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The Skinny on Dipping Fondue-Style

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A New Workout Comes Out Swinging

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THE HOPE OF HIS HOMELAND After two disappointing Olympics, Alex Ovechkin heads to Sochi determined to lead Russia’s hockey team back to the podium 8

FEBRUARY 2, 2014 | A PUBLICATION OF

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Your Best Shot | Submitted by Jim Harvard of Washington, D.C.

eye openers

PDA

French Bulldog Really Into It If you can’t find a cute guy or gal to kiss this month, a pet shop in Fredericksburg, Va., has you covered — in slobber. On Feb. 15 and 16, Dog Krazy will offer a kissing booth where humans can get a wet one from the dog inside for $1, Fredericksburg Patch reported. Proceeds go to the Fredericksburg Regional Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. PUB CRAWLING

It’s Not That Bad — Vomiting On the Sidewalk’s Still Legal Passengers on Arlington’s Trolley Pub — a 14-person pedal-powered conveyance that makes stops at bars — still won’t get to drink onboard, ARLNow reported. Virginia’s state legislature killed a bill that would have allowed such shenanigans on the Trolley Pub and also in limos, buses and boats. In other cities, the Trolley Pub, which is steered by a sober operator and powered by the pedaling of its possibly inebriated riders, is BYOB. OPPRESSION

Council Still Against Young Whippersnappers on Lawn Alexandria’s “lewd and lascivious” cohabitating couples may soon be living in sin legally. According to Alexandria Patch, last month the City Council began considering amending some outdated pieces of city code. One section of the code forbids cohabitation. Another bans shoeshine stands on Alexandria streets. (EXPRESS)

THE TRAFFIC THAT TIME FORGOT: Capitol Hill resident Jim Harvard was walking toward the Anacostia River late last month when he came across a tunnel that used to be an access point to the Southeast Freeway. Today, the tunnel contains decommissioned traffic signs, a big pile of dirt and other materials.

Want to see your pic in print? Submit your best shot by joining our Flickr pool at flickr.com/ groups/wapoexpress. Share a photo from the Washington region, and it could appear here.

Find home service providers you can trust. With help from people you know.

Friends don’t let friends hire

We’ll help you get, and keep track of, provider recommendations from people in your social networks. Because that’s what friends are for.

tasteless interior decorators. Available Now! I Friendorsements I Directory I Coupons I Deals

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Your Best Shot | Submitted by Jim Harvard of Washington, D.C.

eye openers

PDA

French Bulldog Really Into It If you can’t find a cute guy or gal to kiss this month, a pet shop in Fredericksburg, Va., has you covered — in slobber. On Feb. 15 and 16, Dog Krazy will offer a kissing booth where humans can get a wet one from the dog inside for $1, Fredericksburg Patch reported. Proceeds go to the Fredericksburg Regional Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. PUB CRAWLING

It’s Not That Bad — Vomiting On the Sidewalk’s Still Legal Passengers on Arlington’s Trolley Pub — a 14-person pedal-powered conveyance that makes stops at bars — still won’t get to drink onboard, ARLNow reported. Virginia’s state legislature killed a bill that would have allowed such shenanigans on the Trolley Pub and also in limos, buses and boats. In other cities, the Trolley Pub, which is steered by a sober operator and powered by the pedaling of its possibly inebriated riders, is BYOB. OPPRESSION

Council Still Against Young Whippersnappers on Lawn Alexandria’s “lewd and lascivious” cohabitating couples may soon be living in sin legally. According to Alexandria Patch, last month the City Council began considering amending some outdated pieces of city code. One section of the code forbids cohabitation. Another bans shoeshine stands on Alexandria streets. (EXPRESS)

THE TRAFFIC THAT TIME FORGOT: Capitol Hill resident Jim Harvard was walking toward the Anacostia River late last month when he came across a tunnel that used to be an access point to the Southeast Freeway. Today, the tunnel contains decommissioned traffic signs, a big pile of dirt and other materials.

Want to see your pic in print? Submit your best shot by joining our Flickr pool at flickr.com/ groups/wapoexpress. Share a photo from the Washington region, and it could appear here.

Find home service providers you can trust. With help from people you know.

Friends don’t let friends hire

We’ll help you get, and keep track of, provider recommendations from people in your social networks. Because that’s what friends are for.

tasteless interior decorators. Available Now! I Friendorsements I Directory I Coupons I Deals

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WS, T HE NE E T A LIT L W E ASK

for what it’s worth DEFINITIONS

ETIQUETTE

How to Party, Politely Super Bowl Sunday is here. But before you don your team’s jersey and overdose on seven-layer dip, brush up on your manners. “There’s a place for manners in every situation in life,” says Crystal L. Bailey, the director of the Etiquette Institute of Washington. “The Super Bowl is not exempt.” Bailey, who teaches dining and social etiquette to people of all ages (she once had a mother call asking for advice about her 18-month-old!), offers some tips on how to be a super guest. Is it rude to show up fashionably late? “It’s absolutely rude to show up mid-game. You don’t want to miss the National Anthem.”

have are carrots and celery to go with wings.”

Is double-dipping still frowned upon? “Oh, the George Costanza. … The only double-dipping you should be doing is on your plate. Have a field day then, but not in the communal dip.”

Uh-oh … I need to burp … “It’s great if you have a napkin to cover your mouth, because no one wants to smell that, especially if you’re burping draft beer.”

