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The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street Editor Jennifer Self | Phone 395-7434 | e-mail jself@bakersfield.com

Index Scary for Charity ...................................... 23 Third Thursday ........................................ 24 20th annual Fall Home Show .................. 25 Arts Alive .................................................. 26 “Toy Story 3” on ice ................................ 27 The Lowdown with Matt Munoz.............. 28 Boo at the Zoo ........................................ 30 Calendar .............................................. 35-37

Hell bent for leather Metal titans Judas Priest grinding it out BY MATT MUNOZ Bakotopia.com editor mmunoz@bakersfield.com

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fter nearly four decades of leather-wearing, fist-pumping, heavy metal mayhem, veteran British rockers Judas Priest have decided to pull the brakes. The group announced last year that the current tour would be the final major spectacle and immediatly began planning a massive show poised to out-pyro all previous productions. Bakersfield will get a chance to feel that heat when it blazes into Rabobank on Tuesday. Weary of the incessant touring fans have come to expect since the 1974 debut of “Rocka Rolla,” original members Rob Halford, Ian Hill and Glenn Tipton are out to prove they still pack a mighty punch. And although the tour is called “Epitaph,” this is in no way the band’s swan song. “We don’t want to create confusion. All we’re saying is, we’re not going to do a world tour again that takes 18 months out of your life,” Tipton said during a phone interview with The Californian. “Maybe it’s the beginning of the end, but it’s certainly not the end.” Like The Beatles years before, Judas Priest was part of another British invasion that included Def Leppard and Iron Maiden, acts that followed the lead of the granddady of all metal bands, Black Sabbath. Halford’s operatic screams and love for motorcycles, as well as his fondness for S&M leather and studs, helped the band stand out in the crowd. But it wasn’t so much the bad boy antics as it was the twin lead guitars of Tipton and K.K. Downing that would profoundly influence American bands like Metallica and Slayer. “I think if along the way we’ve helped to inspire some young musicians, then that’s something we’re very proud of,” Tipton said. Pumping out razor-sharp anthems like “Breaking the Law,” “You’ve Got Another Thing Comin’” and “Love Bites,” Priest has released 16 studio and six live records, some featuring replacement band members, most notably vocalist Tim “Ripper” Owens, who stepped in after Halford left to pursue other projects.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JUDAS PRIEST

Judas Priest, which will be at Rabobank Arena on Tuesday night, was part of a British invasion that included Def Leppard and Iron Maiden, acts that followed the lead of the granddady of all metal bands, Black Sabbath.

Judas Priest with Black Label Society and Thin Lizzy When: 6 p.m. Tuesday Where: Rabobank Arena, 1001 Truxtun Ave. Cost: $30 to $90 Information: 852-7777 or ticketmaster.com

Halford eventually returned and, through it all, Tipton said fans have stayed fiercely devoted. “It’s something to be really proud of,” said Tipton. “A Judas Priest night is the whole thing, it’s not just us and the audience — it’s us and the audience together. So many young factions in the crowd, it’s just wonderful, really. They sing along, not just with the choruses, but with the lead breaks.” Reflecting on the group’s humble beginnings in the workingclass trenches of Birmingham, England, Tipton recalled a few of those early struggles.

“We were just like every other young band. We’d do one gig, and get enough gas money to maybe buy a bag of chips between us and get to the next gig. When we did our first album it wasn’t much better. I remember sleeping in the van outside the studio in the middle of London on top of the equipment, and we were allowed two meal tickets a day to eat at the studio canteen. Things looked up eventually.” After achieving arena stardom, Priest became the focus of controversy in 1990, when the band was pulled into court, accused of including a subliminal message on an early cover of the song, “Better by You, Better than Me.” The band was accused of complicity in the suicide attempts of two Nevada teenagers. The case drew headlines and was eventually dropped, but the notoriety put Priest at the forefront of the controversial campaign to force record labels to put parental advisory stickers on some rock and rap albums. “You know, it just didn’t make

sense. But having said that, it was a serious six weeks to two months in court and we came out of it, proving that we hadn’t put any reverse messages on the album. We flew the flag, not just for heavy metal, we felt, but every album that was recorded, every album that was designed, every book, every book cover — even films. Because I think if we’d have lost that case it would have set a precedent that would have started a roller coaster of lawsuits. It was a tragic case of two kids and their families who had been talked into going on trial when there was no case, really.” The band’s latest double-album, “Nostradamus,” continues in the tradition of Priest’s recent conceptual works, and for Tipton it’s every bit as good as even their signature work. “Like it, love it, hate it, understand it, this record certainly was a mammoth project that stands alongside some of our best records.”

Win Judas Priest tickets Tune in to “Californian Radio” on KERN 1180 AM at 9 a.m. today for your chance to win tickets to the Judas Priest concert Tuesday at the Rabobank Arena. Just listen for the cue to call and then phone 661-842-KERN.

Tipton said fans can expect more new music after the tour wraps in April, though Tuesday’s show will have a retrospective feel to it. “It’s going to be a Priest extravaganza. We’re doing a track off of every studio album and playing songs we’ve never played before live like “Blood Red Skies,” plus everyone’s got their favorites — just a rockin’ night of great metal not to be missed.” Also performing in the current lineup are drummer Scott Travis and guitarist Ritchie Faulkner. Opening acts are Black Label Society and Thin Lizzy, featuring original guitarist Scott Gorham.


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Thursday, October 20, 2011 The Bakersfield Californian

Eye Street

Go boo for a good cause Scary for Charity event on Oct. 29 BY STEFANI DIAS Californian assistant lifestyles editor sdias@bakersfield.com

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alloween is a night for dressing up, embracing a new persona and having a good time. If you think your costumed character has a philanthropic nature, consider making plans for Scary for Charity, which takes place Oct. 29. Hosted by KGET-TV, Channel 17’s Alissa Carlson, this night of food, fun costumes, silent auction and dancing at the Marriott Hotel is perfect for anyone looking for holiday frivolity. “This would be a good date night for a couple or a night out with girlfriends,” said organizer Wendy Armijo, co-owner of A&L Marketing and Advertising. At a new venue this year, the event also has a tie-in that might interest the party-hard crowd. The Marriott, which is selling tickets and promoting the event, is offering a special room rate of $69 a night for the Friday and Saturday (Oct. 28 and 29) of the event, offering a safe after-party alternative for those who don’t want to drive home. “So far the people I’ve told have been excited. It makes it safer for them to have a great time and not worry about how to get home,” Armijo said. With a hotel room or designated driver, guests can feel free to indulge in candy corn martinis or pumpkin screwdrivers. Along with festive cocktails, the horrifying hors d’oeuvres include deviled eyeballs (eggs), bloody meatballs, crunchy fingers (fries), vomit (pea) soup shooters, slimy slider sandwiches, Snow White (not really) poisoned candy apples and the less-frightening chicken-pineapple skewers and fresh fruit. Continue to treat yourself with the silent auction, which Armijo said includes a day of pampering at Beautologie medispa, a pair of tickets to Hearst Castle, a rafting trip for two via Kern River Tours and a four-pack of tickets to the Bakersfield Symphony Orchestra concert of choice. Also up for grabs will be a signature shot glass (as supplies last) as well as cash and other prizes in the costume contests, awarded for funniest, scariest, best overall and best couple. Costumes get guests in the spirit, bolstered further by music from DJ Margo Saylor, a photo booth and staging that includes “big scary monsters” from Los

PHOTOS COURTESY OF WENDY ARMIJO

KGET-TV, Channel 17 anchor Alissa Carlson, seen here with Angela Barton and her sister, Shannon Taylor, will return as hostess for this year's Scary for Charity, which takes place Oct. 29.

Scary for Charity When: 7 p.m. to midnight Oct. 29 Where: Marriott Hotel, 801 Truxtun Ave. Admission: $50; can be purchased at scaryforcharity.com or at the Marriott

Angeles and unique lighting. “There are moving bats and ghouls for the wall and seethrough ghosts hovering around a graveyard,” with light work done by Innovative Concert Lighting, Armijo said. Last year’s event drew nearly 250 people, Armijo said, and raised close to $7,000 for the Kern Partnership for Children and Families. “It was more than any of their other events have raised at one time,” Armijo said of the partnership, on whose board she serves. This year, Armijo said the goal is $12,000, with attendance expected to exceed 400. “But we may end up with 500,” she said, referring to the Marriott’s capacity.

Sarah Ketchum and Joe Jimenez at last year's Scary for Charity.

The partnership, which was looking for a signature fundraising event, teamed with Armijo last year for the first Scary for Charity. The group was created to provide assistance to low-income and foster children in Kern County who have needs that cannot be met through government assistance. The board now also manages the Jamison Center, the first stop for children entering the foster system, so proceeds from the event will benefit the center as

KISS — from left, Danny Spanks, Crystal and Kenn McCloud and Dave Burich — rocked Scary for Charity in 2010.

well, Armijo said. Tickets are $50 and available online at scaryforcharity.com or at the Marriott. And don’t be scared if you don’t remember to

buy your tickets early. “Some people like to go at the last minute,” Armijo said. “Last year, 50 percent of the people showed up at the door.”


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The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street

Third Thursday goes out with festive bang

Motivation without Medication™

PATHWAYS HYPNOSIS Vaughn Barnett

Children encouraged to break out costumes

C.Ht., NLP, BA Alpha Chi Honor Society American Hypnosis Assoc.

BY STEFANI DIAS Californian assistant lifestyles editor

661.322.0077

Third Thursday When: 5:30 p.m. today Where: Central Park at Mill Creek, 21st and R streets Information: 325-5892

sdias@bakersfield.com

PathwaysHypnosis.org

Z

Named Bakersfield’s Favorite Pizza in The Californian’s 2011 Readers Survey

Brighton has created our exclusive Power of Pink Bracelet. For each bracelet purchased we will donate $5 to support Breast Cancer Research and Awareness. Limited quanities, while suplies last.

Power of Pink Bracelet $50

ombies, princesses and all manner of spooky and sweet costumed kids will be on the march this Thursday. What do they want? Candy, of course. And downtown businesses will provide as part of the final Third Thursday of the year. That stroll, which runs from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., is one of the ways to get into the Halloween spirit for the event-themed Pumpkin Festival. Parents are encouraged to bring their little ghouls and boys in costume to visit participating businesses and groups to receive candy or other treats (including coupons that Mom and Dad might appreciate). Start at the booth for Valley Yellow Pages, the event sponsor, which is on 19th Street across from the park. Participants include Community Action Partnership of Kern and Adobe Krow Archives at Mill Creek; and Penn Point Dance Academy, Mill Creek Florist & Balloons, Blacktop Cyclery, Gorilla Airsoft and All Tied Up on 18th Street. On R Street, the Corvette Club of Bakersfield and Three-Way Chevrolet will host a trunk or treat,

Drillers really know how to party Alumni hosting event on Saturday at Fox Theater BY MATT MUNOZ Bakotopia.com editor mmunoz@bakersfield.com

