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MARCH 30, 2014 | A PUBLICATION OF

| READEXPRESS.COM | @WAPOEXPRESS

Strasburg Unleashed And three more reasons why the Nats have the best starting rotation in baseball this season 6

GETTY IMAGES/EXPRESS ILLUSTRATION

The District’s Beer Scene Is Hoppin’

4

A Spring Cleaning for the Potomac

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Your Best Shot | Submitted by Jim Havard of Washington, D.C.

eye openers

OMMMM-MG

Recipient: ‘Thanks, I Guess?’ Alexandria-based auction house Rasmus sold an unusual item this month: a 12-foot-tall fiberglass statue of Buddha. The gold-painted statue was part of a liquidation sale at the now-defunct Buddha Bar in the District. Local attorney and bar owner David Chung made the winning bid at $1,526, but he won’t be taking Buddha home with him, The Washington Post reports. He says it’s a housewarming gift for D.C. builder Bill Dean. RECORD HOLDERS

Orange Is the New Black Lab The Humane Society of Harford County, Md., learned this month that it landed a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records. They achieved the record for most dogs wearing bandanas at a single location by gathering 200 dogs outfitted in orange Humane Society kerchiefs in Bel Air, Md., on Oct. 12. Guinness officials verified the record in early March, Bel Air Patch reports. SMELLS LIKE ...

Actual Mascot Now Warmer Than Guy Wearing Costume Climate change could harm not only the environment but team spirit, too. The National Wildlife Federation reported this month that the University of Maryland’s beloved mascot, the terrapin, may be in danger from higher temperatures and rising seas, Capital News Service said. Buffalo, wolverines and alligators are also in danger, the report said. (EXPRESS)

RED IS IN, WHITE IS OUT (HOPEFULLY) FOR SPRING: A cardinal cocks its head near Jim Havard’s Capitol Hill home on a snowy mid-March afternoon. “Our house is close to the Anacostia River and Congressional Cemetery, so there are lots of trees and open space around for wildlife,” Havard said.

Want to see your pic in print? Submit your best shot by joining our Flickr pool at flickr.com/ groups/wapoexpress. Share a photo from the Washington region, and it could appear here.

live closer to all the action (oh yeah, and work too). The Metro r Rider ’ss Guide. Every r second and fourth Wednesday of the month month. t

Advertisers: Have a metro-accessible location to advertise? rentalads@washpost.com

0185 5X3

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WS, T HE NE E T A LIT L W E ASK MATING

for what it’s worth PRODUCTIVITY

ARCHITECTURE

Damn You, Autocorrectal!

The Mod Pod D.C.’s intercity bus depot, in the parking garage behind Union Station, got a whole lot more interesting last fall after a revamp by Studio Twenty Seven Architecture. The makeover’s standout element is a pair of connected ovoid pods, one an information booth, the other a store. Which happen to be inscribed with a verse from a Death Cab for Cutie song. In Morse code. Indie rock lyrics aren’t the only improbable design element of this odd structure, which opens for business this spring. We got the scoop from the head designer, Todd Ray. MARISSA PAYNE (E XPRESS) The inspiration: Ray and his team used the concept of a Zen rock garden (an expanse of sand or gravel with straight lines raked through it, punctuated by thoughtfully placed stones) to guide their design. The bus lanes are the lines; the pods are the rocks. “We wanted a setting where you can reflect about the place you’re going to be,” Ray says.

SOURCE: SURVEY BY WHATSYOURPRICE .COM, A WEBSITE WHERE MEN PAY WOMEN TO DATE THEM, WHICH SEEMS LIKE SOMETHING YOU’D WANT TO OBFUSCATE LATER.

The colors: The yellow matches hues already in the garage, Ray says. He views the gray shell as a rind, cut away to reveal the inner pulp, as with an orange.

ANICE HOACHLANDER (HOACHLANDER DAVIS PHOTOGRAPHY LLC)

According to a new survey, 2 out of 7 Washingtonians met their partner online. Among them, 56 percent of men and 50 percent of women lied to their friends and family about it.

The shell: The fiberglass exterior of the “booleaned ellipsoid” was created off-site with the help of a shipbuilder. The whole thing fit on a standard-width tractor-trailer. “We shipped it in overnight, then snapped it together right on-site,” Ray says.

