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VIRGINIA NABS TOP SEED IN NCAA TOURNEY 13 today’s pape r in side

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Monday 03.12.18

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NCAA TOURNAMENT

MYSTERY MEN While Virginia is the top overall seed, coach Tony Bennett and the gritty Cavaliers prefer to fly under the radar 13

Sanctuary state California is united in opposition to Trump’s immigration policies 11

Planes, no tanks

AP

Trump’s military parade will have a flyover, but no big land vehicles 6

THINKSTOCK, WASHINGTON POST AND GETTY IMAGES/EXPRESS ILLUSTRATION

Just short Tiger ties for second, the closest he’s come to winning in 5 years 17

Parkland fallout Schools are struggling to prepare for walkouts over gun deaths 8 am

40 | 32

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2 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

VYACHESLAV OSELEDKO (AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

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Kyrgyz chefs cook noodles with meat in the national Beshbarmak dish Sunday as they attempt a Guinness World Record in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, for the largest such dish. The Beshbarmak weighed 3,228 pounds, organizers said.

Mysterious stranger charms locals, alarms authorities

When a cereal box is old enough to drink, it is too old to eat

A horse in a nightclub, of course, of course that’s against the law

A couple in Lakewood, Colo., say they purchased a 21-year-old box of cereal from a local Walmart, UPI reported Friday. Anthea Carelse took only a couple of bites before noticing something was off with her Quaker granola, but her husband, Josiah, ate an entire bowl — after which the two discovered the box’s expiration date read Feb. 22, 1997. Walmart says it is investigating the incident. (EXPRESS)

Footage of a scantily clad woman riding a white horse has prompted officials to shut down a nightclub in Miami Beach, Fla. A video went viral Thursday night that showed the woman riding the horse inside the club. As the animal moved through the crowded space, it stumbled, and the woman fell off. Police and code enforcement officers began investigating, and by Friday the club’s business license had been revoked. (AP)

Authorities are worried about a hippopotamus that has been roaming loose in a swampy area of southern Mexico. Nobody knows where it came from, but hippos are not native to the country. The hippo appears to have been living in two ponds near Las Chopas, in the state of Veracruz. It was first spotted by local media near a garbage dump in January. Residents have come to love the animal so much they nicknamed it “Tyson.” (AP)

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At 92, she’s still a Girl Scout

Anna Foultz has volunteered with the Girl Scouts for more than 60 years.

service projects, serve as delegates at the national Girl Scout conventions and become mentors to younger scouts. Foultz, a mother of four, became involved in the Girl Scouts in 1955. She and her motherin-law started a troop at an elementary school in Philadelphia so that Foultz’s oldest daughter could be involved, she recalled in a memoir she recently published called “Two Steps Forward.” Foultz dove into her new role, devouring training manuals and

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ANNA FOULTZ, who, at 92 years old, calls herself the “oldest active Girl Scout,” talking about why she stays involved with the organization. Foultz organized a White House tour on Saturday for five troops from the Ocean City, Md., area.

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planning excursions to historic sites, gardens, a television station, the zoo. “We had projects to work on, and I began to feel empowered,” she wrote. Her family moved multiple times, as her husband, an engineer for the Federal Aviation Administration, took on different projects. Every time she started over in a new place, she called the local Girl Scout council and got involved. She said she found guidance in the old Girl Scout song: “Make new friends, but keep the old.” She and her family lived in Northern Virginia in the 1970s, and then 30 years ago, she retired with her husband in Ocean Pines, Md. They became involved with volunteer work — organizing events and raising money for Alzheimer’s disease research, veterans’ groups and, of course, Girl Scouts. Grace Brosch, 15, who took part in Saturday’s tour, said she was excited that Foultz organized the trip, because it was something she had really wanted to do. She has been a scout for eight years and plans to stay involved. “I definitely want to follow in her footsteps,” she said. MICHAEL

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REGION Anna Foultz dressed in green with a glittering white cowboy hat Saturday for an official tour of the White House, showing off badges and pins collected during more than six decades of volunteering with the Girl Scouts. She took along a new generation of Girl Scouts from five troops near Ocean City, Md., who had boarded a bus early in the morning. Foultz, 92, proudly calls herself the “oldest active Girl Scout” in the country. She knows there are centenarians still involved with Scouting. But she does not shy away from a challenge. “You show me one who is more active,” she said. Many Girl Scouts stay active throughout their lives. Nationwide, the Girl Scouts has more than 130,000 “lifetime members,” according to the national organization. The designation is available to anyone 18 or older who is committed to the mission of the organization and pays a fee. Many older volunteers lead

EVELYN HOCKSTEIN (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Anna Foultz organized a White House tour for 5 Maryland troops

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local Funds are contingent on Maryland and D.C. giving similar support TRANSPORTATION The Virginia General Assembly agreed Saturday to give Metro $154 million a year in permanent, new funding, on the condition Maryland and D.C. make somewhat larger contributions to provide the transit agency with up to $500 million more annually. The action marked what appeared to be a historic step in securing for Metro a significant source of dedicated revenue that it has lacked since opening in 1976.

Virginia has long been viewed as a major obstacle to approving such funding, partly because the legislature is controlled by Republicans who have been skeptical of investing in public transit. The new money would be used to revive a transit system beset by aging equipment and longneeded repairs. It remained necessary to resolve differences between the Virginia legislation and a similar bill before the Maryland General Assembly. A key issue is the varying amounts each jurisdiction would pay, based on population and ridership. But the breakthrough in Richmond follows a similar advance in

MARVIN JOSEPH (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Va. lawmakers OK $154M for Metro

Metro has not had a significant source of dedicated funding since the subway opened in 1976.

Annapolis this month. Republican Gov. Larry Hogan endorsed a Metro funding bill passed by the Democratic-dominated House,

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which would give Metro $150 million a year in dedicated funding if Virginia and D.C. each pledged the same amount or more. D.C., the strongest supporter of Metro funding, plans to go along with whatever the two states decide rather than risk blocking a regional agreement, officials said. Virginia’s action drew applause from much of the region, including from Hogan, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and Metro. It also was hailed by business groups, environmentalists, unions and grassroots civic organizations that have been pressing for increased Metro funding. ROBERT McCARTNEY (THE WASHINGTON POST)

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“We need common-sense gun reform. It is time for Rubio to show real leadership and withdraw his D.C. gun bills.” MAYOR MURIEL BOWSER, calling Sen. Marco Rubio’s efforts to repeal D.C.’s gun laws despite his support for certain federal limits after the Parkland, Fla., school shooting “the height of hypocrisy.” Rubio has introduced bills to roll back D.C.’s gun-control laws, which are among the country’s most restrictive.

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THE DISTRICT

Teen convicted in killings of boy, off-duty officer A teen has been convicted in the unrelated shootings of a 15-yearold boy and an off-duty Secret Service officer in D.C. A jury on Friday found Maurice Bellamy, 19, guilty of two counts of firstdegree murder while armed and robbery. He was 17 when he was charged in the killings of Davonte Washington and 30-year-old Arthur Baldwin. Prosecutors said Bellamy shot Washington in March 2016. Bellamy used the same pistol in December 2015 when he and two friends thought Baldwin was a drug dealer and planned to rob him. Bellamy could get life-in-prison terms at sentencing July 20. (AP/TWP) BALTIMORE

First sentence given in police corruption case The first prison sentence has been handed down in the corruption scandal that has roiled Baltimore police. The Baltimore Sun reports that a federal judge Friday sentenced David Kendall Rahim to five years in prison. He pleaded guilty to charges that he was recruited by his cousin, Baltimore police Detective Jemell Rayam, to help carry out a $20,000 robbery. Rayam is one of eight members of the Gun Trace Task Force accused of corruption who have pleaded guilty or were found guilty. He has yet to be sentenced. (AP) REGION

Destructive insects found at D.C. airports The U.S. Customs and Border Patrol says it has intercepted one of the world’s most destructive pests of stored grains, cereals and seeds at two D.C.-area airports this year. An agency release said agriculture specialists at Dulles airport and BWI recently encountered the Khapra beetle, the only insect it takes regulatory action against. The pests were found in rice from Saudi Arabia and cow peas from Nigeria. The food was incinerated. (AP)

No one hurt in gunfire Friday at Bethesda mall


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THE NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM’S 2018 SPACE LECTURES EXPLORE THE MYSTERIES OF THE JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE (JWST)

local

Pentagon details military parade Event in D.C. will take place on Veterans Day and won’t have tanks

Wednesday, March 14

The Earliest Galaxies: Exploring Cosmic Sunrise with Hubble, Spitzer, and JWST Garth Illingworth, University of California, Santa Cruz, and 2018 John N. Bahcall Lecturer This lecture is part of the John N. Bahcall Lecture Series, sponsored by the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Hubble Space Telescope Project/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

EXPLORING SPACE LECTURE SERIES Meet Hubble’s Successor: The James Webb Space Telescope Wednesday, April 18 Is Astronomy Ready for the James Webb Space Telescope? Ken Sembach, Space Telescope Science Institute Wednesday, May 23 The Hubble Space Telescope: Opening Cosmic Doors for JWST Jennifer Wiseman, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

THE DISTRICT It looks like President Trump is getting the military parade he wants in D.C. — though he may get no tanks for the effort. A Pentagon planning memo released Friday says the parade being planned for Nov. 11, Veterans Day, will “include wheeled vehicles only, no tanks — consideration must be given to minimize damage to local infrastructure.” Big, heavy tanks could tear up D.C. streets. But the event will “include a heavy air component at the end of the parade,” meaning lots of airplane flyovers. Older aircraft will be included as available. The memo from the office of Defense Secretary Jim Mattis offers initial planning guidance to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, whose staff will plan the parade along a route from the

White House to the Capitol, and integrate it with the city’s annual veterans’ parade. Northern Command, which oversees U.S. troops in North America, will execute the parade. Trump decided he wanted a military parade in D.C. after he attended France’s Bastille Day celebration in the center of Paris last July. As the invited guest of French President Emmanuel Macron, Trump watched enthusiastically from a viewing stand as the French military showcased its tanks and fighter jets, including many U.S.-made planes, along the famed Champs-Elysees. Trump praised the French display months later when he and Macron met in New York, saying, “We’re going to have to try and top it.” The Pentagon memo did not include a cost estimate for the parade. The White House budget director recently told Congress the cost to taxpayers could be between $10 million and $30 million. DARLENE SUPERVILLE (AP)

A celebration of all things Irish

Wednesday, June 20 The Historical Quest to See to the End of the Universe….Or Its Beginning Robert Smith, University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada Aerojet Rocketdyne and United Launch Alliance.

Lectures begin at 8:00 pm. They will be preceded by a “meet the lecturer” introduction at 7:30. Stargazing in the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory will follow, weather permitting. Lectures are free, but reservations are required. Reserve tickets at s.si.edu/airandspacelectures.

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MATT McCLAIN (THE WASHINGTON POST)

The Exploring Space lectures are made possible by the generous support of

THE DISTRICT | Members of the Boyle School of Irish Dance perform Sunday during D.C.’s Saint Patrick’s Day parade. NBC4’s Pat Collins was the Grand Marshal at the 48th annual parade showcasing D.C.’s Irish culture.

Former Confederate site in Baltimore dedicated to Harriet Tubman


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 7

 

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8 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

nation+world

First national walkout in wake of Fla. shooting is set for Wednesday EDUCATION As schools around the country brace for student walkouts following the deadly shooting in Parkland, Fla., principals and superintendents are scrambling to perform a delicate balancing act: how to let thousands of students exercise their First Amendment rights while not disrupting school and not pulling administrators into the debate over gun control. Some have taken a hard line, promising to suspend students who walk out, while others are using a softer approach, working with students to set up places on campus where they can remember the Parkland victims and express their views about school safety and gun control. Since the Feb. 14 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, demonstrations have sprung up on campuses around the country. But the first large-scale, coordinated national demonstration is planned for Wednesday, when organizers of the Women’s March have called for a 17-minute walkout — one

minute for each of the 17 killed in Florida. National demonstrations are also planned for March 24, with a march on Washington, D.C.; and on April 20, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School massacre in Colorado. For school administrators, figuring out how to allow the demonstrations during school hours has proven challenging. In Needville, Texas, near Houston, Superintendent Curtis Rhodes was castigated on social media after he warned that students who leave class would be suspended for three days, even if they get parental permission. The American Civil Liberties Union has been advising students that because they are required to go to school by law, administrators can discipline them for unexcused absences. But the ACLU also told students that schools can’t punish them more harshly because of the political nature of their demonstrations. In Henrico County, Va., near Richmond, administrators sent an email to parents saying they are not sanctioning Wednesday’s walkout, but feel obligated to manage the event because of its heavy promotion on social media. DENISE LAVOIE (AP)

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‘Pharma Bro’ sentenced to seven years for fraud A federal judge in New York on Friday sentenced Martin Shkreli, the notorious hedge fund manager, to seven years in prison for defrauding his investors of $10 million. Shkreli, 34, who had delivered a tearful speech to U.S. District Judge Kiyo Matsumoto apologizing for his conduct and pleading for leniency, showed no reaction to the sentence. Shkreli, known as the “Pharma Bro,” was convicted in August of defrauding investors in MSMB Capital and MSMB Healthcare. (THE WASHINGTON POST)

NATIONAL SECURITY

Justice Dept. proposes rule to ban bump stocks

JUAN KARITA (AP)

Schools try to prepare for protests

Bolivian protesters carry 120-mile-long flag

BOLIVIA | Protesters stretch a flag representing the Bolivian Navy ensign over more than 120 miles Saturday as part of a demonstration of the country’s demand for an outlet to the sea. Bolivian officials say the mostly blue banner was the world’s biggest — or at least longest — flag. Bolivia lost its only seacoast to Chile in a war from 1879 to 1883. It’s been demanding a sea outlet for generations and has asked the World Court to order Chile to negotiate a settlement in good faith.

NRA GRANTS TO SCHOOLS

The amount the National Rifle Association gave in grants to about 500 U.S. schools from 2010 through 2016, according to an Associated Press analysis. The grants, meant to promote shooting sports, have gone to an array of school programs, including the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, rifle teams and hunting safety courses. While officials in many districts say they have no plans to cut ties with the NRA, school districts in Denver and Florida’s Broward County have recently turned down grants. (AP) Mexico rules out terrorism, says homemade bomb caused ferry explosion that injured 26

The Justice Department on Saturday took another step toward banning bump stocks — which effectively turn semi-automatic weapons into automatic ones — by submitting to the Office of Management and Budget a proposed regulation that would prohibit the sale of the device. If the office OKs the proposed legislation, it would then be available for public comment before a final version is put into place. (TWP) AFGHANISTAN

At least 30 killed in wake of offer for peace talks At least 30 people died in violence around Afghanistan on Friday, including 10 civilian victims of a suicide bombing outside a mosque in Kabul’s Shiite community and 18 Afghan police officers and soldiers killed in scattered fighting in the northern Takhar province, officials said. The violence came 10 days after President Ashraf Ghani offered to hold peace talks with Taliban militants. The group has not publicly responded to Ghani. (TWP)

Conservative Sebastian Pinera, a former Chilean president, returns to presidency


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 9

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nation+world

Calif. center treated vet who killed 3 YOUNTVILLE, CALIF. The Army veteran who killed three women during a siege in California had long dreamed of serving his country in the military, but his skill as a marksman led to dangerous missions in Afghanistan that left him anxious and wary when he came back home, according to people who knew him. Authorities said Albert Wong, 36, who served a year in Afghanistan and returned highly decorated, took the women

JOSH EDELSON (AP)

Shooter had recently been expelled from mental health program

Three women were killed Friday at the Veterans Home of California.

hostage Friday at the Yountville veterans center where he had sought help. He was found dead of a gunshot wound. His victims were identified as The

Pathway Home Executive Director Christine Loeber, 48; clinical director Jennifer Golick, 42; and Jennifer Gonzales Shushereba, 32, a clinical psychologist with

Public Meeting The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) invites you to review the Washington Union Station Expansion project alternatives that will be advanced for further study in the Environmental Impact Statement and to provide feedback. FRA will share information on program elements, including rail, bus, vehicle transportation, pedestrian, and bicycle planning at the meeting. This meeting is also part of concurrent National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 consultation. Visit www.WUSstationexpansion.com for more project information.

PUBLIC MEETING Thursday, March 22, 2018 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Formal presentations (same presentation at both times): 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Washington Union Station’s Presidential Room (Located in the East Hall, in the former B. Smith’s restaurant space) 50 Massachusetts Avenue, NE Washington, DC 20002

Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact the project team at info@WUSstationexpansion.com at least seven days prior to the meeting.

the San Francisco Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System. Golick’s father-in-law, Mike Golick, said in an interview that she had recently expelled Wong from the program. “These brave women were accomplished professionals who dedicated their careers to serving our nation’s veterans, working closely with those in the greatest need of attention after deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan,” The Pathway Home said. Wong served in the Army Reserve before enlisting for active duty in 2010 and being deployed to Afghanistan in 2011, according to military records. MICHAEL BALSAMO AND ELLEN KNICKMEYER (AP)

DAY OF REST

Poland prohibits Sunday shopping A new Polish law banning almost all trade on Sundays has taken effect, with large grocery stores and most other retailers closed for the first time since liberal shopping laws were introduced in the 1990s after communism’s collapse. The new practice, not uncommon in Europe, was proposed by the trade union Solidarity, which says workers deserve Sundays off. The Catholic church, to which more than 90 percent of Poles belong, welcomed the change. (AP)

Critics across party lines rips new Fla. gun law FLORIDA The political and legal fallout from Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s decision on Friday to sign a sweeping gun bill into law following a school massacre was nearly immediate, as the National Rifle Association filed a lawsuit to stop it and politicians in both parties criticized it. The law raises the minimum age to buy rifles from 18 to 21, extends a three-day waiting period for handgun purchases to include long guns, and bans bump stocks, which allow guns to mimic fully automatic fire. “I think when you start getting into some of the blanket restrictions on people’s Second Amendment rights, I think that that is constitutionally vulnerable,” Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., said on Fox News. Democrats were quick to fault Scott and legislators for failing to include a ban on semi-automatic rifles such as the one used in the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum said Florida’s officials “simply have not done enough to stop our gun violence epidemic, and that remains true even with the governor’s signature.” The law also creates a so-called guardian program enabling some teachers and school employees to carry guns. Students criticized the provision, and the Broward County school superintendent already said he doesn’t want to participate in the program. GARY FINEOUT AND KELLI KENNEDY (AP)

Private plane flying from UAE to Turkey crashes in Iran, killing 11


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 11

nation+world

Defiance in California

POLITICS In the nerve center of the Trump resistance, some volunteers staff 24-hour hotlines in case immigration agents strike in the middle of the night. Others flood neighborhoods to film arrests and interview witnesses. Local governments are teaming with donors to hire lawyers for those facing expulsion hearings. California and the Trump administration are engaged in all-out war over immigration enforcement, the president’s signature issue on the campaign trail and in the White House. It is a personal battle in the nation’s most populous and economically powerful state, where 27 percent of the 39 million residents are foreign-born. Attorney General Jeff Sessions last week filed a lawsuit accusing California and its new slate of laws protecting immigrants of violating the Constitution and endangering federal agents. He also compared the actions of state and local officials to “secession” and

DAVID MCNEW (GETTY IMAGES)

Most populous state unites against Trump’s immigration policies

Supporters of the DACA program marched in September in Los Angeles.

a “radical open-borders agenda.” In San Francisco, Mayor Mark Farrell called Sessions a “moron” and has proposed hiring more public defenders. Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg told public radio he would “proudly resist.” Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf, who outraged the White House by warning her city about an impending immigration roundup last month, says she has no regrets. California’s defiance marks a seismic shift for the state. In 1994, nearly 59 percent of voters passed

Proposition 187, a ballot initiative that sought to deny public benefits to those in the state illegally and expel undocumented children from public schools. The measure was ultimately blocked in court. But outrage over its passage, fueled by the state’s rapidly growing Latino population, helped turn a Republican stronghold into a mecca for Democrats. Since then, California has granted undocumented immigrants privileges they can’t get in most other states, such as

driver’s licenses and in-state college tuition. In January, California officially became a sanctuary jurisdiction, restricting state and local governments from cooperating with immigration agents and warning employers that they could be fined if they voluntarily hand over workers’ private information to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Officials say they are not stopping immigration agents from arresting criminals, but ICE says California’s efforts put its workforce in danger, forcing agents to pursue criminals on the streets, often without local police backup. T h e r i si n g te n si o n h a s prompted some to ask whether Oakland and other cities are taking the resistance too far. The Los Angeles Times, which has defended undocumented immigrants in its opinion pages, said the Oakland mayor crossed a line when she tipped off the city about the roundups last month. “Her heart may have been in the right place,” the newspaper wrote in an editorial. “But some of those targeted by ICE agents could very well have been people with violent criminal pasts.” MARIA SACCHETTI (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Trump fiery, freewheeling at rally President Trump told western Pennsylvania voters Saturday that his new tariffs will save the steel industry and urged them to send Republican Rick Saccone to the House so he can keep delivering those kinds of results. Here are some other takeaways from the 75-minute rally. (TWP) Threat to drug dealers

Attack on the media

Meeting with Kim Jong Un

Trump said that allowing prosecutors to seek the death penalty for drug dealers — an idea he said he got from Chinese President Xi Jinping — is “a discussion we have to start thinking about. I don’t know if this country’s ready for it.” It was not the first time he suggested executing drug dealers. Earlier this month, he described it as a way to fight the opioid epidemic.