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www.shopchristines.com

4915 Stockdale Highway • 661-834-3068 Monday Friday: 10 6 • Saturday: 10 5

and the Bakersfield Fire Department and GET (with a haunted house) will also take part on 19th Street. Children eager for more treats, which will be most of them, can also enjoy a free horse-drawn wagon ride to Log Cabin Florist and the Bargain Box Thrift Shop, both of which will be doling out candy and coupons. With treats gathered, children can strut their stuff for the costume parade at 7 p.m. The walk will lead through the park and end in the pumpkin patch, at R and 21st streets next to the returning Boot Scootin’ BBQ. The pumpkin patch will also host a coloring contest for children from 6 to 7 p.m. and carnival games. For those who love to see animals in costumes — and who doesn’t? — Biscuit Doggie Boutique & Spa will host a doggie Halloween costume contest at the Mill Creek bridge in the park. If the idea of pups in ponchos is more frightening to you than the house that gives toothbrushes to trick-or-treaters, you may also have a

story to share at The Porch story slam. The Bakersfield Museum of Art is looking forward to a spooktacular time with its latest story-telling event on the topic “It Creeped Me Out.” If you’ve got a true scary story to tell, head out to the event, which starts at 7 p.m. After the scary stories, adults can up the creep-out factor with the zombie crawl, starting at 8:30 p.m. It heads from the museum to Mill Creek Deli & Pub, where there will be a costume contest at 9 p.m. for those 21 and older. Wrapping up a season of Third Thursday, which replaced the street fairs on Chester Avenue, organizers are pleased with the results so far. “I think overall it’s been a success,” Cathy Butler, president of the Downtown Business Association. “Vendors seem to be happier (at Central Park) than being out in the street. With the new improvements with the park, the water element, it’s been familyfriendly. It was also lovely to tie in with the Bakersfield Museum of Art and Bakersfield Community House.” Events like Third Thursday, First Friday and last week’s Party on the Plaza, which kicked off the Bakersfield Condors season at Rabobank Arena, are a way to invigorate downtown. “Creating different activities in the different areas (of downtown), it’s a strong heartbeat for the community.”

hen Bakersfield High alumnus Rick Harrison was informed last year that there would be no 35th reunion for his class of 1975, he took matters into his own hands and threw a party himself. “I called up Coconut Joe’s and rented out their place, put together an invitation on the Internet and we ended up having 250 people show up,” said Harrison, who planned the shindig from his home in San Jose. And now that the party has started, there’s no stopping it. Harrison’s inspired idea has mobilized other Drillers into action, and the result is a huge party at the Fox Theater on Saturday called Driller Bash. Not your typical class reunion, the

BHS Driller Bash When: 6 p.m. Saturday Where: Fox Theater, 2001 H St. Cost: $55 single or $100 couple; includes dinner and entertainment Information: 333-1001 or vallitix.com

atmosphere will be more than welcoming as grads (and not-quite grads) from several decades gather to reminisce and dance the night away. “The whole concept is to have a big party rather than a reunion, and it just caught on that way,” Harrison said. “People normally don’t like reunions. People feel pressure to lose weight or maybe they lost their job. With it being a party, everyone’s more likely to get into it.” Co-organizer Lori Larrew-Crown, who graduated with Harrison, said members of all classes from the 1960s,

“The whole concept is to have a big party rather than a reunion, and it just caught on that way.” — Rick Harrison, Bakersfield High alumnus

’70s and ’80s are invited. “Reunions are fun, but it’s a lot more fun to see people from other classes. It’s like going to an old school dance at the cafeteria and everybody’s just tickled to see each other. As we get older, we appreciate seeing each other more.” Bakersfield singer-songwriter Monty Byrom, BHS class of ’76, will head up the entertainment, which is appropriate since he credits his musical career to the education he received at Bakersfield High. At the top of his Please see 29


Thursday, October 20, 2011 The Bakersfield Californian

Eye Street There are deals to be had at the Fall Home Show as vendors are looking to drum up as much business as possible.

CALIFORNIAN FILE

Fall Home Show opens doors to crucial upkeep BY MIRANDA WHITWORTH Contributing writer

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ainy days, cooler weather and the holidays are all around the corner, and that means big changes for your home. If you want to be ready to protect, maintain and deck the halls, you need to check out the 20th annual Fall Home Show Friday through Sunday at the Kern County Fairgrounds. Show Manager Joaquin Rodriguez says that while many people consider spring the time to get their property in order, it’s what you do in the fall that will determine how much work you’ll have ahead of you next year. “In the spring you are fixing up what was damaged in your yard or on your home during the winter months. So this show is about prevention. What do you need to be doing for your house or pool too keep them up in the winter?” Attendees will not lack for guidance. Rodriguez says the best part about shopping at a home show is the variety and diversity all in one venue. “You can go to Home Depot and then go to Michael’s or all of these different businesses to shop. But you’ll be driving from one business to the next and you won’t be able to see them all in one day or even one weekend. But if you come out to the show, you have options.” In a time when money is tight and much-needed repairs around the house still need to be made, Rodriguez says the Fall Home Show is an opportunity for attendees to take advantage of the competitive atmosphere and get not only the best services for the money but the absolute right person for the job. “You won’t just talk to one pool guy; you will see a bunch of them. You can price shop and have more opportunities to find a professional that is right for you.” There are deals to be had as well. According to Rodriguez, the vendors are looking to drum up as much business as possible. “A lot of these professionals will have only deals that you can get if you contract with them right then and there, much better deals than you could get from them if you just walk into their establishment.” The show also features the return of one of Kern County’s most knowledgeable gar-

Fall Home Show When: 1 to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday Where: Kern County Fairgrounds, 1142 P St. Admission: $7; $4 for seniors on Friday; free for kids 12 and under; receive $1 off with donation of nonperishable food item. Information: 800-655-0655, kerncountyfair.com or ggshows.com

dening duos. Dale “The Sultan of Sod” Edwards and Lindsay “The Plant Professor” Ono are back after a one-year sabbatical. “They will be there with seminars on gardening and keeping up your yard during the winter months. They are back bigger and badder than ever, or at least that’s what they tell me! They are great, and we are excited to have them back.” The 11th Annual Golden Empire Koi Show also will be taking place at the fairgrounds, and that means all things ponds and all things fish. “It’s the largest koi show in the area and there will be businesses on hand to tell you about koi, and how to set up koi ponds within your existing landscaping. You can even adopt a koi at the event.” But as the holidays approach, one of the biggest draws is what decor enthusiasts will be looking for when winter truly sets in. “Michael’s will have a huge holiday display out in Building 3. They always put together an amazing spread. Last year their theme was ‘The Nightmare Before Christmas,’ and it was really impressive. I am not sure what they will be doing this year. I am looking forward to seeing it myself. They always surprise me.”

Win free tickets to the home show Tune in to “Californian Radio” on KERN 1180 AM at 9 a.m. today for your chance to win tickets to the Fall Home Show. Just listen for the cue to call, and then phone 661-842-KERN.

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The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street Camille Gavin CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

Comedy will tax your funnybone ‘Les Miserables’ hits high school stage

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hink palazzo pants and wildly plaid sports coats. “Wait till you see the clothes — you’ll wonder why we ever wore them,” says Laurie Howlett, the director of “Love, Sex and the IRS.” “The guys are going to look very hip.” A typical farce, the play by Billy Van Zandt and Jane Milmore is filled with sight gags and twists of fate. It’s the story of two out-ofwork musicians, played by Max Jacobs and Justin Thompson. A side note: Both actors are graduates of Cal State Bakersfield’s theater arts program and this is their first appearance on the Stars stage. In the play, the two men find they’re in trouble with the Internal Revenue Service because, to save money, they have been filing tax returns listing themselves as a married couple. The day of reckoning comes when the IRS informs the “couple” they're going to be investigated by an agent, portrayed by Tim Fromm, who’s well known to local audiences for his cameo roles in many other shows. A masquerade ensues that involves a cluster of mistaken identities. Kelci B. Lowry and Brittnee Knight play the girlfriends of the musicians. Also in the cast are Howlett’s husband, Mark Price, Helen Prine and Joe Lowry. Kathi Lowry did the costumes; Cory McCall designed the set; and Gabe Urena did the lighting and sound design. Performances continue through Nov. 13.

Teens do ‘Les Mis’ One thing I can say for sure: Vickie Stricklind of the NOR Teen Scene doesn’t shy away from challenging young actors. In this case, it’s the musical “Les Miserables,” which opens this evening at East Bakersfield High School auditorium. True, this is the “school edition” of the famous musical. But like the original version, the story is told entirely in song, opera style. Teen Scene was initiated during the summer and this is the first pro-

PHOTO COURTESY OF VICKIE STRICKLIND PHOTO COURTESY OF PETER BECKMAN

Jon (Max Jacobs, right) tries to convince Leslie (Justin Thompson) that he has to dress up as a woman to fool the IRS. His girlfriend, Kate (Kelci B. Lowry), is stuck in the middle in more ways than one in “Love, Sex and the IRS,” opening Friday at Stars Theater.

duction. Stricklind, a veteran director of shows for the North of the River Recreation and Park District as well as Bakersfield Community Theatre, is confident the 45-member cast, ages 8 to 18, can bring it off successfully. “This cast has given me chills and brought tears to my eyes,” she said. “They are on the brink of doing something so very extraordinary, and I am so proud of them.” Based on Victor’s Hugo’s novel, the play is set in 19th century France and in many ways is a commentary on the repressive social and political conditions of the time. Overall, however, it is a touching story of love, hope and redemption. “‘Les Miserables’ is such a wonderful experience for these young actors,” Stricklind said. “It challenges them to act while singing, and to view life from another’s perspective; a life and world so very different from their own.” The play is the story of an exconvict named Jean Valjean (played by Kyle Gaines) who has been imprisoned for 19 years for stealing a loaf of bread. He is relentlessly pursued by a cruel policeman, Inspector Javert, played by Curtis Jensen. I spoke briefly to Gaines and asked if he planned to adopt a European accent for his role ... “I chose to just keep it simple with a minimal accent,” he said. “I wanted it to be more straight and not clouded — but when I do use an accent it leans toward French.”

Camille Gavin’s “Arts Alive” column appears on Thursday. Write to her via e-mail at gavinarts@aol.com

This is the 15-year-old East High freshman’s first starring role, although he’s no stranger to the stage. He started acting at age 4 and estimates he’s been in 40 shows since at both NOR Junior Theater and Bakersfield Music Theatre. In addition to playing the flute, piccolo and piano, he studies voice locally with Gretchen Anderson. Kyle’s mother, Julie Gaines, is the show’s producer. His father, Al Gaines designed the set that, said Stricklind, was built by his “tech” students at East High. The set includes a revolving barricade, screen projections and special lighting. “Les Mis,” which opened in London in 1985, was written by Claude Michel Schonberg, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer. Some of the background music for the Teen Scene production is provided by an orchestral recording and some by pianist Susan Yeasley. Stricklind said most of the cast will be equipped with body microphones. Others in leading roles are Ariel Clark as Fantine, the unfortunate working girl, and Rose Taylor, as her daughter, Cosette, who is adopted by Valjean. Kelsea Johnson portrays Eponine, and Michael Ellsworth, Marius. Those in supporting roles are Braden Unruh, Brett Walker, Kelsey Gaines, Josh Hefner, James O’Hearn, Kaitlin Lang and Sarah Jensen. The production staff includes Wes Jensen, assistant director, and Emily Coughenour, student director. Period costumes were provided by Fantasy Frocks.

Photographic exhibit at BC An exhibit featuring the work of Andrew Zimmerman and

Rose Taylor plays Cosette and Kyle Gaines is Valjean in a scene from “Les Miserables,” which opens tonight at East High School.

Michelle Rogers, two photographers based in Virginia, opens this evening at Bakersfield College’s Jones Gallery. Zimmerman’s photos are scenes of the Virginia landscape and its natural beauty. Margaret Nowling, curator, said the photographer uses a large format view camera to capture images on 8-by-10-inch film. The resulting photographs are contact prints made using traditional dark room techniques. Since no enlargements are made, the prints retain the same sharpness and clarity as the negatives. Rogers, a native of France now living in Virginia, collects old postcards and then, after photographing the images, combines the result into triptychs with her own photographs. She bleaches, or tones, the three black-andwhite photos until the contemporary images seem to be of the same era as the photos of the postcards. The exhibit can be seen through Nov. 10. Usual gallery hours are from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. For tonight’s reception, there will be free parking in the staff parking lot at the Haley Street entrance.