The Morse code: Ray desired a distinctive pattern and a rich texture for the pods’ facade. “We thought about the history of Washington, and how it always had some sort of a military influence,” Ray says. Morse code fit the bill. But would the dots and dashes be concave or convex? The latter won out. “The outies will catch less dust,” Ray says, as any bellybutton scientist could tell you.

MYSTERIES

What’s That Green Train? It’s WMATA’s track geometry vehicle (TGV), a manned, diesel-powered Metrorail car that’s painted a vivid emerald hue. Why it exists: Informally known as “The Pickle,” the TGV trawls the Metro system flagging potential problems. It uses ultrasound to look for defects inside the

The facade: Ray’s team wanted to evoke Union Station’s classical friezes and its proliferation of store logos. That translated into yellow panels of Morse code. Oh, you crazy architects!

The lyrics: The code spells a verse from Death Cab for Cutie’s “Soul Meets Body”: “Cause in my head there’s a Greyhound station/ Where I send my thoughts to far-off destinations/ So they may have a chance of finding a place/ Where they’re far more suited than here.” A bus station as a metaphor for meditation — so very Zen.

tracks and an infrared camera to detect issues with the third rail. It also makes sure the two outer rails are always the same distance apart. When to spot: The Pickle works about three weeks per month, and can be anywhere in the Metrorail system. Look for it zooming through stations between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on weekdays, or try to catch it in repose during morning rush hour. As you ride the Blue Line

April Fools’ Day is imminent, so here’s a prank sure to bring levity and/or shame to any workplace. We especially encourage elected officials and their staffers to try it. (Disclaimer: Firings resulting from said prank are not the fault of Express or its parent company.) 1. Open Microsoft Word on a colleague’s computer. 2. Tell the program to swap a commonly used word for a similar-looking, funnier one. For example, replace “fiscal” with “fecal,” and many boring phrases, such as fiscal year, fiscal policy and fiscal cliff, become much more interesting. Here’s how: 2a. On a Mac, select “AutoCorrect” from the “Tools” menu. On a PC, go to the “File” menu and choose “Options,” then “Proofing,” then “AutoCorrect.” 2b. Type “fiscal” under “Replace” and “fecal” under “With.” 2c. Click “Add,” then “OK.” 3. Write a test sentence to verify it worked. 4. Giggle. SADIE DINGFELDER (E XPRESS)

Pro Tip: Pry your co-worker from his desk by sending him an Outlook invite to a fake meeting in a far-away conference room.

Have suggestions for the page? Email us at fwiw@wpost.com or tweet us @WaPoExpress.

from King Street to Van Dorn, look to the right and scan for green among the parked trains at the Alexandria rail yard. Why green? “A lot of us asked that same question and we haven’t been able to come up with a very logical answer,” says WMATA assistant chief engineer Andy Off. “It does run during revenue hours and it moves through stations, so we wanted it to be overwhelmingly clear that it’s not a normal revenue car.” S.D.

CORRECTION: A story in the March 16 issue misspelled the name of the photographer of sommelier Rachael Ewing. He is Dan Swartz. Spot a mistake? E-mail us at corrections@readexpress.com.

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on the spot

GARRETT PECK

HISTORIAN, BEER SCHOLAR, AUTHOR OF ‘CAPITAL BEER’

D.C., Alexandria and Arlington had lots of pre-prohibition breweries. Did you uncover any you didn’t know existed while researching?

What was really cool was finding how many there were during the Civil War. It was boom

times for beer. You had all these soldiers coming here and D.C.’s population exploded. … A big minority of the soldiers were German Americans … so the Civil War really becomes this seminal moment in American

GARRETT PECK

Ever wondered what beer was like in Washington before DC Brau brought brewing back to the Capital in 2011? Grab a pint with local historian Garrett Peck. The beer scholar’s new book, “Capital Beer: A Heady History of Brewing in Washington, D.C.,” traces the area’s beer beginnings back to 1770, and explains why, after prohibition, it took decades for D.C. to start brewing again. Author Garrett Peck knows his way around Washington’s drinking history.

drinking history because beforehand, Americans largely drank whiskey. Afterward, they drank lager.

Lagers take twice as long to brew as ales, so they caught on later.