Trump delivered a profane attack on the news media, calling NBC News host Chuck Todd a “sleeping son of a bitch” and deeming CNN “fake as hell.” Trump also rattled off several falsehoods, such as a claim that 52 percent of women voted for him in the presidential election (it was 52 percent of white women, according to exit polling).

Trump touted his decision to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and boasted that it was something his predecessors couldn’t do. When Trump mentioned Kim’s name, the crowd booed. But Trump responded: “No, it’s very positive. ... No, after the meeting you may do that, but now we have to be very nice because let’s see what happens.”

Officials: Traces of contamination from nerve agent found in Salisbury, England, restaurant and pub

Chemical failure at fertility clinic threatens eggs HEALTH A long-established San Francisco fertility clinic had a liquid nitrogen failure in a storage tank where thousands of eggs and embryos are kept frozen for future use, jeopardizing the tissue that hundreds of women have deposited there in hope of having children. The March 4 incident at Pacific Fertility Clinic, acknowledged on Sunday by the facility’s president, is the second such admission in a matter of days, coming on the heels of a similar malfunction the same weekend at an unrelated clinic in Cleveland. The pair of incidents, with powerful emotional and financial consequences, come as the number of U.S. women freezing their eggs has soared in recent years as assisted reproductive technology has advanced and become increasingly popular. As at the University Hospitals Fertility Center in Cleveland, doctors at the Pacific Fertility Clinic raced over the weekend to notify hundreds of patients, said Carl Herbert, a physician and the clinic’s president. “There is just not an ability to do this unemotionally. Anger is a big part of the phone call,” he said of his discussions with patients. Herbert said the extent to which the chemical failure damaged the eggs and embryos remains unclear. The clinic’s website says fees for egg freezing are $8,345 for the initial cycle and $6,995 for each subsequent round. AMY GOLDSTEIN (TWP)

Chinese lawmakers abolish presidential term limit; Xi Jinping could rule for life


12 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

nation+world

AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Seven years later, Japan mourns

MIYAGI, JAPAN | Residents fly dove-shaped balloons Sunday to mark the seventh anniversary of the earthquake and tsunami that left 18,500 dead or missing. The magnitude 9.0 offshore quake also caused partial meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Lightning strike kills 16, injures 140 at Rwandan church

FRANCE

NATIONAL SECURITY

SYRIA

National Front severs ties with founder Le Pen

U.S.: No more conditions on N. Korea before Trump visit

Mattis warns Syria on use of chemical weapons

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen on Sunday proposed renaming the far-right National Front party co-founded by her father 46 years ago to National Rally, opening a new era after her resounding defeat in last year’s presidential race to Emmanuel Macron. The new name would have to be approved by party members in a mail vote. In another decisive change, the party severed ties to firebrand founder Jean-Marie Le Pen, 89, by eliminating his title of honorary president-for-life. After her defeat, Marine Le Pen promised a “re-foundation” of the party, but its anti-immigration agenda has remained intact. (AP)

Trump administration officials said Sunday there will be no more conditions imposed on North Korea before a first-ever meeting of the two nation’s leaders beyond the North’s promise not to resume nuclear testing and missile flights or publicly criticize U.S.-South Korean military exercises. The officials’ comments followed the surprise announcement last week that President Trump has agreed to meet the North’s Kim Jong Un by May. Administration officials credited tough economic sanctions imposed by the United Nations, and pushed by the U.S., with helping bring Kim to the brink of negotiations. (AP)

U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis on Sunday warned the Syrian government not to use chemical weapons in its civil war and said the Trump administration has made it clear that it would be “very unwise” to do so. Mattis told reporters traveling with him to the Middle East that he was disturbed by reports of civilian casualties in bombings by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s forces. Mattis also said that Russia, which has intervened militarily in Syria to support the Assad government, could be complicit in the civilian casualties. Russia and the Syrian government have accused rebels of blocking civilians from fleeing. (AP)

Trump looking to add veteran Washington lawyer Emmet T. Flood to legal team to help him deal with Mueller probe

Ready or not, emerging technologies are changing industries, creating new business opportunities, and most importantly, transforming your job—possibly faster than you realize. UVA’s executive-format M.S. in MIT can provide practical, real-world solutions that can accelerate your career and create bottom-line value for your organization. Visit with us and learn more. Thursday, March 15 @ 6:00 PM Info Session: Tysons Corner Thursday, March 22 @ 12:00 PM Webinar: Online Saturday, April 7 @ 8:00 AM Class Visit & Info Session: Tysons Corner

RSVP: www.commerce.virginia.edu/ ms-mit/events

Full-time UVA Faculty | In Northern Virginia & Charlottesville | Next Application Deadline: April 1, 2018


sports

MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 13

CAVALIERS TO WATCH

Thriving in the dark

Kyle Guy Sophomore guard

When Virginia’s offense stalls, it turns to the silky shooter with the quick release. Guy scored a teamhigh 14.1 points per game this season and was MVP of the ACC Tournament.

NCAA TOURNAMENT Most everyone had taken shelter, but Tony Bennett was walking in the rain. In his mind, some things are worse than a downpour. Last month against Virginia Tech, Bennett went to work 87 minutes before tip-off. It was a late arrival for most coaches but early for a Virginia coach who avoids crowds and detests idle time. Bennett’s staff used to find some of his quirks odd, but when you’re the coach of a team that would go on to earn the top overall seed in the NCAA Tournament, it’s all part of the plan. Virginia will face the 16th-seeded Retrievers from University of Maryland, Baltimore County on Thursday in Dayton, Ohio. “Certain things are sacred to me,” Bennett said later. Among those are efficiency, maximizing potential and — in a profession in which success often follows self-promoters — his privacy. Bennett is college basketball’s most public mystery. He avoids the spotlight for himself and his team. He doesn’t see how interviews and TV appearances can help their goals. The Cavaliers (31-2) captured their third ACC regular-season title in five seasons and won the conference tourney Saturday, so maybe he has a point. Even on that rainy day, with ESPN’s “College GameDay” in

town and Hokies coach Buzz Williams seizing any chance for national exposure, Bennett declined to appear on television. He operates no social media accounts, has tended to avoid top50 recruits (and the entitlement that often comes with them) and arrives at the arena as late and as stealthily as possible. Bennett, 48, has crafted a program in this image. He is ruthlessly competitive and driven to prove his name belongs among the game’s great coaches, but he is almost defiantly unwilling to conform to the trends that would seem to make that rise easier. Longtime Virginia assistant Jason Williford said his boss has taught him one prevailing lesson: “It’s OK to be different.” In his younger days, Bennett had been a point guard blessed with average talent but an unholy work ethic. As the son of a famously demanding college coach — Dick Bennett led Wisconsin to the Final Four in 2000 — Bennett teased friends for wanting to attend the high school dance; he had left a window unlocked at the gym to practice alone. In college, he’d find a racquetball court that would allow him in so he could turn off the lights and practice dribbling in the dark. By the time Bennett made it to the NBA with the Charlotte

Coach Tony Bennett led Virginia to its third regular-season ACC title in the past five seasons.

“In this crazy world that we’re in — and we’re in a crazy time — we can be different. It’s OK to be different.” JASON WILLIFORD, an assistant at Virginia, on a program that prizes team defense and humble players.

Hornets, he had decided his future was either as a pastor or a coach. While teammates hit the town, he watched movies and went to bed early. “There’s a lot of things, just like in sports and our society today, that weren’t as interesting to me,” Bennett said. “I felt comfortable, but I also knew who I was.”

Ivy League: Penn to make 24th NCAA tourney appearance after 68-65 win over Harvard in final

He was a worker, not one of the gifted. He was a preparer, not a character. A man, not a celebrity. When he left Washington State, where he had succeeded his dad as coach, to take over at Virginia in 2009, he would rebuild a program in that image. The Cavaliers would run an unglamorous version of the manto-man defense called the “Pack Line.” And they would play slow, minimizing possessions even as successful programs took more shots. “We have to lose before we can win,” Bennett told his confused staff in those early days. And they would not change. Because before anyone else knew who the Cavaliers would be, Bennett knew. They would resemble Tony Bennett himself. KENT BABB (THE WASHINGTON POST)

STEVE HELBER (AP)

Bennett has built No. 1 overall seed Virginia in his image, avoiding attention and prizing blue-collar recruits over blue-chip talent

Devon Hall Senior guard

In his fifth year, the grad student is an established leader who can be trusted in big moments. He’s an 89 percent free throw shooter and — at 6 foot 5 — a pesky defender.

Isaiah Wilkins Senior forward

Virginia’s leading rebounder (6.3 per game) is a scrappy 6-7. Sports-reference.com says he has the nation’s third-best defensive rating, allowing 83.6 points per 100 possessions. (EXPRESS)

Sun Belt: Georgia St. beats Texas Arlington 74-61 in final, earns fourth NCAA bid


14 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 15

ncaatournament

ncaatournament

South

Bracket breakdown: How it will (or won’t) unfold

UPSET ALERT A Texas: Freshman forward Mohamed Bamba, a potential NBA lottery pick, protects the rim for analyst Ken Pomeroy’s 10th-ranked defense with 3.7 blocks per game.

SWEET SIXTEEN SLEEPER

most readers would make their own predictions online, so I’m generously offering you mine to use as inspiration, or to roast me on Twitter (@gabecito). As sports editor, I always aim for objectivity. These picks, however, are influenced by a diploma from an ACC college and a childhood in Big 12 country.

FIRST ROUND

1 UMBC (24-10) 16

FINAL FOUR PICK

5 Kentucky (24-10)

March 15-16

1 Virginia (31-2)

UPSET ALERT D South Dakota State: The Jackrabbits coasted to a Summit League title and played a tough schedule with wins over Iowa and Ole Miss and early losses to Kansas, Wichita State and Colorado. Junior forward Mike Daum (23.8 ppg) is f sixth in the country in scoring. s

SWEET SIXTEEN SLEEPER S E Houston: Coach Kelvin Sampson has ha the Cougars in position for their first fir tournament win in 34 years. Senior guard Rob Gray has poured Se in aat least 30 points in five games this season.

FINAL FIN IN FOUR PICK Carolina: The defending N F North champions aren’t as big as in years cham past, past but the Tar Heels could advance to th their third straight title game by hoarding possessions — they lead the hoar country coun in rebounds per game (42.5). Senior Seni wing Theo Pinson can slash, pass and finish in the paint.

Gary Clark’s free throw delivers Cincinnati AAC title in 56-55 win over Houston

SECOND ROUND

16 LIU Brooklyn

11 St. Bonaventure

16 Radford

11 UCLA

FIRST FOUR March 13-14

16 N.C. Central

11 Ariz. State

16 Texas Southern

11 Syracuse

SECOND ROUND

March 17-18

March 17-18

SWEET 16

SWEET 16

March 22-23

March 22-23

81 Creighton (21-11)

ELITE 8

ELITE 8

91 Kansas St. (22-11)

March 24-25

March 24-25

4 Arizona (27-7)

South

13 Buffalo (26-8)

March 31, San Antonio

LIUB/Radford 16 Virginia Tech (21-11) 8 Alabama (19-15) 9

11 Loyola-Chi. (28-5)

Murray State (26-5) 12 Wichita St. (25-7) 4

East

Regional games in Atlanta

6 Miami (Fla.) (22-9)

Marshall (24-10) 13

Regional games in Boston

G

Florida (20-12) 6 SBU/UCLA 11

B

Texas Tech (24-9) 3

3 Tennessee (25-8) 14 Wright St. (25-9)

Stephen F.A. (28-6) 14

Butler (20-13) 10

2 Cincinnati (30-4)

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

15 Georgia St. (24-10)

April 2, San Antonio

Purdue (28-6) 2 CSU Fullerton (20-11) 15

I

C

Kansas (27-7) 1

1 Xavier (28-5)

Penn (24-8) 16

16 NCC/TSU

National Champion

8 Missouri (20-12)

Seton Hall (21-11) 8 N.C. State (21-11) 9

9 Florida St. (20-11)

Clemson (23-9) 5

D

New Mexico St. (28-5) 12

12 S. Dakota St. (26-8)

Auburn (25-7) 4

4 Gonzaga (30-7)

West

13 UNCG (27-7)

F

Regional games in Los Angeles

6 Houston (26-7)

L

Midwest

Charleston (26-7) 13

Regional games in Omaha, Neb.

TCU (21-11) 6 ASU/Syracuse 11

K

E

3 Michigan (28-7)

J

14 Montana (26-7)

Mich. St. (29-4) 3 Bucknell (25-9) 14

7 Texas A&M (20-12)

Rhode Island (25-7) 7

10 Providence (21-13)

Oklahoma (18-13) 10

2 UNC (25-10) 15 Lipscomb (23-9)

aylen Adams G St. Bonaventure: Jaylen might be this year’s mid-major -major star. The senior averaged 19.8 8 points and 5.4 assists a game and nd led the Bonnies to 12 straight wins ins to end the regular season.

SWEET SIXTEEN SLEEPER LEEPER ER or point H West Virginia: Senior guard Jevon Carter averaged raged 17 points, 6.5 assists and 2.9 .9 steals per game to spark a high-pressure h-pressure attack. The gritty point guard has already been a part of two wo runs to the Sweet 16 for coach Bob Huggins.

FINAL FOUR PICK unson and I Villanova: Jalen Brunson Mikal Bridges won the national ational title as freshmen and were bounced ounced in the first weekend by Wisconsin sconsin last year. On Saturday night,, the guards combined for 56 points to lead the Wildcats to a Big East tournament urnament title. Ken Pomeroy ratess Villanova as the best offense in thee country (127.4 points per 100 possessions). ossessions).

Arkansas (23-11) 7

A

10 Texas (19-14)

11 San Diego St. (22-10)

March 15-16

Villanova (30-4) 1

H

FINAL FOUR

5 Ohio St. (24-8)

FIRST ROUND

W. Virginia (24-10) 5

1 Davidson (21-11) 12

7 Nevada (27-7)

West

UPSET ALERT

Plunking a handwritten bracket on the fridge is still undoubtedly satisfying, at least until your picks start to stink like 7-week-old potato salad. We figured

B Miami: It’s been 12 years since coach Jim Larranaga took George Mason to the Final Four. The ‘Canes won’t go that far this year, but they’re capable of punching above their weight behind freshmen guards Lonnie Walker IV and Chris Lykes. C Arizona: The Wildcats boast two skilled 7-footers. Serbian senior Dusan Ristic shoots 43 percent from 3-point range. Deandre Ayton just dropped 32 points and 18 rebounds in the Pac-12 title game as a freshman. Junior Allonzo Trier (18.4 ppg) is a proven playmaker. With coach Sean Miller tied to recruiting corruption, any success for Arizona may be short-lived, on paper at least.

East

GABE HIATT | EXPRESS

Fill out your own bracket at washingtonpost.com

Kentucky beats Tennessee 77-72 in SEC title game; Vols fans complain on social media about Dick Vitale using Wildcats’ chant on ESPN broadcast

Duke (26-7) 2 Iona (20-13) 15

Big Ten gets four bids, fewest for league since 2008

Midwest UPSET ALERT ch J Bucknell: Led by seniors Zach Thomas, Nana Foulland and Stephen phen Brown, the Bison won 18 of theirr last 19 games, including a dominant ant Patriot League tourney. They beat at Boston University by 31 in the semis mis and Colgate by 29 in the title game. me.

SWEET SIXTEEN SLEEPER R K Syracuse: The last time the committee barely let the Syracuse use in, the Orange made a Final Fourr as a No. 10 seed in 2016. Syracuse has the tallest team in the country, and its 2-3 zone terrorizes opponents. ts.

FINAL FOUR PICK L Duke: Move over, Kentucky — Durham, N.C., is the new home me of one-and-doners. Duke may have five future first-round picks, s, including ACC player of the yearr Marvin Bagley III. And with senior or Grayson Allen, the Blue Devils have ave an experienced point guard who’s o’s already won a title (2015).

Washington Post: NCAA committee snubbed Saint Mary’s (Calif.), Southern Cal


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FOUNDER Flo Stone

STAFF Executive Director Maryanne Culpepper Managing Director Christopher Head Director of Programming Brad Forder Director of Development Jessie Brinkley Special Events Lori Dynan Development Manager Heidi Hermisson Programming Manager Samantha Plakun Festival Coordinator Monica Schorn Digital Media Saaret Yoseph; Jacob Crawford Director of Marketing PR Collaborative Volunteer Managers Jon Gann; Jim Taglauer Festival Interns Bella Fix; Kate Leone; Madeline Burbridge Festival Guide Editor Monica Lee Bellais

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Susan Vitka, Chair Max Williamson, Vice Chair John van D. Lewis, Treasurer Elizabeth Berry, Secretary Ferzina Banaji; Barbara L. Franklin; Caroline Gabel; Jennifer Johnson; Annie Kaempfer; Dan M. Martin; Gregory McGruder; Josie Merck; Liz Norton; Peter O’Brien; Nora Pouillon; Jacob Scherr; E. William Stetson, III; Flo Stone; Catherine Wyler Ex Officio: Maryanne Culpepper Trustees Emerita: Marion Guggenheim; Anita Herrick; Joan D. Murray; Dane A. Nichols

ADVISORY COUNCIL

Chair: Margaret Parsons Wendy Benchley; Katie Carpenter; Harriett Crosby; Sarah Davidson; Alice Day; Lincoln Day; Diana Lady Dougan; Sarah duPont; Anne Emmet; Mark Epstein; Nelse Greenway; Grace Guggenheim; Laurence Hausman; Joseph Krakora; Elizabeth Kucinich; Mary McCracken; Helen McNeill; Sally Meadows; Gouri Mirpuri; Chris Palmer; Gary Rahl; Susan Rappaport; Deborah Rothberg; Edith Schafer; Joan Shorey; Jonathan Steffert; Roger D. Stone; Mary Wallace; Georgiana Warner Cover Photo: Peter Mather Peter Mather, photojournalist from Northern Canada is working on a long form story on North America’s most elusive predator – The Wolverine. He is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers and is represented by National Geographic Creative and Minden Pictures. Cover Design: Taylor Design Collective Frog Illustration: Ben Hillman & Co.

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WELCOME TO THE 26TH ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL! This has been a year of incredible activism. From Amsterdam to Antarctica, Kansas to Kenya, people are marching, making their voices heard, and putting themselves in harm’s way to protect our planet and all that lives upon it. And talented filmmakers are telling their stories, inspiring our timely theme, ‘Stories from the Frontlines.’ Welcome to the 26th Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital! Our lineup of films and speakers is stronger than ever. We kick off with a big opening night film, The Last Animals, which gets us up close with rangers as they wage a dangerous war on poachers who are driving some of the planet’s most iconic animals – rhinos and elephants – to the brink of extinction. The closing night takes us on an investigative journey with elite Special Forces trainer James Wilks as he busts the myth of meat as a staple protein in the human diet in The Game Changers. Be sure to stay for receptions after both events and meet the filmmakers. In between are 120 more films sure to fire your interest and inspire you to get involved. Anote’s Ark documents the journey of Kiribati President Anote Tong to help his countrymen as their homeland is literally snatched away by rising seas. Point of No Return takes wing in a solar-powered plane as two pilots attempt to be the first to circumnavigate the globe. Photographer Neil Rettig tracks down a rare Bird of Prey, the Philippine Eagle – one of only 800 remaining. Most screenings are followed by our signature audience Q&A with the filmmaker and content experts. Our 2018 Environmental Champion Dr. Sylvia Earle, an ocean scientist, explorer, and advocate extraordinaire joins us with a slate of short ocean films from around the world. We’re also featuring a slate of VR (virtual reality) experiences that will take you diving on amazing coral reefs and trekking in the boots of rangers. And we’re adding in lots of encore screenings of our films, including Encore Sunday, March 25th. For the latest updated info, be sure to check our website: dceff.org. Thanks to all our volunteers, sponsors, donors and venue partners. We literally couldn’t do it without you! Join us for the Festival. Guaranteed to get you talking! Maryanne Culpepper, Executive Director

DO YOU HAVE A SPECIAL INTEREST OR CAUSE THAT YOU CARE ABOUT? We’ve got you covered. Here are some incredible films about topics:

TABLE OF CONTENTS Festival Welcome . . . . . . . . . 2

STORIES FROM THE FRONTLINES THE LAST ANIMALS, CHASING THE THUNDER, WATER WARRIORS, RANGER AND LEOPARD, ATOMIC HOMEFRONT OCEANS BLUE, ATLANTIC SALMON: LOST AT SEA, CHASING CORAL BIRDS ALBATROSS, BIRD OF PREY, MARCH OF THE PENGUINS 2: THE NEXT STEP

FOOD WASTED! THE STORY OF FOOD WASTE, EVOLUTION OF ORGANIC, THE CHOCOLATE CASE WILDLIFE PARIS: A WILD STORY, UNTAMED ROMANIA, TATRA MOUNTAINS - LIFE ON THE EDGE CLIMATE CONNECTIONS ANOTE’S ARK, THANK YOU FOR THE RAIN, LITTLE YELLOW BOOTS

Opening & Closing Nights; Awards Screenings . . . . . . . . 3 Feature Films . . . . . . . . . . 4-15 Pocket Guide . . . . . . . . . .11-14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-15 Venue Index . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Feature Films, Con’t . . . . .17-18 Short Film Programs . . . .16-20 Clips & Conversations . . . . . .21

HEROES L’ODYSSÈE, JANE, SILAS, UNFRACTURED

Film Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Donors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Sponsor List . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

This publication was printed on recyclable newsprint paper. Please recycle.