How do I politely suggest that everyone watch the Puppy Bowl instead? “Definitely do not try to commandeer someone else’s remote. And don’t walk in front of the TV.” 

Be a Better Spectator, Sport “Twizzle” and “swizzle” may sound like words that Snoop Dogg, er, Lion would use while playing Twister in a sweater. Instead they’re real terms for moves in ice dancing, an Olympic pairs sport with big potential for a U.S. medal in Sochi. What do they mean? We asked Lori Cervinka, the skating director at Kettler Capitals Iceplex in Arlington.

VENN IN D.C.

Stuck in the Middle

What is the proper sportsbetting etiquette? “If you wager, expect to pay up. Don’t try to slink out of that at the end.” 

How do I get out of doing another keg stand?

“Stay away from the salads and the gourmet. I think the best vegetables to

“A ‘no thanks’ will do. Although it’s kind of fun … if you’re college-aged.”

For What It’s Worth is produced by Marissa Payne and Rachel Sadon. Have suggestions for the page? Email us at fwiw@wpost.com or tweet us @WaPoExpress.

BLUSTERY WINDS C CTI M TAR OR A N ND S T WI

S SAN AHAR DST AN ORM

RATHER WARM

DANTE’S “INFERNO”

Is it OK to bring the organic vegetable tapenade I made from my CSA as a snack?

Swizzle A simple way of traveling across the ice. “A swizzle is something toddlers learn,” Cervinka says. “You push your heels out, and then your toes, to make footballs or lemons with your feet.”

Twizzle A one-legged turn that makes a “3” shape on the ice, Cervinka says. It’s a critical element for ice dancers, who are judged on how well they synchronize their twizzles.

PAINFULLY FRIGID

D.C. WINTER 2014

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on the spot

They started with ideas I’ve had for years that I wanted to find a way to work into a script at some point, a television series or a screenplay. And when I looked at them, often they were too specific for that: It’s nothing Michael Scott would say, it’s nothing that a romantic come-

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What inspired these stories?

about aren’t especially interesting from a guy who played the temp on “The Office.” It’s not the biggest life experience from which to explore the issues of love and perfection and the universal. Whereas in fiction I feel that you can because it’s

ONE SHORT APPOINTMENT!

That’s another thing that I wanted to do with this book is make the live performance of fiction a night of entertainment, to make this something someone might actually want to leave their house and go see. I wrote the book while workshopping it at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in Los Angeles once a month. So going to Politics and Prose, to me it’s not just about selling books, it’s about creating a night of entertainment.

kw

A number of reasons. One is that I just didn’t feel like talking about myself. I was the only one who would be interested. Another is a lot of the biggest things I think

I love fiction and I read a lot of it. Unfortunately, a lot of the best stuff isn’t very accessible or entertaining. It’s deep, it’s profound, but especially in short fiction, a lot of the best stuff is internal and cold and distancing. I feel like for better or worse, I want to be an entertainer.

rP

Why fiction instead of the personal essays many comics write?

You’ll be performing some of the stories Saturday, right?

ve

In “One More Thing” ($25, Knopf), a book of 64 short stories, B.J. Novak uses fiction to slyly ask big questions: How do you plan your time in heaven when you have an eternity? What if the tortoise and the hare had a rematch? What’s the best way to find love? (The answer to that last one is a red T-shirt). Novak, who wrote for and starred in “The Office,” is at Politics and Prose on Saturday.

But within fiction, you stayed in the vein of humor.

no

ACTOR, AUTHOR OF ‘ONE MORE THING’

dy would have, but it’s something that was very much on my mind.

Ha

B.J. NOVAK

not about who’s telling it to you, it’s just about what the story is.

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SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR DC WATER’S LONG TERM CONTROL PLAN MODIFICATION. Let your voice be heard at: dcwater.com/green.

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02.02-02.08 THE BEST THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK | COMPILED BY EXPRESS STAFF

Super Bowl XLVIII We don’t need to tell you it’s Super Bowl Sunday (who doesn’t watch the Super Bowl?). But if you need a refresher, the 48th annual battle between men in tights pits the Seattle Seahawks against the Denver Broncos. Kickoff is scheduled for 6:25 p.m. on Fox, and Bruno Mars is your halftime entertainment.

FRIDAY

Gabriel Sherman

FOX

‘New Girl’

The Super Bowl’s OK, but the most exciting event this Sunday comes after the big game’s final whistle when Prince — yes, that Prince — gueststars on the Fox sitcom “New Girl.” The Purple One, who’s a huge fan of the show, asked to make a guest appearance. He’ll come between lovebirds Jess (Zooey Deschanel, left) and Nick (Jake Johnson, right) at a party they all attend.

We have improvisational and sketch comedy troupe Upright Citizens Brigade to thank for the careers of alums Amy Poehler, Horatio Sanz and Ed Helms. Given UCB’s track record, it’s worth stopping by their show at Sixth and I to catch the unscripted antics of possible future comedy stars. Sixth and I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW; Sun., 7 p.m., $20-$25; 202-408-3100, sixthandi.org. (Gallery Place)

approach by skipping the electronics altogether. Rams Head On Stage, 33 West St., Annapolis; Tue., 8 p.m., $39.50; 410-268-4545, ramsheadonstage.com.