Tips on grant writing If you belong to an arts organization, you probably know it’s possible to get grant money from foundations. First though, you have to write an application. And for some, that’s a tough hurdle. I asked Michael Millar, Arts Council of Kern’s executive director, what he considers the key element in writing a proposal and here’s what he said: “Take the things you do well and communicate them well so potential funders can really understand the impact you’re making on the community.”

GO & DO ‘Les Miserables’ When: 7 p.m. today, Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Saturday Where: East Bakersfield High School Auditorium, 2200 Quincy St. Cost: $10, $7, children 10 and under, and students with ID Information: 392-2000

Photographic Traditions Opening reception: 5:30-7 p.m., today Jones Gallery, Bakersfield College, 1801 Panorama Drive Cost: Free Information: 395-4616

‘Love, Sex and the IRS’ 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday Stars Theatre Restaurant, 1931 Chester Ave. Cost: $45 to $55; show only, $35 Information: 325-6100

Grantwriting workshop 5:30-7 p.m. Monday Arts Council of Kern, 2000 K St., Suite 110 Cost: Free Information: 324-9000

Millar will lead a grant writing workshop on Monday evening at Arts Council headquarters in downtown Bakersfield. The session is being held as part of the council’s annual Community Grant Program, which distributes about $10,000 each year. Twelve different organizations in Kern County benefited from the program in 2011.


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Thursday, October 20, 2011 The Bakersfield Californian

Eye Street Purchase any Cold Sandwich

OR Purchase any Panini Sandwich and receive a

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“Disney on Ice Presents Pixar’s Toy Story 3” is coming to Rabobank Arena for several performances starting today.

Favorite ‘Toy Story’ pals come to life on ice BY ASHLEY FISCHER Contributing writer

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ike the movies that inspire it, Disney’s new ice production appeals not just to children but to anyone who’s ever agonized over whether to get rid of their favorite stuffed companion at the next yard sale. “Disney on Ice Presents Pixar’s Toy Story 3”, coming to Rabobank Arena for several performances starting today, revisits some of the most heartwarming characters created for the screen in the last 20 years in a story charming enough to crack even the hearts of those cooler-than-thou adolescents. “Our show actually sums up all of the ‘Toy Story’ movies, so you get to see all three movies from your seat at the same time,” said performer and professional ice skater Kristine Gardner, who plays the role of Barbie in the production. “You can actually see and interact with all of your favorite characters, like Buzz Lightyear, and Woody and Jessie, and the whole round-up gang. It’s really one of the most amazing productions they’ve put together.” This not-so-animated escapade

Disney on Ice: Pixar’s Toy Story 3 When: 3 and 7 p.m. today and Friday; 11 a.m., 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 5 p.m. Sunday Where: Rabobank Arena, 1001 Truxtun Ave. Admission: $10 to $45, plus fee (Thursday only); $16 to $45, plus fee (Friday through Sunday) Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000

features digital projections of images directly onto the ice, the first in Disney’s lineup of ice productions to do so. Which, according to Gardner, is one of the many things that make this fast-paced performance so much fun to watch. Not only do you get to see your favorite toys playfully brought to life by performers, but you also get to see them spinning, jumping and twirling through the air (sometimes in some pretty cumbersome costumes). “Watching all this fast motion with the people jumping and spinning combined with the lights and the

music — it’s just all really impressive to see for anyone who might come to the show,” said the Canadian skater. “And figure skating is a very unique sport, it’s so athletic and so artistic, and to turn that into a way of watching your favorite movie; it’s a very unique experience.” The first half of the show depicts a mash-up of the most memorable moments from the first two installments in the trilogy, while the second half focuses on following the plot of the third film, in which college-bound Andy reluctantly decides to donate his beloved toys to a local day care. In spite of being too old to play with Barbies in real life, Gardner, 26, readily admitted to still watching her favorite Disney films (“Toy Story” and “The Little Mermaid”). “It’s so fun to be able to portray a character or a role model that you grow up with watching in the films. I’ve been seeing these characters and these movies since I was little, and they’re such a part of my childhood. I know them so well. “And now I get to go out on the ice and portray them — it’s such an amazing feeling. I mean, that’s my job. And that’s amazing.”

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OCTOBER 21 NOVEMBER 12

OCT. 21, 22, 23, 28, 29, 30, NOV. 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12 STARS DINNER THEATRE  1931 CHESTER AVENUE 325-6100  bmtstars.com


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The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street The Lowdown with Matt Munoz

Mainstream, but still cool Pauly Shore coming for show at Fishlips

Bakotopia Unplugged Open Mic Night With host Matt Munoz When: 8 to 11 p.m. Wednesdays. Signups start at 7:30 p.m. Where: Fishlips, 1517 18th St. Information: 324-2557 or visit the Facebook page for updates.

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he last time I interviewed Mexican singer-songwriter Julieta Venegas was backstage at the Wiltern Theater in Los Angeles. I can still remember being escorted backstage through the venue and into a small room, where Venegas and I chatted casually for 30 minutes like we were neighbors. It was the kickoff of her world tour after the release of her album “Limon Y Sal.” She was shy, had a great sense of humor and was a huge fan of Flaming Lips, but especially Tom Waits — in fact, she said she’d kiss the soles of his feet if he walked in the room. That was five years ago, and today she remains as eclectic as ever with a new live show coming to Rabobank Theater Saturday night. If you’re unfamiliar with Venegas’ music, here’s something to help you get acquainted. Introduced as a bold young feminist with 1997’s “Aqui,” her brilliant follow-up, “Bueninvento,” showed maturity, establishing the then-20-something as an anti-pop princess. But finding love would change all that when she got sweet with “Si,” the album that broke her into the Latin charts. From the pink hue to a photo of her posing in a wedding dress, the cover left longtime fans puzzled while the rest of the world ate it up. Soon, the Grammy nominations began flooding in and her new image

Matt’s Picks

PHOTO COURTESY OF PAULY SHORE

Tickets are currently on sale for a Dec. 8 show with comedian Pauly Shore at Fishlips.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DI MARIO

Critically acclaimed Mexican singer songwriter Julieta Venegas appears Saturday at Rabobank Theater.

was clear: Venegas was now a bonafide pop music queen and content with that. After the best-selling “Limon Y Sal,” Venegas’ international popularity soared with “MTV Unplugged,” one of the best from that series. Now with “Otra Cosa,” her status as a new mom brings her full circle. Highly recommended. Tickets for Saturday’s show are $17.50 to $47.50 and available at the Rabobank box office, 1001 Truxtun Ave. Showtime is 8 p.m. For more information call 8527777 or ticketmaster.com.

Upcoming shows A reminder to snap up tickets to some noteworthy shows com-

ing to town over the next few months before the holidays empty out your bank account. You’ve heard their song “Sail” on KRAB a million times; now you can witness Los Angeles buzz band Awolnation live at B Ryder’s on Nov. 2. Fronted by alterna pretty boy Aaron Bruno, the place should be packed with screaming girls. Also on the bill will be Middle Class Rut and Twin Atlantic. Tickets are $15; for purchase information, go to timgardeapresents.com. I love hip-hop music, but, live, most acts just plain suck. Not the case with underground hero Murs, who will be returning to Bakersfield Nov. 22.

Matt Munoz is editor of Bakotopia.com, a sister website of The Californian that devotes itself to promoting Bakersfield’s art scene. Matt’s column appears every Thursday in Eye Street.

At his last show, I swore I saw the walls sweat. And when you can get steely Fishlips owner Shawna Haddad-Byers to say, “What a sweet human being” about an artist, you know he’s good. Tickets are $15 in advance and can be purchased at Fishlips, 1517 18th St. or vallitix.com.

The Weasel is back Before things got gross in Jersey, comedian Pauly Shore had his own MTV show in the ’90s called “Totally Pauly.” It was the network’s early attempt at a reality show, scheduled before “Yo! MTV Raps.” After its cancellation, Shore and his surfer dude persona, “The Weasel,” stayed afloat in a series of B-comedies including “Bio-Dome,” “Son In Law” — filmed partly in Wasco — and my mom’s favorite, “Encino Man.” Now, he’s back on the standup comedy circuit and coming to Bakersfield for a show at Fishlips on Dec. 8. Start practicing your, “Hey, Buddy,” and get your tickets now for $20 at Fishlips or vallitix.com. For more information call 3242557.

The Architecture, Holy Beast, The Nature at Fishlips, 1517 18th St., 9 p.m., Friday, $5, 324-2557. A great Friday triple bill. Bakersfield progressive indie band Holy Beast have been making the rounds over the past year, mostly through the live downtown circuit. They’ve got soul, great songs, and vocalist Chanell Hall, who’s one of the most adventurous singers out there. Bassist Carlos Contreras, guitarist Edy Hernandez, and drummer Alejandro Tuesta also show off some really good jazz and rock chops. Check out a song or two at holybeast.com. Also, if you haven’t picked up The Architecture’s debut CD “Begin to Shake,” there’s nothing stopping you. I’m currently listening to the song “Julie Andrews Swordfish,” which I downloaded on iTunes. Opening is another new local band, The Nature. Tech N9NE at The Dome, 2201 V St., 8 p.m., Saturday, $24, 327-0190. I’ve been getting emails asking for information about this show all week, and here it is. Kansas City misfit Aaron Dontez Yates AKA Tech N9NE has proved you don’t need airplay to build a fan base. Recording 13 full-length records released on his own label, he’s revered in hip-hop circles and draws huge crowds just through word of mouth. Guaranteed to pack out.


29

Thursday, October 20, 2011 The Bakersfield Californian

Eye Street

BC choirs staging tribute Famed composer will lead ‘Shining Night’ on Friday

Shining Night: Music of the Masters with BC choirs When: 7:30 p.m. Friday

BY SUSAN SCAFFIDI Contributing writer

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he Bakersfield College choirs usually save their “big” programs for the spring, after student singers have had most of the school year to polish their skills. But the big program comes instead this Friday evening, when the choirs will perform an extraordinary concert they are calling “Shining Night: Music of the Masters.” It’s the kickoff to a very big year for the BC choral program, with the inauguration of a new chamber choir that now includes singers from the community, and a chance to work with eminent composer Morten Lauridsen, whose music will be featured at Friday’s concert at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 4500 Buena Vista Road. “It’s essentially a tribute to Dr. Morten Lauridsen,” choir director Ron Kean said. Lauridsen’s music has dominated the choral world for several decades. Lauridsen is a professor of composition at USC, and served as composerin-residence for the Los Angeles Master Chorale from 1994-2001. His works are among the most performed in the United States, and have earned him such accolades as “American Choral Master,” by the National Endowment for the Arts, and the

Where: St. John’s Lutheran Church, 4500 Buena Vista Road Tickets: $10; $5 students, seniors and active military with ID. Tickets available at the door.

