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doors opening. welcome home. The Metro Rider ’s Guide. Every second and fourth Wednesday off the month.

readexpress.com | @wapoexpress JANUARY 30, 2014

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Manning won’t seal ‘best ever’ status with a 2nd title, Elway says 15 ‘THIS CITY HAS FAILED’

D.C. firefighters are lambasted for refusing to aid a dying man 11

BRIAN OH (FOR EXPRESS)

And We Think It’s Bad Here The South is crippled by a freak winter storm that puts D.C.’s weather woes in perspective 13

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eye openers

CRANK CALLS

Woman Identified Herself to 911 Dispatcher as I.P. Freely Savana Jimenez, 22, called in a fake report of a gunman near a convenience store to help a friend avoid a traffic ticket over a taillight, said police in Roswell, N.M. Police said Jimenez called 911 earlier this week hoping the officer who pulled over the car she was a passenger in would get dispatched to the fake crime. Jimenez was arrested and charged with obstruction. (AP) HONEY, HAVE YOU SEEN THE CREAMER?

“He looked forlorn and quite cold so I thought he could use a gulp of coffee.” — TOM A S HOLMBERG, WHO OFFERED A WOULD-BE HOME INVADER A CUP OF COFFEE WHILE THEY WAITED FOR POLICE TO ARRIVE IN KVARNASEN, SWEDEN, THELOCAL.SE REPORTED. HOLMBERG HAD OVERPOWERED THE MAN, WHO ENDED UP APOLOGIZING FOR THE ATTEMPTED ROBBERY.

REPTILES

Rumor Began When Patron Rolled a Pair of Snake Eyes The Sands Casino Resort in Bethlehem, Pa, is trying to dispel a Facebook rumor that claims snakes have invaded the casino. Sands spokeswoman Julia Corwin said if there were snakes in the casino, they would have been caught on surveillance cameras. State police, who operate a station at the casino, reports “absolutely zero snakes” inside. (AP)

JOB HUNTING PARTY: College students shout as they raise their arms Wednesday at the start of a ceremony to mark the annual job hunt in Tokyo. Roughly 1,500 students, who will graduate from schools in March 2015, attended the annual ceremony which aims to encourage future graduates to look for employment.

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Nation

Mad at What Obama Didn’t Say President’s executive omissions leave some of his allies angry Washington For some White House allies, the long list of executive actions President Barack Obama announced in his State of the Union address was marred by a few glaring omissions. Gay rights advocates are seething over Obama’s refusal to grant employment discrimination protections to gays and lesbians working for federal contractors, safeguards they have sought for years. And some immigration overhaul supporters were disappointed that he did not act on his own to halt deportations. On both issues, White House officials say the place for action is in Congress, where success-

The Flare-Up That Stole the Spotlight A reporter for a New York City cable news station said Wednesday that U.S. Rep. Michael Grimm called him to apologize for physically threatening him at the end of an interview about the State of the Union. “I acceptGrimm Scotto ed his apology and I think we’re going to move on from here,” said NY1 reporter Michael Scotto. During the confrontation Tuesday, Grimm stalked out of an interview when Scotto tried to ask him about an investigation into his campaign finances. Then he stormed back and said, “Let me be clear to you. If you ever do that to me again, I’ll throw you off this f---ing balcony.” When Scotto protested, Grimm glanced at the camera and said, “You’re not man enough. I’ll break you in half. Like a boy.” (AP)

ful legislation would be far more sweeping than the steps the president could take by himself. But work on an employment nondiscrimination bill and an overhaul of the nation’s immigration laws is stalled on Capitol Hill, leaving advocates perplexed as to why their

calls for executive action did not fit into Obama’s vow to act “whenever and wherever” Congress will not. “In the absence of congressional action, an executive order that prohibits discrimination by contractors is a tailor-made solution to the president’s expressed aims,”

In Brief

said Fred Sainz, vice president of the Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest gay advocacy organization. Ben Monterroso, executive director of the immigration organization Mi Familia Vota, said: “The president said he is going to use executive orders to act where Congress fails, and we expect him to do the same with immigration reform.” The criticism comes from two constituencies that have reliably supported Obama. More than 70 percent of Hispanic voters backed Obama in the 2012 presidential election, and the gay community has praised him for his support. For gay advocates, the frustration that followed the State of the Union was compounded by the fact that the president announced a minimum-wage executive order that in many ways mirrored the action they are seeking. JULIE PACE (AP)

SAN FRANCISCO

San Francisco: Rescuers Didn’t Kill Asiana Victim The city of San Francisco on Wednesday contradicted a coroner’s findings that a girl survived an airliner crash in July only to be run over and killed by rescuers at San Francisco International Airport. Instead, the city says in a report obtained Wednesday that 16-year-old Ye Meng Yuan died when she hit the ground after the force of the impact tossed her from the jet. (AP) WASHINGTON

Farm Bill Passes House After years of setbacks, a nearly $100 billion-a-year compromise farm bill cleared the House on Wednesday despite strong opposition from conservatives. The five-year bill heads to the Senate, where approval seems certain. (AP) CHARLESTON, W.VA.