But it was prohibition that doomed local breweries.

It also took this wave of German immigrants to the city, who introduced it to us. … Philadelphia was the first city that began brewing lager and it became a major exporter of lager … At some point, all the brewers realized, “We can do this ourselves.” Around 1864, 1865, all the brewers start making it, and it caught on so quickly. People were just nuts about it because it was such a new thing and it was just the right thing for D.C. summers.

People had really shifted their drinking habits toward liquor because liquor was so much more profitable for the bootleggers to bring in. … After prohibition the ones that survived were the big national brewers, and they had access to the national media markets which emerged after prohibition. The big national magazines, radio became huge and, of course, spending marketing on this stuff would cost a lot of money so these little guys couldn’t compete. In response to all those great Anheuser-Busch and Schlitz advertisements, people who once proudly drank local began drinking Bud.

Why did it take so long for D.C. to embrace craft brewing?

With [prominent D.C. brewery] Heurich closing in 1956, the local community and culture toward beer essentially petered out.

200 MASTERWORKS

120 ARTISTS

MADE IN THE USA

RUDI GREENBERG (E XPRESS)

Visit garrettpeck.com for a list of upcoming book events in the area.

1 AMERICAN SPIRIT

AMERICAN MASTERS FROM THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION 1 8 5 0 –1 9 7 0 Through August 31, 2014

The exhibition is organized by The Phillips Collection. The exhibition is presented by Generous support is provided by The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts. Brought to you by the Made in the USA Committee

1600 21st Street, NW (Dupont Circle Metro) www.phillipscollection.org MEMBERS ENJOY UNLIMITED FREE ADMISSION AND DISCOUNTS. JOIN US! ARTHUR G. DOVE, RED SUN (DETAIL), 1935. OIL ON CANVAS, 20 1/4 X 28 IN. THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, ACQUIRED 1935. © THE ESTATE OF ARTHUR G. DOVE, COURTESY TERRY DINTENFASS, INC.

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03.30-04.05 THE BEST THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK | COMPILED BY EXPRESS STAFF

9:30 Club, 815 V St. NW; Wed., 6 p.m., $22; 202-265-0930, 930.com. (U Street)

MONDAY

WEDNESDAY

‘How I Met Your Mother’ Series Finale

Bob Mankoff Wondering who to complain to about how you keep losing the New Yorker caption contest? It’s Bob Mankoff, who serves as editor of the magazine’s quirky cartoons. On Wednesday, he’ll discuss his new book, “How About Never — Is Never Good for You?: My Life in Cartoons,” which traces his life and career path in the medium he knows best: cartoons. Politics and Prose, 5015

After nine seasons of myth-building, reverse storytelling and meta callbacks, “How I Met Your Mother” finally reaches an end Monday at 8 p.m. on CBS. Even though viewers have already learned the identity of Ted’s titular mate, there’s still plenty for the final episode to uncover. Needless to say, it’s going to be legen — wait for it, one last time — dary.

finest chefs, including those behind VOLT, Taco Bamba and The Source, and the city’s most masterful mixologists, like Gina Chersevani and Derek Brown? That’s the idea behind Taste of the Nation at the National Building Museum. The event raises money for hungry kids in D.C. National Building Museum, 401

Paddlestar Galactica II Forget your college basketball bracket: Participants have been training and raising money all month for 826DC’s ultimate ping pong showdown, and it all comes to a head on Sunday. Though it’s too late to get a spot at the table, spectators are welcome to go watch teams battle it out and help select the winner of the Best Uniform contest. U Street Music Hall, 1115 U

F St. NW; Mon., 6 p.m., $120-$225; 202272-2448, nbm.org. (Judiciary Sq)

TUESDAY

Nickel Creek, ‘A Dotted Line’ WASHINGTON POST FILE PHOTO

St. NW; 202-588-1880, Sun., 1 p.m., free; 826dc.org. (U Street)

MONDAY

Taste of the Nation Ever wished there were one place where you could sample the creations of some of D.C.’s

Before going on hiatus in 2006, the members of Nickel Creek proved they could pick out a bluegrass tune just as well as they could pound out foot-stomping folk jam. They’ve reunited to release their first album in nine years. “A Dotted Line,” ($13, Nonesuch Records) is out Tuesday and features the trio’s haunting melodies and mandolin jams.