BETH ORTON

THURSDAY

Phillips After 5: ‘Nordic Lights’ Washington had so many polar vortices this year that we had to look up the plural of vortex. The Phillips Collection makes winter bearable by channeling the mood of Scandanavian countries where cold is cool. There’ll be an aurora borealis-inspired light show, lamp installations, Lite Brites, Nordic cheeses and beers, and theremin music. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW; Thur., 5 p.m., $10-$12; 202-387-2151, phillipscollection.org. (Dupont Circle)

JOY ASICO

SUNDAY

UCB TourCo

“Folktronica” is exactly what it sounds like: a blend of folk sounds and electronica beats. It’s also how Beth Orton, above, made her name. But with her latest album, “Sugaring Season,” the British singer-songwriter, known for her haunting vocals, takes a more stripped down

Connecticut Ave. NW; Friday through Feb. 23; (202) 783-7777, marivanna. ru/washington. (Farragut North)

Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW; opens Fri. through Aug. 13; 202-6331000, mnh.si.edu. (Smithsonian)

SUNDAY

Beth Orton

‘Unintended Journeys’ Red Cross International estimates that natural disasters caused by climate change create more refugees than wars do. The Natural History Museum’s latest photo exhibit focuses on the people displaced by these natural disasters, following the families on their unintended journeys which continue long after the storm ends. National

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

trying Russian eatery Mari Vanna’s three dishes from Sochi, including spicy, meaty Solyanka Soup ($11), left. The special menu kicks off its 16-day run Friday with a happy hour and free vodka shots. Mari Vanna, 1141

OPENS FRIDAY

FRIDAY

Eat Like You’re In Sochi! Celebrate the fact that you’re not an Olympic athlete and can eat whatever you want by

WEDNESDAY

Leyla McCalla While touring with roots-rock act The Carolina Chocolate Drops, multi-instrumentalist Leyla McCalla, right, found time to record an album of her own, “VariColored Songs: A Tribute to Langston Hughes.” The record includes original songs as well as rootsy numbers she’s composed to Hughes’ poetry, and Haitian folk songs. Hamilton, 600 14th St. NW; Wed., 7:30 p.m., $12$14; 202-787-1000, thehamiltondc.com. (Metro Center)

Fox News chief Roger Ailes has been a polarizing figure in American politics and media for nearly two decades. In the new book “The Loudest Voice in the Room,” author Gabriel Sherman discusses how Ailes helped divide the nation. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW; Fri., 7 p.m., free; 202-3641919, politics-prose.com. (Van Ness)

IN THEATERS

‘The LEGO Movie’ FRIDAY | In this kid-friendly adventure comedy, an ordinary Lego man must team up with the brand’s famous figures, voiced by a slew of celebrities including Will Arnett and Morgan Freeman, to save the Lego world from destruction.

SATURDAY

Sybarite5 Sure, string quintet Sybarite5 can play Mozart if you’d like, but the group is at its best (and its most interesting) when covering songs by rock bands like Radiohead and Led Zeppelin. Even if you think it’s not your thing, Sybarite 5 proves, once and for all, that classical music can rock. Sixth and I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW; Sat., 8 p.m., $25; 202-408-3100, sixthandi.org. (Gallery Place)

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JEAN MEISEL 50–65 HORIZON LINE JaNUary 23–May 4, 2014

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cover story

To Russia, With Love Ovechkin heads into the Sochi Olympics with the weight of a nation on his shoulders Winter Olympics Long before he dreamed of planting a kiss on the Stanley Cup, Alex Ovechkin yearned to feel the weight of Olympic gold around his neck. The Washington Capitals captain was bred for such lofty aspirations; he’s the son of Tatyana, a perennial World and European champion and two-time Olympic gold medalist in basketball, and Mikhail, a former professional soccer player. Ovechkin’s childhood home in Russia was adorned with his mother’s medals, which hung on the walls. While Ovechkin’s collection of

personal achievements — including three Hart Trophies as NHL MVP and three goal-scoring titles — places him among the greatest individual players the hockey world has ever seen, he can’t relate to the team success that surrounded him growing up. Other than two first-place f inishes at the 2008 and 2012 World Championships, the 28-year-old has experienced nothing but disappointment in tournament play. In eight NHL seasons, Ovechkin has never taken the Capitals past the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs. And in two previous Winter Olympics, he and his fellow Russians have failed to medal. The Sochi Games are Ovech-

Olympic Ovi Although there’s a small sample size of Alex Ovechkin’s Olympic statistics, here’s how his Olympic stats with Russia compare to his NHL stats with the Capitals. GAMES PLAYED Capitals: 648 Russia: 12 GOALS PER GAME Capitals: 0.63 Russia: 0.58 ASSISTS PER GAME Capitals: 0.58 Russia: 0.17 POINTS PER GAME Capitals: 1.2 Russia: 0.75 +/Capitals: +66 Russia: +4 * Stats entering Jan. 24

kin’s next opportunity to attain the team glory that has eluded him. Beginning on Feb. 13, when Russia takes the ice for its opening preliminary-round game against Slovenia (7:30 a.m. on MSNBC), Ovechkin and his countrymen will have the host nation’s undivided attention. “Growing up in Russia, Olympics, it’s a lot for us,” Ovechkin said. “Maybe somebody don’t understand it, but it’s the biggest event maybe of our year and maybe of my life.” Prior to its dissolution in 1991, the Soviet Union won seven of nine gold medals in men’s ice hockey between 1956 and 1988, and the Unified Team, representing six of the 15 former Soviet republics, claimed gold in 1992. Since then, however, Russia has only two medals — a silver in 1998 and a bronze in 2002 — to show for its past five