W.Va. Official: People Are Inhaling Formaldehyde A state official said Wednesday that he “can guarantee” that some West Virginians after the chemical spill are breathing in traces of a carcinogen while showering, but federal health guidelines say people need to breathe “a lot of it” to be a problem. The MCHM that spilled can break down into formaldehyde, Environmental Quality Board official Scott Simonton said. AP)

Spy Chief: Give Us Back Our Files Washington

Bo and Sunny Coach Puppy Bowl Pooches Four-legged participants in Animal Planet’s “Puppy Bowl” have been coached by two of the most famous dogs in America: White House pets Bo, left, and Sunny, right. Michelle Obama and her dogs recently helped more than a dozen pups from animal shelters get ready for the competition during drills on the South Lawn of the White House. The “Puppy Bowl” is like a football game, but the players are pooches. The program airs Sunday on Animal Planet. See a photo gallery of the puppy lineup at washingtonpost.com. (AP)

SAN FRANCISCO PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS (AP)

AT THE WHITE HOUSE

During a congressional hearing Wednesday, the nation’s spy chief called on former NSA contractor Edward Snowden to return a massive trove of classified documents. Speaking before a Senate panel about security threats, James Clapper Jr. outlined an array of dangers to American interests including a rise in cyber threats. But Clapper focused his opening remarks on Snowden, delivering a blistering stream of criticism in which he described the former contractor for the National Security Agency as a hypocrite who has severely undermined U.S. security. Clapper said the documents exposed by Snowden have bolstered adversaries, caused allies to curtail cooperation with the United States and put lives of U.S. intelligence operatives at risk. “Snowden claims that he has won and that his mission is accom-

James Clapper Jr. on Wednesday said Edward Snowden’s leaks put lives at risk.

plished,” Clapper said. “If that is so, I call on him and his accomplices to facilitate the return of the remaining stolen documents that have not yet been exposed to prevent even more damage to U.S. security.” Alluding to Snowden’s status as a refugee in Russia, Clapper scoffed at “his choice of freedomloving nations and beacons of free

expression from which to rail about what an Orwellian state he thinks this country has become.” The remark was among a series of exchanges that transformed the hearing into a platform for U.S. intelligence officials and some of their critics in Congress to vent frustration with the Snowden fallout. GREG MILLER (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Google Selling Motorola Phone Venture to Lenovo Google is selling Motorola Mobility’s smartphone business to Lenovo Group for $2.9 billion but keeping most of Motorola’s patent portfolio. Google Inc. bought the business for $12.4 billion in May 2012. Since then, Motorola has lost nearly $2 billion and shed thousands of jobs. (AP) NEW YORK

Trump for N.Y. Governor? Donald Trump is toying with the idea of challenging New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, saying the state’s high taxes and tight gun-control laws make the incumbent vulnerable. “I believe — and many people believe — I’m the only Republican who can win,” he said this week. (AP)


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Nation

Justice Department to hunt down thieves from holiday heist Washington

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U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. told lawmakers Wednesday that the Justice Department will hunt down the hackers who lifted 40 million debit- and credit-card numbers from Target customers. Appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Holder confirmed that his agency is investigating the holiday heist that exposed vulnerabilities of the nation’s creditcard system. Target first acknowledged the involvement of the Justice Department in late December, a week after revealing that customer account data was nabbed. Holder said the government is working to not only find the perpetrators, but also anyone who uses the stolen data for credit-card fraud. Hackers also grabbed personal information, including names and phone numbers, of up to an additional 70 million Target customers. “The Department of Justice takes seriously reports of any data breach, particularly those involving personally identifiable or financial

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE (AP)