National Arts Medal by President George W. Bush. The choirs will perform Lauridsen’s famous “Lux Aeterna,” “Sure on This Shining Night,” and “Dirais-ton.” Kean has also programmed music by composers who influenced Lauridsen’s work, including the motet “Os Justi,” by Anton Bruckner, “Schaffe in mir, Gott,” by Johannes Brahms, and Benjamin Britten’s “Rejoice in the Lamb.” The choirs, who will be accompanied by organist and pianist Liz Cervantes, will also perform a new work, “Clap Praise,” a gospel-style work by Los Angeles-based composer Diane White-Clayton. The piece includes a section of extremely complex handclapping that is the centerpiece of the work. Kean said White-Clayton came to BC to work with the choir. “She worked with us on the rhythms,” Kean said. “She also worked with us on style.” White-Clayton is a distinguished performer and educator and is also

the choir director at the famous Faithful Central Bible Church, which meets at the Forum in Los Angeles. “She’s an amazing pianist and has an incredible ear for gospel music,” Kean said. “(‘Clap Praise’) is just one of the happiest pieces you can ever imagine.” Kean admits he is pushing the choirs, but with good reason. Next month, the singers travel to the Music Association of California Community Colleges (MACCC) annual conference, where they will work with Lauridsen and sing the same compositions. “This ends my tenure on the board (of MACCC) and so I wanted to go out in a big way,” Kean said. “So I asked Dr. Lauridsen if he would be our composer-in-residence at the conference, and he agreed.” “So this is really a big program for us,” Kean said. “I wanted my students to be prepared for when they work with Dr. Lauridsen.” Kean has a personal connection with Lauridsen, one of Kean’s professors while earning his doctorate at USC. “I look back and I was really lucky, my gosh,” said Kean, who is dedicating the concert to Armando and Heladio Ramirez, both of Arvin, who died last week in an industrial accident in Lamont. Kean said he is trying to contact the young men’s family. “I just them to know we care about them,” Kean said.

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list of mentors was the late Driller band director Colonel Wes Moore. “You didn’t just respect the Colonel, you loved him. He made you feel like you’re the most important thing in the world. I can’t really think of figures that would make you wanna go to school the way he did. I still get emotional when I think about him. That big boomy voice. … He’d always call me Byrom.” Byrom has assembled a band of local musicians, including his brother Tanner on drums, bassist Billy Haynes, keyboardist Chris Neufeld, guitarist Chris Pence, vocalist Leonard Thomas, trumpeter John Hollins and Dennis Wilson on sax. “I was in every music class they had there — orchestra, jazz, choir. Whatever group they let me in. I was a great student and a terrible student,” Byrom laughed. “We’re going to be playing a lot of grooving ’70s music, maybe some ’80s and probably have some other alumni jump onstage if they’re feeling it.” For the price of admission, attendees will enjoy dinner by Luigi’s, a DJ and live dance music throughout the evening, plus a lot of opportunities to recall glory days. “We have someone in charge of bringing out old yearbooks and historians on hand to share information and photos,” Harrison said. “You don’t realize how much these things mean to you until you’re gone.” Harrison said his twin sisters, Susan and Nancy, as well as brother Craig — now a priest at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church downtown — were active participants on campus, both in athletics and student government. Their father, Don, also happened to be the school’s athletics director and vice principal when they attended. “I was voted ‘the one who got away with the most’ and ‘class clown.’ I had a good time. That’s why you gotta have someone like that organize something like this. My brother Craig was student body president and big man on campus.

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Bakersfield High School graduate Monty Byrom, shown performing at Buck Owens’ Crystal Palace in July, has put together a band to play at the Driller Bash.

I always tell him, ‘I think I made you become a priest, because I was such a hard act to follow.’” Funds raised from the event will benefit Bakersfield High music, arts and athletic programs. Harrison, who plans to make the party an annual event, would like to remind other alumni to help spread the word. “We all have strong bonds to the teachers and coaches that have had a lot of influence on our life. It’s a great way to give back and have a lot of fun doing it.”

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The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street

Integrity Winter, in a bumblebee costume, gets a good look around CALM from his wagon during the annual Boo-at-the Zoo event in 2009.

CASEY CHRISTIE / THE CALIFORNIAN

Get a head start on Halloween BY MIRANDA WHITWORTH Contributing writer

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f you’re looking to get a jump on Halloween tricks and sweet treats, there are plenty of options for Bakersfield’s ghosts and goblins, young and old alike. If a day of family and fun among the animals at CALM sounds intriguing, Boo at the Zoo on Saturday and Sunday brings staff, animals and attendees together for fun with costumes, presentations and games. In fact, Boo at the Zoo has been such a hit that office assistant Jordan Reed said what once was a one-day event has expanded to two. “This isn’t a normal trick-or-treat, where kids go up and simply ask for candy,” Reed said. “There are games involved at the different stations, so they have a chance to walk around and check out the animals while they play.” In addition to the sweet games, Boo at the Zoo offers a carnival-type atmosphere with a bounce house and train rides for $1. And the animals will be getting in on the fun as well. Keepers will be out in force, giving presentations involving their furry critters, complete with a fall twist. “We give the animals pumpkins that have treats inside them. It’s not only fun for the animals but it’s fun for the kids to watch them get out and explore.”

The Eagles Halloween Bash If your desire for Halloween fun has nothing to do with children, adults have a chance to get out and enjoy the spookiest holiday of the year with the Eagles Halloween Bash on Saturday. The service organization transforms its downtown Eagles Hall into a haunted hotspot for the annual event. Joe Sanchez, entertainment chairman for the Eagles, said when it comes to planning the party, they have to start early. “We turn the hall into a haunted building and it takes about two days to get it all done. “You walk in through this tunnel and we

Boo at the Zoo When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday Where: CALM, 10500 Alfred Harrell Highway Admission: $9, adults; free for children under 12 free with paying adult. Information: 872-2256 or calmzoo.org

Eagles Halloween Bash with Thee Majestics When: 8 p.m. to midnight Saturday Where: Eagles Hall, 1718 17th St. Admission: $10, available at the business office or bar at the hall Information: 747-1628

have a coffin with a body in it and all these creepy noises. “It’s fun to hear all of the women screaming. Some won’t even walk through it, so we have to drag them in the door through another way. It’s a lot of work, but it’s definitely worth it.” The night will feature music from Thee Majestics and a costume contest. “We give prizes for the best-dressed male and best-dressed female,” Sanchez said. “We also have a best-couple prize and that can be given to a man and woman or two women or two men. So it can be a theme.” But if the creepy fun sounds appealing, Sanchez advised getting tickets to the 12th annual event right away. “We are only selling 300 tickets, and we sold out last year. So you better get them early. We have already gotten rid of quite a few since they went on sale.” The Halloween bash lasts from 8 p.m. until midnight, and a full menu and bar will be available. But like tickets to the event, it’s all about getting in on the action early. “There are no reserved tables; it’s all first come, first served, so you better get on it.”


31

Thursday, October 20, 2011 The Bakersfield Californian

Eye Street

Trumpet/guitar duo a sweet melody Performance on Friday at CSUB Music Building BY SUSAN SCAFFIDI Contributing writer

B

eing a performer is always risky business, especially when your music depends on your abilities as a composer and improviser. Trumpeter Kris Tiner is making a career of it, as he brings another of his music projects into public view in the CSUB music building Friday evening. One of Tiner’s long-time collaborations is Tin/Bag, named for Tiner and New York City-based guitarist Mike Baggetta. The pair met in 2001 while both were studying and performing at the Betty Carter Jazz Ahead program at the Kennedy Center. Tiner said he and Baggetta were studying “straight ahead” jazz music in the program, but discovered they had a mutual interest in improvisatory music without the framework of a traditionally composed song. The two formed their trumpetguitar duet and started working together formally in 2004. Tiner said over the years their musical

Tin/Bag concert When: 7:30 p.m. Friday Where: CSUB Music Building, Room 127 Tickets: $12; $8 seniors; $6 students. Master class at 4 p.m. is free.

experiments have finally coalesced into a distinct “style.” “It was becoming more and more focused, not tonally, but in a lyrical manner,” Tiner said. “And with a limited palette.” Tiner described that “palette” as a four- or five-note melody that serves as a framework for the duo to improvise harmony and extended melodies. “It’s a really very focused, a very stark framework,” Tiner said. “We don’t really play jazz,” Tiner said. “We just really find a unique way of putting melody and harmony together.” Friday evening’s performance is part of a weekend tour promoting the duo’s latest CD of original music, “Bridges,” which will feature heavily in the concert program. Tiner said he’s also includ-

ing music “inspired” by existing songs, including Bob Dylan’s “Just Like a Woman” and music performed or composed by such artists as Willie Nelson, Kitty Wells and Hank Williams. “I’m drawn to singers whose singing is just plain and in line with what we’re trying to do,” Tiner said. “It’s just to see what happens when we take this approach, which is pretty stripped down, and see how much we can get from the songs that’s not derivative.” Tiner has several other music groups, or “projects” as he calls them, that test him both as composer and performer, including the Kris Tiner Quintet, the Empty Cage 4Tet, TPS Trio, tptflm (trumpet and film) and the Industrial Jazz Group. Tiner’s work in all of these areas has received considerable praise from music critics, as well as awards from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), the American Composers’ Forum, the Chamber Music of American’s American-French Jazz Exchange and the International Association for Jazz Education.

HENRY A. BARRIOS / THE CALIFORNIAN

Kris Tiner plays with his quartet at the Bakersfield Jazz Festival.

Tiner said he takes a different approach to each ensemble. “I think the challenge for me and what I kind of enjoy is playing in these different contexts,” Tiner said. “I never wanted to be just a trumpet player who always sounds the same.” Tin/Bag presents Tiner with his most challenging work: it’s just trumpet, guitar and the two

musicians’ ability to come up with something worthwhile on the spot. “It’s very exposed,” Tiner said. “I have to really practice for it. If I’m not prepared for it, it can sound really awful.” The concert is part of CSUB’s Guitar Arts concert series. Tiner will also present a free master’s class at CSUB at 4 p.m. on Friday.


32

The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street “You get this wonderful, grand effect: the organ will sound more alive and bigger.” — Nelson Dodge, who directed the weeklong installation of the modified organ at First United Methodist Church

Organ gets digital makeover Technology makes pipes ‘speak’ again at Methodist church

BY SUSAN SCAFFIDI Contributing writer

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BY SUSAN SCAFFIDI Contributing writer

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ntil the modern age, the pipe organ was the most complex device ever created by human beings, with a history that starts in the third century B.C. But its precisely because of modern technology that this ancient instrument is finding a new lease on life. In September, technicians from Church Keyboard Center of San Dimas installed Bakersfield’s second digital-pipe combination organ at First United Methodist Church on Stockdale Highway and Montclair. The new organ, a Rodgers Masterpiece MS 376B, is a cousin to the instrument already in use at First Presbyterian Church on H Street. First United Methodist Church has been raising funds for over a year to upgrade the original $40,000 organ purchased in 1972, which has cost the church $80,000 in repairs. A committee of church members concluded that merely repairing the organ wasn’t cost effective, and that upgrading the entire instrument, with its 1,500 pipes, would be a better investment. “One of the selling points (of the Rodgers) was that we are going to keep our organ,” said committee member Walter Grainger. “The investment in today’s dollars would be far more than this church has ever paid — almost $500,000.” “You just don’t throw that kind of investment away,” Grainger said. According to Church Keyboard Center president Nelson Dodge, who directed the weeklong installation, the upgrade and new digital technology will cost the church $151,000 — far less than replacing the entire organ. But the members of First United Methodist are getting more than an upgrade. This new model is engineered by organist and digital technology expert Dr. Robert Tall, who is as widely respected as an organ-building consultant as he is a performer. Tall will perform on the new organ Sunday. Dodge said the organ has been customized for the worship center at First United Methodist Church. “The pipes are going to ‘speak,’” Dodge said. “With the digital we can add to the reverberation.” “You get this wonderful, grand effect: the organ will sound more alive and bigger,” Dodge said. Pipe organs function by sending pressurized air through pipes of various sizes, each of which is tuned to a specific pitch and sound quality, known as timbre. The pipes, which are normally closed, are opened when the organist presses the corresponding keys on the keyboard or steps on the assigned foot pedal. The first type of pipe organ, an ancient Greek invention called a hydraulis, used water pressure to compress air and push it through the pipes, like a gasoline pump in reverse. By

Installer gets first crack at new organ

FELIX ADAMO / THE CALIFORNIAN

At his voicing bench, tonal finisher Steuart Goodwin voices pipes for a digital/pipe hybrid organ for the First United Methodist Church.