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cover story

RUSSIA IN ITS FIRST GAME OF THE SOCHI

ry and rendering Ovechkin, who mustered only three shots on goal in that game, virtually invisible. It was an embarrassing defeat that led to a sixth-place finish, and Russia had its poorest overall showing in the Winter Olympics since it began competing in 1912. That prompted then-president and current Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev to call for the nation’s top Olympic officials to resign. “Let’s put up a bunch of guillotines and scaffolds up on Red Square,” Russia coach Vyacheslav Bykov told Russian reporters sardonically at the time. “We have 35 people on the hockey team. Let’s go to Red Square and dispatch with them all.” This month, Russia will aim to restore its national pride as well as its place among the world’s hockey elite by boasting one of the most formidable 25-man rosters, particularly its world-class forward corps. With the NHL taking an Olympic break from Feb. 9 to 26, Ovechkin will be joined by the likes of the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Evgeni Malkin, the Detroit Red Wings’ Pavel Datsyuk, and Ilya Kovalchuk, formerly of the New Jersey Devils and now playing in the KHL. “Since I was a little kid and since everybody [on the roster] was a little kid, their dream was to play in the Olympic Games,” Ovechkin said. “Especially we have the chance to represent the country in Sochi, it’s unbelievable. ... I don’t think somebody is going to just say their mission is done just to be in the Olympic Games. Our mission is to win the gold medal and play our best hockey.” The expectations for the Russian hockey team are enormous, but Ovechkin, no stranger to intense scrutiny, is well-equipped to carry them on his shoulders. “It’s going to be lots of pressure,” he said. “It’s going to be lots of media. It’s going to be lots of attention out there. Of course, when you get closer to that, you just have to handle it.”

OLYMPICS ON FEB. 13 VS. SLOVENIA

ADAM VINGAN (FOR E XPRESS)

GETTY IMAGES PHOTOS

2013: Ovechkin carried the Olympic torch in Greece last September.

2006: Russia finished fourth in Ovechkin’s first Olympics in Turin.

Olympic appearances, four involving NHL participation. A fresh-faced Ovechkin made his Olympic debut in 2006 at the age of 20. He scored five goals, including the game-winner in Russia’s 2-0 quarterfinal victory against Canada, and the team finished fourth. He was named to the all-tournament team. Four years later, Ovechkin, by then a two-time NHL MVP with the Capitals, headlined a Russian squad that was among the pretournament favorites in Vancouver, but both he and the team flamed out. The homestanding Canadians exacted revenge, blowing out Russia in a 7-3 quarterfinal victo-

2010: Russia and Ovechkin were eliminated by Canada at Vancouver.

“I don’t think somebody is going to just say their mission is done just to be in the Olympic Games. Our mission is to win the gold medal and play our best hockey.” — A LE X OVECHKIN, WHO WILL LEAD

From D.C. to Sochi Far fewer Washington-area locals compete in Winter Olympics than in Summer Games. Here are five of the handful of athletes with ties to the area (other than Alex Ovechkin) who will be competing in Sochi. (E XPRESS)

Nicklas Backstrom SWEDEN, HOCKEY D.C. connection: Washington Capitals Outlook: The Caps center led Sweden in scoring in the Vancouver Olympics in 2010, when the team finished fifth. Backstrom is one of several high-profile NHL stars on this year’s Sweden squad.

Ashley Caldwell U.S., FREESTYLE SKIING D.C. connection: From Ashburn, Va. Outlook: The former gymnast, 20, missed the last two years of competition after tearing ligaments in her knee, but she’s healthy now. Caldwell was named to her second Olympic team despite an 11th-place finish at a World Cup event.

John Carlson U.S., HOCKEY D.C. connection: Washington Capitals Outlook: The 23-year-old is a first-time Olympian and is one of eight defensemen on a young U.S. team. He’s the first Caps player to earn a spot on the U.S. squad. (NHL players have been allowed to participate since 1998.)

Elana Meyers U.S., BOBSLED D.C. connection: Former George Washington University softball shortstop Outlook: The 29-year-old, who won bronze in 2010 at Vancouver, is expected to pilot the top U.S. women’s sled with former Illinois shot putter and sprinter Aja Evans.

Ashley Wagner U.S., FIGURE SKATING D.C. connection: West Potomac High grad Outlook: After a disappointing U.S. Figure Skating Championships, in which she fell twice, Wagner has altered her long program for the Olympics. The 22-year-old looks to shake off her fourth-place finish in Boston.

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shopping Toeing the Line ITALIAN WOOL SUIT? Check. Brushed leather satchel? Check. Woven silk skinny tie? It’s all in the details. That’s why D.C.-born Penance Hall’s new line of luxury dress socks should also suit such discerning gents (currently $20 a pair via a Kickstarter program on penancehall.com; $35 thereafter). Crafted in the U.S. from a breathable, super-soft South Carolina wool, the toetoppers boast no-droop, wicking construction as well as sly, striped style.

NOTHING SAYS “I think you’re

the cat’s meow” like a handmade Valentine’s Day card. Analog (716 Monroe St. NE; shopanalog .com), the vintage boutique in D.C.’s Brookland neighborhood, helps you show your affection via a free Valentine-making workshop Feb. 7, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Baltimore street artist Mary England guides wannabe love birds as they make missives from provided glitter, pipe cleaners and construction paper.