F

FEMALE DIRECTOR

KID FRIENDLY

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FEATURE FILMS

KATE BROOKS

OPENING NIGHT

William W. Warner Beautiful Swimmers Award Established by the Warner/Kaempfer family for the 2015 Festival in memory of William W. Warner, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, “Beautiful Swimmers,” a study of the crabs and watermen of the Chesapeake Bay, this award recognizes a film that reflects a spirit of reverence for the natural world. The award includes a $10,000 cash prize.

OPENING NIGHT RECEPTION

THE LAST ANIMALS (US/UK, 2017, 92 min.) Presented by the Reva and David Logan Foundation The Last Animals follows the conservationists, scientists, and activists battling poachers and criminal networks to save elephants and rhinos from the edge of extinction. Director: Kate Brooks F Thurs, Mar 15, 7 PM $35 DC PREMIERE National Geographic Society Opening Night Reception and Special Presentation

THE PROTECTORS: WALK IN THE RANGER’S SHOES (VR FILM) (USA, 2017, 10 min.) Directors: Kathryn Bigelow F and Imraan Ismail CLOSING NIGHT Winner:

THE GAME CHANGERS Shared Earth Foundation Award for Advocacy Established for the 2014 Festival, this award recognizes a film that inspires advocacy in response to a compelling environmental challenge. The award includes a $10,000 cash prize. (USA, 2018, 88 min.) Executive Produced by James Cameron, The Game Changers tells the story of James Wilks —elite special forces trainer and winner of The Ultimate Fighter —as he travels the world on a quest for the truth behind the world’s most dangerous myth: that meat is necessary for protein, strength and optimal health. Meeting elite athletes, special ops soldiers, visionary scientists, cultural icons, and everyday heroes, what James Wilks discovers permanently changes his relationship with food and his definition of true strength. Director: Louie Psihoyos Sat, Mar 24, 7 PM $35 Q&A Joseph Pace, James Wilks and Louie Psihoyos Carnegie Institution for Science DC PREMIERE

Winning Directors: Anjali Nayar F and Hawa Essuman F

Winner: SILAS

(Canada/Kenya/South Africa, 2017, 80 min.) Liberian activist, Silas Siakor is a tireless crusader, fighting to crush corruption and environmental destruction in the country he loves. Silas is a global tale that warns of the power of politics and celebrates the power of individuals to fight back. One man’s battle gains momentum and emboldens communities to raise their fists and smartphones, seize control of their lands and protect their environment. It is a new generation of resistance. Thurs, Mar 22, 7 PM $10 Q&A Anjali Nayar and Silas Siakor DC PREMIERE National Geographic Society The Polly Krakora Award For Artistry in Film Established in 2010 by Joseph Krakora in memory of his wife Polly Krakora, a member of the DCEFF Advisory Council, the Polly Krakora Award for Artistry in Film recognizes artistic achievement, craftsmanship, and cinematography in an environmental film. The award includes a $5,000 cash prize.

Piet Oudolf is the most influential landscape designer of the last 50 years. The film is a wandering journey, visiting many of his iconic works, including his garden in Holland and the great public works in New York, Chicago, and the UK, as well as far-flung sources of inspiration, from German industrial parks to the thick woods of Pennsylvania and a Texas wildflower explosion. Piet now refers to as his masterpiece, the 7,000 square meters public garden for the art gallery, Hauser & Wirth Somerset. Director: Thomas Piper Guest Speaker: Piet Oudolf Sat, Mar 17, 4:30 PM FREE with reservations Q&A Thomas Piper and Piet Oudof DC PREMIERE National Gallery of Art Eric Moe Award for Best Short on Sustainability Founded in 2013 by Julia and Richard Moe in memory of their son, Eric, to honor his strong interest in film and commitment to sustainability, this award recognizes a short film that best captures efforts to balance the needs of humans and nature. The award includes a $5,000 cash prize.

Winning Director: Michael Premo Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM $10 Q&A Michael Premo National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE Winner: Eric Moe Award for Best Short on Sustainability

WATER WARRIORS (USA, 2017, 22 min.)

Presented with the National Wildlife Federation and National Geographic Society

Winner: Polly Krakora Award for Artistry in Film

FIVE SEASONS: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf (USA, 2017, 75 min.)

Water Warriors is the story of a community’s successful fight against the oil and natural gas industry in New Brunswick, Canada, A multicultural group of unlikely warriors–including members of the Mi’kmaq Elsipogtog First Nation, French-speaking Acadians and white, English-speaking families–set up a series of road blockades, sometimes on fire, preventing exploration. After months of resistance, their efforts not only halted drilling; they elected a new government and won an indefinite moratorium on fracking in the province.

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FEATURE FILMS

FEATURE FILMS

A BEAUTIFUL STAR (Japan, 2017, 127 min.) A Beautiful Star portrays a family on Earth who comes to believe that they are actually from other planets. They try to save the endangered planet Earth, but things get crazy on the way. Director: Dailachi Yoshida Sun, Mar 18, 2 PM FREE No Reservations Required Freer Gallery of Art DC PREMIERE

income and essential to their families having carved out a rare space of respect for themselves by diving in the Pacific Ocean with no aid from air tanks for underwater breathing. Director: Cláudia Varejão F Fri, Mar 16, 6:30 pm FREE No Reservations Required Japan Information & Culture Center DC PREMIERE

state and federal agencies to uncover the truth about the extent of the contamination and are fighting to keep their families safe. Director: Rebecca Cammisa F Sat, Mar 24, 2 PM $10 Q&A Rebecca Cammisa Carnegie Institution for Science

ANOTE’S ARK

(USA, 2018, 45 min.) Backyard Wilderness reveals that nature is much closer than we think. Following the seasons in one backyard, we are transported inside dens and nests and in ponds that uncover the creatures within. We are reminded that Wi-Fi isn’t the only connection that matters and that in ordinary places, we can discover extraordinary things – if we just step outside. Directors: Susan Todd F and Andrew Young Sat, Mar 17, 12 pm Tickets Required; Prices Vary Sneak Peek/Preview Event Smithsonian Air & Space Museum

(Canada, 2018, 77 min.) The Republic of Kiribati will be swallowed by the Pacific Ocean within decades. Anote Tong, Kiribati’s President, races to protect his island home set against the backdrop of international climate negotiations and the fight to recognize climate displacement as an urgent human rights issue. Director: Matthieu Rytz Fri, Mar 16, 7 PM $10 Q&A Anote Tong, President The Republic of Kiribati National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE

BEARTREK (USA, 2016, 86 min.) A conservation story wrapped in an adventure with renowned biologist Chris Morgan on an epic and entertaining journey to find the world’s most elusive and endangered bears. Discover the threats facing them in the wild, and meet the dedicated people racing to save them from extinction, and join the campaign to protect bears and their habitat. Directors: Chris Morgan and Joe Pontecorvo Sun, Mar 18, 2 pm $10 National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE

ALBATROSS (USA, 2017, 98 min.) Albatross is a compelling visual journey into the heart of a gut-wrenching environmental tragedy. On one of the most remote islands on Earth, tens of thousands of albatross chicks lie dead on the ground, their bodies filled with plastic. The film crew witnessed cycles of birth, life, and death of these magnificent creatures as a multi-layered metaphor for our times. Director: Chris Jordan Sat, Mar 24, 4 PM FREE Q&A www.dceff.org for more details National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE

ATLANTIC SALMON – LOST AT SEA (USA/Ireland, 2017, 56 min.) Co-Presentation with Blue Ocean Film Festival Despite conservation efforts worldwide, populations continue to fall for Atlantic Salmon. For the first time, using the latest DNA technology, scientists can track the salmon from the rivers, through the estuaries, and into the vast North Atlantic and back again, in hopes of finding an answer before it is too late. Narrated by Gabriel Byrne. Director: Deirdre Brennan F Mon, Mar 19, 7 PM $10 Q&A www.dceff.org for more details Naval Heritage Center DC PREMIERE

ATOMIC HOMEFRONT AMA-SAN (Portugal, 2016, 112 min.) For more than 2000 years the Ama-San dived in Japan. Bound by sisterhood, women are the primary source of

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BACKYARD WILDERNESS (IMAX)

(USA, 2017, 96 min.) Atomic Homefront reveals St. Louis, Missouri’s past as a uranium-processing center for the atomic bomb and the governmental and corporate negligence that led to the illegal dumping of Manhattan Project radioactive waste throughout North County neighborhoods. The film is a case study of how citizens are confronting

BENDING THE ARC (USA, 2016, 102 min.) Dr. Paul Farmer, Dr. Jim Yong Kim, activist Ophelia Dahl, Todd McCormack, and investor Thomas White began a movement in the 1980s in a rural Haitian village that grew into a global health battle. Together we can change the trajectory of the world, bending the arc of the universe forever. Directors: Kief Davidson and Pedro Kos Sat, Mar 17, 2 pm $10 Naval Heritage Center


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T5

FEATURE FILMS

BIRD OF PREY

CACÚ: UN CAMBIO POR LA VIDA

CHASING THE THUNDER

(USA, 2017, 95 min.) A selection from the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival Fewer than 800 Philippine Eagles exist in the world and found only in the Philippines. Today the future of these iconic raptors, and of an untold number of other species is tied to the fate of the Philippines’ last fragments of oldgrowth forest. Bird of Prey explores the vanishing world of the Great Philippine Eagle to save it from extinction. Director: Eric Liner Sun, Mar 18, 7 pm $10 Q&A Eric Liner, John Bowman and Neil Rettig National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE

(Dominican Republic, 2017, 79 min.) Screening presented with the Global Foundation for Democracy and Development (GFDD) and the Dominican Republic Environmental Film Festival (DREFF) Five fishermen from Manresa, a poor neighborhood to the West of Santo Domingo’s Distrito Marine biologist Omar Shamir Reynoso documented national transitioned from sea turtle nest predators to conservationists of the species over four years. The documentary teaches viewers about the biology of sea turtles that nest in the Dominican Republic, and shows firsthand the poverty and needs of a vulnerable neighborhood in Greater Santo Domingo. Director: Marvin del Cid US PREMIERE

(USA, 2018, 98 min.) Presented by the Reva and David Logan Foundation A thrilling high seas adventure feature documentary where two marine conservation captains from Sea Shepherd go on a hundred day chase of the illegal poacher and pirate fishing vessel, The Thunder. Directors: Mark Benjamin and Marc Levin Fri, Mar 16, 7 pm $10 Q&A Katie Carpenter (producer), Paul Watson (Sea Shepherd, founder), Peter Hammarstedt (Sea Shepherd, Captain) Carnegie Institution for Science DC PREMIERE

Preceded by:

ARISTOLOCHIAS OF HAITI (Dominican Republic, 2018, 10 min.) Screening presented with the Global Foundation for Democracy and Development (GFDD) and the Dominican Republic Environmental Film Festival (DREFF) Eladio Fernandez, Dominican conservation photographer from the iLCP, takes us to Haiti on an expedition to find a new species of Aristolochia (pipe vine) and another that had not been seen for 90 years. Director: Eladio Fernandez Mon, Mar 19, 7 pm $10 E Street Cinema US PREMIERE

BLUE

CHASING CORAL

(Australia, 2017, 75 min.) Co-Presentation with Blue Ocean Film Festival By 2050 there will be more plastic in the sea than fish. Blue is a provocative journey into the ocean realm, witnessing a critical moment in time when the marine world is on a precipice. Director: Karina Holden F Tues, Mar 20, 7 pm $10 Naval Heritage Center DC PREMIERE

(USA, 2017, 93 min.) Co-Presentation with Blue Ocean Film Festival Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. A team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world. Director: Jeff Orlowski Thurs, Mar 22, 7 pm FREE Reservations Required Naval Heritage Center

CITY OF THE SUN (Georgia, 2017, 100 min.) A former Soviet architectural and technological achievement is now a semi-abandoned mining town of Chiatura. It once produced 50% of the world’s manganese employed up to 10,000 workers. Today, with drastically reduced manganese production, dangerous working conditions, and little prospect for any improvement, it is well on its way to becoming a ghost town. Director: Rati Oneli Sat, Mar 17, 2 pm FREE The National Gallery of Art DC PREMIERE

COYOTE: THE MIKE PLANT STORY (USA, 2017, 105 min.) Chronically underfunded and undermanned, sailor Mike Plant’s thirst for adventure and the fearless belief in his dreams drive him to become an American hero of the sea. The film follows Plant’s daring spirit as he challenges both Mother Nature, around the world alone on a sailboat, and French dominance in the sport. Director: Thomas Simmons www.dceff.org for screening details DC PREMIERE

DIRTBAG: THE LEGEND OF FRED BECKEY (USA, 2017, 96 min.)

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T6 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

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FEATURE FILMS personal stories hidden behind the smoke. Fire Chasers is a Netflix Original Documentary produced by Appian Way, Stone Village Television, and Original Productions. Episodes 1 & 2. Episodes 1 & 2. Director: Julian T. Pinder Sun, Mar 18, 2 pm $10 Naval Heritage Center DC PREMIERE

MICHAEL ABLEMAN

Fred Beckey is the legendary American “Dirtbag” mountaineer whose name is spoken in hushed tones around campfires. This rebel climber’s pioneering ascents and lifestyle form an iconic legacy that continues to inspire generations. Director: Dave O’Leske Sun, Mar 18, 2 pm $10 E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

(USA, 2017, 86 min.) A motley crew of back-to-the-landers, spiritual seekers, and farmers’ sons and daughters reject chemical farming and set out to explore organic alternatives. It’s a heartfelt journey of cultural transformation in the way we grow and eat food. Organic is now mainstream – split into an industry-oriented toward sustainable agriculture. Narrated by Frances McDormand. Director: Mark Kitchell Fri, Mar 23, 7 pm FREE Reservations Required American University

(USA, 2017, 75 min.) Winner: Polly Krakora Award for Artistry in Film Piet Oudolf is the most influential landscape designer of the last 50 years. The film is a wandering journey, visiting many of his iconic works, including his garden in Holland, the Highline in New York, and the great public works in Chicago, the UK, as well as far-flung sources of inspiration, from German industrial parks to the thick woods of Pennsylvania and a Texas wildflower explosion Piet now refers to as his masterpiece — the 7,000 square meters public garden for the art gallery Hauser & Wirth Somerset. Director: Thomas Piper Guest Speaker: Piet Oudolf Sat, Mar 17, 4:30 pm FREE with Reservations Q&A Thomas Piper and Piet Oudof National Gallery of Art DC PREMIERE

EXPERIMENTAL CITY

GENERATION ON THE WIND

(USA, 2017, 95 min.) A visionary scientist, alarmed by the growing environmental crisis in 1960s America, designs a domed metropolis with futuristic technology and innovation that eradicates pollution and waste of the modern city. Technological optimism and new environmentalism collide. Director: Chad Fredrichs Sat, Mar 17, 4 pm $10 E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

(USA, 1979 / remastered in 2016, 58 min.) In 1978, as the price of oil soars and domestic reserves plummet, young artists, mechanics, and environmental activists set out to build the largest electrical generating windmill in the world. The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences funded the restoration of this documentary. Director: David Vassar Thurs, Mar 22, 7 PM FREE Reservations Required Q&A – David Vassar The National Archives

EVOLUTION OF ORGANIC

DISPATCHES FROM THE GULF 2 (USA, 2017, 56 min.) Experience remarkable stories from the unprecedented scientific mission to comprehensively study the environmental impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and find new ways to ease the devastation. Dispatches From The Gulf 2 follow-up to the Emmy® Award-winning film Dispatches from the Gulf. Narrated by Matt Damon. Directors: Marilyn Weiner F and Hal Weiner Tues, Mar 20, 7 pm $10 Carnegie Institution for Science WORLD PREMIERE

FIVE SEASONS: THE GARDENS OF PIET OUDOLF

DONKEYOTE (Spain, 2017, 86 min.) Spaniard, Manolo decides to plan one last walk by retracing the Trail of Tears, a brutal forced 2200-mile trek through the Native American Cherokee Nation, with his favorite walking companions, his donkey, Gorrión and his dog, Zafrana. After arriving in America, despite Manolo’s chronic arthritis, a history of heart attacks, and Gorrión’s fear of water. Manolo’s discovers a delicate equilibrium, man, and beast intrepidly braving the harsh landscape together. Director: Chico Pereira www.dceff.org for screening details AFI Silver Theatre

DUSK CHORUS (Italy, 2017, 62 min.) Eco-acoustic composer David Monacchi’s quest to record pure continuous 24-hour 3D soundscapes in the area with the world’s highest biodiversity in Yasunì, Ecuador’s remote primary forests with a unique listening experience of fragments of the disappearing sonic heritage of millions of years of evolution. Directors: Nika Šaravanja F, Alessandro d’ Emilia and David Monacchi Sun, Mar 18, 4 pm $10 E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

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FIRE CHASERS (USA, 2017, 110 min.) Plunge daringly and intimately into the world of wildfires and the global ramifications to the earnest and emotional

GLADESMEN: THE LAST OF THE SAWGRASS COWBOYS (USA, 2017, 86 min.)


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T7

FEATURE FILMS

Feature length documentary about the government’s ban on Florida’s iconic airboats in much of the Everglade largest effort to repair a damaged ecosystem, there is a vast river of grass that has been ravaged by more than a century of development, pollution, and other environmental degradation. Director: David Abel Tues, Mar 20, 7 PM $10 Q&A David Abel E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

VAN LAWICK

the industry’s evangelists. Directors: Sam Wainwright Douglas, Paul Lovelace, and Jessica Wolfson F Sat, Mar 17, 2 PM $10 E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

JANE HUMAN FLOW (Germany, 2017, 145 min.) Over 65 million people around the world have been forced from their homes to escape famine, climate change, and war in the most horrific human displacement since World War II. Human Flow, an epic film journey led by the internationally renowned artist Ai Weiwei, gives powerful visual expression to this massive human migration. The documentary elucidates both the staggering scale of the refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact. Director: Ai Weiwei Sat, Mar 17, 2 PM FREE Reservations Required Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

IN THE HILLS AND HOLLOWS HIGH TIDE IN DORCHESTER (USA, 2017, 57 min.) This documentary aims to foster a conversation about climate change and related impacts of sea level rise and erosion, and leverage that conversation into action. Directors: Tom Horton, Dave Harp and Sandy Cannon-Brown F Thurs, Mar 22, 6:30 PM FREE Reservations Required Q&A Tom Horton and Dave Harp National Museum of Women in the Arts WORLD PREMIERE

HOT GREASE (USA, 2017, 74 min.) Set in Houston, Texas, the energy capital of the world is the surprising story of how kitchen grease is opening a new green energy frontier. It is a modern-day gold rush that could yield billions of dollars in profits for

(USA, 2017, 90 min.) Presented by Bank of America Drawing from over 100 hours of never-before-seen footage in the film library at the National Geographic Society, is 50 years of archival footage, which tells the story of Jane Goodall, a woman whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time and revolutionized our understanding of the natural world. Set to a rich orchestral score from legendary composer Philip Glass, the film offers an unprecedented, intimate portrait a trailblazer who defied the odds to become one of the world’s most admired conservationists. Director: Brett Morgen Mon, Mar 19, 7 PM $10 Q&A National Geographic Society

(USA, 2017, 55 min.) Co-presented with the AMERICAN CONSERVATION FILM FESTIVAL (ACFF) Take an intimate look at the lives of several West Virginia residents in the middle a massive natural gas boom and how this industry forever changes their quality and way of life. The film also explores the lives of residents who have left their home and the place they love, as a result of the growth and development of the fracking industry. Director: Keely Kernan F Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM $10 Q&A Keely Kernan Carnegie Institution for Science DC PREMIERE

LAWS OF THE LIZARD

INTO THE AMAZON

(Finland, 2017, 95 min.) A cinematic letter to a future great-grandchild weaves together past, present and future into a beautiful, moving and hopeful documentary film about the power of each of us to make a difference in the world. Director: John Webster Tues, Mar 20, 7 PM FREE Reservations Required Embassy of Finland US PREMIERE

(USA, 2018, 100 min.) This is the remarkable journey taken by President Theodore Roosevelt and legendary Brazilian explorer Cândido Rondon into the heart of the South American rainforest to chart an unexplored tributary of the Amazon in 1914. Director: John Maggio www.dceff.org for screening details DC PREMIERE

(USA, 2018, 44 min.) Co-Presentation with the Smithsonian National Museum of National History A thirty-year quest to discover nature’s rulebook and an unassuming creature: a six-inch lizard called an anole that might hold the key to understanding the past, present, and future of life on Earth. Directors: Nathan Dappen and Neil Losin Sat, Mar 24, 3 pm FREE Reservations Required Q&A Smithsonian’s National Zoo WORLD PREMIERE

LITTLE YELLOW BOOTS

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T8 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FEATURE FILMS

L’ODYSSÈE (France, 2017, 122 min.) Co-Presentation with Blue Ocean Film Festival In the summer of 1964, footage of Jacques Cousteau’s attempt to balance his family life, his hunger for adventure among the earth’s oceans, and his desire to bring the magic of undersea life into homes worldwide. Director: Jérôme Salle Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM $10 Naval Heritage Center