Community concert When: 4 p.m. Sunday Where: First United Methodist Church, 4600 Stockdale Highway Admission Free Information: 325-1267

the Middle Ages, bellows and hand pumps were used to push the air through. During the Renaissance and Baroque periods, organ builders — themselves both artists and mechanical engineers — were able to add different timbres to the organ, imitating various types of wind and stringed instruments. By the Romantic period, pipe organs were capable of mimicking an entire orchestra. Electricity was used to move the air at the end of the 19th century. Invented by English organ builder Robert Hope-Jones, the electro-pneumatic organ was sold to the Rudolf Wurlitzer Company, which found an immediate use for the powerful instrument: accompanying silent movies in the giant movie palaces of the day. The digital pipe organ represents the next great leap forward in organ building. Using music sampling and MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) technology, the new organs can now re-create the sound of an orchestra — hundreds of instruments — with astonishing accuracy. “There are over 1,000 voices possible,” Dodge said, adding that all of the organ’s pipes have been digitally sampled and

included in the hybrid’s memory. “But then the rest of it is orchestra sounds, Hammond B3 (organ), percussion, Clavinova, electric piano, guitar — just about everything,” Dodge said. Dodge said the organ is also equipped with virtually limitless memory, which will enable any number of organists to store their instrument settings for all of the music they play. Tall took charge of retuning the organ’s pipes, an arduous task that includes adjusting each of the 1,500 pipes for individual sound and timbre, and then matching them each to the other for the best sound possible. “That’s really where my expertise is,” Tall said, adding that the common term for the adjustment is “voicing.” “You adjust the pipes for the attack, the running tone, how (the organ sounds) in relationship to the entire room,” Tall said. The new technology brings with it another benefit — making the organ, with its ability to reproduce faithfully contemporary instruments, useful to younger generations of church-goers and musicians. “It’s one of the ways by which younger people who have an interest in contemporary music can be drawn,” said Dr. Phil Dodson, one of Kern County’s pre-eminent organists and a musician at First United Methodist. “This is the thing we’ve been looking for because we have the contemporary service and we’re trying to sell (younger members) that this is the instrument to liven up their service,” Grainger said.

rganist Robert Tall will try out the new digital pipe organ he helped install at First United Methodist Church this weekend. Tall returns to Bakersfield at 4 p.m. Sunday for a concert to dedicate the new organ, which was installed in mid-September. “It’s going to be music the whole world loves,” Tall said of the program, which will include music by Baroque masters Bach, Handel and Vivaldi, and also 20th Century French composer Jean Langlais and some contemporary music. Tall said he will finish with an orchestral extravaganza. “I’m going to push a button on my computer, and my orchestra is going to play, and then I’m going to have some fun,” Tall said. Tall is one of the pioneers of the digitalpipe combination instrument, sometimes called a “hybrid,” a term Tall objects to. “A hybrid suggests (the instrument) is neither fish nor fowl,” Tall said. “and this is definitely a fish.” The digital-pipe combination starts with a full pipe organ as its basis, then adds the digital component to enhance the pipe sound while adding as many as hundreds of sampled instruments. Tall said the newer instruments are gaining wide acceptance, but the first efforts, which came out in the early 1970s, did not go over well because the analog technology in use at the time didn’t produce a good sound. “Once we started to go to digital, then the idea (of computer-assisted technology) became quite attractive,” said Tall, who added that the digital sampling is so accurate, even die-hard critics couldn’t tell the difference. “They were angry not because they hated the concept, but because they had been fooled,” Tall said. Tall said the digital technology is a boon to cash-strapped churches that want the pipe organ sound but can’t afford that instrument, which can costs hundreds of thousands, even millions of dollars. “The future of the pipe organ belongs to the digital-pipe combination,” Tall said. In addition to the cost and complexity of a pipe organ, there is also the cost of hiring additional instruments that are needed to perform many of the larger works written for the organ. But that savings to the churches means a loss to the performers who can be replaced by the digital technology. Tall acknowledged the trade-off, but countered that some compositions, such as the large-scale organ concertos, are finally getting heard. “Otherwise, they sit on the shelf unheard because no one can afford to perform them,” Tall said. Joining Tall is the Chancel Choir of First United Methodist Church, directed by Kathleen Schaffer and accompanied by Philip Dodson. Admission is free.


32

The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street “You get this wonderful, grand effect: the organ will sound more alive and bigger.” — Nelson Dodge, who directed the weeklong installation of the modified organ at First United Methodist Church

Organ gets digital makeover Technology makes pipes ‘speak’ again at Methodist church

BY SUSAN SCAFFIDI Contributing writer

O

BY SUSAN SCAFFIDI Contributing writer

U

ntil the modern age, the pipe organ was the most complex device ever created by human beings, with a history that starts in the third century B.C. But its precisely because of modern technology that this ancient instrument is finding a new lease on life. In September, technicians from Church Keyboard Center of San Dimas installed Bakersfield’s second digital-pipe combination organ at First United Methodist Church on Stockdale Highway and Montclair. The new organ, a Rodgers Masterpiece MS 376B, is a cousin to the instrument already in use at First Presbyterian Church on H Street. First United Methodist Church has been raising funds for over a year to upgrade the original $40,000 organ purchased in 1972, which has cost the church $80,000 in repairs. A committee of church members concluded that merely repairing the organ wasn’t cost effective, and that upgrading the entire instrument, with its 1,500 pipes, would be a better investment. “One of the selling points (of the Rodgers) was that we are going to keep our organ,” said committee member Walter Grainger. “The investment in today’s dollars would be far more than this church has ever paid — almost $500,000.” “You just don’t throw that kind of investment away,” Grainger said. According to Church Keyboard Center president Nelson Dodge, who directed the weeklong installation, the upgrade and new digital technology will cost the church $151,000 — far less than replacing the entire organ. But the members of First United Methodist are getting more than an upgrade. This new model is engineered by organist and digital technology expert Dr. Robert Tall, who is as widely respected as an organ-building consultant as he is a performer. Tall will perform on the new organ Sunday. Dodge said the organ has been customized for the worship center at First United Methodist Church. “The pipes are going to ‘speak,’” Dodge said. “With the digital we can add to the reverberation.” “You get this wonderful, grand effect: the organ will sound more alive and bigger,” Dodge said. Pipe organs function by sending pressurized air through pipes of various sizes, each of which is tuned to a specific pitch and sound quality, known as timbre. The pipes, which are normally closed, are opened when the organist presses the corresponding keys on the keyboard or steps on the assigned foot pedal. The first type of pipe organ, an ancient Greek invention called a hydraulis, used water pressure to compress air and push it through the pipes, like a gasoline pump in reverse. By

Installer gets first crack at new organ

FELIX ADAMO / THE CALIFORNIAN

At his voicing bench, tonal finisher Steuart Goodwin voices pipes for a digital/pipe hybrid organ for the First United Methodist Church.

Community concert When: 4 p.m. Sunday Where: First United Methodist Church, 4600 Stockdale Highway Admission Free Information: 325-1267

the Middle Ages, bellows and hand pumps were used to push the air through. During the Renaissance and Baroque periods, organ builders — themselves both artists and mechanical engineers — were able to add different timbres to the organ, imitating various types of wind and stringed instruments. By the Romantic period, pipe organs were capable of mimicking an entire orchestra. Electricity was used to move the air at the end of the 19th century. Invented by English organ builder Robert Hope-Jones, the electro-pneumatic organ was sold to the Rudolf Wurlitzer Company, which found an immediate use for the powerful instrument: accompanying silent movies in the giant movie palaces of the day. The digital pipe organ represents the next great leap forward in organ building. Using music sampling and MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) technology, the new organs can now re-create the sound of an orchestra — hundreds of instruments — with astonishing accuracy. “There are over 1,000 voices possible,” Dodge said, adding that all of the organ’s pipes have been digitally sampled and

included in the hybrid’s memory. “But then the rest of it is orchestra sounds, Hammond B3 (organ), percussion, Clavinova, electric piano, guitar — just about everything,” Dodge said. Dodge said the organ is also equipped with virtually limitless memory, which will enable any number of organists to store their instrument settings for all of the music they play. Tall took charge of retuning the organ’s pipes, an arduous task that includes adjusting each of the 1,500 pipes for individual sound and timbre, and then matching them each to the other for the best sound possible. “That’s really where my expertise is,” Tall said, adding that the common term for the adjustment is “voicing.” “You adjust the pipes for the attack, the running tone, how (the organ sounds) in relationship to the entire room,” Tall said. The new technology brings with it another benefit — making the organ, with its ability to reproduce faithfully contemporary instruments, useful to younger generations of church-goers and musicians. “It’s one of the ways by which younger people who have an interest in contemporary music can be drawn,” said Dr. Phil Dodson, one of Kern County’s pre-eminent organists and a musician at First United Methodist. “This is the thing we’ve been looking for because we have the contemporary service and we’re trying to sell (younger members) that this is the instrument to liven up their service,” Grainger said.

rganist Robert Tall will try out the new digital pipe organ he helped install at First United Methodist Church this weekend. Tall returns to Bakersfield at 4 p.m. Sunday for a concert to dedicate the new organ, which was installed in mid-September. “It’s going to be music the whole world loves,” Tall said of the program, which will include music by Baroque masters Bach, Handel and Vivaldi, and also 20th Century French composer Jean Langlais and some contemporary music. Tall said he will finish with an orchestral extravaganza. “I’m going to push a button on my computer, and my orchestra is going to play, and then I’m going to have some fun,” Tall said. Tall is one of the pioneers of the digitalpipe combination instrument, sometimes called a “hybrid,” a term Tall objects to. “A hybrid suggests (the instrument) is neither fish nor fowl,” Tall said. “and this is definitely a fish.” The digital-pipe combination starts with a full pipe organ as its basis, then adds the digital component to enhance the pipe sound while adding as many as hundreds of sampled instruments. Tall said the newer instruments are gaining wide acceptance, but the first efforts, which came out in the early 1970s, did not go over well because the analog technology in use at the time didn’t produce a good sound. “Once we started to go to digital, then the idea (of computer-assisted technology) became quite attractive,” said Tall, who added that the digital sampling is so accurate, even die-hard critics couldn’t tell the difference. “They were angry not because they hated the concept, but because they had been fooled,” Tall said. Tall said the digital technology is a boon to cash-strapped churches that want the pipe organ sound but can’t afford that instrument, which can costs hundreds of thousands, even millions of dollars. “The future of the pipe organ belongs to the digital-pipe combination,” Tall said. In addition to the cost and complexity of a pipe organ, there is also the cost of hiring additional instruments that are needed to perform many of the larger works written for the organ. But that savings to the churches means a loss to the performers who can be replaced by the digital technology. Tall acknowledged the trade-off, but countered that some compositions, such as the large-scale organ concertos, are finally getting heard. “Otherwise, they sit on the shelf unheard because no one can afford to perform them,” Tall said. Joining Tall is the Chancel Choir of First United Methodist Church, directed by Kathleen Schaffer and accompanied by Philip Dodson. Admission is free.