Holder: We’ll Find Target Hackers

Eric Holder on Wednesday testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

information, and looks into allegations that are brought to its attention,” he said. Luxury retailer Neiman Marcus has also revealed that 1.1 million of its customers had been affected by a data breach. The cyberattack resulted in 2,400 cards from customers being used in fraudulent transactions. Security firm IntelCrawler identified a Russian teen as the author of the malware that was probably used in the cyberattacks against Target and Neiman. Earlier this month, the FBI warned retailers of more attacks to come after discovering 20 breaches in the past year caused by the same malware that corrupted Target’s system, according to a person familiar with the case. DANIELLE DOUGLAS (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Cruise Docks After 700 Fall Ill Bayonne, N.J. A cruise ship on which hundreds of passengers and crew members fell ill returned to port Wednesday in New Jersey, with health officials recommending that those still showing symptoms check in at hotels or seek medical care before heading home. One woman aboard the Explorer of the Seas yelled, “We made it!” as the ship docked in Bayonne. Other passengers, with blankets wrapped around them, stood on deck to watch the ship pull in.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said its latest count puts the number of those sickened at 630 passengers and 54 crew members. The ship was carrying 3,050 passengers. Health investigators suspect norovirus, but lab results are not expected until later this week. If norovirus is to blame, it would be one of the largest norovirus outbreaks in the past 20 years, the CDC said. Norovirus — once known as Norwalk virus — is highly contagious. (AP)


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World

STAVANGER, NORWAY

Snowden Nominated For Nobel Peace Prize Two Norwegian politicians on Wednesday jointly nominated former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden for Snowden the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize, saying his disclosures of secret U.S. documents have contributed to making the world more peaceful. (AP) AMSTERDAM

Horse Meat Found in Dutch Beef Products The Dutch Foods and Wares Authority says it has “preventatively” blocked all shipments from a Dutch slaughterhouse after investigators found horse meat in four shipments labeled as beef products. (AP)

The Brutality of Blasphemy Law Pakistan’s religious minorities live in fear of prosecution Lahore, Pakistan The elderly man’s troubles started when two young men milling inside his homeopathic clinic casually asked him about his religion. He thought they were merely curious. In fact, they belonged to an outlawed militant group and were carrying hidden tape recorders. Within hours, police officers showed up at Masood Ahmad’s clinic and played back the tape in which he explained the tenets of the minority Ahmadiyya sect, rejected by mainstream Muslims because it disputes the basic tenet of their faith that Muhammad is Islam’s last prophet.

Not Just Pakistan Other nations aside from Pakistan also have such laws on the books. Blasphemy offenses are punishable in more than 30 countries, including some with predominantly Christian populations, such as Poland and Greece, as well as Muslim countries like Indonesia and Pakistan, according to a 2012 report by the Rev. Chloe Breyer, executive director of the Interfaith Center of New York. (AP)

Ahmad was charged with blasphemy — which can carry the death penalty. The 72-year-old has been jailed since his arrest this month, awaiting a trial that could take months or even years to begin. Pakistan’s blasphemy law is increasingly becoming a weapon in the arsenal of Muslim extrem-

‘Angry Birds’ Site Hacked “Angry Birds” creator Rovio Entertainment Ltd. said the popular game’s website was defaced by hackers Wednesday, two days after reports that the personal data of its customers might have been accessed by U.S. and British spy agencies. (AP)

ists. Vigilantes frequently entrap and sometimes kill adherents of minority religions accused of blasphemy. They have created a climate of fear, forcing frightened judges to hold court sessions inside jails. The violence associated with Pakistan’s blasphemy law has been brutal. Three years ago, liberal Gov. Salman Taseer was assassinat-

Geneva

L’OSSERVATORE ROMANO/AP

Hearsay

“I can assure you that Sochi will be among the most security-friendly games and all the procedures will be very gentle and smooth.”

Christians and other religious minorities in Pakistan live in fear of violence.

DAYS AFTER releasing two doves that were immediately attacked on Sunday, Pope Francis seems to have made up with the world of birds. Above, he blesses a parrot, Amore, during a general audience at the Vatican on Wednesday.

ed by his own guard after defending a Christian woman charged with blasphemy. In a separate attack, militants gunned down Minority Affairs Minister Shahbaz Bhatti after he campaigned for changes in the law. Human Rights Watch chastised Pakistan’s record of protecting its religious minorities, saying in its 2014 world report that “abuses are rife under the country’s abusive blasphemy law, which is used against religious minorities, often to settle personal disputes.” Ahmad’s neighbors said they were saddened by his arrest but would not dare testify on his behalf. Mohammad Ershad, a barber, called Ahmad a “thorough gentleman,” but added: “People don’t want to say anything. Everyone feels it is better to save oneself.” K ATHY GANNON (AP)

Bitterness of Syrian War On Display at Peace Talks

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ANJUM NAVEED (AP)