LOVE & BANANAS (USA, 2018, 76 min.) Ashley Bell and a team of elephant rescuers, led by world-renowned elephant conversationalist Lek Chailert, embark on a daring 48-hour mission across Thailand to rescue a captive Asian elephant from a trekking camp and set her free. Love & Bananas will hopefully provide a solution to keeping this species alive. Director: Ashley Bell F Fri, Mar 16, 7 pm $10 Naval Heritage Center WORLD PREMIERE

MARCH OF THE PENGUINS 2: THE NEXT STEP (France, 2017, 85 min.) After two months of shooting in unique conditions in Antarctica last winter, Luc Jacquet returns with a new film shot mostly in 4K, with unseen submarine and droneshots. This new story sees a young penguin about to embark on his first journey, following the mysterious call that compels every penguin, when winter falls, to set out for an unknown destination. Director: Luc Jacquet Sat, Mar 17, 7 PM $10 National Geographic Society US PREMIERE

MEGASTRUCTURES: GARDENS BY THE BAY (Netherlands, 2011, 50 min.) Gardens by the Bay is an ambitious project set to transform Singapore into one of the greenest cities on earth. A flat piece of reclaimed land was transformed into Singapore’s largest park, challenging not only the designers, but also engineers who must create a raft of new green technologies. Produced by Singapore-based Beach House Pictures for National Geographic Society. Director: Donovan Chan Tues, Mar 20, 7 PM FREE Reservations Required Embassy of Singapore

MIND OF A GIANT MAKALA (France, 2017, 97 min.) A young man from a village in the Congo hopes to offer his family a better future. His only resources are his two hands, the surrounding bush, and an iron will. When he sets out on an exhausting, perilous journey to sell the fruit of his labor, he discovers the true value of his efforts

8 TICKETS & DAILY UPDATES AT DCEFF.ORG

be considered one of the most clever and complex creatures on the planet. They have self-awareness, can co-operate and pass on information, and adapt to solve problems in ways we never knew. Directors: Emre Izat and Geoff Luck Sun, Mar 18, 3 PM FREE Reservations Required Q&A Smithsonian’s National Zoo

VINCENT MUNIER

and the price of his dreams. Director: Emmanuel Gras Fri, Mar 16, 7 pm FREE Reservations Required Embassy of France DC PREMIERE

(Netherlands, 2016, 50 min.) Co-Presentation with the Smithsonian National Museum of National History Revolutionary new research reveals what it is like to be an elephant. As scientists struggle to count Africa’s elephants, they discover intriguing new behavior. In order to survive their current crisis, the elephants are learning. We are discovering that elephants must

MOUNTAIN (Australia, 2017, 74 min.) From Antarctica to Hawaii a cinematic and musical collaboration between acclaimed director Jennifer Peedom (Sherpa) and the Australian Chamber Orchestra (ACO), one of the greatest chamber orchestras in the world. Mountain looks at the troubled and triumphant history of our timeless fascination with mountains a juxtaposition of image and music to explore the powerful force that mountains hold over the imagination of so many. Director: Jennifer Peedom F Sat, Mar 17, 4 PM $10 National Geographic Society Preceded by:

THE LAST HONEY HUNTER (USA, 2017, 36 min.) One man from the Kulung culture harvests psychotropic honey that is guarded by capricious spirits and the world’s largest honeybees. Director: Ben Knight

NO MAN’S LAND (USA, 2017. 80 min.) On January 2, 2016, armed protestors led by the militant Ammon Bundy occupied the headquarters Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Southeastern Oregon to challenge the US Government’s right to manage public land. The FBI and the Oregon State Police took Bundy into custody on January 26, 2016, the standoff continued for another two weeks as a small group continued. No Man’s Land is story of those on the inside of this militia movement, attempting to uncover what


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T9

FEATURE FILMS Baltimore; it’s always been a people problem. Director: Theo Anthony Sun, Mar 18, 2 PM FREE Hirshhorn Museum DC PREMIERE

draws some Americans to the edge of revolution. Director: David Garrett Byars Fri, Mar 16, 7 PM $10 Q&A David Byars E Street Cinema

RODENTS OF UNUSUAL SIZE

PARIS: A WILD STORY

their team’s spirits. A remarkable psychological drama unfolds, as they face gut-wrenching decisions and grapple with fear, conflict, and the unknown. Directors: Noel Dockstader and Quinn Kanaly F Fri, Mar 23, 7 PM $10 Q&A Noel Dockstader and Quinn Kanaly National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE

(France, 2016, 90 min.) Paris: A Wild Story relates the astonishing destinies of creatures that stroll through town in search of food, love and adventures while humans sleep, travel, and work in Paris. Paris is known throughout the world for the beauty of its architecture and the wealth of its heritage, and there are 500,000 trees and 2,900 wild species of fauna and flora that inhabit Paris. Nature overflows with the fascinating and moving stories of wild species that dwell amongst Paris. Director: Frédéric Fougea Tues, Mar 20, 7 PM FREE Reservations Required Embassy of France DC PREMIERE

PLANET POWER (France, 2018, 40 min.) This is a story of pioneers, scientists and inventors, one that began 200 years ago, driven by innovation. Electricity is also the energy of our future as long as it is produced in a cleaner and more sustainable way. Thanks to clean technologies, the greatest forces of nature can help make our planet cooler and our future better. Directors: Pascal Vuong and Ronan Chapalain Fri, Mar 23, 12 PM FREE Reservations Required National Museum of American History

POINT OF NO RETURN (USA, 2017, 95 min.) Presented by the Reva and David Logan Foundation Two Swiss pilots journey as they make an historic attempt to circumnavigate the globe in an airplane fueled exclusively by sunlight to prove the potential of clean technology and inspire hearts and minds. Technical failures, unplanned landings, and stormy weather put the entire mission in jeopardy and drain

(USA, 2017, 71 min.) After decades of hurricanes and oil spills, Louisiana fisherman Thomas Gonzales faces a new threat – hordes of monstrous twenty-pound swamp rats know as nutria. These invasive South American rodents have unusual orange teeth and a voracious appetite; they eat up the coastal wetlands that protect the Delacroix Island from hurricanes. Thomas and a pack of lively bounty hunters are hell-bent on saving Louisiana before it dissolves beneath their feet. Directors: Quinn Costello, Chris Metzler and Jeff Springer Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM $10 Q&A Chris Metzler and Jeff Springer E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

SILAS

RANGER AND LEOPARD (Iran, 2017, 53 min.) A selection from the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival Halvani’, a dedicated ranger, hears about the presence of a Persian Leopard in an area under his protection in Isfahan, Iran. Nobody has spotted any Persian Leopard there for about forty years, Halvani’ suspects that there are traces of Persian Leopard and is on a quest to find them. Directors: Fathollah Amiri and Nima Asgari Sun, Mar 18, 4 PM $10 National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE

RAT FILM (USA, 2016, 82 min.) Across walls, fences, and alleys, rats not only expose our boundaries of separation, but also make homes in them. Rat Film is a feature-length documentary that uses the rat, as well as the humans that love them, live with them, and kill them to explore the history of Baltimore. There’s never been a rat problem in

(Canada/Kenya/South Africa, 2017, 80 min.) Winner: William W. Warner Beautiful Swimmers Award Liberian activist, Silas Siakor is a tireless crusader, fighting to crush corruption and environmental destruction in the country he loves. Silas is a global tale that warns of the power of politics and celebrates the power of individuals to fight back. One man’s battle gains momentum and emboldens communities to raise their fists and smartphones, seize control of their lands and protect their environment. It is a new generation of resistance. Directors: Hawa EssumanF and Anjali Nayar F Thurs, Mar 22, 7 PM $10 Q&A Anjali Nayar F and Silas Siakor National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE

TATRA MOUNTAINS–LIFE ON THE EDGE (Slovakia, 2018, 51 min.) Co-Presented in partnership with EKOTOP Film Festival and with the support of the Trust for Mutual Understanding. The Tatra Mountains loom far above the clouds – the smallest high mountain range on earth. Some species have thrived here since the ice age: chamois are well equipped for the harsh climate. Marmots, meanwhile, spend more than half the year asleep. Red deer and bears repopulated the region after the end of the ice age. Since then, they’ve tried to master the various challenges of this mountainous world. Director: Erik Baláž Sun, Mar 18, 4 PM $10 Q&A Erik Baláž Carnegie Institution for Science WORLD PREMIERE

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T10 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FEATURE FILMS THE CHOCOLATE CASE

THE GAME CHANGERS

(Netherlands, 2016, 90 min.) The Chocolate Case is the incredible journey of three Dutch journalists, who tried to persuade large corporations to end the use of child labor in the chocolate industry, but when rebuffed, decides to take matters into their own hands by creating the world’s first slave-free chocolate bar Director: Benthe Forrer F Thurs, Mar 22, 6 PM FREE Reservations Required Q&A with Director Benthe Forrer and Special Guest Maurice Dekkers will be at screening. Embassy of the Netherlands DC PREMIERE

(USA, 2018, 88 min.) Winner, Shared Earth Foundation Award for Advocacy Executive Produced by James Cameron, The Game Changers tells the story of James Wilks —elite special forces trainer and winner of The Ultimate Fighter —as he travels the world on a quest for the truth behind the world’s most dangerous myth: that meat is necessary for protein, strength and optimal health. Meeting elite athletes, special ops soldiers, visionary scientists, cultural icons, and everyday heroes, what James Wilks discovers permanently changes his relationship with food and his definition of true strength. Director: Louie Psihoyos Sat, Mar 24, 7 PM $35 Q&A Joseph Pace, James Wilks and Louie Psihoyos Carnegie Institution for Science DC PREMIERE

THANK YOU FOR THE RAIN (Norway, 2017, 90 min.) Over the last five years Kisilu, a smallholder farmer in Kenya has filmed the life of his family, village and the impact of climate change by floods, droughts and storms, but also the more human costs - his kids are sent home from school when he can’t pay the fees. Men are moving to towns in search for jobs, and family tensions rise. Kisilu takes this message of hope to the UN Climate Talks, in Paris, COP21. Director: Julia Dahr F Thurs, Mar 22, 7 PM $10 E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

THE COLORADO (USA, 2016, 90 min.) Co-Presentation with The Kennedy Center For five million years the Colorado River has carved some of the most majestic landscapes on the planet. It has also become the lifeline of a vast portion of North America, providing the water that sustains nearly forty million people, half a dozen major cities, and an immense agricultural empire. The Colorado journeys through the prehistoric settlement of the region, the period of European exploration, the dam-building era, modern industrial agriculture and immigration, and the impacts of climate change. Director: Murat Eyuboglu Sun, Mar 18, 7:30 PM $29 Q&A The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Preceded By

IILLEGAL ACTIVISTS-THE BATTLE FOR NORWAY’S FJORDS (Norway, 2017, 11 min.) Eighty youths chained themselves to mining drills to save a Norwegian fjord, in what became most prominent civil disobedience action in Norway in 30 years. The film tells an intimate and personal story about a political battle, and why young people decide to break the law for a fjord that’s hundreds of miles away from their home. Directors: Julia Dahr F and Julie Lunde Lillesæter F Thurs, Mar 22, 7 PM E Street Cinema US PREMIERE

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THE FARTHEST (USA, 2016, 122 min.) Presented by the National Academy of Sciences and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. NASA’s epic Voyager mission, launched in 1977, revolutionized our understanding of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and their dazzling moons and rings. In 2012, Voyager 1 left our solar system and ushered humanity into the interstellar age. Director: Emer Reynolds F Fri, Mar 23, 8 PM $10 Q&A National Academy of Sciences

EIDOLON FILMS

THANK YOU FOR THE RAIN (Norway, 2017, 90 min.) Co-presented by the New African Film Festival Over the last five years Kisilu, a smallholder farmer in Kenya has filmed the life of his family, village and the impact of climate change by floods, droughts and storms, but also the more human costs - his kids are sent home from school when he can’t pay the fees. Men are moving to towns in search for jobs, and family tensions rise. Kisilu takes this message of hope to the UN Climate Talks, in Paris, COP21. Director: Julia Dahr F Sun, Mar 18, 2 PM $13 AFI Silver Theatre DC PREMIERE

THE GUARDIANS (USA, 2017, 70 min.) The Guardians poetically interweaves the lives of the threatened monarch butterfly with an indigenous community fighting to restore the forest they nearly destroyed. Migrating 3,000 miles to hibernate in towering Oyamels, the monarch population faces collapse, hitting a record low of 33 million, down from 1 billion just twenty-years ago. Shot over three years, this cinematic journey through the monarch butterfly dense mountaintops of Michoacan tells an intimate story of a unique community on the front lines of conservation. Directors: Ben Crosbie and Tessa Moran F Sun, Mar 18, 7 PM $10 Q&A Ben Crosbie and Tessa Moran E Street Cinema WORLD PREMIERE

THE LAST ANIMALS (US/UK, 2017, 92 min.) Presented by the Reva and David Logan Foundation. The Last Animals follows the conservationists, scientists, and activists battling poachers and criminal networks to save elephants and rhinos from the edge of extinction. Director: Kate Brooks F Thurs, Mar 15, 7 PM $35 Q&A Kate Brooks National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T11

POCKET GUIDE

SCHEDULE | VENUES | TRANSPORTATION

ANOTE’S ARK, Kiribati’s President, races to protect his island home against the backdrop of international climate negotiations and the fight to recognize climate displacement as an urgent human rights issue.

JANE drawing from over 100 hours of never-before-

PARIS: A WILD STORY, witness the astonishing

seen footage, Jane tells the story of Jane Goodall, a woman whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time.

destinies of creatures that stroll through town in search of food, love, and adventures while humans sleep, travel, and work in Paris.

CHASING THE THUNDER a thrilling high seas

L’ODYSSÈE set in the summer of 1964, Jacques

THE GUARDIANS poetically interweaves the lives of

adventure documentary where two marine conservation captains from Sea Shepherd go on a hundred day chase of the illegal poacher and pirate fishing vessel.

Cousteau attempts to balance his family life, his hunger for adventure among the earth’s oceans, and his desire to bring the magic of undersea life into homes worldwide.

the threatened monarch butterfly with an indigenous community fighting to restore the forest they nearly destroyed.

HIGH TIDE IN DORCHESTER a documentary that

MARCH OF THE PENGUINS 2: THE NEXT STEP,

aims to foster a conversation about climate change and related impacts of sea level rise and erosion then leverage that conversation into action.

the sequel to March of the Penguins, Luc Jacquet returns with a new film shot mostly in 4K, with unseen submarine and droneshots.

UNTAMED ROMANIA, a feature-length film celebrates Romania’s astounding natural beauty and sheer diversity of wild animals.

TICKETS & DAILY UPDATES AT DCEFF.ORG 11


T12 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FEATURE FILMS

CALENDAR

FRI, MARCH 16

THURS, MARCH 15

Ama-San 6:30 PM AMA-SAN Japan Information Cultural Center

The Last Animals 7 PM OPENING NIGHT: THE LAST ANIMALS National Geographic Society Preceded by THE PROTECTORS: WALK IN THE RANGER’S SHOES Carnegie Institution for Science

No Man’s Land 7 PM ANOTE’S ARK National Geographic Society 7 PM CHASING THE THUNDER Carnegie Institution for Science 7 PM LOVE & BANANAS Naval Heritage Center 7 PM NO MAN’S LAND E Street Cinema 7 PM MAKALA Embassy of France

9:30 PM SHORTS PROGRAM 1 COLORS OF CHANGE; FISH STORY; MAMMOTH; SNAILS E Street Cinema

12 TICKETS & DAILY UPDATES AT DCEFF.ORG

SAT. MARCH 17 11AM – 7PM VR SHORT FILMS: CHASING CORAL: THE VR EXPERIENCE (VR); THE PROTECTORS: WALK IN THE RANGER’S SHOES (VR) Carnegie Institution for Science 12 PM BACKYARD WILDERNESS (IMAX) (Sneak Peek/Preview Event) Smithsonian Air & Space Museum 12 PM SHORTS PROGRAM 2 BOY-ZSHAN BI-DEN (BUFFALO RETURN); CANIS LUPUS COLORADO; LIONS OF WEST TEXAS; TEXAS LIVING WATER; LECHE Y MIEL E Street Cinema 12:30 PM MOTHER TONGUE FILM FESTIVAL SHORTS IDENTIDAD/IDENTITY; SHAASH JAA/BEARS EARS; THEN, NOW, AND FOREVER: ZUNI IN THE GRAND CANYON; WE PRAYED IN WATER Museum of the American Indian

SUN. MARCH 18 12 PM SHORTS PROGRAM 4 LA CUMBRE; RETURN FROM DESOLATION; A STEELHEAD QUEST: PORTRAIT OF A RIVERED LIFE; THE MIRNAVATOR E Street Cinema

Lions of West Texas

2 PM CITY OF THE SUN The National Gallery of Art 2 PM HOT GREASE E Street Cinema 2 PM Sky Migrations HUMAN FLOW Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden 2 PM SHORTS PROGRAM 3 CAMERA TRAP; SKY MIGRATIONS; THE SALMON FOREST; WILDLIFE & THE WALL Carnegie Institution for Science 2 PM BENDING THE ARC Naval Heritage Center 4 PM EXPERIMENTAL CITY E Street Cinema 4 PM THE LAST HONEY HUNTER; MOUNTAIN National Geographic Society 4 PM EARTH OPTIMISM SHORTS: SOIL CARBON COWBOYS with Director Peter Byck Carnegie Institution for Science 4:30 PM Winner, Polly Krakora Award for Artistry in Film FIVE SEASONS: THE GARDENS OF PIET OUDOLF National Gallery of Art 7 PM MARCH OF THE PENGUINS 2: THE NEXT STEP National Geographic Society 7 PM THE NEW FIRE E Street Cinema 7 PM WASTED! THE STORY OF FOOD WASTE Carnegie Institution for Science

2 PM A BEAUTIFUL STAR Freer Gallery of Art 2 PM BEARTREK National Geographic Society 2 PM DIRTBAG: THE LEGEND OF FRED BECKEY E Street Cinema 2 PM FIRE CHASERS (Episode 1&2) Naval Heritage Center 2 PM RAT FILM Hirshhorn Museum 2 PM THANK YOU FOR THE RAIN AFI Silver Theatre 2 PM SHORTS PROGRAM 5 YOCHI; HEART OF THE LAND; LA PESCA; PLANTAE Carnegie Institution for Science 3 PM MIND OF A GIANT Smithsonian’s National Zoo 4 PM DUSK CHORUS E Street Cinema 4 PM RANGER AND LEOPARD National Geographic Society 4 PM TMU/EKOPTOP PROGRAM TATRA MOUNTAINS - LIFE ON THE EDGE Carnegie Institution for Science 4 PM THE SACRIFICE The National Gallery of Art 7 PM BIRD OF PREY National Geographic Society 7 PM THE GUARDIANS E Street Cinema 7 PM UNTAMED ROMANIA Carnegie Institution for Science Untamed Romania 7:30 PM THE COLORADO The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T13

FEATURE FILMS MON, MARCH 19

TUES, MARCH 20

12 PM 12 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS ENCORE SCREENINGS E Street Cinema E Street Cinema

Gladesmen: The Last of the Sawgrass Cowboys

7 PM 7 PM BLUE ATLANTIC SALMON: Naval Heritage Center LOST AT SEA 7 PM Naval Heritage Center DISPATCHES FROM THE GULF 2 7 PM Carnegie Institution for Science ARISTOLOCHIAS 7 PM OF HAITI; CACU: UN GLADESMEN: THE LAST OF THE CAMBIO POR LA VIDA SAWGRASS COWBOYS E Street Cinema E Street Cinema 7 PM 7 PM WHAT LIES UPSTREAM LITTLE YELLOW BOOTS THEARC Embassy of Finland 7 PM 7 PM JANE MEGASTRUCTURES: National Geographic GARDENS BY THE BAY Society Embassy of Singapore 7 PM 7 PM PARIS: A WILD STORY (Clips + Conversations) Embassy of France SILENT FOREST 7 PM Carnegie Institution (Clips + Conversation) for Science AN EVENING WITH CHRIS PALMER - THE BEST ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURE FILMS FROM HOLLYWOOD 9:30 PM American University ENCORE SCREENINGS E Street Cinema

Wild Florida: Hidden in Plain Sight 7 PM (Clips + Conversation) WILD FLORIDA: HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT National Geographic Society 7 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS Landmark Theatres Bethesda Row Cinema 9:30 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS E Street Cinema

WED, MARCH 21 12 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS E Street Cinema 12 PM LIVING PROOF: Short Films on the Human Toll of Climate Change by GroundTruth Films: A CLIMATE FOR CONFLICT; BREADWINNER The Wilson Center

THURS, MARCH 22 12 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS E Street Cinema

FRI, MARCH 23

6 PM THE CHOCOLATE CASE Embassy of the Netherlands 6:30 PM HIGH TIDE IN DORCHESTER National Museum of Women in the Arts

2 PM ATOMIC HOMEFRONT Carnegie Institution for Science 7 PM EVOLUTION OF ORGANIC American University

6:30 PM PROTECTING WILD RIVERS Department of the Interior 7 PM IN THE HILLS AND HOLLOW Carnegie Institution for Science 7 PM L’ODYSÈE Naval Heritage Center 7 PM RODENTS OF UNUSUAL SIZE E Street Cinema 7 PM THE RIVER’S BED NYU 7 PM Eric Moe Award for Best Short on Sustainability WATER WARRIORS; THE BOTANIST National Geographic Society 7 PM STUDENT SHORT ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL American University 9:30 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS E Street Cinema

9:30 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS E Street Cinema Coyote: The Mike Plant Story

3 PM LAWS OF THE LIZARD Smithsonian’s National Zoo 4 PM ALBATROSS National Geographic Society 4 PM UNFRACTURED Carnegie Institution for Science

Hightide in Dorchester 7 PM CHASING CORAL Naval Heritage Center 7 PM GENERATION ON THE WIND The National Archives 7 PM Winner, William W. Warner Beautiful Swimmers Award SILAS National Geographic Society 7 PM ILLEGAL ACTIVISTS - THE BATTLE FOR NORWAY’S FJORDS; THANK YOU FOR THE RAIN E Street Cinema 7 PM PULITZER CENTER SHORTS A WIDOW’S TORMENT: CONVERSATION VS. CATTLE IN KENYA; GREEN AT WHAT PRICE? Carnegie Institution for Science 7 PM (Clips + Conversation) OK, I’VE WATCHED THE FILM, NOW WHAT? American University 7 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS Landmark Theatres Bethesda Row Cinema

SAT, MARCH 24 12 PM SHORTS PROGRAM 6: ADAPTATION BANGLADESH: SEA LEVEL RISE; HARBINGER; NOBODY LOVES ME; PERSON OF THE FOREST Carnegie Institution for Science

12 PM PLANET POWER National Museum of American History

SUN MARCH 25 12 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS Carnegie Institution for Science

2 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS Carnegie Institution for Science 2 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS Naval Heritage Center 4 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS Carnegie Institution for Science

Evolution of Organic 7 PM POINT OF NO RETURN National Geographic Society 7 PM SYLVIA EARLE’S OCEAN FILM CHALLENGE Naval Heritage Center 7 PM EARTH OPTIMISM SHORTS: HOPE ON THE HUDSON with Director Jon Bowermaster Carnegie Institution for Science

7 PM Winner, Shared Earth Foundation Award for Advocacy THE GAME CHANGERS Carnegie Institution for Science 7 PM ENCORE SCREENINGS Carnegie Institution for Science

8 PM THE FARTHEST National Academy of Sciences

RESERVATIONS / SEATING POLICY All seats must be reserved in advance, unless otherwise noted, at dceff.org/schedule. You MUST arrive 15 minutes before posted show time to guarantee your seat. Patrons with tickets/reservations will be asked to join the RESERVED line, which is prioritized. Badge holders and Friends of the Festival are added to the front of the line, then general ticket/reservation-holders. All empty seats are released 5 minutes before the posted show time. Patrons without reservations will be asked to join the STANDBY line. Once the Reserved line has entered the theater, remaining seats will be awarded to Patrons in the Standby line.