33

Thursday, October 20, 2011 The Bakersfield Californian

Eye Street Ashley Fischer CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

Rolling for breast cancer cure Women’s roller derby teams in fundraiser

I

’ve never exactly been steady on my own two feet. Or, as my stepfather once so kindly put it: I have the coordination of a “newborn giraffe.” So for me, tying on a pair of roller skates and heading out onto the rink at Skateland in the midst of a roller derby practice seemed like an ideal way for my evening to end in disaster. Or at the very least, with a quick trip to the emergency room. Fortunately, my very first attempt to find my inner hell-oneight-wheels, as well my introduction to the world of roller derby, took place during the practice of one of the friendliest teams around: The Bakersfield Diamond Divas. But if you don’t have a practice session lined up with this gregarious group of women, you still have the chance to see them in all of their glittering glory this week during their bout against Antioch team the Undead Bettys. The event also serves as a benefit for the breast cancer awareness group, Links for Life. Considering that October is both Breast Cancer Awareness

Bakersfield Diamond Divas Bout for Breast Cancer When: Doors open at 5 p.m., Divas “Rough Cuts” bout 5:30 p.m., main bout 7 p.m. Saturday Where: Skateland, 415 Ming Ave. Admission: Adults $10 for pre-sale, $12 at the door; children and seniors, $5 Information: bakersfielddiamonddivas.com

Month and National Roller Skating Month (former President Ronald Reagan declared it so in 1983), watching the Divas’ 40 or so members “boutin’ for boobies” seems to be the perfect way to get your charitable side rolling. “October is obviously a huge month for breast cancer awareness, and because we’re, of course, a team of all ladies, we figure that holding this fundraiser is the not only the best way to help ourselves, but help our family members to boot,” said Helen Swall, (aka “Dutch Dynamite”). “Because there’s gotta be somebody out there that you know that has been affected by breast cancer, or possibly can be.”

In addition to donating a portion of the ticket sales, the Divas will raise money for their chosen beneficiary by selling baked goods and a limited edition pink ribbon-themed version of the team’s T-shirt. The bake sale will feature a wide array of tasty treats whipped up by the skaters themselves (all pink, of course), as well as cupcakes and other baked goods donated by local bakery Courtney’s Confections. Even though “jamming” (each bout is divided into two 30minute sessions, or “jams”) for a good cause is nothing new in the derby world, the Divas take that mission to heart, raising funds for different charities at each of their bouts. “That was one of our primary objectives, was to do something with the different charities each time,” Swall said. “And I think that’s something that really sets us apart.” This season alone, the team donated money to Relay for Life, H.A.L.T., the Alpha House of Taft and

the Jamison Children’s Center of Kern County. Swall approximated that in the team’s nearly three years of existence, the altruistic athletes have gifted over $15,000 to different organizations. But if you’re concerned that a roller derby bout might be a bit too rough and tumble to bring the kids to, don’t worry. In spite of some of the playfully threatening-sounding derby names (like 12 Gauge Tinkerbell and Twisted Hippie), Swall assured me that every Divas event is entirely family friendly. They pretty much have to be; with the majority of the team being mothers (Swall included), practice nights down at Skateland are very much a family affair. And of course, kids make for a pretty decent cheering section. “My husband is one of the coaches, so he’s always there at the practices, and our children go to every single bout. And then all of our skaters that have their family fan base that come to every single bout, as well

“October is obviously a huge month for breast cancer awareness, and because we’re, of course, a team of all ladies, we figure that holding this fundraiser is the not only the best way to help ourselves, but help our family members to boot.” — Helen Swall (aka Dutch Dynamite)

as their friends.“ Aside from winning their matches, the Divas primarily are concerned with brining a bit of “sparkle and class” to the sport. “But with what we do, I feel it’s a way for me to be able to teach my children about the importance of helping people in the community. And it’s inspiring for me — when I look at all of the hard work I’m putting in and I’m able to see the end result and who it helps — it makes it all worth while.”

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 Shopping Bazaar 3:30 p.m. • Cooking School 6 p.m.

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Hosted by: Rock Harbor Church at The DoubleTree Hotel, 3100 Camino Del Rio Saturday, Oct. 22, 9:00 am to Noon. Reserve your seat today at event.rhc@bak.rr.com or call 829-6743.


34

The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street

‘Doubt,’ ‘Zombies’ worth catching this weekend BY STEFANI DIAS

‘Doubt: A Parable’

Californian assistant lifestyles editor sdias@bakersfield.com

I

had the pleasure of enjoying two vastly different shows at the theater last weekend. Not the movieplex, but the community theater — or theatre, as most thespians spell it. First off, right in the Halloween season, was the opening night of “Geeks vs. Zombies.� Having seen its debut at The Empty Space last year and in my reporting for a preview of this year’s show, I was interested to see the changes. It was much as I remembered it, fast-paced and witty with extremely committed zombie actors (I think “geek� Thor Reese swings a foam bat at them as hard as possible). There were a few flubbed lines and some kinks in the fight choreography, but overall it’s a solid show. Next I caught the Sunday matinee of “Doubt� at Bakersfield Community Theatre, which a friend joking referred to as the “Bermuda Triangle of Bakersfield theater.� I can see some merit in that, given the South Chester location and the necessity of driving around the back to park, but don’t let the location stop you: BCT is putting on some powerful shows. I enjoyed “Super Villain� this summer as well as “Doubt.� The four-person cast is a stunner, with Barbara Gagnon and Brian Sivesind carry-

When: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Where: Bakersfield Community Theater, 2400 S. Chester Ave. Admission: $15 adults; $12 seniors/students/military Information: 831-8114

‘Geeks vs. Zombies’ When: Doors open at 7:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. today through Saturday Where: The Empty Space, 706 Oak St. Admission: Suggested donation $10 adults; $8 students/seniors Information: 327-PLAY or esonline.org

ing most of the show’s dramatic weight. Unfortunately, and through no fault of the actors, a portion of the second act was marred by the “soundtrack� from the church next door. Regardless, this show is thought-provoking and worth seeing, especially in its closing weekend. But as“Doubt� advises you not to make judgments based solely on what you’re told, don’t just take my word on it. Take a friend (or two), see the plays here or elsewhere and judge for yourself.

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35

Thursday, October 20, 2011 The Bakersfield Californian

Eye Street

A Real Scary Sale! $

GO & DO Today Amanda Ross-Ho Lecture, 2 p.m., CSUB, Albertson Room, 9001 Stockdale Highway. Free. 654-2238. Bingo, warm ups start at 5 p.m., with early birds at 6 p.m., regular games at 6:30 p.m., Volunteer Center of Kern County, 2801 F St. From $20 buy-in to “the works.” 395-9787. Blood Drive & AAUW Bakersfield Evening Social, come donate blood, meet, greet, eat, 5 to 8 p.m., Houchin Blood Bank, 5901 Truxtun Ave. To register, 706-9269 or 323-4222. Disney on Ice: Pixar’s Toy Story 3, 7 p.m. today and Friday; 11 a.m., 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 5 p.m. Sunday, Rabobank Arena, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $10-$45 plus fee (Thursday only); $16$45 plus fee (Friday through Sunday). ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Free Admission Day, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Buena Vista Museum of Natural History, 2018 Chester Ave. 324-6350. Kern County Mineral Society, meeting, 7:30 p.m., East Bakersfield Veterans Hall, 2101 Ridge Rd. 834-3128. Murray Family Farms’ OctoberFest 2011, 12:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, now until Oct. 31, Murray Family Farms, 6700 General Beale Road. Monday through Friday: $6.99 all ages; Saturday and Sunday: $10.99. Children 3 years and under free. murrayfamilyfarms.com or 3300100. Taft Chamber Oktoberfest 2011, carnival, bounce house, vendors and more, 5 to 10 p.m. today and Friday; noon to 10 p.m. Saturday; noon to 8 p.m. Sunday, Sixth and Main Street, Taft. 765-2165. Talladega Frights Haunted Attraction, 7 p.m. today through Sunday, 11811 Rosedale Highway, between Jewetta Avenue and Old Farm Road. $15 to $25. talladegafrights.com, facebook.com/TalladegaFrights or 6998633. The Chamber Haunted House, 7 p.m. today through Monday, Sam Lynn Ballpark, 4009 Chester Ave. $10 The Chamber; $5 3D Invasion; $14 combo ticket. chamberhaunt.com. Third Thursdays Faire in the Park, pumpkin festival, trick or treat, entertainment, barbecue, arts and crafts, games, contests, farmers market, 5:30 p.m., Central Park at Mill Creek, 21st and R streets. 325-5892.

Friday 17th annual Gayle Carlson Memorial Golf Tournament, 11 a.m., Buena Vista Golf Course, 10256 Golf Course Road, Taft. $125 per person, includes cart, lunch, dinner and door prizes; $20 dinner only. Visit napd-bak.org or 3951361. 20th annual AAA Hot Rod Reunion, featuring vintage drag racing, hot rods and more, opens 8 a.m. Friday through Sunday, Famoso Raceway, 33559 Famoso Road, McFarland. One-day tickets $25; children under 15 free when accompanied by paid adult. museum.nhra.com or 800-884-6472. 20th annual Fall Home Show, 1 to 7 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Kern County Fairgrounds, 1142 S. P St. $7; $4 senior

GO & DO The Chamber Haunted House, 7 p.m. today through Monday, Sam Lynn Ballpark, 4009 Chester Ave. $10 The Chamber; $5 3D Invasion; $14 combo ticket. chamberhaunt.com. day (Friday) children 12 and under are free. ggshows.com or 1-800-6550655. CSUB Guitar Arts Series, Tin/Bag, Kris Tiner/Mike Baggetta, 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., CSUB, Music Building, Room 107, 9001 Stockdale Highway. $12 adults; $8 seniors; $6 students. 654-2511. Fifth annual Recovery Conference, workshops, speakers, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Marriott Hotel, 801 Truxtun Ave. Free. Registration required, 868-5064. FLICS International Cinema Society, presents “Poetry,” 7:30 p.m., Bakersfield Fox Theater, 2001 H St. $5. flics.org or call 428-0354. Second annual Golden Empire Train Show, 1 to 7 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Kern County Fairgrounds, 1142 S. P St. $7; $4 senior day (Friday) children 12 and under are free. ggshows.com or 1-800-655-0655. Shining Light, presented by BC’s Department of Performing Arts; 7:30 p.m., St. John’s Lutheran Church, 4500 Buena Vista Road. $10; $5 students/ seniors/BC faculty/staff/active military.