WEDNESDAY SHORE FIRE MEDIA

SUNDAY

Connecticut Ave. NW; Wed., 7 p.m., free; 202-364-1919, politics-prose .com. (Van Ness)

WEDNESDAY

Real Estate In a lot of ways, Real Estate hasn’t changed since the breakout success of 2011’s “Days.” On its latest album “Atlas,” the band sticks with the hazy indie rock that makes them the perfect summertime listen, but adds a new, melancholy

Biz Stone As one of the founders of Twitter, Biz Stone knows how to tell a story in 140 characters. But in his new book, “Things a Little Bird Told Me: Confessions of a Creative Mind” ($26, Grand Central Publishing), he spends 240 pages telling stories about his life and career. He’ll discuss and sign his book Wednesday. Sixth and I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW; Wed., 7 p.m., $20; 202-408-3100, sixthandi.org. (Gallery Place)

IN THEATERS

‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ FRIDAY | The seemingly endless “Avengers” franchise marches on with a second “Captain America” film. In this new installment, our hero, played by Chris Evans, right, struggles to adjust to modern life and faces a new threat from the mysterious Winter Soldier. Scarlett Johansson reprises her role as Cap’s fellow Avenger, the Black Widow.

JO HALE (GETTY IMAGES)

sound. Songs like “Crime” and “The Bend” hint at darker themes of loss and anxiety beneath the sunshiny beat. Still, you’ll tap your feet through Real Estate’s show on Wednesday.

FRIDAY

Cher On last year’s “Closer to the Truth,” Cher builds the dancepop sound that revitalized her career. Her live show, which comes to the Verizon Center on Friday, is known for lavish sets, piles of glitter and more costume changes than a Broadway musical. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW; Fri., 8 p.m., $28-$159; 202-628-3200, verizoncenter.com. (Gallery Place)

FRIDAY

Uncalled 4 Band The D.C. go-go group Uncalled 4 Band may have called it quits in 2011, but they didn’t exactly split up. UCB had started as a group of talented teenage musicians in 1996, and stuck together as the international touring band for fellow area go-go artist Wale. The band will reunite for one night only at the Howard Theatre on Friday. Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW; Fri., 11:59 p.m., $30$100; 202-803-2899, thehowardtheatre .com. (Shaw-Howard U)

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cover story

A Staff Evaluation Last season, the Nationals had an above-average pitching staff. Stephen Strasburg finished 13th in the majors with a 3.00 ERA. Jordan Zimmermann played in his first All-Star game. And Gio Gonzalez had a sub-3.40 ERA for a fourth straight season. Not a bad year for the team’s top three starters. But wait until this season. Here are four reasons the Nationals will have the best starting rotation in baseball in 2014. JEFFREY TOMIK (E XPRESS)

Big upgrade

It’s time to let Stephen Strasburg loose. The Nationals have been understandably cautious since their ace had Tommy John surgery in 2010. He came back to pitch five games at the end of 2011, then had an innings limit and was shut down early in 2012. Last season, three years after his surgery, Strasburg pitched into the ninth inning just twice. Out of the top 30 pitchers in ERA last season, the Nats right-hander averaged the fourth-fewest pitches per start (95.0). He finished the 2013 season 8-9 with a 3.00 ERA, 191 strikeouts and 1.05 WHIP — pretty much top-of-therotation stats aside from his record. If Strasburg is able to stay healthy — he had a short stint on the disabled list last year for a strained muscle in his back — he should be in the Cy Young race. There’s no reason why the 25-year-old shouldn’t reach 200 innings for the first time in his career this year.

Arms Race Here are four teams whose pitching staffs could rival the Nationals’ dominant starting rotation this season:

STRASBURG AND FISTER: JOHN MCDONNELL (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Dodgers: With Cy Young winners Clayton Kershaw and Zack Greinke leading this staff, the Dodgers have the best one-two punch in baseball. But they lack depth. Good luck with Dan Haren as your No. 4 starter.