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T14 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FEATURE FILMS

VENUE & TRANSPORTATION INFO

SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN Fourth St. & Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC Metro: L’Enfant Plaza SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY 1300 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington DC Metro: Smithsonian, L’Enfant Plaza

AFI SILVER THEATRE 8633 Colesville Rd., Silver Spring, Md. Metro: Silver Spring AMERICAN UNIVERSITY Doyle/Forman Theater, School of Communication, Center for Environmental Filmmaking, 201 McKinley Building, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Tenleytown-AU Metro, Shuttle bus service to AU

SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL ARCHIVES 7th St. & Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Archives-Navy Memorial

CARNEGIE INSTITUTION FOR SCIENCE 1530 P St. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Dupont Circle EMBASSY OF THE NETHERLANDS 4200 Linnean Avenue NW, Washington, DC Metro: Van Ness-UDC EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF SINGAPORE 3501 International Place NW, Washington, DC Metro: Van Ness-UDC

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY 1600 M St., NW, Washington, DC Metro: Farragut North SMITHSONIAN FREER GALLERY OF ART Jefferson Drive at 12th St. SW Metro: Smithsonian, L’Enfant Plaza

KENNEDY CENTER 2700 F St. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Foggy Bottom-GWU

EMBASSY OF CANADA 501 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Archives- Navy Memorial, Judiciary Square

LANDMARK THEATRES BETHESDA ROW 7235 Woodmont Ave., Bethesda, MD Metro: Bethesda

EMBASSY OF FINLAND 3301 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Woodley Park-Zoo EMBASSY OF FRANCE 4101 Reservoir Rd. NW, Washington,DC Metrobuses: D1, D2, D3, D5, D6

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY WASHINGTON, DC 1307 L St NW, Washington, DC Metro: McPherson Square TOWN HALL EDUCATION ARTS & RECREATION CAMPUS (THEARC) 1901 Mississippi Ave. SE, Washington, DC Metro: Southern Avenue

LANDMARK THEATRES E STREET CINEMA 555 11th St. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Metro Center, Gallery PlaceChinatown

SMITHSONIAN HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN Independence Ave. & Seventh St. SW, Washington, DC Metro: Smithsonian, L’Enfant Plaza

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART 6th St. and Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Archives-Navy Memorial, Judiciary Square

SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM Independence Ave at 6th St. SW, Washington, DC Metro: Smithsonian, L’Enfant Plaza

14 TICKETS & DAILY UPDATES AT DCEFF.ORG

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS 1250 New York Ave. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Metro Center NAVAL HERITAGE CENTER 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Archives/Navy Memorial

JAPAN INFORMATION AND CULTURE CENTER, EMBASSY OF JAPAN 1150 18th St. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Farragut North, Farragut West DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 18 St NW & C St NW, Washington, DC Metrobus: 80, DC Circulator

SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL ZOO 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, DC Metro: Woodley Park-Zoo

WOODROW WILSON INTERNATIONAL CENTER Sixth Floor Auditorium, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC Metro: Federal Triangle


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T15

FEATURE FILMS to restore peace to the world and finds he must give something in return. Director: Andrei Tarkovsky Sat, Mar 18, 4 PM FREE Reservations Required The National Gallery of Art

UNFRACTURED

THE NEW FIRE (USA, 2017, 84 min.) The good news - there’s a new solution to climate change. The bad news - we may not like it. From MIT to Silicon Valley, young engineers are rebooting a controversial and all but abandoned technology – nuclear power. Director: David Schumacher Sat, Mar 17, 7 PM $10 Q&A with David Schumacher E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

(Canada, 2017, 91 min.) Presented by the Reva and David Logan Foundation. Sandra Steingraber, hailed by Rolling Stone magazine as a “toxic avenger” debates the gas industry, delivers fiery speeches, and marches alongside other protestors, often at great cost to her personal life and family’s well being. In December 2014, New York’s Governor announced a permanent ban on fracking. During this dramatic moment, Sandra tearfully listens to the announcement with other anti-fracking activists and hears government officials repeating her health-based arguments for a ban. Director: Chanda Chevannes F Sat, Mar 24, 4 PM $10 Q&A Chanda Chevannes & Sandra Steingraber Carnegie Institution for Science DC PREMIERE

WHAT LIES UPSTREAM (USA, 2017, 89 min.) In January 2014 West Virginia citizens notice that a mysterious chemical, MCHM, has leaked into the Elk River, poisoning the drinking-water supply for nearly half of West Virginia. Director: Cullen Hoback Mon, Mar 19, 7 PM FREE Reservations Required Town Hall Education Arts & Recreation Campus (THEARC)

MAX MILLIGAN

THE RIVER’S BED (Switzerland, 2017, 88 min.) Co-presented with the Embassy of Switzerland The river Rhône has been straitjacketed for 150 years, the history of a domination of its course by humans. But the river has not yet been tamed! This engaging and poetic film, shot in the company of inhabitants linked to the future of the Rhône, is a journey that prompts universal questioning of our relationship with nature and territory. Director: Mélanie Pitteloud F Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM $10 NYU US PREMIERE

and how it’s directly contributing to climate change. Directors: Anna Chai F and Nari Kye F Sat, Mar 17, 7 PM $10 Q&A www.dceff.org for screening details Carnegie Institution for Science

UNTAMED ROMANIA (UK, 2018, 88 min.) A feature-length film celebrates Romania’s astounding natural beauty and sheer diversity of wild animals. Vast mountains, ancient forests and expansive wetlands provide undisturbed habitats to many of the continent’s iconic creatures. Director: Tom Barton Humphreys Sun, Mar 18, 7 PM $10 Q&A Allison Bean, Managing Director of Off the Fence and Tom Barton Humphreys Carnegie Institution for Science US PREMIERE

WASTED! THE STORY OF FOOD WASTE THE SACRIFICE (Sweden, 1986; remastered 2017, 145 min.) At the dawn of World War III, a man searches for a way

(USA, 2017, 90 min.) Through the eyes of chef-heroes like Anthony Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien. The film exposes the criminality of food waste

WOMAN AND THE GLACIER (Lithuania/Estonia, 2016, 56 min.) The Lithuanian scientist Aušra Revutaite has spent 30 years in the Tian Shan mountain range straddling the borders between Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and the autonomous Chinese region of Xinjiang. Some 3,500 meters above sea level with only her faithful dog and gray cat for company, she studies climate change on the Tuyuksu Glacier at an old Soviet-era research station. Director: Audrius Stonys www.dceff.org for screening details AFI Silver Theater DC PREMIERE

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T16 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FEATURE FILMS

SHORT FILMS

SHORTS PROGRAM 1 Fri, Mar 16, 9:30 PM $10, E Street Cinema

COLORS OF CHANGE (Greenland, 2018, 22 min.) Experience Greenland through the eyes of Artist Zaria Forman, Nasa scientist, John Sonntag and Inuit Elder Angaangaq Angakkorsuaq “Uncle” who speaks for the ice. Director: Jenny Nichols F WORLD PREMIERE

FISH STORY (UK, 2017, 14 min.) A search for the truth behind a fishy tale. Director: Charlie Lyne

MAMMOTH (USA, 2017, 26 min.) In the remote Russian Arctic, an aging scientist and his son try to recreate the Ice Age. Director: Grant Slater DC PREMIERE

SNAILS (Poland, 2015, 30 min.) The snail industry is growing and Polish breeders are exporting their snails not only to France or Italy, they are also conquering China and Japan. Director: Grzegorz Szczepaniak

SHORTS PROGRAM 2 Sat, Mar 17, 12 PM $10, E Street Cinema DC PREMIERE

CANIS LUPIS COLORADO

LIONS OF WEST TEXAS

(USA, 2017, 18 min.) Canis Lupus Colorado is the story of the past, present, and future of Colorado’s now extinct native wolf population. It unfolds through the eyes of Mike Phillips, the world’s foremost expert on wolf restoration, John Emerick, an ecologist and author in Rocky Mountain National Park, photojournalist Morgan Heim, elk hunter David Gann, and lifelong rancher Duke Phillips. Now we’re at a tipping point: the emerging west, the future of our public wild lands, and the health of vast ecosystems are all at stake. Directors: Eric Bendick and Thomas Winston DC PREMIERE

(USA, 2017, 9 min.) Researchers capture a wild mountain lion to put a GPS collar on her in order to study mountain lion prey, home range size, and to get a glimpse into the secretive lives of Texas’ largest apex predator. The data collected only adds to the mystery of how mountain lions continue to persist in West Texas where they can be trapped, shot, and killed without regulation. Director: Ben Masters

LECHE Y MIEL

BOY-ZSHAN BI-DEN (BUFFALO RETURN) (USA, 2017, 9 min.) Thanks to the Shoshone tribe, the National Wildlife Federation, and the coordinated efforts of a host of other individuals and organizations, bison have finally been brought back to the Wind River Indian Reservation and the landscape that they once defined after a 130-year absence. Directors: Colin Ruggiero DC PREMIERE

16 TICKETS & DAILY UPDATES AT DCEFF.ORG

(USA, 2016, 14 min.) Yuma is often thought of as a hot, dry desert town in southwestern Arizona, but for the area residents, and the United States as a whole, it is the land of plenty. During the winter months, nearly all the leafy vegetables Americans eat are grown in the fertile fields, which lie at the literal end of the Colorado River. For the people who work the fields, the Colorado River represents not only the source of their livelihood, but a deep, spiritual connection to this arid landscape as well. Leche y Miel (Milk & Honey) provides a short, beautiful glimpse into the area’s Latino community and their connection to the strained Colorado River. Director: Justin Clifton DC PREMIERE

TEXAS LIVING WATER (USA, 2017, 9 min.) Myron Hess has spent his life in court fighting for the health of Texas Rivers and Bays. What will it take to get the needed Environmental Flows? Director: Ben Masters


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T17

FEATURE FILMS

SHORT FILMS

SHORTS PROGRAM 3

SHORTS PROGRAM 4

SHORTS PROGRAM 5

Sat, Mar 17, 2 PM $10, Carnegie Institution for Science

Sun, Mar 18, 12 PM $10, E Street Cinema

Sun, Mar 18, 2 PM $10, Carnegie Institution for Science

CAMERA TRAP (Canada, 2016, 26 min.) An aspiring wilderness photographer puts every thing on the line in his quest to capture one photo that will help tell the story of the greatest land migration on earth. Director: Marty O’Brien US PREMIERE

A STEELHEAD QUEST: PORTRAIT OF A RIVERED LIFE (USA, 2017, 50 min.) A steelhead advocate and long-time angler, Terry Myers, spent 2015 in search of a wild steelhead on a different river each month of the year. The film explores the experience of a two-year quest by an unassuming, but determined woman as she tries to unlock the mysteries of catching wild steelhead. With her husband Jerry in tow, we see the challenges they face with depleting runs, while still fully enjoying every aspect of being on the river together - rain or shine, fish or no fish. Director: Sarah Menzies F

HEART OF THE LAND (Finland, 2016, 30 min.) A couple runs a small dairy farm in the heart of the Finnish countryside. The work of generations will soon come to its end, as their retirement is approaching and there’s no one left to continue the family tradition – love for the land, the richness of everyday life, and the sadness of letting go. Directors: Kaisa Astikainene F DC PREMIERE

LA CUMBRE

SKY MIGRATIONS (USA, 2017, 15 min.) While it takes a village to raise a child, it takes an entire hemisphere to raise a raptor. A landscape devoid of raptors is without ecological integrity, the barometer of our collective wellbeing. High atop these remote ridgelines above the Great Basin, a region of unforgiving deserts, mountain ranges and sagebrush steppes, is the frontline of raptor conservation. Director: Charles Gifford US PREMIERE

WILDLIFE AND THE WALL (USA, 2017, 5 min.) Wildlife and the Wall showcases the beautiful landscapes of the United States-Mexico border, discusses how a border wall would impact beyond immigration, and provides a look at how a few wildlife species in the area would be affected. Director: Ben Masters

THE SALMON FOREST (USA, 2017, 30 min.) The Salmon Forest explores the connection between wild salmon and the livelihood of the people who live near the Tongass National Forest in Southeastern Alaska. The film celebrates the unique role public lands play in salmon production while reminding us that proper management can support commercial fisheries, subsistence, recreation, and healthy forests. Director: Ben Hamilton Q&A DC PREMIERE

(USA, 2017, 12 min.) La Cumbre unveils the reality of what it means to live as an amputee in the developing world. In partnership with the Range of Motion Project we join world class mountaineer and wounded warrior Chad Jukes on a heartfelt journey to shed light on a public health issue affecting amputees world wide. Director: Dana Romanoff F DC PREMIERE

RETURN FROM DESOLATION

LA PESCA

(USA, 2017, 11 min.) Garrett Eaton, an Afghan war vet, oilman, and river guide who has fought his way back from addiction and certain death through the wild serpentine rivers of the American Southwest. While this is a story of renewal, forgiveness and healing, Return from Desolation is also a bridge between what we think we know and the nuance of what it means to be human in a complex society. Through Garrett’s experience, we see the importance of wild, public landscapes to help us all find our way home. Director: Justin Clifton DC PREMIERE

(Canada/Colombia, 2017, 22 min.) Poetic and sensorial richness, the film captures the gestures of a family of fishermen in Colombia weave nets, cook, and play dominoes, all the while waiting for the fish to come so that they can recommence anew. Director: Pablo Alvarez Mesa US PREMIERE

THE MIRNAVATOR

YOCHI

(USA, 2017, 11 min.) Ultra-runners overcome obstacles on every trail. While competing in her first 50K trail race of the season, Mirna Valerio must overcome the negative voices that don’t believe she belongs in the sport. Director: Sarah Menzies F DC PREMIERE

(USA, 2017, 25 min.) Yochi, a 9-year-old selectively mute Mayan boy, guards a nest of endangered Yellow-Headed Parrots in Belize’s pine savannah. When his beloved older brother, Itza, returns from the city, Yochi learns that he’s in debt and has turned to poaching – setting the brothers on a collision course. Director: Ilana Lapid F DC PREMIERE

PLANTAE (Brazil, 2017, 10 min.) When cutting a big tree deep inside the Amazon jungle, a logger contemplates an unexpected reaction of nature. Director: Guilherme G. Acuna Gehr US PREMIERE

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T18 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FEATURE FILMS

SHORT FILMS

SHORTS PROGRAM 6 Sun, Mar 24, 12 PM $10, Carnegie Institution for Science

EARTH OPTIMISM SHORTS: HOPE ON THE HUDSON

STUDENT SHORT ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM FREE American University

ADAPTATION BANGLADESH: SEA LEVEL RISE (USA, 2017, 12 min.) The “new normal” of global climate change is, generally, a harrowing reality to contemplate. Cultural anthropologist Alizé Carrére helps us see, however, that it does not need to be a reality devoid of hope. In Bangladesh — the most densely populated country in the world and one that will bear a disproportionate share of the impact of global climate change — Carrére shows us the kind of resilience, flexibility and innovation that will be requisite for the survival of our species. Director: Justin DeShields DC PREMIERE

HARBINGER (USA, 2017, 27 min.) Chytrid is an invasive fungus that swept through Central America, wiping out amphibians. Entire species vanished and the world barely noticed. Luckily Edgardo Griffith and Heidi Ross realized how close Panama’s national animal might be to extinction. They breed dozens of species in captivity, and fight tirelessly for rare amphibians. Featuring Elizabeth Kolbert, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, “The Sixth Extinction.” Director: Sam Sheline WORLD PREMIERE

Co-presented with the Smithsonian’s Conservation Common Two short films celebrate efforts to restore the Hudson River and the ship that once plied its waters, followed by a discussion with the filmmaker and Smithsonian expert. Director: Jon Bowermaster Fri, Mar 23, 7 PM $10, Carnegie Institution for Science

RESTORING THE CLEARWATER (USA, 2017, 17 min.) For nearly a year the historic sloop, Clearwater, was out of the water, on land, enduring what wooden boats have historically endured forever: Restoration. Onshore near the Hudson River Maritime Museum on the Rondout Creek in Kingston, swathed in tarps and protective sheets, the nearly 60-year-old wooden boat was carefully mended and updated. Built under the visionary leadership of musician/activist and Hudson River resident Pete Seeger, the Clearwater continues to fulfill the original mission he envisioned, to help educate and share the plight of our local Hudson River environment as it luffs its sails and roams America’s First River. DC PREMIERE

CITY ON THE WATER NOBODY LOVES ME (USA, 2017, 12 min.) High in Lake Titicaca in the Andes Mountains, a large and homely frog once thrived, a species endemic to altitude and cold water named Telmatobius culeus. But over-collecting for human consumption, pollution and predation by introduced species have devastated the Titicaca water frog. In 2016, 10,000 frogs died all at once, and it wasn’t the first mass die-off this critically endangered species has experienced. This short film from The Redford Center shines a new light on these underappreciated animals, showing their amazing adaptability, crucial role in the aquatic ecosystem and what’s at stake — unless humans intervene. Director: Jeff Reichert DC PREMIERE

PERSON OF THE FOREST (USA, 2017, 17 min.) In the vanishing lowland rainforests of Borneo, research is underway to uncover and understand the unique cultural behaviors in wild orangutans. There, photographer Tim Laman, researcher Cheryl Knott, and young explorer Robert Suro shed new light on the similarities between our ancient ancestors, and us before it’s too late. Director: Melissa Lesh F

18 TICKETS & DAILY UPDATES AT DCEFF.ORG

(USA, 2017, 18 min.) From Brooklyn’s Newtown Creek to Queens’ Flush Meadow, waterways once thought ruined forever by industrial and manmade pollution are making a comeback. From the Billion Oyster Project to Dragon Boat races, from the Gowanus Canal to the Harlem River, there is brand new activity on all of the waterways that surround NYC, making this the cornerstone of our new Hope on the Hudson series.

EARTH OPTIMISM SHORTS: SOIL CARBON COWBOYS With Director Peter Byke Co-presented with the Smithsonian’s Conservation Common Three short films showcase pioneering efforts by farmers to make agriculture sustainable, followed by a discussion with the filmmaker and Smithsonian expert. Sat, Mar 17, 4 PM $10 Q&A Peter Byke Carnegie Institution for Science

Fascinating and entertaining films made by top film students. Professor Chris Palmer and DCEFF’s Samantha Plakun will lead an entertaining and interactive session with the audience and the filmmakers on why and how these films are made. Followed by a discussion with the student filmmakers.