Saturday “A Night in Rio,” Brazilian music with dinner, silent and live auction, 5:30 to 9 p.m., Wesley United Methodist Church, 1314 Oswell St. $30, proceeds support community outreach programs of Wesley United Methodist Church. Advance reservations only. 871-3030. “Boo-at-the-Zoo,” with games, crafts and treats, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, CALM, 10500 Alfred Harrell Highway. Free for children 12 and younger and CALM members. calmzoo.org or 872-2256. 22nd annual “Catch the Wave” Benefit Concert, presented by Kern County Firefighters Union; tribute to The Beach Boys, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Bakersfield High School, in Harvey Auditorium, 1241 G St. $15. 203-3521. Art and Dancing in the Moonlight, hosted by Greg Heyart, 6 p.m., Juliana’s Art Studio & Gallery, 501 18th St. $75. Visit kerncasa.org or 631-2272 Bakersfield Diamond Divas Roller Derby, vs. Undead Bettys and Bakersfield Diamond Diva Roughcuts take on the Damned Skaters in a double header, doors open at 5 p.m., first about at 5:30 p.m., Skateland, 415 Ming Ave. $12 adults; $5 children and seniors. 831-5567. Beginning Guitar Workshop on Chords & Songs, 3 to 5 p.m., Beale Memorial Library, Tejon Room, 701 Truxtun Ave. Free. 868-0770. Bulky Waste Recycling, bring furniture and electronics, 8 a.m. to noon, Kern County Fairgrounds, 1142 S. P St. Free. 862-8900. California Trucking Association Sporting Clays Tou, registration 8 a.m., shoot 9 a.m. Saturday, Kern

County Gun Club, 12450 Shotgun Road. $85 per person; $425 per 5-person team. Proceeds benefit Optimal Hospice Foundation. 323-4015. Down Syndrome Buddy Walk, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Golden Valley High School, 801 Hosking Ave. 328-9055 ext. 257. Eagle’s Halloween Bash, with Thee Majestics, costume contest, 8 p.m. to midnight, Eagles Hall, 1718 17th St. $10. 747-1628. Fall Fiesta Time, food catered by El Pueblo Restaurant, silent auction, bounce house, 4 to 10 p.m., M.A.R.E. Facility, 18200 Johnson Road. $50 per person; $15 for children under 12. Proceeds benefit M.A.R.E. 589-1877. Fast & Fabulous Holiday Appetizers, demonstration with recipes, samples and great ideas, 10 a.m. to noon, Beladagio, 9500 Brimhall Road, Suite 705. Free. 829-2288. Inspire Salon & Spa Grand Opening for Charity, celebration benefitting local non-profits BARC, Links for Life and CURED, with food, music, salon tours and raffle prizes, noon to 4 p.m., Inspire Salon & Spa, 3615 Coffee Road. 587-4777. Julieta Venegas, 8 p.m., Rabobank Arena, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $17.50$47.50 plus fee. ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Kern Audubon Society, birding walk around Truxtun Lake and along the Kern River, meet 8 a.m., at the Truxtun Extension parking lot west of Mohawk Street. Bring water, snacks and binoculars. kernaudubonsociety.org or 3227470. Kern CUE Technology Conference 2011, 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., CSUB, 9001 Stockdale Highway. $25 CUE members; $30 non-members. Visit kerncue.org or 496-5351. Local History Lecture, part of the “One Book, One Bakersfield” community reading project, Fuchsia Ward, pioneer of the Friendship House, discussing the story of the founding house against the backdrop of an era of exciting political change, 11 a.m., Beale Memorial Library, 701 Truxtun Ave. 868-0745. MS Walk 2011, check-in 7 a.m., opening ceremonies 8:30 a.m., Yokuts Park, 4200 Empire Drive. walkMSsocal.org or 321-9512. Sierra Club Kern-Kaweah Chapter annual Fall Dinner, 5 to 8 p.m., Chalet Basque, 200 Oak St. $24 per person. Reservations by Oct. 14. 3235569. The Bounty of Kern County, social 5:30 p.m., dinner 6:30 p.m., horse race derby, prizes, 5:30 p.m., Moorea Banquet Centre, 8700 Swigert Court, #109. $65 per person. 397-9635. Think Pink California Tropic Pageant, open to girls, boys, babies and teens, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., East Hills Mall, 3000 Mall View Road. $50. Visit californiatropic.com or 877-998-7674. Writing Workshop 101, 11 a.m. to noon, Beale Memorial Library, Tejon Room, 701 Truxtun Ave. Free. 8680770. YMCA presents “Life School Musical,” 5 p.m., St. John’s Lutheran Church, 4500 Buena Vista Road. $5. 837-9622. Please see 36

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36

The Bakersfield Californian Thursday, October 20, 2011

Eye Street CONTINUED FROM 35

Sunday Healthy Indulgence Cooking Class and Diner, with Chef Myla Mendez, 3 to 6 p.m., Pacific Health Education Center, 5300 California Ave. $50 includes dinner. pacifichealth.org. Pumpkin Patch, noon to 9 p.m. Sunday through Friday; 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, Wesley United Methodist Church, 1314 Oswell St. 699-6625.

THEATER “Doubt: A Parable,” 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Bakersfield Community Theater, 2400 S. Chester Ave. $15 adults; $12 seniors/students/military. 831-8114. “Geeks Vs. Zombies,” doors open at 7:30 p.m. show at 8 p.m. today through Saturday, The Empty Space, 706 Oak St. Suggested donation $15 adults; $10 students/seniors. 327-PLAY. “Love, Sex and the IRS,” show at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday, Stars Dinner Theatre, 1931 Chester Ave. $45 to $55; show-only tickets $35; matinee $45 to $50. 325-6100. “Sweeney Todd,” 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Spotlight Theatre, 1622 19th St. $25; $22 students/seniors. 634-0692 or thespotlighttheatre.com. “The Phantom of the Melodrama,” followed by the vaudeville revue “Merry Olde England” 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday, Gaslight Melodrama Theatre & Music Hall, 12748 Jomani Drive. $12 to $23. 587-3377. Improv Comedy Show, with Center For Improv Advancement, 8 to 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, Ice House, 3401 Chester Ave., Suite M. Adults: $5, children under 12 are $1. ciacomedy.com. Major League Improv, improvisational comedy show, appropriate for families, 6 p.m. Saturdays, The Empty Space, 706 Oak St. Free but donations are accepted. 327-PLAY. Omnipresent Puppet Theatre, presents “Frankenstein,” 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday, Gaslight Melodrama Theatre & Music Hall, 12748 Jomani Drive. $6. 587-3377. RAT, offensive comedy sketch, 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday, The Empty Space, 706 Oak St. $5. 327PLAY.

ART “Art vs. Zombies” Closing Reception, group art show, 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, The Empty Space, 706 Oak St. 327-PLAY. “Disorder” Exhibition, now on display through Nov. 5, CSUB, Todd Madigan Gallery, 9001 Stockdale Highway. Gallery hours are 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. 6542238. Art for Healing program, classes that alleviate stress, resulting from illness, or grief. All classes are free but some suggest a donation and are held at Mercy

Hospital, Truxtun Campus, Truxtun and A Street. Visit mercybakersfield.org/art or to register, 632-5357. Juliana’s Art Studio & Gallery, offers youth art, clay sculpture, stained glass, and silver jewelry, Juliana’s Art Studio & Gallery, 501 18th St. For times and dates call 327-7507. Patti Doolittle, featured artist for October, Dagny’s Coffee Co., 1600 20th St. 634-0806. The Art Shop Club, 9 a.m. to noon each Thursday through Saturday, The Art Shop, 1221 20th St. All mediums. 322-0544, 589-7463 or 496-5153.

DJ

Lengthwise Brewery, 6720 Schirra Court, 836-2537; Whiskey Galore, 8 p.m. Friday.

Banacek’s Lounge, 4601 State Road, 387-9224; with DJ Casey Overstreet, 9 p.m. Fridays. Le Corusse Rouge, 4647 White Lane, 834-1611; with DJ Chill in the Mixx, 5 p.m. every Friday until 2 a.m. Saturday. Rockstarz Party Bar, 7737 Meany Ave., Suite B5, 589-6749; DJ James, 9 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays. Free. Tam O’Shanter, 2345 Alta Vista, 324-6774; Deejay Redeemed, Deejay SoFly and more, 8:30 p.m. Friday. $5. Tam O’Shanter, 2345 Alta Vista, 324-6774; DJ Frankie, DJ’s Blowskee and Roule, 8:30 p.m. Friday. $5. The Bull Shed Bar & Grill, at Hotel Rosedale, 2400 Camino Del Rio Court, 327-0681; with Meg, 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.

Classic Rock

Jazz

Bellvedere Cocktail Lounge, 3090 Brundage Lane, 325-2139; Twang Bangers, 9 p.m. Friday. Chuy’s, 2500 New Stine Road, 833-3469; Elevation 406, 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Saturday.

Cafe Med, 4809 Stockdale Highway, 834-4433; Mauro with guest Rico Velazquez and Lee Wilson, 8 p.m. Saturday. Cafe Med, 4809 Stockdale Highway, 834-4433; Richie Perez, 7:30 to 11 p.m. Thursdays. Le Corusse Rouge, 4647 White Lane, 834-1611; Bakersfield Jazz Workshop, 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. every Wednesday. Imbibe Wine & Spirits Merchant, 4140 Truxtun Ave., 633WINE; live music & wine bar with featuring local artists, along with 24 wines, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Friday; featuring Jazz Connection, along with 24 wines, 7 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday and 6 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Padre Hotel, 1702 18th St., 4274900; Mauro, Rico Velazquez and Lee Wilson, 6:30 p.m. Thursday. The Nile, Jazz Music, 6 p.m. every Sunday. Cost $10 at 1721 19th St. 364-2620.

MUSIC Celtic

Comedy Elevation Lounge, 818 Real Road, 325-6864; Improv Tuesday — Live comedy with DJ after party, 9 p.m. Tuesdays.

Country Buck Owens Crystal Palace, 2800 Buck Owens Blvd., 3287560; Monty Bryom Band, 7:30 p.m. Friday. Sandrini’s, 1918 Eye St., 3228900; Vince Galindo, 9 p.m. Wednesdays.

Dancing African Dance for Fitness, taught by national touring artists, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 1 to 2 p.m. Saturdays, Su Studio Dance Academy, 1515 21st St. $5$7 per class. africandanceclasses.com or 760-917-3685. Folklorico Classes, advance dancers/performing group 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays; and beginners, all ages, 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturdays, Fruitvale-Norris Park, 6221 Norris Road. $22 per month for beginners; $25 per month for advance dancers. 833-8790. Greenacres Community Center, 2014 Calloway Drive, offers ballroom dance, East Coast swing (jitterbug) and Argentine Tango dance classes; $35, $45 for nonmembers. 322-5765 or 201-2105. Joaquin Squares, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Rasmussen Center, 115 E. Roberts Lane. $5. 324-1390, 325-3086 or 399-3658. Pairs and Spares Dance, with Jerri Arnold, Country George and Ed Shelton, 7 p.m. Friday, Rasmussen Senior Center, 115 E. Roberts Lane. $5; $7 nonmembers. 399-3575. Tam O’Shanter, 2345 Alta Vista, 324-6774; 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Karaoke B. Ryder’s Sports Bar & Grill, 7401 White Lane, 397-7304; 8 p.m. Thursdays and Tuesdays. Banacek’s Lounge, 9 p.m. every Friday and Saturday at 4601 State Road. 387-9224. Banacek’s Lounge, 9 p.m. every Friday and Saturday at 4601 State Road. 387-9224. Bellvedere Cocktail Lounge, 3090 Brundage Lane, 325-2139; 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Thursdays and Sundays. Big Daddy Pizza, 6417 Ming Ave., 396-7499; 7 to 10 p.m. every Tuesday; 8 to 11 p.m. every Friday. Cactus Valley Mexican Restaurant, 4215 Rosedale Highway, 633-1948; 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday; beer pong and happy hour all day Sunday. Cataldo’s Pizzeria, 6111 Niles St., 363-7200; 6:15 to 10:15 p.m. Tuesdays. Cataldo’s Pizzeria, 4200 New Stine Road, 397-5000; 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday.

