Europe dans son ouvrage « L’Europe : défaite ou défis ». Samuele Masucci est un étudiant italien en Master à l’Université libre de Bruxelles.

74


Conseil d’administration : Président ― Leon Lopez Cuervo Secrétaire génerale ― Marta Gonzalez Garcia Trésorier ― Anthony Kédia Rédacteur en chef ― Alexandre Donnersbach Vice-rédacteur en chef ― Thibaut L’Ortye Coordinateur web ― Maxime Behar Coordinatrice événements ― Sophie Bories Vice-coordinateur événements ― Valentin Capelli Coordinatrice relations publiques ― Clémence Burkel Coordinateur distribution ― Charles Bareth Équipe rédaction : Rédacteur en chef ― Alexandre Donnersbach Vice-rédacteur en chef ― Thibaut L’Ortye Coordinateur web ― Maxime Behar Relations internationales : Simon Hardy (responsable), Jean-François de Hertogh, Morgane Garrel Konienczny, Clementine Granier, Ilivy Naidenoff, Mehdy Taleb-Riviere, Laurent Uyttersprot Citoyenneté : Elodie Ladriere (responsable), Coline Cornelis, Janusz Linkowski, William Meyer, Gregory Sterck, Leo Zylberman-Nasrallah Économie et social : Christian Staat (responsable), Samuele Masucci, Alice Ringot, Julia Rokicka, Hélène Gire Dossier : Stefano Messina (responsable), Flore Dargent, Kirill Gelmi, Mauro Sanna Web : Simon Carrette, Quentin Coignus, Alexis De Biolley, Yolande Kirsch, Matthias Lintermans, Katya Ostrovaskaya, Alice Ringot, Valeriya Stefanenko, Eleonora Tonini, Tania Horbach, Raphaël Krowicki

Contact us: http://www.eyes-on-europe.eu Facebook: Eyes on Europe Twitter: @EoE_Bxl Eyes on Europe ASBL Institut d’études européennes Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 39 1050 Brussels Since its first release in October 2004, Eyes on Europe never ceased to evolve and improve it-self. Today, our association is working thanks to more than 60 members, all students from the Institute for European Studies and from the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). The magazine could not be released without the intensive work and interactions from the public relations, the communication, the distribution, the web and the editorial staff. The Eyes on Europe Executive Board would like to thank its member for their intensive and amazing daily work. We hope 2014 will see new developments and new projects for our association. Eyes on Europe is also grateful towards its partners. They allow us to develop and improve the magazine and to organize new activities. Many thanks to all of them, we truly hope to continue to work together for the coming years. p.10: © J.Griffin Stewart — www.flickr.com p.13: © NASA www.flickr.com p.31: © el_gallo — www.flickr.com p.36: © piervincenzocanale — www.flickr.com p.46: © TarValanion — www.flickr.com p.52: © Gonzlaught — www.flickr.com p.63: © campact — www.flickr.com p.68: © Pauline C. E. Kaspar — www.flickr.com

Équipe événements : Coordinatrice ― Sophie Bories Vice-coordinateur ― Valentin Capelli Florine Yapi, Morgane Bastin, Marine Planquart, Loubna El Morabet, Manon Dias, Laura Gerbino, Pauline Dubois, Yara Abi-Khalil, Alessio Papagni, Victoria Hansen, Jessica Simoes, Irène Tsocha Équipe relations publiques et distribution Coordinatrice RP ― Clémence Burkel Coordinateur distribution ― Charles Bareth Audrey Schlosser, Nadya Krasteva, Grégory Brison, Evgenia Krilova, Fernanda Santana, Alexis De Biolley, Eleonora Tonini, Olga Trofimciuc, Jaime Camino Velasco Illustrations : Thomas Ferrando, www.gateauxsecs.be Graphisme : Alexis Jacob, www.alexisjacob.be Développement web : Jonathan Petit

EYES ON EUROPE

82


As we are always looking for ways to improve, we would love to hear from you. Please do not hesitate to reach out to us at redaction@eyes-on-europe.eu or on social media using #EoE19 to comment on this issue of Eyes on Europe!

EYES ON EUROPE

83


www.eyes-on-europe.eu

Eyes on Europe #19 - Transatlantic Relations  

Eyes on Europe's latest issue focuses on transatlantic relations. It includes an an op-ed from Karel de Gucht, EU Trade Commissioner, as wel...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you