D.C. Toy Story AMERICAN GIRL, the plaything behemoth that pushes wellgroomed little dolls on wellgroomed little girls, just launched its “girl of the year,” and she’s a hometown one. Isabelle ($120, American Girl, Tysons Corner Center, 1961 Chain Bridge Road, McLean, Va.; 877-247-5223, americangirl.com) comes with a book about her D.C. life, including ballet classes and a mom who works at the Smithsonian.

JASON HORNICK (FOR EXPRESS)

Art That’s Full of Heart

Find Field, Deliver Tobie Whitman always has her hands full, usually with a bunch of beautiful flowers. Earlier this week, the former international policy expert-turned-florist launched Little Acre, a field-to-vase floral delivery service that sources all of its blossoms within the D.C. area (littleacreflowers.com). One seasonal arrangement is available daily in small ($50), medium ($75) or large sizes ($100, shown). Buds might include tulips, lilies and hyacinths; arrangements arrive wrapped in rugged canvas repurposed from coffee bags from a local java shop.

For Football Parties, a Good Call WHETHER YOU’RE MAKING CHILI or grabbing 10 dozen buckets of chicken wings to go, your Superbowl spread will be a winner if it’s set up on Cake Kitchen Papers’ touchdown runner ($30, Stylish Patina, 410 S. Maple Ave., Falls Church; 703-6638428, stylishpatina.com). It’s also a nice backdrop for football-themed cupcakes.

A Whole Pilotto Love IN DOWNTOWN D.C. BOUTIQUES, one of Peter Pilotto’s punchy printed dresses runs

$800 or more. But when the edgy Brit designer’s collaboration with Target launches Feb. 9 (in stores and at target.com), you can score way-cheaper spins on his futuristic, acid-dream designs. Styles, many beach-ready, include wild totes (shown, $40), a halter dress in mixed blue, yellow and black floral, ($35) and our favorite, Vans-type slip-on shoes ($30) in a killer black-and-white tribal pattern.

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home

She’s Blogged A Lot of Hours Local style blogger Meg Biram now sells glam decor online

IKEA

Ikea’s popular Expedit bookcase (shown, $139) splits up a small room.

Strong Division Split up a room chicly using curtains, open bookcases or even vintage barn doors Space Solutions On the Hill, a House divided usually leads to ugly gridlock. But at your own place, splitting one room into two can make good design sense, whether it’s for privacy concerns or to break up a large space. A folding screen might be the first thing you’d think of to, say, fence off the bed in a 400-squarefoot Logan Circle studio or to create a dressing area in a Vienna bungalow. But other options — curtains, netting, bookcases, plants — can also cordon off things harmoniously. Still, “don’t just create a little box and break up the sight lines of a room,” says Darlene Chimaliro, a D.C. interior designer with Studio MOD(ish) (studiomodish.com). “Having light come through is key.” And don’t throw a Japanese Shoji screen in your living room simply because you crave an exotic vibe. “It should make sense why you’re dividing a room,” says Arlington decor blogger Michele Ginnerty of My Notting Hill (mynottinghill

.blogspot.com). This means “yes” to using velvet drapes to section off your desk in a big bedroom but “no” to wedging Grandma’s ’70s brass screen into a weensy bathroom. Here are some ways to stylishly put a partition in your place.

Door Scores In a jumbo, one-room loft, “think about mounting a big door to the ceiling on a sliding track,” says Chimaliro. Score patina-ed vintage ones at Community Forklift (4671 Tanglewood Drive, Edmonston, Md.; 301-9855180, communityforklift.com); non DIYers should consider hiring a contractor to install them.

Screened In Renting? Folding screens can create a new “room” sans nails. Look for rustic styles at World Market (world

market.com) or glam ones at Jonathan Adler (1267 Wisconsin Ave. NW; 202-965-1416, jonathanadler.com).

Shelf Life Open bookcases — think Ikea’s blocky Expedit — can break off part of a room and provide storage, all without spoiling a small room’s sight lines. “It’s nice to even use a piece of furniture that’s only four or five feet tall,” says Ginnerty. “That way you signal a separate area, but don’t block out light.”

Curtain Call The same off-the-rack drapes (try Pottery Barn, West Elm or Restoration Hardware) that you buy for windows can also be mounted on the ceiling to create a home-office zone or bed nook in a studio apartment. Measure first, then buy curtains that hit the floor, or you’ll get an unappealing high-watered look. One sleek mounting option: Umbra’s Glide Track System ($30$50, bedbathandbeyond.com).

Split a room with a screen ($995, jonathanadler .com).

Other Options

If privacy isn’t an issue, you can zone a room via a long line of house plants (just be sure you’ve got a good source of light) or, if you’ve got hippie leanings, an old-fashioned bead curtain.