Jordan Zimmermann

ALEX BRANDON (AP)

JONATHAN NEWTON ( THE WASHINGONT POST)

Strasburg unleashed

The Nationals’ No. 4 starter in 2013 was Dan Haren, who went 10-14 with a 4.67 ERA. This season’s No. 4 starter will be Doug Fister, below, who was 14-9 with a 3.67 ERA for the Tigers last season. If Fister — with that 3.67 ERA — had pitched Haren’s 169 2 ⁄ 3 innings in 2013, the Nationals would have allowed nearly 20 fewer runs and ranked third instead of seventh in the majors in starters’ ERA. Fister is also moving from the AL to the NL, where he won’t have to face a designated hitter on a daily basis. Lots of pitchers see significant improvement when changing leagues. For example, Gio Gonzalez’s ERA went from 3.12 in his last season with the A’s in 2011 to 2.89 in his first season with Washington in 2012. If Fister, who has pitched in the AL in all five of his MLB seasons, has even a slight improvement on his 3.53 career ERA, there won’t be a better No. 4 starter in the majors in 2014.

Gio Gonzalez

Prime time The top four pitchers in the Nationals’ rotation will be from 25 to 30 years old and have four to six years of experience. Washington has a group of starters who are right in the prime of their careers. Since 2003, only four out of 22 Cy Young winners were older than 30; two have since been linked to performance-enhancing drugs (Roger Clemens and Bartolo Colon), one was out-of-nowhere knuckleballer R.A. Dickey and the last was Roy Halladay. Pitchers peak in their late 20s or early 30s — which could mean a career-best year for Stephen Strasburg, 25, Gio Gonzalez, 28, Jordan Zimmermann, 27, and Doug Fister, 30.

Defense has their back The Nationals’ defense didn’t exactly help the pitchers last season. Washington had the seventh-most errors (107) in the majors. Infielders Ian Desmond, Ryan Zimmerman and Adam LaRoche each ranked in the bottom three in their position in errors. Zimmerman, who may see some time at first this year, seemed to fix his throwing problems toward the end of the 2013 season. LaRoche was a Gold Glove first baseman in 2012. And Desmond has shown flashes of being a top-tier defensive shortstop. At one point, he had 59 straight games without an error last year. The Nationals are not a bad defensive team, but they had a really bad defensive year in 2013. A sound defense would only help this powerhouse rotation.

Braves: A promising young rotation had an injury-filled spring that required Atlanta to sign Ervin Santana to a one-year deal in mid-March. Kris Medlen had season-ending Tommy John surgery earlier this month.

Tigers: Max Scherzer won the AL Cy Young last year and he’s Detroit’s No. 2 starter. The Tigers’ depth is comparable to the Nats’, with Justin Verlander, Scherzer, Anibal Sanchez, Drew Smyly and Rick Porcello.

Cardinals: Adam Wainwright is the veteran ace on a staff of talented arms. But they’re inexperienced. How will 22-year-old Michael Wacha fare in his first full big league season? And how will 23-year-old Shelby Miller follow up his stellar rookie year?

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activities getting private property owners’ permission to clean. Site leaders distribute gloves and bags, and make sure bagged debris gets to landfills and recycling centers at the day’s end. One of those coordinators, Jim Heins, 80, helps organize around 200 volunteers each year along the 185-mile C & O Canal National Park. Heins says much of the trash comes from upstream — as far away as Pennsylvania — as

Last year, organizers distributed bags and gloves at 633 cleanup sites.

“What’s great about a cleanup is that you see a tangible result — you see progress.” — A LEN A ROSEN, WHO COORDINATES ALICE FERGUSON FOUNDATION PHOTOS

THE ALICE FERGUSON FOUNDATION’S

A Potomac Pick-Me-Up Thousands of volunteers clean up the banks of the Potomac each spring Environmentalism Even the Potomac could use a little spring cleaning. Each year, March rains wash litter from city streets into storm drains and from there into streams, so debris eventually winds up along the Potomac river’s shores. The problem is compounded by litterbugs who drop trash near the river. To combat the mess, each year during the first weekend of April, thousands of volunteers take part in the annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup (potomaccleanup .org), a gargantuan trash pick-up along the banks of the river and its tributaries.