LIVING PROOF: Short Films on the Human Toll of Climate Change by Ground Truth Films Wed, Mar 21, 12 PM FREE Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

A CLIMATE FOR CONFLICT (Somalia, 2017, 15 min.) This film interweaves the intimate stories of people living in Somalia and trying to cope with a changing environment: a fisherman starts pirating boats when he can no longer make a living at sea; a camel herder goes to war with neighbors over pasture and water; a farmer joins the extremist group Al-Shabaab when drought becomes too intense. This film is part of a larger project that has been featured in Foreign Policy, ABC News Nightline and National Public Radio. Directors: Nichole Sobecki F and Laura Heaton F

BREADWINNER (Afghanistan, 2018, 10 min.) Extremism in Afghanistan, the film highlights the power of girls’ education to address the impacts of climate change. Families grapple with the impacts of drought, some farmers begin growing illegal and extremist-linked opium poppy while others find an unlikely solution to their crisis: educated, working women. This film continues the filmmakers’ commitment to in-depth reporting in Afghanistan where they spent seven years making the feature documentary What Tomorrow Brings, which was an Emmy® nominated PBS/POV series and winner of 2017 Edward R. Murrow, Alfred I. duPont and Overseas Press Club Awards). Director: Beth Murphy F WORLD PREMIERE


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T19

FEATURE FILMS

SHORT FILMS VR SHORT FILMS

ERIC MOE AWARDS SHORTS Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM $10 National Geographic Society

Through the magic of virtual reality, immerse yourself in the environment like never before. Visit dceff.org to learn more. Sat, Mar 17 and Sat, Mar 24, 11AM -7 PM FREE Carnegie Institution for Science

WATER WARRIORS

THE OCEAN AGENCY RICHARD VEVERS

(USA/Canada, 2017, 22 min.) WINNER: Eric Moe Award for Best Short on Sustainability Water Warriors is the story of a community’s successful fight against the oil and natural gas industry in New Brunswick, Canada, A multicultural group of unlikely warriors set up a series of road blockades, sometimes on fire, preventing exploration. After months of resistance, their efforts not only halted drilling; they elected a new government and won an indefinite moratorium on fracking in the province. Director: Michael Premo Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM $10 Q&A Michael Premo National Geographic Society DC PREMIERE

THE BOTANIST

CHASING CORAL: THE VR EXPERIENCE (VR)

(Canada, 2016, 20 min.) Finalist: Eric Moe Award for Best Short on Sustainability After the fall of the Soviet Union, Tajikistan, a former Social Soviet Republic, plunged into a devastating civil war. A famine struck the mountainous region of the Pamir where Raimberdi, a passionate and ingenious botanist, built his own hydroelectric station to help his family survive through the crisis. Maude Plante-Husaruk F and Maxime Lacoste-Lebuis Wed, Mar 21, 7 PM $10 National Geographic Society

(USA, 2017, 6 min.) Synopsis: This adventurous underwater VR experience follows Zackery Rago, a passionate scuba diver and researcher, as he documented the unprecedented 2016 coral bleaching event at Lizard Island on the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia. An insightful exploration that accompanies Jeff Orlowski’s feature film of the same name (Audience Award: US Documentary, Sundance Film Festival, 2017), about the quest of a group of filmmakers and ocean scientists to capture visual evidence of our changing oceans. Director: Jeff Orlowski

THE PROTECTORS: WALK IN THE RANGER’S SHOES (VR) PULITZER SHORTS Presented with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting A series of shorts presented with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting Thurs, Mar 22, 7 PM $10 Carnegie Institution for Science

(USA, 2017, 10 min.) From National Geographic Documentary Films, The Protectors: Walk in the Ranger’s Shoes chronicles a day in the life of a ranger in Garamba National Park. These rangers often are last line of defense in a race against extinction, at the hands of poachers slaughtering elephants for their ivory tusks. Directors: Kathryn Bigelow F and Imraan Ismail

PROTECTING WILD RIVERS A film showcase celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act Wed, Mar 21, 6:30 PM FREE with Reservations Department of the Interior Q&A

TICKETS & DAILY UPDATES AT DCEFF.ORG 19


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FEATURE FILMS

SHORT FILMS

MOTHER TONGUE FILM FESTIVAL SHORTS Through the magic of virtual reality, immerse yourself in the environment like never before. Visit dceff.org to learn more. Sat, Mar 17, 12:30 PM Museum of the American Indian

IDENTIDAD/IDENTITY (Panama, 2017, 4 min.) In the struggle to maintain their traditional lands many Indigenous communities are caught between modernization and traditional culture. Must they be at odds? Must the embrace of one eradicate the other? Director: Iván Jaripio (Embera)

WE PRAYED IN WATER (USA, 2012, 5 min.) Cherokee Nation tribal members worry about fracking pollution disrupting the ceremonial practice of “going to water.” Director: Joseph Erb (Cherokee)

SHAASH JAA / BEARS EARS (USA, 2016, 23 min.) Shásh Jaa’ (Bears Ears) is 1.9 million acres of Utah wilderness considered sacred lands to many indigenous communities of the four-corners area, including the Navajo, Ute, Ute Mountain, Hopi, and Zuni peoples. The governments of these tribal nations come together to form the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition, in hopes of having the area designated a National Monument to be co-managed with the partnership tribes. Director: Angelo Baca (Navajo)

THEN, NOW, AND FOREVER: ZUNI IN THE GRAND CANYON (USA, 2017, 27 min.) Created under the direction of the Zuni Elders, this short documentary follows several elders and Medicine Men on an ancient pilgrimage through the Grand Canyon to visit their place of origin and advocate for the protection of the land. Director: Daniel A. Byers

to sustainability

to fresh thinking

to innovation At Bank of America, we’re focused on accelerating the transition to a low-carbon and sustainable economy. Our $125 billion environmental business initiative is focused on leveraging our financial and intellectual capital to help develop solutions to challenges such as climate change and demands on natural resources. We see these efforts as key to our strategy of responsible growth and critical to building a better tomorrow. Learn more at

to each other

bankofamerica.com/environment


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T21

FEATURE FILMS

CLIPS & CONVERSATIONS

AN EVENING WITH CHRIS PALMER THE BEST ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURE FILMS FROM HOLLYWOOD Film producer Chris Palmer describes, with lots of clips, the best environmental feature films of all time from Hollywood, illustrating his remarks with compelling footage. He will also screen the winners of this year’s Eco-Comedy Video Competition, co-sponsored by AU’s Center for Environmental Filmmaking and The Nature Conservancy. Tues, Mar 20, 7 PM FREE Reservations Required Q&A American University

THE ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL IN THE NATION’S CAPITAL

OK, I’VE WATCHED THE FILM, NOW WHAT? How do we produce films that make a difference? This session, illustrated with clips of inspiring films, explores the ways we can turn films into action, at both the policy and personal levels. Our top panelists will address the challenges of producing films that have a tangible and measurable impact on their audiences and society. Thurs, Mar 22, 7 PM FREE Reservations Required Q&A American University

SILENT FOREST

CARLTON WARD

(USA, 2018, work in progress) Silent Forest is an intimate portrait of conservationists and activists who are fighting to stop forest elephant poaching and wildlife trafficking in Africa’s Congo Basin region. Director: Mariah Wilson F Mon, Mar 19, 7 PM $10 Q&A Mariah Wilson Carnegie Institution for Science

WILD FLORIDA: HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT National Geographic Explorer Carlton Ward Jr. is on an epic trek to discover forests, swamps, rivers, and ranchlands hidden in the heart of Florida. His photography is used to elevate critical conservation issues while revealing the wonders of a world on the brink of being lost. PHOTOGRAPHER: Carlton Ward, Jr. Tues, Mar 20, 7 PM $25 Q&A Carlton Ward, Jr. National Geographic Society

SYLVIA EARLE’S OCEAN FILM CHALLENGE

Presented with Mission Blue, Audience Awards and HATCH A showcase of ocean shorts from filmmakers around the world. Fri, Mar 23, 7 PM FREE Q&A Naval Heritage Center

2018 Environmental Champion Dr. Sylvia Earle, a world-renowned oceanographer, explorer, author, and lecturer was recognized as DCEFF’s 2018 Environmental Champion for her commitment to raising awareness about the need for ocean conservation through film and personal advocacy. She has led more than 100 expeditions worldwide, logging more than 7,000 hours underwater.

The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital is the world’s premier showcase of environmentally themed films. Since 1993, our mission has been to celebrate Earth and inspire understanding and stewardship of the environment through the power of film. Each March in Washington DC, we host the largest environmental film festival in the world, presenting 100+ films to audiences of more than 30,000. Filmmaker and topical discussions are an important part of our events, which happen at museums, embassies, libraries, universities, and local theaters throughout the city. We also present a year-round screening series and community events. Many of our screenings are free, and our Washington, DC location offers the unique opportunity for films and filmmakers to reach national and international lawmakers and decision-makers. Our impact continues to grow both in DC and beyond. We are the largest and longest-running environmental film festival in the United States.

Dr. Earle served as Chief Scientist of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration from 1990-92, and has been Explorer-inResidence at the National Geographic Society since 1998. She was awarded the 2009 TED Prize for her proposal to establish a global network of marine protected areas, called “hope spots.” Her organization Mission Blue was founded that year to build public support for these hope spots. At the 2018 Festival Dr. Earle will participate in the first Ocean Film Challenge and present the prize to the winning filmmaker.

TICKETS & DAILY UPDATES AT DCEFF.ORG 21


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INDEX A BEAUTIFUL STAR 4 A CLIMATE FOR CONFLICT 18 A STEELHEAD QUEST: PORTRAIT OF A RIVERED LIFE 17 ADAPTATION BANGLADESH: SEA LEVEL RISE 18 ALBATROSS 2, 4 AMA-SAN 4 AN EVENING WITH CHRIS PALMER: THE BEST ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURE FILMS FROM HOLLYWOOD 21 ANOTE’S ARK 2,4, 11 ARISTOLOCHIAS OF HAITI 5 ATLANTIC SALMON – LOST AT SEA 4 ATOMIC HOMEFRONT 2, 4 BACKYARD WILDERNESS 4 BEARTREK 4 BENDING THE ARC 4 BIRD OF PREY 2, 5 BLUE 5 BOY-ZSHAN BI-DEN 16 BREADWINNER 18 CACU: UN CAMBIO POR LA VIDA 5 CAMERA TRAP 17 CANIS LUPIS COLORADO 16 CHASING CORAL 5, 12, 13, 19 CHASING CORAL: THE VR EXPERIENCE 19 CHASING THE THUNDER 5, 11 CITY OF THE SUN 5 CITY ON THE WATER 18 COLORS OF CHANGE 16 COYOTE: THE MIKE PLANT STORY 5

DIRTBAG: THE LEGEND OF FRED BECKEY 5 DISPATCHES FROM THE GULF 2 6 DONKEYOTE 6 DUSK CHORUS 6 EARTH OPTIMISM SHORTS: HOPE ON THE HUDSON 18 EARTH OPTIMISM SHORTS: SOIL CARBON COWBOYS 18 EVOLUTION OF ORGANIC 2, 6 EXPERIMENTAL CITY 6 FIRE CHASERS 6 FISH STORY 16 FIVE SEASONS: THE GARDENS OF PIET OUDOLF 3, 6 GENERATION ON THE WIND 6 GLADESMEN: THE LAST OF THE SAWGRASS COWBOYS 6 HARBINGER 18 HEART OF THE LAND 17 HIGH TIDE IN DORCHESTER 7, 11 HOT GREASE 7 HUMAN FLOW 7 IDENTIDAD/IDENTITY 20 ILLEGAL ACTIVISTS – THE BATTLE FOR NORWAY’S FJORDS 10 IN THE HILLS AND HOLLOWS 7 INTO THE AMAZON 7 JANE 2, 7, 11 LA CUMBRE 2, 17 LA PESCA 17 LAWS OF THE LIZARD 7, 13 LECHE Y MIEL 16 LIONS OF WEST TEXAS 16

LITTLE YELLOW BOOTS L’ODYSSEE LOVE & BANANAS MAKALA MAMMOTH MARCH OF THE PENGUINS 2: THE NEXT STEP MEGASTRUCTURES: GARDENS BY THE BAY MIND OF A GIANT MOUNTAIN OK, I’VE WATCHED THE FILM, NOW WHAT? NO MAN’S LAND NOBODY LOVES ME PARIS: A WILD STORY PERSON OF THE FOREST PLANET POWER PLANTAE POINT OF NO RETURN PROTECTING WILD RIVERS PULITZER SHORTS RANGER AND LEOPARD RAT FILM RESTORING THE CLEARWATER RETURN FROM DESOLATION RODENTS OF UNUSUAL SIZE SHAASH JAA/BEARS EARS SILAS SILENT FOREST SKY MIGRATIONS SNAILS STUDENT SHORT ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL

2, 7 8,11 8 8 16 2, 8,11 8 8, 12 8 21 8 18 2, 9,11 18 9 17 9 19 19 2, 9 9 18 17 9 20 2, 3, 9 21 17 16 18

SYLVIA EARLE’S OCEAN FILM CHALLENGE TATRA MOUNTAINS – LIFE ON THE EDGE TEXAS LIVING WATER THANK YOU FOR THE RAIN THE BOTANIST THE CHOCOLATE CASE THE COLORADO THE FARTHEST THE GAME CHANGERS THE GUARDIANS THE LAST ANIMALS THE LAST HONEY HUNTERS THE MIRNAVATOR THE NEW FIRE THE PROTECTORS: WALK IN THE RANGER’S SHOES THE RIVER’S BED THE SACRIFICE THE SALMON FOREST THEN, NOW, AND FOREVER: ZUNI IN THE GRAND CANYON UNFRACTURED UNTAMED ROMANIA WASTED! THE STORY OF FOOD WASTE WATER WARRIORS WE PRAYED IN WATER WHAT LIES UPSTREAM WILD FLORIDA WILDLIFE AND THE WALL WOMAN AND THE GLACIER YOCHI

With every drop of water you drink, every breath you take, YOU’RE CONNECTED TO THE OCEAN. — D R . SY LV I A E A R L E

National Geographic salutes Explorer-in-Residence and Environmental Film Festival Guest of Honor Sylvia Earle for her pioneering work exploring and protecting our ocean. Her dedication—and her impact—are an inspiration for us all.

natgeo.org

21 2, 9 16 2, 10 19 2, 10 10 10 3, 10 11, 10 2, 3, 10 8 17 15 3, 19 15 15 17 20 15 11, 15 2, 15 2, 3, 19 20 15 21 17 15 17


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MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | T23

FEATURE FILMS SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR DONORS

The Environmental Film Festival gratefully acknowledges the following Friends of the Festival who have supported the 2018 Festival.

$100,000+ DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Wallace Genetic Foundation $50,000+ Bank of America Farvue Foundation Caroline D. Gabel, Shared Earth Foundation The Reva & David Logan Foundation National Geographic Vervane Foundation $25,000+ Jane Watson Stetson & E. William Stetson, III, Boatwright Foundation Susan E. Vitka & Peter Fox-Penner $10,000+ Armand G. Erpf Fund Howard Hughes Medical Institute Joseph Krakora Kaempfer Family Fund MARPAT Foundation The Curtis & Edith Munson Foundation National Endowment for the Arts Elva and Lawrence O’Brien Family Trust Prince Charitable Trusts Trust for Mutual Understanding $5,000+ Henry Foundation Faith G. & John van D. Lewis Annie & Paul Mahon Marine Stewardship Council Julia & Richard Moe Park Foundation Van Metre Family Foundation $2,500+ Wendy Benchley & John Jeppson DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment The Hon. Diana Lady Dougan Barbara L. & John Franklin Global Fund for Democracy and Development

Hannelore & Jeremy Grantham Hausman Foundation for the Environment Lynne & Joe Horning Dane A. Nichols Helen & Larry O’Brien Nora Pouillon Susan S. Rappaport Catherine Wyler & Richard Rymland $1,000+ Anonymous Susan & Walter Arensberg Jessie Brinkley & Bruce Bunting Alexander D. Crary Harriett Crosby Anjanette Daigle & Peter Moskovitz Alice & Lincoln Day Melanie Du Bois & Andrew Oliver Claire & Al Dwoskin Anne Emmet Elizabeth & Michael Galvin Golden Rule Foundation The Grace Jones Richardson Trust Marion Guggenheim Anita G. Herrick Annie Kaempfer Kovler Fund Burks Lapham Cynthia McGrath Gregory McGruder Robert & Margaret McNamara Foundation #3 Sally & William Meadows Steve Michelson Barbara & Nicholas Millhouse Liz Norton Peter O’Brien Margaret Parsons Sylvia Ripley & Chris Addison Lisa Renstrom & Robert Perkowitz Deborah Rothberg Nancy & Simon Sidamon-Eristoff Flo and Roger D. Stone Margaret & John Symington Mary & Roger Wallace Leslie Jones &

David Max Williamson Windy Films Mikel & Joe Witte $500 David Baumunk Elizabeth Berry Susan & Dixon Butler Shelley Cohen & Michael Gala Celia Crawford Kae & Donald Dakin Helen & Raymond Dubois Sarah duPont Elisabeth French Sarah & Walter Gorman Sara Grosvenor Donna & Joseph Head Robert L. Henninger Kim Hirose Sherry Houghton Robert Jones Linda Lilienfeld Helen McNeill Katherine B. Morgan Darwina L. Neal Gail Ostergaard Jackie Quillen Edith Schafer Joan Shorey Semrod Family Foundation Jan Sherwood Katherine A. Silverthorne & David C. Lashway Jenny Springer & L. Michael Cantor Stacy A. Swann $250 Baked & Wired Brent Blackwelder Elan Joel Blutinger Victoria Cordova Deanna Dawson Jeffrey DeJoannis Richard Devaney Mark Epstein Judith & David Falk Laura Faul Stephanie Flack

Wendy & William Garner Paula Goldberg Bruce Guthrie Jessie Harris & Woody Cunningham Corbin & John Harwood Elsa Haubold & Tony Tripp Elizabeth Blair Jones Sarah Gould Kagan & Stewart Kagan Julian Keniry Wendy Makins Sophia Maroon Dan M. Martin Mary McCracken Elizabeth & Kenneth Mendez Andrew Mergen

Kathleen Mikitin Thomas W. Myers Bridget Tuthill & Marc Norman Marie Ridder Louise Sagalyn Eileen Shields-West Anne Sidamon-Eristoff Michael Singer Gene M. Smith Marcia & Herman Smith Mary Gay Sprague Victoria Stack Helen & Carter Strong Hilary Gardner Swain Wendy Swanson Nina Testa

The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) is celebrating 20 years of wild, certified, sustainable seafood. Look for the blue fish on your seafood, and let’s #KeepItWild for the love of seafood today, tomorrow, and always. 20.msc.org

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T24 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL IN THE NATION’S CAPITAL

1224 M Street, NW, Suite 301 Washington, DC 20005 202.342.2564 dceff.org

SPONSORS LEAD SPONSORS

MAJOR SPONSORS

FEATURE SPONSORS

BOATWRIGHT FOUNDATION CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS

ARMAND G. ERPF FUND

ELVA AND LAWRENCE O’BRIEN FAMILY TRUST KAEMPFER FAMILY FUND SUPPORTING SPONSORS


16 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

sports

D.C. area doesn’t have team with an NCAA bid for first time since 1978 MEN’S BASKETBALL On Sunday night, something was missing from the NCAA Tournament selection show: a D.C.-area presence in the field of 68. The last chance for a program located in the metropolitan area to play its way into March Madness was extinguished Friday

when George Mason was eliminated from the Atlantic 10 tournament. Maryland missed the NCAA Tournament after three consecutive appearances. Georgetown’s main goal for its first season under coach Patrick Ewing was to establish a foundation. George Mason didn’t have a scholarship senior, and George Washington tried develop a plethora of young players. American is in a full rebuild. Howard’s best

Georgia players refuse NIT invitation after school fires coach Mark Fox

AP

District deprived of rooting interest Patrick Ewing, left, led Georgetown to a 15-15 mark in his first year as coach. Mark Turgeon’s Terps went 19-13 after getting three straight NCAA bids.

two players were a freshman and a sophomore. None of those teams were seeded better than fifth in their conference tournaments. Added together, it’s the first time the

area won’t have a team in the tournament since 1978, when only 32 programs were invited. The big picture isn’t so bad. All but Howard have earned NCAA bids since 2011, and four of the

six have made it since 2014. Next season should be brighter for several teams. Georgetown finished 15-15, but two of Ewing’s first recruits — Jamorko Pickett and Jahvon Blair — landed on the Big East’s all-rookie team. GW (15-18) won five of seven late in the regular season and returns an improving young backcourt. With forward and Virginia transfer Jarred Reuter eligible next season, Mason (16-17) could be a serious A-10 contender for the first time. Maryland (19-13) is under the most scrutiny after a condensed Big Ten schedule and key injuries contributed to an eighth-place conference finish. PATRICK STEVENS (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Potomac, Md., native Abby Meyers (18 pts) leads Princeton women past Penn 63-34 for Ivy League title

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sports

BUDDING AGENT

Tiger Woods, who has had several back surgeries in recent years, broke par four days in a row.