JENNIFER BARGER (EXPRESS)

Meg Biram is a lifestyle and media powerhouse: When she’s not covering home, beauty or fashion trends on her blog, megbiram. com, the D.C. resident is helping other bloggers find their voices via B Bar, a business she co-founded with a pal (shopthebbar.com). Recently, Biram launched an online shop where she sells rich textiles and luxe beauty products (shop .megbiram.com). How would you describe your aesthetic? It’s global-midcentury-modernmeets-a-glam-Kelly Wearstler feel. I love marble and glass with a highfashion feel, but at the same time I love midcentury modern teak wood chairs with a Moroccan rug. Those styles seem so different. Why do they work together? I think it’s because I follow my eye and I just go with it. Because I’m not an interior designer, I don’t have all those rules in my head. I think if you find items you really love, you can figure out a way to pull them together. Where are your favorite places to shop in D.C.? There are a lot of cool little global

YVONNE ROCK PHOTO

Chic Finds

Local lifestyle blogger Meg Biram runs an online shop and consulting business.

stores. If you want an African mud cloth, you can find 10 stores that carry that. I also like And Beige, GoodWood, Salt & Sundry and Jonathan Adler. How do you juggle all of your projects? I really love everything I’m doing. It’s kind of like my hobbies are my job, so I don’t really mind working a lot. I think to be an entrepreneur who has really big dreams you have to be slightly crazy in a good way. I definitely have that. Is your blog Washington-centric? I talk about D.C. because I live here, but I want to keep a global focus. A lot of my topics are very neutral as far as where you live. HOLLEY SIMMONS (E XPRESS)

Meg Biram’s online shop sells globally sourced home goods like Turkish pillows (left, $108) and vintage kilim rugs (right, $450).

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food

Dip. Sip. Repeat. It’s frigid. Maybe you don’t want to make a reservation anywhere except your living room. No matter — invite over a few friends willing to brave the chill for a cozy evening of forks and corks. “I love fondue because it gives guests the chance to share and interact,” says chef Dennis Marron of Poste Moderne Brasserie (555 Eighth St. NW, 202783-6060). Communal, social and (yes) a little bit retro, the prep-inadvance and cook-your-own aspects of a fondue soirée also virtually guarantee a stress-free event for the host.

PLAN IT

Start with a good fondue pot, says Marron. If it uses Sterno, heat the fondue first on the stove before transferring to the table; if it’s electric, you can warm the mixture right in the pot. And if you have the space (and the extra pots), he recommends setting up three stations for cheese, oil or broth, and chocolate. Don’t have a dedicated pot? Brasserie Beck (1101 K St. NW, 202-408-1717) chef de cuisine A nthony Acinapura suggests melting and stirring the cheese or chocolate in a double boiler before pouring into a serving dish.

PREP IT

To keep their aged cheddar-truffle goat cheese fondue smooth and

creamy, Blue Duck Tavern (1201 24th St. NW, 202-419-6755) cheese specialist Matthew O’Herron has a little secret. “Use sodium citrate, which is essentially the same emulsifier used in processed American cheese.” To cook meat, vegetables and seafood, use a mixture of court bouillon (wine, broth and herbs), or the traditional, decidedly more decadent option. “Duck or beef fat work great, but you can also use clarified butter,” recommends Marron, but avoid olive oil — its smoking point is too low.

PLUNGE IT

“Get creative with your garnishes — think of off the wall, unexpected things to dip,” Acinapura says. Try Brussels sprouts, grapes and Tater Tots in cheese, broccoli

and scallions in oil, or cake slices and dried fruit in chocolate. Mix up dipping sauces to use on anything cooked in oil or broth: horseradish stirred into sour cream, curry powder sprinkled into plain yogurt, soy sauce added to chopped ginger, garlic and scallion, and Worcestershire sauce and shallots mingled with ketchup.

PAIR IT

Nopa Kitchen + Bar (800 F St. NW, 202-347-4667) chef Greg McCarty serves the same beverage that went into the cheese fondue — a sparkling wine, which goes with everything. O’Herron pours a bock or doppelbock with Alpine cheeses or aged gouda, and hoppy red ales with cheddar or British cheeses. Blue Duck Tavern sommelier Gene Alexeyev relies on the “razor-like crispness” of sauvignon blanc to cut through rich fondues, and earthy reds to bring out the forest and mushroom aromas in sharper cheeses. Brasserie Beck general manager Ramon Narvaez suggests Cotes du Rhone with court bouillon, and a glass of red zinfandel or ruby or tawny Port as a sweet finish with chocolate. KELLY A. MAGYARICS (FOR E XPRESS)

MAKE IT Poste Fondue 1

⁄2 lb. Emmenthal cheese, grated ⁄2 lb. Gruyere cheese, grated

1

2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 garlic clove, peeled 1 cup white wine 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon cognac 1 ⁄2 teaspoon dry mustard powder Freshly grated nutmeg THINKSTOCK

In a small bowl, coat the cheeses with cornstarch and set aside. Rub the inside of a fondue pot with the garlic, then discard. Over medium heat, add the wine and lemon juice, then bring to a simmer. Gradually whisk in the cheese. Add gradually and be sure it is fully incorporated. Once smooth, stir in cognac, mustard and nutmeg.