The cleanup, the largest regional event of its kind, spans Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and the District. It’s spearheaded by the Alice Ferguson Foundation (fergusonfoundation.org), an Accokeek, Md.-based nonprofit dedicated to keeping the Potomac clean. This year’s all-volunteer trash collection takes place Saturday. Last year, nearly 15,000 gloved volunteers at 633 sites along the river plucked rogue bottles and snack food wrappers from muddy banks. Organizers say the haul yielded 312 tons of trash and debris, including 193,800 beverage containers, 27,400 cigarettes, 27,200 plastic bags, and 1,314 tires — not to mention shopping carts, golf balls, car batteries, mattresses and the occasional appliance. The tradition kicked off in 1989 with a small cleanup at a single site, the foundation’s Hard Bar-

At last year’s cleanup, volunteers pulled 312 tons of trash from the river.

gain Farm Environmental Center at Piscataway National Park. “Students who had been coming to the farm for nature hikes kept seeing this trash, and asked, ‘What are you going to do about it?’” says Alena Rosen of the Alice

Ferguson Foundation. The cleanup effort snowballed from there. Now, with thousands of volunteers at hundreds of sites, each site has a leader trained in dealing with biohazards — like syringes, razor blades or medical waste — and in

ANNUAL POTOMAC RIVER WATERSHED CLEANUP

well as from litterbug park-goers. “They just pitch it on t he ground,” Heins says, referring to the wrappers, bottles, spent fishing supplies and even neatly tied bags of dog poop that end up around park. Heins has also found some oddities, such as the century-old upright typewriter and the abandoned safe (which a lock-picking friend revealed was empty). His volunteers have discovered strollers, computers, smart phones, parking signs, orange cones, lawn chairs and a river-ravaged bicycle. Volunteers find the process pretty satisfying. “What’s great about a cleanup is that you see a tangible result — you see progress,” Rosen says. And there are important results volunteers can’t see: The onceocean-bound litter they pick up will no longer be likely to harm wildlife or become part of an ocean garbage patch, nor will it pollute the Washington region’s major water supply (which goes through a filtering/treatment process before it reaches our taps). Tangible or not, that’s good progress. CARRIE MADREN (FOR E XPRESS)

Saturday, multiple locations, 301292-5665, potomaccleanup.org.

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shopping Fin Dining FISH OF ALL SHAPES and colors

inspired Italian designer Paola Navone’s latest collection of tableware and furniture for Crate & Barrel (stores and crateandbarrel .com). Swimmingly cool pieces include bright, Nemo-like ceramic chopstick rests (shown, $3), chairs with scale-like, woven backs ($380) and laminated placemats ($9 each) with sardine-ina-can graphics. Use the stuff to serve up — what else? — a nice seafood dinner.

Market Research

P.S. I Love You IN AN ATTEMPT TO completely dominate the interior

LEIGH VOGEL/EDENS

Confection Perfection

Union Market: It’s not just for foodies anymore. April 4 though April 6, the second level of the hip northeast D.C. warehouse welcomes back Thread, a pop-up bazaar selling clothing, accessories and home goods made by indie U.S. artisans (1309 Fifth St. NE; 301-652-7400; unionmarketdc .com/thread). D.C. vendors include Mutiny (rugged men’s clothing and curios), Saint Clair (globally inspired jewelry) and Politics & Prose bookstore.

of your house, Ikea just launched the PS 2014 collection of home goods (ikea.com). Designed for apartmentdwellers, young folks and people on-the-move, this year’s PS pieces include a mod-inspired secretary desk ($189), a branch-like coat and hat rack ($35) and a futuristic-looking pendant lamp (shown, $70). The collection — created by budding designers from around the world — launches in stores this week.

“SO, A BAR OF CHOCOLATE and a

bowl of cherries walked into a bar in Rome ...” The end of this romance could be Bodrato’s Boero truffles (12 for $20, Cork Market, 1805 14th St. NW; 202-265-2674). Each oozy, boozy Italian treat contains a cherry that’s soaked for months in grappa before being dipped in sugar and dark chocolate. It’s hard to tell whether the rapture we experienced tasting them was mere intoxication or true love.

Grab Bag is written by Jennifer Barger and Holley Simmons.

Clothes To Home YOU PAY A LOT in taxes. Show pride for where you dwell with the wry Home T collection ($28 each, thehomet.com). Made in the U.S. from super-soft cotton, the shirts rep all 50 states (plus D.C.!). A portion of the proceeds goes to multiple sclerosis research, which affects family members of the company’s husbandand-wife founders. Also available: canvas tote bags ($28), shirts for kids ($28) and baby onesies ($28), if you’d like to get the rug rats on the locavore bandwagon early.