Chateau Lounge, 2100 S. Chester Ave., 835-1550; 9 p.m. every Saturday. City Slickers, 1001 W. Tehachapi Blvd., 822-4939; 7 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Corona’s Cantina, 9817 S. Union Ave., 345-8463; 7 to 10 p.m. Fridays. Del Rio Cocktail Lounge, 5840 State Road, 393-0262; 8 p.m. every Saturday. Diana’s Pit Stop, 10807 Rosedale Highway, 587-8888; 8 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays. Don Perico Restaurant, 2660 Oswell St., Suite 133, 871-2001; 7 to 11 p.m. Thursdays. DoubleTree Hotel, Club Odyssey, 3100 Camino Del Rio Court; 8 p.m. to midnight Tuesdays. Elevation Lounge, 818 Real Road, 325-6864; 9 p.m. Wednesday. Ethel’s Old Corral, 4310 Alfred Harrell Highway, 873-7613; 6 to 9 p.m. every Wednesday. Iron Horse Saloon, 1821 S. Chester Ave., 831-1315; 7 to 11 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays. Julie’s The Branding Iron Saloon, 1807 N. Chester Ave., 6 to 10 p.m. every Friday. Karaoke. Le Corusse Rouge, 4647 White Lane, 834-1611; A to Z Karaoke, 8 p.m. to midnight Tuesdays. Le Corusse Rouge, 8 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday at 4647 White Lane. 834-1611. Lone Oak Inn, 8 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday at 10612 Rosedale Highway. 589-0412. Magoo’s Pizza, 1129 Olive Drive, 399-7800; 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday. Magoo’s Pizza, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. every Tuesday at 1129 Olive Drive. 399-7800. Maria Bonita Mexican Restaurant, 10701 Highway 178, 3663261, 7 to 11 p.m. Fridays. All ages. McMurphy’s Irish Pub & Sports Bar, 14 Monterey St., 869-1451; 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. Tuesdays. Pizzeria, 4200 Gosford Road, 3971111; 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays. Pour House, 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays at 4041 Fruitvale Ave. 589-9300. Pyrenees Cafe, 601 Sumner, 3230053; 8 p.m. to midnight Saturdays. Replay Sports Lounge & Grill, 4500 Buck Owens Blvd., 3243300; 8 p.m. every Wednesday. Rocket Shop Cafe, 2000 S. Union Ave., 832-4800; 8:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday. Rocket Shop Cafe, 8:30 to midnight every Saturday at 2000 S. Union Ave. 832-4800. Rockstarz Party Bar, 7737 Meany Ave., Suite B5, 589-6749; 8 p.m. Mondays through Wednesdays. Rocky’s Pizza & Arcade, 2858 Niles St., 873-1900; 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday. Round Table Pizza, 2060 White Lane, 836-2700; 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday.

Round Table Pizza, 2620 Buck Owens Blvd., 327-9651; The Junction with host Mac Clanahan, 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. Round Table Pizza, 4200 Gosford Road, 397-1111; 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Round Table Pizza, 6:30 p.m. every Wednesday at 4200 Gosford Road. 397-1111. Rusty’s Pizza, 5430 Olive Drive, 835-5555; 6:30 p.m. every Wednesday. Sports & Spirits, 9 p.m. every Thursday and Saturday at 6633 Ming Ave. 398-7077. Sports & Spirits, 6633 Ming Ave., 398-7077; 9 p.m. Thursdays and Saturdays. T-Bones Steakhouse, 8020 District Blvd., 398-1300; with Irish Monkey Entertainment, 6:30 to 11 p.m. Thursdays. Tejon Club, 6 to 10 p.m. every Saturday at 117 El Tejon Ave. 3921747. The Bull Shed Bar & Grill, at Hotel Rosedale, 2400 Camino Del Rio Court, 327-0681; 7 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. The Junction Lounge, 2620 Buck Owens Blvd., 327-9651; 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The Old River Monte Carlo, 9750 Taft Highway, 837-0250; 8:30 p.m. every Thursday. The Playhouse, 2915 Taft Highway; 397-3599; 7 to 10 p.m. Sundays. The Prime Cut, 9500 Brimhall Road, 831-1413; hosted by Ed Loverr, 9 p.m. to midnight Friday. The Prime Cut, 9 p.m. every Friday at 9500 Brimhall Road. 8311413. The Regent, 2814 Niles St., 8714140; 8:30 p.m. every other Friday. The Wrecking Yard, 9817 S. Union Ave., 827-9192; 7 to 10 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. The Wright Place, 2695-G Mount Vernon Ave., 872-8831, 8 p.m. every Thursday. Tomi’s Cowgirl Cafe, 7 to 10 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday at 1440 Weedpatch Highway. 3635102. Tomi’s Cowgirl Cafe, 7 to 10 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday at 1440 Weedpatch Highway. 3635102. Trouts & The Blackboard Stages, 805 N. Chester Ave., 3996700; 7 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays, 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

Latin/Salsa DoubleTree Hotel, Club Odyssey, Club Odyssey, 3100 Camino Del Rio Court, 633-1949; various levels, 3 to 9 p.m. every Sunday. $5 per person, per lesson.

Mariachi Camino Real Restaurant, 6 to 9 p.m. every Sunday at 3500 Truxtun Ave. 852-0493. Please see 37


37

Thursday, October 20, 2011 The Bakersfield Californian

Eye Street CONTINUED FROM 36

Music showcase

Wednesday 10/26

Fishlips, 1517 18th St., 324-2557; Bakotopia Unplugged Open-Mic Night, 8 p.m., signups begin at 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Sandrini’s, 1918 Eye St., 322-8900; 9 p.m. Wednesdays.

Author Irene Kendig Discussion/Book Signing of her book “Conversations with Jerry and Other People I Thought Were Dead” and discussing what happens when we die and what does it mean while we’re alive, 7 to 9:30 p.m., The Center for Spiritual Living, 222 Eureka St. 323-3109. CASA Volunteer Orientation, learn how to make a difference in the life of an abused, abandoned or neglected child, noon to 1 p.m. and 5 to 6 p.m., CASA, 2000 24th St. kerncasa.org or 631-2272. Music inspired by the words of Emily Dickinson, James Sproul talking about his composition “Dream Cycle,” 2 p.m., masterclass presented by Danya Katok and Nana Shi on contemporary vocal music, 3:30 p.m., concert 7:30 p.m., CSUB, 9001 Stockdale Highway, Music Building. $10 concert, $5 seniors, CSUB students free with ID. 6542511. Spooktacular Tales & Creepy Craft, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., Beale Memorial Library, 701 Truxtun Ave. Free. 868-0770.

Rock

Thursday 10/27

B. Ryder’s Sports Bar & Grill, 7401 White Lane, 397-7304; Elevation 406, 9 p.m. Friday; Back Up Johnny & Vanity Avenue, 9 p.m. Saturday, $5 each night; 21 & older only. B. Ryder’s Sports Bar & Grill, 7401 White Lane, 397-7304; Mickey Avalon, 6 p.m. Wednesday. $20. Jerry’s Pizza, 1817 Chester Ave., Use Your Teeth, His Coming Day, Amens & Omens, Catharsus, The Day I Ate The Moon, A Day Of Atonement, Under Sleepless Skies, 5 to 10 p.m. Saturday. $5. 633-1000. Rockstarz Party Bar, 7737 Meany Ave., Suite B5, 589-6749; live bands, 9 p.m. every Thursday.

Drew Heizler Lecture, 2 p.m., CSUB, Albertson Room, 9001 Stockdale Highway. Free. 654-2238. Paint the Town Pink, ladies-only painting party, 7 to 10 p.m., Color Me Mine at The Marketplace, 9000 Ming Ave. $25 per person. Benefitting Links for Life. bakersfield.colormemine.com or 664-7366. Poetry Slam, part of the “One Book, One Bakersfield” community reading project, “Positive Prose and Poetry: Action through Art,” with local writers and poets gathering for an evening of spoken word, 7 p.m., Bakersfield Community Theatre, 2400 S. Chester Ave. 831-8114. Talladega Frights Haunted Attraction, 7 p.m. Thursday through Monday, 11811 Rosedale Highway, between Jewetta Ave. and Old Farm Road. $15 to $25. talladegafrights.com, facebook.com/TalladegaFrights or 699-8633. The Chamber Haunted House, 7 p.m. Thursday, Sam Lynn Ballpark, 4009 Chester Ave. $10 The Chamber; $5 3D Invasion; $14 combo ticket. chamberhaunt.com.

The Prime Cut, 9500 Brimhall Road, 8311413; featuring local artists, 7 to 10 p.m. every Wednesday.

Oldies KC Steakhouse, 2515 F St., 322-9910; Jimmy Gaines, Bobby O and Mike Halls, 6:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday.

Old school Jacalito Grill, 900 Truxtun Ave., Suite 110, 325-2535; Prisoners of Love, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday. Que Pasa Mexican Cafe, 2701 Ming Ave., 832-5011; Al Garcia & the Rhythm Kings, 8 to 11 p.m. every Thursday.

Open Mic

Top 40 DoubleTree Hotel, Club Odyssey, 3100 Camino Del Rio Court. 323-7111; 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. every Friday.

Trivia night Bellvedere Cocktail Lounge, 3090 Brundage Lane, 325-2139; 7 p.m. Tuesdays. Chuy’s, 2500 New Stine Road, 833-3469; 7 p.m. every Tuesday. Sandrini’s, 1918 Eye St., 322-8900; Trivia Night with Dave Rezac, 10 p.m. Tuesdays.

UPCOMING Monday 10/24 American Red Cross “Tee for Charity,” American Red Cross Kern Chapter Annual “Tee for Charity” Golf Tournament, 10 a.m. registration, opens with a light lunch, shotgun at 11:30 a.m., dinner, awards ceremony and raffles to follow, Seven Oaks Country Club, 2000 Grand Lakes Ave. 324-6427. Weill Child Guidance Foundation Golf Classic, four-person scramble, shotgun begins at noon, Stockdale Country Club, 7001 Stockdale Highway. $150 per person; $600 per team. 395-7467.

Tuesday 10/25 Annual Kern County Sportsman’s Dinner, with cocktails, door prizes, doors open at 5 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m., Kern County Fairgrounds, 1142 S. P St. $30. 805-5766. Sierra Club Conditioning Hikes, three to five miles, 7 p.m., meet at corner of highways 178 and 184. 872-2432 or 873-8107.

Friday 10/28 “Love, Sex and the IRS,” doors open at 6 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday, Stars Dinner Theatre, 1931 Chester Ave. $45 to $55; show-only tickets $35; matinee $45 to $50. 325-6100. An Evening of Art Song and Aria, with CSUB students of Peggy Sears, 7:30 p.m., Emmanuel Lutheran Church, 1900 Baker St. $10; $5 students/seniors; free for CSUB students with ID. 654-2168. Breast Cancer Awareness Event, two presentations on breast cancer, hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., California Institute Of Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery, 2901 Sillect Ave., Suite 201. Free. 3272101. Kids’ Night Out “Animal House!,” Kids’ Night Out “Animal House!,” for ages 7 and up, paint and design a dinner plate, pizza, and games, 6:30 to 9 p.m., Color Me Mine at The Marketplace, 9000 Ming Ave. $25; $19 for additional siblings. bakersfield.colormemine.com or 664-7366. Lantern Light Ghost Tour, ghost hunts and paranormal investigations at 8:30 p.m. Friday through Monday, Silver City Ghost Town, 3829 Lake Isabella Blvd., Bodfish. $12 per person of all ages. 760-379-5146.

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1-877-827-6888 TTY/TDD 1-800-929-9955 7 days a week, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Find more locations at healthnet.com/seminars. HMO products will be discussed. Se habla español. *Medically necessary services to plan approved locations. Health Net. A Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. The benefit information provided herein is a brief summary, not a comprehensive description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or copayments/coinsurance may change on January 1, 2013. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-877-827-6888 (TTY/TDD 1-800-929-9955), 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., 7 days a week. Free gift provided without obligation to enroll, while supplies last. CA84730 (10/11) SC6888 Health Net of California, Inc. is a subsidiary of Health Net, Inc. Health Net is a registered service mark of Health Net, Inc. All rights reserved. Material ID # H0562_2012_0311 File & Use 09142011


Bakersfield Californian Eye Street / 10-20-11