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health

Punch up your fitness routine by training like boxer Marlen Esparza

The most terrifying place to be in America this week? In the ring with Marlen Esparza at the USA Boxing National Championships in Spokane, Wash. It’s much safer to meet the 2 4-yea r-old f ly weight , who brought home a bronze medal from the 2012 Olympics, through the TV in your living room. With her debut DVD, “Power Boxing Workout” ($17, acacialifest yle .com), Esparza can show up any time to flash a smile and introduce viewers to technique, lingo and her training philosophy. “ I t ’s h o w I t h r o w punches. It’s how I learned,” says Esparza, who was drawn to her dad’s favorite sport at the age of 11. With this beginner program, she hopes to hook a broader audience on boxing, which she views as a training ground for more than just physical fitness: “It takes a lot mentally. You learn what you’re capable of.” You a l so lea r n what ’s required to power up a jab or cross. Much of the conditioning in the hour-long workout is focused on the lower body and core. (“You’re like a tree — you need a strong trunk,” she explains.) The lunge series that involves stepping out at every possible angle is something Esparza always relies on when she’s tapering before a big

Even Olympians make New Year’s resolutions. So what’s Marlen Esparza’s?

“I’ve been trying to work on my butt. I want to make it more proportional to my body.”

orders, “Live, jab, cross, hook, cross, escape!” When you’re wiped out, it’s time to join Esparza for her “shake out.” The ritual is partially a physical cool-down to loosen up her body and check in with how her muscles feel. But it’s also a chance for a mental release. “I can’t leave the gym and be worried. I have to get my mind correct. Whatever happened, it’s done,” Esparza says. “If you bring those other days with you, you’ll never feel fresh.” Working on this DVD has also served as a reboot for Esparza, who says that getting into a coaching mindset motivates her to fine-tune her own technique. “I know how to throw my jab. But if I explain it to somebody, I’m perfecting mine all over again,” she says. “The simplest things to me aren’t that simple.” It’s not diff icult, however, to understand her goal for this week’s championships — and every other fight leading up to the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro: “I want to not just win, but dominate.” Expect Esparza’s instructions on how to do that in future DVDs. V ICK Y HALLE T T (E X PRES S)

OTHER NEW DVDS

Denise Austin: Burn Fat Fast Latin Dance ($15) Local fitness guru Denise Austin offers her take on the Latin dance craze with four quick routines. In addition to the 30-minute cardio workout, Austin also leads a 10-minute toning segment.

Element: Barre Conditioning ($15) Sadie Lincoln, the creator of barre3 (a national chain of studios, with one in Georgetown), dips into her repertoire of tiny pulsing movements to make you sweat in two half-hour routines. Boxer Marlen Esparza wants to introduce exercisers to her sport.

R.I.P.P.E.D. Total Body Challenge ($17) Terry and Tina Shorter created this entire workout program — down to the tunes — that’s taught at gyms (rippedplanet.com). Try it at home with this high-energy 45-minute DVD.

RaceDots Attract Attention The race is always on for that new product that all athletes will want. And Jason Berry, who lives in Arlington, thinks he could win it. When the filmmaker and amateur cyclist signed up for a competition last year, he splurged on a pricey speed suit. But Berry couldn’t bring himself to pierce the thin fabric with safety pins to attach his race bib. “To put holes in it would be egregious,” says Berry, who improvised a solution with magnets he’d gotten as a gift instead. They had pictures of cats on them. “I thought for sure

RACEDOTS

Knockout Workout

match. There are no weights, but it’s still a killer routine, she says. And although she’s not usually one to stay still, Esparza will stop moving in order to strengthen her mid-section. “I started to fall in love with the plank in 2010 when I realized how it warms your body,” she says. “I have to shadow box for five to six minutes to get warm. I can hold plank for a minute instead.” (Viewers may get downright hot following along with all of Esparza’s plank variations in the workout, which include rotating from side to side and alternating leg and arm lifts.) Wonder why Esparza insists that you do some squats on the balls of your feet? “In the ring, you never get on your heels. That’s the wrong position. You always want to be ready to go,” she says.  Once Esparza has run through the conditioning and explained boxing basics, she tests that readiness with a barrage of moves. At that point, you should know how to get into “orthodox stance” ( le f t fo ot for w a rd , right foot back), and follow along as she

RaceDots are magnets that secure event bibs for runners and cyclists.

somebody was going to mock me.” He got the opposite reaction. Other competitors wanted a magnetic fix, too. Over the next few months, Berry experimented with various magnets. Ones that are too powerful are a pain to get on and off; ones that are too weak could let a bib drop. When he found ones that were just right, added a durable shell and developed an assembly mechanism, Berry had his invention: RaceDots. After a successful Indiegogo campaign, Berry’s fledgling company also had funding. (And plenty of it — the goal was $30,000, but folks donated more than twice that amount.) As of last week, the products are available for pre-sale on racedots .com: A set of five is $25-$29, with an expected delivery date in April. That’s just in time for race season. VICKY HALLETT (EXPRESS)

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fun & games ACROSS 1 Neutral vowel sound 6 Cutting the mustard 10 Vegas casino razed in 1996 15 Bit for Fido 18 The Ram, astrologically 19 Alex Haley miniseries 21 Send a message, in a way 22 Charles the Grammy winner 23 Shell out far more than one had hoped 26 Econ. measure for a country 27 Ugly duckling’s mother 28 Primitive dwellings 29 Feels poorly 30 Mammal fur 32 E.T. crafts 34 Floor measure

JUST FACE IT 35 Tigers and tabbies 36 Ringo on the drums 39 Opposite of good 42 Cravings 44 From Oslo 45 Words before date and record 46 Aspirin target, sometimes 50 Police datum 52 Infamous emperor 54 Canary, for one 55 Deep, as a voice 56 Carnaval site 57 Certain toast 62 Fuzz-covered fruit 64 Have regrets 65 Small child 66 Coffee additive 67 Panamanian, e.g. 74 Lampoon