Safari Chic, In the Bag STRAIGHT-FROM-THE-SAVANNAH patterns star in Diane von Furstenberg

and Tory Burch’s spring collections. We’re also into tribal fashions actually made in Africa. New “Tamaduni”-patterned bags crafted in Kenya just landed at Amani ya Juu (3166 Mt. Pleasant St NW; 202-536-5303, amaniafrica.org). Styles include a cross-body purse (shown, $24) and drawstring tote ($42).

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home time, place the tip of the caulk gun into one corner, squeeze the trigger and fill in a new line of caulk, moving in the opposite direction than the gun is pointing. Use a damp towel to wipe off any extra caulk. (You might need to repeat this step two or three times.) Keep the area completely dry until the caulk has cured completely. (See caulk tube instructions for timeframe.)

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WHEN TO CALL IN THE PROS: The next time you have to call in a handyman to do some bigger jobs for you, ask if he’d be willing to recaulk your tub at the same time. TRACY KRULIK (FOR EXPRESS)

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if you have any mold or mildew growing, you need to kill it off with a mold/mildew remover spray before applying the new caulk. Cut a 45-degree angle off of the tip of the caulk gun — the farther down the tip, the wider the line of caulk. Working on one side of the tub at a

ve

HOW TO: Using your utility knife or caulkremoving tool, scrape out the old caulk. Be careful not to scratch outside of the caulking area. Sweep or rinse off all dust and debris. (A wet-dry vacuum makes this step very easy.) Inspect the area, and

MORE INFO: While recaulking your tub is simple to do, it does take a bit of muscle to get out all the old caulk. (A perfect winter-weather indoor workout?)

no

WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Something to cut out the old caulk — for example a utility knife or Workforce 3-in-1 Caulk Tool ($4.98 at Home Depot); bath caulk (for example, Red Devil 10 oz. Premium Kitchen and Bath with Stain Block Caulk; $4.98 at Home Depot); a caulk gun (for example, Workforce 60:25 Caulk Gun; $6.47 at Home Depot); a damp towel; a wet/ dry vacuum (optional); a Mold/mildew removing liquid (if needed).

Ha

Over time the seal around your bathtub can crack, allowing moisture to pool inside — creating a perfect environment in which mold and mildew can grow. Don’t make the mistake of applying new caulk over the old, cracked stuff, says handyman Andre Silva (202-292-9194; traylordesignconstruction.com). It won’t hold. To do the job properly you need to clear away the old caulk and start from scratch.

THINKSTOCK

Recaulk A Bathtub

Greenbelt Dog Park

W W W. C H E R R Y W O O D - D E N T A L . C O M

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fun & games SPARKLING SWINE ACROSS 1 “Pulled” barbecue meat 5 Allegro ___ (very fast, in a score) 10 Grassy plain 16 Captain’s record 19 High-pitched wind instrument 20 Breed, as salmon 21 It can follow two hips (var.) 22 Sickly 23 Neat and orderly 24 Palindromic belief 25 Lazy 26 Be in a competition 27 Twist, as a wet cloth 29 Put away, as food

31 Place for an ace, to a cheater 33 On the plane 35 Express complaints 36 Cuts uppers, e.g. 37 “Come on!” 38 WWI soldier 39 Dwarf in the nursery? 40 Put up with 42 Hinders 44 A country’s output, for short 47 Habit wearer 48 Chunk of grass, in golf 50 Sea eagle variety 51 Bangkok citizen 52 Bacchanalian revelry 54 Detect, as danger

56 Guaranteed financial support of 58 Dwells 60 Bagpipers’ wear 62 Buy, as merchandise 63 Signs to heed 64 Represents in drawing 65 Delivered from 66 Catch, as in a net 68 Brainy group 69 Deep purplishreds 72 Coming through the door again 74 Overdo it on stage 76 Eschew 77 Places for props 78 Indian princess

Last Week’s Solution

79 Fire-setter’s crime 81 For some, it can be bruised easily 82 Ordinal suffix 83 Dubious buy 87 One crying uncle? 89 Upscale groups 91 French social philosopher Georges 92 Splendor 93 Bathhouses 95 Fries, once 96 Necks, slangily 98 Show the way 99 Word with “any” or “some” 100 Free-for-all feature 101 Storyline that spans multiple episodes 102 Cream-filled dessert 104 American ostriches 106 Tugboat noise 110 Grande or Plata 111 Fish catchers 112 River of Tours 113 Cyclotron particles 114 “Inception” actor Watanabe 115 African fly 116 Dog park noises 117 With 1-Across, a tasty entree DOWN 1 Where the chips fall?