Tiger just a putt short in best finish since 2013 Woods ties for second behind Paul Casey as comeback gets a boost GOLF A long victory drought on the PGA Tour finally ended Sunday in Palm Harbor, Fla., just not the one a raucous crowd was expecting. Paul Casey closed with a 6-under 65 and won the Valspar Championship, but only after watching from the locker room as Tiger Woods came up one putt short of forcing a playoff. It was the closest Woods has come to winning in nearly five years. Casey, who started the final round five shots behind, ran off three straight birdies early

on the back nine at Innisbrook to take the lead, and he closed with four par saves to post a 10-under 274. No one caught him, giving him his second PGA Tour title and his first since the Houston Open in 2009. Patrick Reed and Woods tied for second at 275. Reed was tied for the lead and appeared headed for a playoff at worst until his approach to the 18th came back down the slope, and his 45-foot birdie putt was so weak that it rolled all the way back to his feet. He three-putted for bogey and a 68. Woods opened with a birdie to briefly share the lead. He then went 15 holes without a birdie until he brought Innisbrook to

life with a birdie putt from just inside 45 feet that fell into the cup at the par-3 17th. That left him one shot behind with one hole to play. Woods played conservatively with an iron off the 442-yard, uphill closing hole. From 185 yards, his approach came up some 40 feet short, and his birdie putt to force a playoff was 2 feet short. He closed with a 70 — the first time since The Barclays in 2013 that he posted all four rounds under par on the PGA Tour. It was his best finish since he tied for second at that Barclays tournament, right about the time his back started to give out. Next up for Woods is the Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill this week. DOUG FERGUSON (AP)

MIKE CARLSON (AP)

Sherman worked out his own deal Richard Sherman made a quick break out of unemployment Saturday, agreeing to sign with the 49ers after the Seahawks cut him Friday. Perhaps more impressive than the time it took for the cornerback to reach a deal — reportedly worth up to $39 million over three years — was how it was reached. NFL Network’s Peter Schrager tweeted that Sherman, a 29-year-old Stanford grad, represented himself in a five-hour negotiating session. Sherman, who is recovering from a torn Achilles in his right leg and a bone spur in his left foot, tweeted at Schrager: “It was work! But we got it done!” (EXPRESS)

(THE WASHINGTON POST)

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

American sinks Navy for Patriot League title Cecily Carl scored 20 points and grabbed eight rebounds Sunday to help American secure its second NCAA Tournament bid with a 58-49 victory over Navy in the Patriot League championship game in Washington. Top-seeded American (26-6), which has won 20 straight home games, claimed its second title in four years — it reached its first NCAAs in 2015. The women’s NCAA bracket will be announced tonight (7, ESPN). Atlantic 10 tournament champion George Washington also has an automatic bid. Maryland and Virginia are expected to get in. (AP) MEN’S BASKETBALL

Free agent ace Jake Arrieta and Philadelphia have agreed to a three-year deal worth $75 million, according to multiple reports Sunday. The right-hander was among several top free agents who failed for months to land a long-term contract in a changing market. Arrieta, 32, won the 2015 NL Cy Young Award with the Cubs and helped them win the World Series in 2016. He was 14-10 with a 3.53 ERA in 30 starts last year. He’ll join Aaron Nola atop the Phils’ rotation. (AP) Reports: Giants aware of social media video showing Odell Beckham Jr. next to woman with white powder

Former Jets defensive end Muhammad Wilkerson is scheduled to visit the Redskins this week, most likely today, according to a person with knowledge of his plans. A firstround pick in 2011, Wilkerson was released by New York last week. The 28-year-old posted 44.5 sacks, including a personal-best 12 in 2015, over eight seasons. He signed a five-year, $86 million extension in 2016, but his play didn’t live up to expectations. Problems with showing up late to work led to several benchings over the past three years.

Connecticut fires Ollie amid NCAA investigation

OFF THE MARKET

Phillies agree to sign Arrieta

NFL

Free agent DE Wilkerson will visit Redskins Park

The combination of an NCAA investigation and a second straight losing season left UConn coach Kevin Ollie out of a job. He was fired Saturday, four years after leading the Huskies to the NCAA title. The university said it is dismissing him for “just cause,” which could keep it from paying the remainder of his contract. Ollie, former coach Jim Calhoun’s hand-picked successor, was in the second year of a $17.9 million deal. UConn was 14-18 this year and 16-17 last year. (AP)

Giants cut CB Rodgers-Cromartie after sides couldn’t rework contract


18 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

ahead

There’s plenty of common space for networking at offices like WeWork.

STUDENT LOANS

Work all together now A shared co-working space might be the work-from-home alternative you need OFFICES Kids, laundry, your Netflix queue — there are lots of things that can compete for your attention when you work from home. “Some people work well from home, but I’m not one of those people,” says Hillary Berman, founder of marketing consulting firm Popcorn & Ice Cream. “I get very distracted, so for me it’s better to get out of the house and have a place to go.” But for a small business that doesn’t require a lot of space, it can be hard to find the right place to land. Coffee shops can be too loud and unpredictable. Traditional office spaces might be bigger than needed and more expensive than budget allows. Berman, 41, sublet an office for a while. But when that was no longer available, she found a new option that’s been ideal for her two-employee firm: a co-working space. She rents a private office at Hera Hub in Friendship Heights that allows her to be productive without the hassles that can come with leasing traditional office space.

“Dealing with coffee and WiFi and water and electricity — that was a huge headache I didn’t want,” she says. “As a business owner, I can focus on running and growing my business, not whether or not the Wi-Fi is working.” There are lots of people out there like Berman who want a professional business location but whose small companies aren’t ready for or interested in a high-rise corner office. Many are turning to co-working spaces, where things like Wi-Fi, coffee, printing, conference room access and other utilities and amenities are often included in monthly membership prices. The number of co-working members around the world is expected to increase from 1.74 million in 2017 to 5.1 million in 2022, according to a 2017 forecast by Emergent Research, a California-based research and consulting firm focused on small businesses, and the Global Coworking Unconference Conference. That same report predicts that the number of co-working

“It’s a great way to tap into a community of remote workers. And I feel like it’s impossible to not be productive from a co-working space.” ALISON WARD, who gets work done for her remote job at WeWork offices around the world

spaces around the world will rise from 14,411 in 2017 to more than 30,000 in 2022. Co-working options abound in the D.C. area, from large companies with lots of locations like WeWork and Carr Workplaces to smaller startups like Cove. Most offer both private office rentals and shared space that members can use on an everyday or asneeded basis. Local businesspeople turn to

co-working spaces for a variety of reasons. When Dan Sondhelm, 45, started his own financial marketing company, Sondhelm Partners, two years ago, he knew the ease and convenience of a co-working space was the best option for his new business. He rents a private office at Level Office in Alexandria that he shares with one employee. “As we add more people we can reconfigure or get a bigger office,” he says. “There’s flexibility in what we can do, which allows you to grow within their system. There might come a time when we want to have our own real estate, but we won’t be there for a while.” In a co-working space, members interact with folks in all kinds of industries and job roles, a perk that Berman considers an invaluable resource. “If I ever have a question about something or a situation that arises, it’s really nice to have a built-in network that you can bounce ideas off of,” she says. “You can learn from each other and get CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

WEWORK

Education Dept.: Leave loans to us The Department of Education told state regulators Friday to back off the companies managing its $1.3 trillion portfolio of student loans, arguing that only the federal government can oversee its contractors. States have stepped in to fill what many see as a void in the federal oversight of student loan servicers, companies the Education Department pays to handle debt payments. The industry has lobbied Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, above, to prevent states from imposing their own regulations, such as standards for timely payment processing. “Many states are likely to view this document as legally dubious … and will wait for courts to weigh in with their own interpretation,” said Christopher Peterson, a former enforcement attorney at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. DANIELLE DOUGLAS-GABRIEL THE WASHINGTON POST)


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 19

Co-working spaces CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18

great advice. Those are the kinds of conversations you can seek out, or they just happen in the kitchen when you’re grabbing a glass of water.” Alison Ward’s home base is in the Reston, Va., area. But she travels all over the world working in the public relations department of 100 percent remote company Toptal, which connects businesses with freelance software developers, designers and finance experts. She’s logged hours at the WeWork location in Shaw as well as in other coworking spaces around the globe. “If I’m traveling by myself, I try to check out co-working spaces when I’m in a new city,” says Ward, 30. “It’s a great way

to tap into a community of remote workers. And I feel like it’s impossible to not be productive from a co-working space. Most are really beautifully designed, the Wi-Fi is strong and everyone is dialed in and plugging away.” When choosing a co-working space, Berman recommends assessing how quickly you expect your company to grow and whether the space can accommodate that. “We’re not adding new team members every day,” she says. “But if you’re a faster-growing business, the co-working model might be hard for you, because at some point you’d outgrow it.” Make sure that a co-working environment matches your company’s style and mission. “Don’t try to shoehorn it,” says Scott Caldwell, 30, president

JULIA WESTFALL

ahead

Hera Hub offers offices small enough for one and big enough for a meeting.

STUDY WITH

PURPOSE

The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) is now accepting applications from candidates who seek a deeper understanding of how politics, economics, and international relations drive global change.

and co-founder of Washington Business Dynamics, which uses D.C. WeWork locations to host meetings and happy hours for its usually spread-out team. “Make sure it’s the right fit for your goals and culture. When we looked at our team and culture, the thing we wanted to build was a balance of fun and professionalism, and WeWork seemed to meet that need.” Understand what you do on a daily basis and whether a coworking space is conducive to that. “Sometimes there’s a lack of call room space and it can be noisy,” says Ward. “If you’re in an industry where you’re on the phone a lot, you have to make sure you have a guaranteed quiet area for taking calls, or it’s just not going to work.” BETH LUBERECKI (FOR EXPRESS)

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20 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

ahead s t ea l th i s jo b

training. He decided he wanted to venture out on his own, so he moved to D.C. to open his own franchise — and he still brings Rex along with him every day.

A job that doesn’t bite What he does Last summer, a stressed-out German shepherd on Capitol Hill named Lyla could barely go for a walk without barking herself into a frenzy. Lyla’s owners, equally stressed out, needed someone who could

work some magic. So they called DC Dog Wizard, the dog training company run by Scott Dancer. “Every time they left their apartment, she was barking at every other dog, just going crazy and off the handle,” Dancer says of then 1-year-old Lyla. “After two weeks with me learning obedience and self-confidence and socialization, they’re now

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

Master of Science Program in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology One year with rolling admission

Fall 2018 Deadline: 5/15/2018 Contact the Program Coordinator for details

202-687-1618

DĞƌŝƚͲďĂƐĞĚƉĂƌƟĂůƐĐŚŽůĂƌƐŚŝƉƐĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞ msbiochemistry.georgetown.edu

able to take this dog off leash at 4 or 5 p.m. in Lincoln Park, when everyone gathers after work.” Dancer opened the D.C. branch of the national Dog Wizard brand in January 2014 and remains its sole trainer. He works with all ages, breeds and sizes of dogs on big issues like separation anxiety or aggression toward other animals or humans, plus what he calls “problem solving.” “That could be, the dog’s digging up my yard, the dog’s peeing in my house, the dog’s chasing squirrels,” he says. “And all of those things can be solved with obedience and socialization.” Dancer typically makes three house calls a day, and sometimes works with tougher cases he kennels at his own home. Sessions typically start with an evaluation to determine what kind of training will work best and progress to a basic puppy lesson with treat-training techniques or a high-distraction, off-leash obedience lesson. Most dogs require six hour-long lessons, but that varies depending on the situation. He says half the challenge is teaching non-canine clients, who must attend all sessions, how to behave with their pets. “The humans are probably the hardest part,” he says. “There’s a dynamic between the owners and

“Obviously, you have to be OK being surrounded by dogs, but you have to be good with people, as well,” Dancer says. “You need to be a great communicator and teacher, because it does no good to teach the dog if the owner isn’t going to be able to experience the same success.” Dog trainers also need patience and time-management skills as they bounce from client to client. And prepare for some heartmelting and face-licking along the way. “My favorite dogs to train are the fearful ones, because you get to see the biggest transformation,” Dancer says. “They go from not peeing outside or even wanting to leave the house to becoming more wellbalanced every day. I don’t want to sugarcoat all the hard work, but it’s mentally stimulating for me as well as the dogs.”

How you can get the job MEKENZIE LOLI

Name: Scott Dancer, 29 Position: Dog trainer, DC Dog Wizard

MEKENZIE LOLI

Who would want this job

Scott Dancer’s first client was his own dog, a boxer named Rex.

dogs that makes a difference.”

How he got the job In 2012, Dancer joined a friend working at Charlotte Dog Wizard in North Carolina, mostly helping wash dogs and keeping the facility clean. After a few months, he started bringing his boxer Rex, then 2 years old, with him on the weekends. “He wasn’t the best at socializing and started getting into little scuffles here and there, and then he bit a dog who needed to go to the vet and get stitches,” Dancer says. “So I trained him, and I’ve been training dogs ever since.” Dancer underwent Dog Wizard’s three-month training program, which taught him skills including how to do scent and agility

You’ll need to do a deep dive into animal behavior and get plenty of hands-on experience. Some facilities, like the Dog Wizard franchise, offer programs that teach you everything you need to get started, plus provide their own certification. No federal or state certification is required to be a dog trainer, but receiving it through an organization — such as the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers — can help attract clients. If you can’t find a formal training program that’s right for you, seek out a trainer who will take you on as an apprentice. As you delve into training, you might decide to specialize in an area like training therapy dogs or search and rescue animals. Options are plentiful. “There’s no such thing as the perfect dog, and that’s what really keeps me interested,” Dancer says. “Is it a challenge to train certain dogs? Yes, and that’s why I can see myself doing this for the rest of my life.” ANGELA HAUPT (FOR EXPRESS)


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 21

JOBS

Newspaper Delivery Carriers are needed to deliver

Newspaper Delivery Carriers are needed to deliver

The Washington Post

The Washington Post

for the following areas:

for the following areas:

For routes in

For routes in Olney, Silver Spring & Rockville, MD

Arlington, VA Call 703-580-7916

Excellent part-time income! Reliable transportation required. Newspaper Delivery Carriers are needed to deliver

For routes in Upper NW area in D.C. Call Dan Santos at 240-9127978 Excellent part-time income! Reliable transportation required. Newspaper Delivery Carriers are needed to deliver The Washington Post for the following areas:

To advertise a job, call

202-334-4100.

FINANCING! PAYMENT PLAN! JOB!

Call Don Money at 301-674-0010

LOOKING FOR A

MEDICAL

Excellent part-time income! Reliable transportation required.

CAREER

Quality First Career Center Classes start soon • PHLEBOTOMY-10 WK • CNA 4 WK • CNA to GNA - 72 HOURS • CPR & FIRST AID • Medical Technician 20 HOURS • Criminal Background

Day/Eves & Weekend Classes

Cashier, Line Server & Grill Cook Full and part time positions available. Apply Within 1704 U Street NW, Washington D.C. or call 202-265-3336

6475 New Hampshire Ave., #501 Hyattsville, MD 20783 • CALL 301-270-5105

Cashier, Line Server, Grill/ Prep Cook Full and part time positions available. Apply Within - The Rolling Rib 9423 Marlboro Pike, Upper Marlboro, MD Open Interviews Fri 3/16 & Sat 3/17 11am-2:30pm

PETS English Cream Golden Retrievers—AKC $1200, Male and Female, Six weeks old, Mom is OFA hip and elbow certified. 804-839-3258 LAB PUPS - Black & yellow, males & females, champ line, 3 rounds of worming, first 2 shots. AKC reg, vet certified, family raised. Ready 3/5. 443-952-0338

Newspapers carriers needed to deliver The Washington Post in DC, MD and VA area.

MARCH IN AND SCORE AT

CARVER TERRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom - $895 2 Bedroom / 1 Bath - $995 2 Bedroom / 2 Bath - $1,095 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath - $1,310

To apply, go to

The Washington Post

202.715.3679

are needed to deliver

for the following areas:

Excellent part-time income! Reliable transportation required.

Call Mr. Howard at 301-627-2408 Excellent part-time income! Reliable transportation required.

(202) 969-4134 3636 16th Street NW • Washington DC 20010

2800 Quebec St., NW Washington, DC 20008

QUEBEC HOUSE All Utilities Included Pets Welcome  Fitness Center New Clubrooms with WiFi Pay Rent Online

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Spring

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dry cleaner on-site

River Hill

for the following areas:

The Washington Post

renovated kitchens available • Small pet friendly • Grocery store and

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• Free utilities &

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$40 Application Fee Per Adult

deliverthepost.com

Newspaper Delivery Carriers

One Month FREE with a 12 Month Lease

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Studios from $1,199

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For routes in

For routes in

Credit cards accepted.

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Spring is in the Air at

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6:30am-3pm Monday through Friday University of Maryland, College Park Adele H. Stamp Student Union For details and to apply: eTerp.umd.edu Position 101044 or https://ejobs.umd.edu/postings/58266 Great benefits, Great team!

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hrscareercoachingandconsultingservices.simplybook.me

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Newspaper Delivery Carriers are needed to deliver

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The Washington Post for the following areas:

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JOBS • RENTALS • HOUSES • WHEELS • STUFF • AND MUCH MORE...

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marketplace

For routes in

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Reach over 300,000 readers daily

JOBS

FRIENDSHIP CROSSING APTS. )  ' * $989 +  ' * $1099 ...ACT FAST!

Minutes to 295, 395, 495 and Downtown DC.        Application    fee   with ad    !"  #!" $"  %" &$' *call for details Professionally Managed By CIH Properties, Inc.

$

25 00

202.640.4789


22 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

Garden Village

$250 0ff 1st Month Rent & $400–$500 S/D with Credit Approved Application

4421 Third Street SE, Washington, DC 20032  $  % & 

 $ 

 '   !!    ! ( )     *+   ' (      ,     %!!(

SPRING

INTO YOUR

NEW HOME!

V

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1 BR MOVE-INS FOR APRIL STARTING AT

Cider Mill

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Newly renovated apartment homes available Bus stops at community Soccer field & playground New fitness center | Se habla español

202-715-3682 3738 D St. SE

*On select apts., ask for details

*see Leasing Consultant for details PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED BY CIH PROPERTIES, INC.

18205 Lost Knife Circle, Gaithersburg, MD 20886

MD RENTALS Bowie—$2100, Bowie, MD Beautiful/Spacious endunit TH, 3BR/3BA/3Lvl. Off 50 and 495. Public Transp/Metro access. Call/text:301-455-2047

Wed Open Until 7 *Must move in by 3/20

AaDDISON CHAPEL partments PRINCE 1 BRs from $929 GEORGE’S 2 BRs from $1,079 BEST KE PT SECRET!

MARCH MADNESS!! Move in by 3/23 & get 1 month of FREE rent!! SHOOT AND SCORE! Take a shot for a chance at a waived app fee             

d All Utilities Included* d Top Notch Service d Renovated Kitchen and Baths

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METRO NEWS ON YOUR iPHONE AND ANDROID DOWNLOAD FREE.

o pel.c

m

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DC Rider

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The

Gardens

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WALK TO WHITE FLINT METRO

*

2BRS AT $1199 ASK ABOUT OUR 3 BEDROOMS

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a DC

THE VISTA

Th e V ist

SE,1815 P ST. 1BD/1BA + Electric Near Metro! HWF, Secured Building Delwin Realty 301.608.3703

MD RENTALS

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Half Off the First Month’s Rent!*

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.c o m

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4660 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SW Washington, DC 20032 PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED BY CIH PROPERTIES, INC.

5401 McGrath Blvd. North Bethesda, MD 20852

(202) 715-3555 SW Washington TheGardensDC.com

 

                     !" # "$% & '   

NEW LUXURY APARTMENTS IN DOWNTOWN SILVER SPRING

2BRS $1324!* Ask About our 1BRs Gated / Hi-rise Resort Style Pool ONLY 6 Mins to Nats Park, MGM Casino & Nat’l Harbor! *Call for details.

180 High Park Lane Silver Spring, MD 20910

CALL

· · · · ·

301.966.6765 TODAY

Jr flats, 1, 2 & 3 BR apartments Fitness center w/programs & cardio machines Swimming pool & rooftop lounge On-site farm to table produce Pet play area & pet washing station


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 23

MD RENTALS

MD RENTALS

TAKOMA LANDING APARTMENTS & TOWNHOMES

• Pets welcome • Gas & water included • Reserved parking, storage & bike storage • Short walk to Silver Spring Metro • Conveniently located near Giant, CVS, Suntrust, Peet’s Coffee & dining

301.841.9287

BRAND NEW RENOVATED SPACIOUS APARTMENTS One BRs from $1,099* Two BR Townhomes from $1,379*

CALL 301.302.8066 NOW!

Walking distance to shopping & schools Laundry facilities on site • All-brick construction On Metrobus route • Cats welcome

703.334.9336

1130 S George Mason Drive•Arlington, VA 22204

PAY NO RENT * Until April 1st!

Newly Renovated Studio, 1, and 2 BR Apt. Homes All Utilities Included • Great Location • Pet-Friendly Modern Kit., Private Balconies & Expansive Windows *On Select Units

301.830.8680

$

560 DALE FOREST

APARTMENTS

â—? Free gas cooking, heating, and hot water â—? Playgrounds â—? Olympic-sized swimming pool â—? Minutes to shopping, dining & VRE

Newly Renovated Units 1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments 24-Hr. On-Site Starbucks & Safeway Washer/Dryer In Most Units Metro Bus Stops on Community

Park your browser here.

Commons of Mclean 1653 Anderson Road, McLean, VA 22102

703.935.0495

14321 Wrangler Lane #1, Dale City, VA 22193

IN PRINT.