Last Week’s Solution

77 Worthless cloth 78 Make a booboo 79 Bambi’s dad, e.g. 83 One way to be forgiving 90 “Much ___ About Nothing” 91 Cambridgeshire isle 92 Word on a sale sign, often 93 “If the ___ fits ...” 94 Fixture for home mixologists 96 Pertaining to the feel of a surface 99 Islamic religious leader 101 Puppies’ cries 102 Between the wings 105 Kosovo peacekeeping

group 106 Give great pleasure to 107 Felon on provisional release 110 It’s made to be broken, proverbially 112 Without a stitch on 114 Woody vines 115 “The Postman Always Rings Twice” character 116 Common gifts for dads 118 Indian butter 122 “To the max” suffix 123 Evict forcefully 127 Pub drink 128 “Masterpiece Theatre” host Alistair 129 Clear a frosted windshield 130 Zoroastrian sect member 131 ___ Plaines, Ill. 132 One who’s quite a feller? 133 Rigged out; dressed 134 Smacked, in Scripture DOWN 1 Easy dupes 2 Stick in one’s ___ (cause resentment) 3 Informal greeting 4 Mother’s standin 5 A silent butler may hold it

6 Builds a fire under 7 Pugilistic affair 8 Captain Kirk’s records 9 Ordinal number ender 10 Inscribed stone markers 11 Beards growing on farms? 12 Hero of “The Matrix” 13 Western villain 14 Prepared, as for a daunting task 15 Bach’s music maker 16 Chain of mountains 17 Does clerical work 20 Play the lead 24 It’s between pi and sigma 25 Went in haste 31 “Web Therapy” actress Kudrow 33 Baked this morning 34 It’s a real eyeopener 35 Intensely hot 36 Lewis Carroll creature 37 Decorative gateway in Japan 38 Archer’s weapon 40 Plywood layer 41 Urban additions? 43 Ankle-knee connector 47 Horsefly 48 Georgetown player 49 Decorative pitcher

51 Sea eagle 53 Power failures 54 Small amount of food 58 It can be monotonous 59 Funny DeLuise 60 Olympic-jacket letters 61 Enters a race 63 Clicked-on item 68 Immature salamander 69 Aesthetically pretentious 70 “Di-dah” lead-in

EDITED BY RICHARD AUER

71 Warm up, as leftovers 72 Hothead’s emotion 73 Ship’s employees 74 Proofreader’s “leave it” 75 Cry like a baby 76 African antelope 80 Raga rhythmmaker 81 Cope with change

I N N E XT W E E K’S

Dating isn’t just for twentysomethings. Next week, learn tips for navigating the Washington area’s singles scene at any age.

82 Prickly highland plant 84 Lawn-game item 85 Growing out 86 Earthenware crock 87 River that starts in the Swiss Alps 88 Prolonged unconsciousness 89 ___ up (excited) 95 Pre-text communique 97 Cel character

98 Open, as a gate 100 Having deep pockets 103 Farmer, essentially 104 Prefix with bond or dollar 107 Say “Not guilty” 108 Usher’s post 109 Fixed prices 111 Praise 113 Agency that entertains GIs 115 Soda nickname

116 Labor strenuously 117 Machu Picchu native 119 Villain’s opposite 120 Word that used to precede Germany 121 HOMES component 124 Sudoku component 125 PI 126 Alternative to FedEx

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fun & games WUMO | WULFF & MORGENTHALER

by

POOCH CAFE | PAUL GILLIGAN

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE | STEPHAN PASTIS

Sudoku

Time-saving guides to the monuments, museums and more

Insider advice on what to see, what not to see, and what’s family friendly

The best events and exhibits, handpicked by our editors

Street maps with step-by-step walking and Metro directions

DIFFICULT

Last Week’s Solution

How to Reach Us To place a display ad: Call 202-334-6732 or email ads@readexpress.com. Spot a mistake? Email corrections@readexpress.com. The newsroom: Call 202-334-6800, fax 202-3349777 or reach out to us on Twitter @WaPoExpress.

Who We Are

Need more Sudoku? Find another puzzle in the weekday Express, the Comics section of The Post every Sunday and in the Style section Monday through Saturday.

Publisher: Arnie Applebaum Executive editor: Dan Caccavaro General manager: Ron Ulrich Circulation manager: Charles Love Managing editor, features: Holly J. Morris Managing editor, news: Lori Kelley Creative director: Jon Benedict

Features editor: Jennifer Barger Copy chief: Diana D’Abruzzo Story editor: Adam Sapiro Deputy creative director: Adam Griffiths Senior editors: Sadie Dingfelder Vicky Hallett Kristen Page-Kirby

Section editors: Michael Cunniff Rudi Greenberg Beth Marlowe Marissa Payne Rachel Sadon Sara Schwartz Holley Simmons Jeffrey Tomik Art director: Allie Ghaman Designer: Rachel Orr Production supervisor: Matthew Liddi

Published by Express Publications LLC, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington, DC 20071, a subsidiary of WP Company, LLC

Download Today! XX0628 2x10.5 IPHONE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF APPLE INC., REGISTERED IN THE U.S. AND OTHER COUNTRIES. APP STORE IS A SERVICE MARK OF APPLE INC.

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We’ll buy your old entry door for

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EXPRESS_02022014