I N N E XT W E E K’S

Large-scale, outdoor murals aren’t just a city thing. We’ll guide you through the coolest ones in Maryland and Virginia.

2 Kobe sash 3 Fishing pole 4 It helps in a database search 5 Moving about 6 Act the high roller 7 Lifted one’s voice 8 Dumbstruck reaction 9 Temporary period 10 Olympics event 11 Private student 12 “___ go bragh” 13 Amateurs might turn this 14 Bird extinct since 1914 15 Like potatoes without buds 16 Enjoy the lap of luxury 17 Antipasto ingredient 18 States of merriment 28 Spread outward, as blackeyed Susans 30 Suffers bodily woes 32 Pilot’s best guess 33 Alabama’s intrastate rival 34 Support one’s family 35 Grown-up kids 36 1,000 kilograms 37 City north of Hue 38 Sound loudness units 39 Hitchcock classic (with “The”)

41 Acts against potential heirs 43 Monopoly income sources 45 Western defense org. 46 Walkway over water 49 Their patients can’t read 51 Fitting room activities 53 Chinese government offices

55 ___ out a living (making do) 56 Some arm bones 57 Teammate of James and Bosh 59 Part of “BFF” 61 Some online exchanges, for short 64 Bolshevik leader 65 Informers, in slang 66 Irish language

EDITED BY ROB LEE

67 Nair alternative 68 Revealing skirts 69 Tasty mushroom 70 Wood-boring tools 71 Like mountains in winter 73 Throws a hissy fit 75 Constructs 80 Black, in Barcelona

83 Most packed with evergreens 84 Badmouth 85 Do some bartending 86 Medical assistant 88 Credit cards, slangily 90 Boy 93 Daily Planet reporter Kent 94 Eagle’s nest 95 ___ away from (avoids)

96 Pointy 97 Lawyers’ burden 99 Desire 100 Provide with a roof 103 Tell fibs 105 Groundbreaking tool 107 “How impressive!” 108 Lennon’s bride 109 One-sixth of a fl. oz.

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fun & games WUMO | WULFF & MORGENTHALER

by

POOCH CAFE | PAUL GILLIGAN

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE | STEPHAN PASTIS

Sudoku

Time-saving guides to the monuments, museums and more

Insider advice on what to see, what not to see, and what’s family friendly

The best events and exhibits, handpicked by our editors

Street maps with step-by-step walking and Metro directions

DIFFICULT

Last Week’s Solution

Need more Sudoku? Find another puzzle in the weekday Express, the Comics section of The Post every Sunday and in the Style section Monday through Saturday.

How to Reach Us To place a display ad: Call 202-334-6732 or email ads@readexpress.com. Spot a mistake? Email corrections@readexpress.com. The newsroom: Call 202-334-6800, fax 202-3349777 or reach out to us on Twitter @WaPoExpress. Publisher: Arnie Applebaum Executive editor: Dan Caccavaro General manager: Ron Ulrich Circulation manager: Charles Love Managing editor, features: Holly J. Morris Managing editor, news: Lori Kelley Creative director: Jon Benedict

Features editor: Jennifer Barger Senior news editor: Diana D’Abruzzo Story editor: Adam Sapiro Deputy creative director: Adam Griffiths Senior editors: Sadie Dingfelder, Vicky Hallett, Beth Marlowe, Kristen Page-Kirby Art director: Allie Ghaman

Section editors: Michael Cunniff, Rudi Greenberg, Lori McCue, Marissa Payne, Rachel Sadon, Holley Simmons, Jeffrey Tomik Copy editors: Samantha Dean, Sean Gossard Designer: Rachel Orr Production supervisor: Matthew Liddi

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