MD RENTALS

Free gas and water       

                            

MAPLE RIDGE

GATED COMMUNITY IN RIVERDALE     

           !      !    ! "         

 #              *select units

PARKVIEW GARDEN

2252 Brightseat Road, Landover, MD 20785

$%&& '  # ' # () *&+-+

mapleridgeapartments.com

parkviewgardenapartments.com

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1, 2, 3 BRS/HUGE 2 BR THS IN RIVERDALE # 

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3100 Southgate Drive, Alexandria, VA 22306

301.867.6888

FREE UTILITIES IN HYATTSVILLE

       

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Studio, One, and Two Bedroom Apartments Available

RIVERDALE FLETCHER’S FIELD Washer and Dryer VILLAGE in Every Home  Stainless Steel Appliances Available

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3 Blocks from Van Ness Metro  Pet-Friendly 301.955.9788 301.637.5986

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NEWLY RENOVATED APARTMENTS

1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments starting from $1,435 Great location & pet friendly Washer & dryer in each apartment 9      H I    

.# J    #     

  

WOW

arting Prices St nly From O

703.334.9362

3415 Parkway Terrace Dr., Suitland, MD 20746

Still the best way to kill time during your commute. XX133 1x1

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Move In Today And

    

APPLICATION FEE CREDITED BACK UPON APPROVAL*

790 Fairview Avenue, Takoma Park, MD 20912

A PA R T M E N T S

WALK TO METRO | ALL CREDIT CONSIDERED Mon-Fri 9am-5pm | Saturday by appt. only

Need to Sell Your House or Apt Building? Hassle-Free. No Commission. Any Condition. 240-470-4177 realtysolvers.com

W/D in Townhomes Only *Prices are subject to change

Parkway Terrace

2 BRs from $1,175 2 BRs upgraded from $1,275

BARCROFT APARTMENT S

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1 BRs from $1,050 1 BRs upgraded from $1,150

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Mon-Fri: ;3# Sat: <&%# Sun: <*%

2677 Avenir Pl., Vienna, VA 22180 | 703.496.9867 l ADU & WDUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now to the Dunn Metro available l Studio, 1BRs & 2BRs* Station l Robust onsite l Rates starting at $1,287* amenities: Concierge, l Applicants must meet Game Room, NFL community qualifying lounge, pools & two & program guidelines ďŹ tness centers *Please call for more details l Walking distance

ROOMMATES

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BOWIE, MD- Share my home, 1 large BR, private entrance, W/D, close to Metro. $650. Call 301-437-8016 CAP HEIGHTS-Senr hme to shr.Furn rooms. $600 +$300SD.W/D.Prvt prkg+prvt fence.All utils incl. Nr Mtro. N/S insi. 1 wk free. Txt/Call 202-568-0792 DC - Quiet neighborhood. Veterans welcome. Rooms for rent in house, with staff to cook & wash. Call 202-760-9803 GERMANTOWN, MD - Limited kitchen privs, full BA, private entrance, near Germantown rec cent, street parking, near bus, pref F. 240-688-1836 Hyattsville - Large Rooms. Close to Metro. No pets/smoking. $575 and $675. 410-263-6701 NE DC - Small furnished room, share BA & kitchen, $450 per month, utilities are split 4 ways. Call 301-523-4772

Oxon Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;$500.00, 1 bedrm, 5100 Glassmanor Drive, 240-486-1948, Nr Pub Transp, Men only ROCKVILLE, MD - Basement room, share bath and kitchen, $500/month, all utilities included. 240-483-9184 SE DC- Furnished room, share kitchen, bath & cable. $165/week, Female preferred. Call 301-922-6393 Upper Marlboro- Unfurnished basement Near PG College, $1000 Util incl. 301-628-8926 XX740 1x.25

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screens

24 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

MUST-SEE THIS WEEK

1

Let’s go channel surf

‘For the People’ 10 p.m. Tuesday on ABC

Another offering from executive producer Shonda Rhimes, this legal drama follows the challenges of six new lawyers working cases in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

YouTube creators get a bad rap due to the select few who use racist language (PewDiePie), make light of suicide (Logan Paul) or set fire to swimming pools (Logan’s brother Jake). To highlight that not everything on YouTube lives in the abyss of humanity’s worst impulses, a handful of journalists who cover the platform share a few channels worth checking out. ABBY OHLHEISER (THE WASHINGTON POST)

2 ‘Wild Wild Country’

Bobby Burns

youtube.com/sailorj

Marques Brownlee

Bobby Burns is a 21-year-old YouTuber who’s quickly become the most insightful mouthpiece on YouTube culture. In his videos, he’s demonstrated how YouTubers manipulate their audiences when delivering important announcements, and staged his own satirical talk show to point out the favoritism YouTube gives to popular late-night series in its Trending tab. Burns curates an important channel with interesting, educational content that’s beneficial to newcomers and daily users alike. JULIA ALEXANDER

Ingrid Nilsen

youtube.com/marquesbrownlee

Sometimes it feels as if tech YouTubers are only talking to each other. Watch a few different phone reviews, and you’re bound to hear the same jargon parroted straight off the manufacturer’s website. That’s not the case with Brownlee. His videos are informative, aesthetically pleasing and easy for tech enthusiasts and average consumers alike to understand. He doesn’t appear to be in the pocket of any particular company but instead seems as though he truly wants to inform his viewers about new tech. RIC SANCHEZ

“Black Panther” crosses $1 billion take at worldwide box office

THE WASHINGTON POST)

youtube.com/bobbyburnsofficial

YOUTUBE

Makeup is an important prop for Sailor J’s online persona, but the joy of her videos is in the juxtaposition of a familiar YouTube format — the beauty tutorial — with comedy. Her breakout series, “How to be a ______,” dunks on each zodiac sign, and she’s also in the middle of a similar one on Hogwarts houses. But she’s also used the tutorial format to make serious comments: After the Parkland, Fla., school shooting, Sailor J uploaded a trenchant review of the (fictional) “Thoughts and Prayers” makeup line. A.O.

Following its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, this documentary series (produced by Jay and Mark Duplass) about the Rajneeshpuram cult that rocked Oregon in the 1980s comes to Netflix. (EXPRESS/

3 ‘Rise’ 10 p.m. Tuesday on NBC

Loosely based on journalist Michael Sokolove’s book “Drama High,” this series from Jason Katims stars Josh Radnor as a high school English teacher tasked with staging the provocative musical “Spring Awakening.”

YOUTUBE

Sailor J

YOUTUBE

YOUTUBE

Friday on Netflix

youtube.com/thegridmonster

Before her tearful coming-out video went viral in 2015, Nilsen built her brand as a popular beauty vlogger with a channel full of the exact types of content you’d expect from that kind of creator. Nowadays, she’s established herself as the kind of YouTuber who will, in the same breath, tell you which foundation will look good on your oily T-zone and also about the time she interviewed President Barack Obama about marriage equality and domestic terrorism. Both of which she does with equal prowess. MADISON MALONE KIRCHER

Guillermo del Toro announces Jenkins-Del Toro International Film Scholarship for aspiring Mexican filmmakers


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 25

screens

MARC SILVER | BROADCAST MUSE

“Corporate” is the new “Office,” a warped 21st-century vision of the workplace that is diabolically clever. The sitcom launched on Comedy Central in January and has earned enough of a following to get the green light for a second season: It was the highest-rated basic-cable prime-time comedy of the

2017-2018 season among males 18 to 34! The Season 1 finale airs at 10 p.m. Wednesday. The corporation is Hampton DeVille, a global conglomerate whose slogan is “we make everything” — agricultural goods, pharmaceuticals, industrial weaponry. Now they’re elbowing into personal tech with Obelisk, a supersized tablet. But the firm is a tad tone-deaf. In the wake of a deadly hurricane, a social media staffer

COMEDY CENTRAL

Odd job: On ‘Corporate,’ work is hell, and hilarious The cubicle-bound cast of “Corporate” is just trying to make it until 5 p.m.

tweets, “Pick up the Obelisk to follow hurricane news. You’ll be blown away by the size.” The internet is furious! Junior-executives-in-training Matt and Jake (portrayed by series creators Matt Ingebretson and Jake Weisman) are ordered to find and fire

Kristen Wiig cast as villain Cheetah in “Wonder Woman” sequel, director Patty Jenkins tweets

the tweeter. The culprit turns out to be an expert on tracking down workplace cakes, so off the threesome goes in search of birthday/sorry-yougot-fired/successful-bypasssurgery baked goods. They bond and the boss is furious. While “The Office” had a

warm heart, “Corporate” beats cold and cruel. But both shows excel at capturing workplace absurdity. The finale is about the company’s creation of a new national holiday, “Remember Day,” in which people give gifts (like, oh, the Obelisk tablet) to commemorate 9/11. If that’s not tasteless enough, the episode involves an act of swanocide and Bin Laden sex jokes. And more of the show’s deadpan humor. As morose Matt observes, “My co-workers are my family. I know that because they constantly mistreat me and I need their approval.” Read Marc’s previous columns at washingtonpost.com/muse

Christopher Abbott to star in George Clooney’s “Catch-22” limited series on Hulu


26 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

trending @SAMGREIS VIA TWITTER

Fiona

NBC

Timothy

“Sturdy built, totally winter-ready and waterproof. Only comes in brown, but that’s actually a plus for me.” @OREGONZOO, using the hashtag #rateaspecies to share a “review” of an otter. The zoo’s initial tweet Friday set off a trend among zoos and science museums. @MontereyAq tweeted a photo of an ocean sunfish, calling it a “TOUR DE FORCE: Simply superlative. ... Absolute head-turner.”

“How is Kate McKinnon playing Robert Mueller AND Arie so perfectly all at once?!” @TATUMTOLLNER, reacting to the “Saturday Night Live” skit

in which Kate McKinnon mashed up the recent “Bachelor” breakup with the Robert Mueller investigation. McKinnon, acting as Mueller, broke up with “Bachelor” contestant Becca, saying he wanted to charge President Trump with obstruction of justice instead of collusion — in the same way that Arie the Bachelor changed his mind from Becca to Lauren.

“Your DNA will decide if you’re the one for our little diva. ... Are you OK with paparazzi? Most importantly, are you willing to relocate to Cincinnati?” @CINCINNATIZOO, replying to Timothy,

a hippo at the San Antonio Zoo, who tweeted his interest in dating Fiona the hippo. Judging by the Cincinnati Zoo’s reply, there are a lot of requirements.

“Thanks, mom.” @SAMGREIS, Sam Greisman — the son of actress Sally Field — posting a photo of his meeting with Olympian Adam Rippon at the Human Rights Campaign Dinner on Saturday. During the Olympics, Sally Field tweeted at Rippon, sending him a screen shot of texts in which she and her son discussed his crush on the figure skating star. Fans on social media were thrilled that the two met.

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The Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science (TCORS) at the University of Maryland School of Public Health in ColleŐe ParŬ is seeŬinŐ ciŐareƩe sŵoŬers to ƉarƟciƉate in a study to ŵeasure brain ǁaves ǁhile sŵoŬinŐ͘ ParƟciƉaƟon involves ϲ laboratory visits lasƟnŐ about ϯ hours each͘ Test ciŐareƩes ǁill be Ɖrovided͘ To ƉarƟciƉate you ŵuƐt͗ ͻ e aŐe ϭϴ to ϱϱ years ͻ e a current sŵoŬer ͻ e riŐhtͲhanded ͻ e in Őood health ͻ e ǁillinŐ to ansǁer ƋuesƟons ͻ SŵoŬe a ciŐareƩe ͻ e ǁillinŐ to coŵƉly ǁith research study reƋuireŵents

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The Tuesday health & fitness section in Express


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 27

fun+games Horoscopes

Scrabble Grams

PAR SCORE 145-155, BEST SCORE 206

Sudoku

EASY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You know that what you’re looking forward to is going to take it out of you, so you must begin preparing right now. ARIES (March 21-April 19) All you may need today is a pep talk, and you know just whom to go to for words of wisdom and encouragement. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You can go through the motions, or you can commit fully — the choice is yours, but you must make it today. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You are able to give someone precisely what was promised — on time and beyond your hopes and expectations. This is a great new beginning. FRIDAY’S SOLUTION

CANCER (June 21-July 22) You’re

waiting for an offer that is likely to open many doors for you — but you still have to jump through a few hoops.

FRIDAY’S SOLUTION

you to set aside anything that distracts you from your primary purpose at this time. Focus on what gets results and maximize gains. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Offering someone else needed assistance will come back to benefit you at a later date that you cannot yet foresee. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You’re able to match another step for step, but that doesn’t mean you’ll come out on top. Be sure to employ your unique methods.

FOUR RACK TOTAL Make a 2-7-letter word from the letters in each row. Add points of each word using scoring directions at right. Seven-letter words get a 50-point bonus. Blank tiles used as any letter have no point value. Scrabble is a trademark of Hasbro in the U.S. and Canada.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) It’s time for

Comics

Forecast By Capital Weather Gang

POOCH CAFE | PAUL GILLIGAN

40 | 32 TODAY: Heavier snow lurks to the south and southwest but may have trouble moving into the Washington area in a meaningful way. Areas of light snow are possible, but the snow will have a tough time sticking to roads and sidewalks, given temperatures rising through the 30s to near 40 and the strengthening March sun.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You may

be torn between two extremes today, each of which offers you risk and potential reward in equal measure. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Certain things may be obscured right now, especially with regard to the immediate future. Some signs are pointing in unexpected directions. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You may have to engage in some last-minute repair work today before something can progress the way you had hoped. Get your tools ready.

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE | STEPHAN PASTIS

AVG. HIGH: 54 RECORD HIGH: 89 AVG. LOW: 36 RECORD LOW: 11 SUNRISE: 7:24 a.m. SUNSET: 7:12 p.m.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) The cause you currently support is in need of more than you can currently offer, but in little time you’ll be able to come through.

DAILY CODE

today in histor y

Need more Sudoku? Find another puzzle in the Comics section of The Post every Sunday and in the Style section Monday through Saturday.

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

45 | 30

42 | 28

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

49 | 29

55 | 34

QP

1912: The Girl Scouts of the USA has its beginnings as Juliette Gordon Low of Savannah, Ga., founds the first American troop of the Girl Guides.

1980: A Chicago jury finds John Wayne Gacy Jr. guilty of the murders of 33 men and boys. (The next day, Gacy is sentenced to death; he was executed in May 1994.)

2003: Elizabeth Smart, the 15-year-old girl who vanished from her bedroom nine months earlier, is found alive in a Salt Lake City suburb with two drifters, Brian David Mitchell and Wanda Barzee. They are serving prison terms for kidnapping her.

Get more news and forecasts at washingtonpost.com/weather or follow @capitalweather on Twitter.


28 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

fun+games Crossword 1

BUT-TING IN 42 Vigorous enthusiasm

Exuberant blowout

3 Croat or Bulgar, e.g.

6

Par ___ (by air)

7

Packs down

37 Argentine grassland

49 Fat-nosed antelope

8

Tighten manuscripts

38 Japanese currency

50 False prefix

Himalayan mystery

39 Reverberating

44 Herbal tea

14 Norway city

46 Once more

15 Execute a duck?

49 VP Agnew

16 It can be hacked

51 Shirt-closing activity

9

57 Dirt blemish

10 Hail units

58 The Little Mermaid

19 Double-play result

59 Malarialike symptom

20 Be forced 23 Public wedding announcement 24 Large amounts 25 Autumn droppings

60 Teen embarrassment 61 Ambiguous 62 “Lymph” attachment

43 Like some prunes 45 Deep anger

55 Naked

13 What proctors watch over

46 Palestinian Mahmoud

56 Novel “___ Love”

21 Little Miss Bobbsey

FRIDAY’S SOLUTION

12 Be a slacker

22 “Teaser!” 25 “Besides which ...”

30 Vein glory?

64 “By Jove!”

27 Strong scent

31 Potato state

65 “Enterprise” jaunt

28 Shower alternative

26 Caffeinated drink

29 “Eureka!” relatives

40 Dory feature 41 O’Hara portrayer

DOWN 1

“Humbug!” kin

2

About 1/3 of Earth’s land

53 Informal hand grenade 54 Frankenstein’s flunky

28 Garage slots

36 How the tortoise beat the hare

52 Altar approach

44 Book features

11 Resort island

63 Yard storage facility

33 Generic guy’s name

48 Make reparations

Large fruits

10 “Table” seasoning

18 “500 words or less,” e.g.

35 .00001 newton

Suds in a tub?

5

Word after “ahoy”

17 Place for a film king

47 What a stream may create

4

43 “Iron Chef” necessities

5

34 ___ Bator (place)

31 Certain wading bird 32 Used a spade 33 Actor Lugosi

EDITED BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER

ACROSS

Football Extravaganza! Theater, dance, music and more!

also appearing Doug Flutie, Marcus Allen, Tim Brown, Derrick Henry, Ronnie Lott, Fred Biletnikoff, Calvin Ridley, Lamar Jackson, Rob Kelley, Ricky Williams, Charlie Ward, Chris Weinke, Jim Plunkett, Warren Moon, Jonathan Allen, Carli Lloyd, DeMarcus Ware, LaDainian Tomlinson and a lot more.

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To advertise: e-mail guidetoarts@washpost.com, or call 202-334-7006. N14-1782 3x5


MONDAY | 03.12.2018 | EXPRESS | 29

people GETTY IMAGES

Andy seeks a man to never talk to

DICTIONARY ENTRIES

Is there a word for PDA on social media?

AP AND GETTY IMAGES

Cheryl Cole and Liam Payne last week used social media to bait rumors that their relationship is in trouble. Cole shared an Instagram photo of herself with Tom Hardy, which the site Fram News tweeted was done to make Payne jealous. On Friday, Payne responded to the tweet with, “I am jealous tbh I want to cozy up to Tom Hardy too.” (EXPRESS)

COURT CASES

Nun involved in Perry convent lawsuit dies Sister Catherine Rose Holzman, 89, a nun who was involved in a lawsuit with Katy Perry over the sale of a convent in Los Angeles, died Friday after collapsing during a court appearance. Hours before her death, Holzman spoke to KTTV, decrying a judge’s ruling that cleared the way for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles to sell the convent to Perry. (AP)

OVERTIME

Emma’s PR guy has rough week

“I have about 19 people ready to stop me from tweeting. Many of them paid.”

CIRCULATION MANAGER | Charles Love

STORY EDITOR | Adam Sapiro

Call 202-334-6800 or fax 202-334-9777

CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Jon Benedict

FEATURES: express.features@wpost.com

MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS | Jeffrey Tomik

LOCAL: page3@wpost.com

MANAGING EDITOR, FEATURES | Rudi Greenberg

NEWS: express.news@wpost.com

DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR | Dave Tepps

CORRECTIONS: Spot a mistake? Let us know at corrections@wpost.com.

LENA DUNHAM, as quoted by People magazine, speaking at a South by Southwest panel about how she’s going to try to avoid controversy

FIND US ONLINE

TO PLACE A DISPLAY AD: Call 202-334-6732 or email expressads@washpost.com

SPORTS: express.sports@wpost.com

verbatim

NEWS AND PROJECTS EDITOR | Zainab Mudallal

MARKETING MANAGER | Travis Meyer

FOR CIRCULATION: Call 202-334-6992 or email circulation@wpost.com.

Robin Wright and her boyfriend, Clement Giraudet, were spotted in Paris last week wearing gold bands, leading Page Six to speculate that the two might have gotten married. The site reported in December that the pair were dating. In a recent interview with MatchesFashion, Wright called Giraudet “my true love.” (EXPRESS)

WHO WE ARE

CONTACT THE NEWSROOM

TO NOMINATE A HAWKER AS STAR DISTRIBUTOR: Email circulation@wpost.com.

Robin has nerve to marry man we’ve only known since December

EXECUTIVE EDITOR | Dan Caccavaro

HOW TO REACH US

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

RUSHING IT

Emma Watson is dating Chord Overstreet, sources told People magazine. The new couple had been seen leaving the Vanity Fair Oscars party, and were later photographed walking hand-in-hand in Los Angeles last week. “They met through friends,” a source told People. “They might seem like an odd match but they actually have very similar personalities.” A source told Page Six, meanwhile, that “Emma wants to keep things quiet and private.” A representative for Watson had previously told Page Six that she and the “Glee” actor are “just friends.” (EXPRESS)

Published by Express Publications LLC, 1301 K Street NW, Washington, DC 20071, a subsidiary of WP Company, LLC

Call 202-334-6200.

In an interview with Entertainment Tonight, Andy Cohen revealed that he and Clifton Dassuncao have split up. Their relationship was first reported in April 2016. When asked to describe the type of man he’s seeking to date, the “Watch What Happens Live” host said, “Someone who’s very independent, someone who has their own thing going on. Maybe someone who’s never seen ‘The Real Housewives.’ ” (EXPRESS)

GETTY IMAGES

SIMILARITIES

DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR | Serena Golden SENIOR FEATURES EDITOR | Lori McCue

SENIOR FEATURES WRITERS | Sadie Dingfelder, Kristen Page-Kirby NEWS EDITORS | Sean Gossard, Rachel Podnar, Briana Ellison SPORTS EDITOR | Gabe Hiatt ART DIRECTOR | Ellen Collier DESIGNER | Jenna Kendle COPY EDITORS | Vanessa H. Larson, Greg Kern PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR | Matthew Liddi

FOUNDING PUBLISHER | Christopher Ma, 1950-2011

TWITTER:

@WaPoExpress INSTAGRAM:

@WaPoExpress FACEBOOK: facebook.com/ washingtonpostexpress FLICKR: Join our Flickr pool at flickr.com/groups/ wapoexpress to share your view of the D.C. area, from events to landscapes and everything in between. Your work could appear in Express.


30 | EXPRESS | 03.12.2018 | MONDAY

7/26/17



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