In Brief

The bitterness and rancor stirred by Syria’s civil war were on full display this week at peace talks in Switzerland — and not just in the closed room where rival delegations are seeking a way to end the three-year conflict. For the first time since the country devolved into civil war, supporters and opponents of President Bashar Assad — many of them journalists — are meeting face to face. The mix is producing more than just awkward moments between people with vastly different views. In the hallways of the U.N.’s European headquarters and outside, tempers have flared. Scuffles

have broken out as journalists interrupt rival reports, government officials have received extraordinary public grillings, and a distraught mother confronted the Syrian government delegation at their hotel. “It has been a rare opportunity to meet and get to know each other again,” said Ibrahim Hamidi, a Syrian journalist working for the London-based Arabic regional newspaper, Al-Hayat. “It’s unnerving for both sides.” Meanwhile, U.N. mediator Lakhdar Brahimi said Wednesday the first phase of the Syria peace talks in Geneva will end on Friday, and that the gap between the government and the opposition remains “quite large.” ZEINA K AR AM (AP)

— DMITRY

CHERN YSHENKO, HEAD OF THE SOCHI OLYMPICS, ASSERTING THAT THE GAMES WILL BE A HUGE SUCCESS

It’s All Greek to Us:

A British court ruled Wednesday that Chobani, a U.S. brand of yogurt, cannot label its products “Greek” in the U.K. because they are made in America. A panel of three judges at the Court of Appeal upheld a lower court’s ruling, siding with Chobani’s rival Fage, which sells Greek yogurts under the “Total” brand. A judge ruled last year that products labeled Greek yogurt have to be made in Greece. (AP)


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what’snew@metro

A message from Metro General Manager Richard Sarles

Metro’s budget is an annual investment in the daily operations of the system and the capital improvements that will provide safe and reliable service with improvements for customers for years to come. We are now working on a budget for the next fiscal year, which runs from July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015. This budget continues to prioritize safety, while placing an added emphasis on improving our riders’ day-to-day experience. Metro riders have started seeing a number of these improvements already, and more are coming. As we continue to introduce new railcars, buses and Metro Access vehicles, customers benefit from a smoother, more reliable ride. In the coming fiscal year, we plan to put into service 64 of the new 7000-series railcars, as well as 151 new, low-floor Metrobuses and 150 new MetroAccess vehicles.

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Bicycle riders will benefit from new ‘Bike & Ride’ facilities, bike lockers or covered bike racks installed at 12 stations. And customers who use our parking facilities will benefit from brighter, energy efficient, LED lighting installed at all 25 Metro-operated garages. Bus riders can expect to see 46 new real-time arrival and customer information displays, accessibility improvements at 40 bus stops, and nearly 3,000 new bus stop signs and over 2,000 information cases updated. Finally, we will continue an aggressive schedule of track upgrades to improve the safety and reliability of a rail customer’s journey. From top to bottom, Metro is investing in safer, better and more service for our customers. We see this as money well spent so that we can continue to bring you a better ride.

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Metro’s New 7000-Series Railcars

Metro customers played a critical role in the design of Metro’s new 7000-series railcars. The cars offer a full slate of customer amenities and are a drastic departure from the old design. Take a look for yourself. Stainless steel hand holds reach to the ceiling and are located at each row of seats. “You don’t have to put your hand near someone’s shoulder and hover over them.” Harise P. – Silver Spring, MD

Seat cushions, lumbar support and higher seat backs offer comfort, and there’s ample space underneath the seats.

Fluorescent lights are replaced by new LED light fixtures, which are brighter and more energy efficient.

“There’s a lot more leg room, and a lot more freedom of movement once you’re in the seat.” Larry Y. – Arlington, VA

Metrorail riders will benefit from continued improvements being made at nearly every station. Another 14 new escalators will be installed at seven stations, 27 escalators will be rehabbed at nine stations, and 12 elevator rehabilitations will be completed in the next fiscal year. Brighter mezzanine lighting is being installed in all underground stations, and 23 station rehabilitation projects will clean and repair stations from top to bottom.

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Resilient, non-slip flooring replaces carpet. “The floors were the first thing I noticed. I just thought, ‘Wow, how nice!’” Arthur F. – Rockville, MD

Make Your Voice Heard Metro is considering a budget that invests in safer, better and more service in the coming year. The Authority proposes modest fare changes that would take effect July 1, 2014. Metro has also released its proposed FY15 Capital Improvement Plan. We want your input on both. Details are available at wmata.com. Here’s how to make your voice heard: • Complete an online survey at wmata.com/ budgetsurvey or send written comments to writtentestimony@wmata.com before 5 p.m. on February 11, 2014. • Attend a public hearing held on the dates and at the locations listed on the right. Each public hearing will begin at 6:30 p.m., with a half hour information session starting at 6 p.m. Register to speak at a public hearing by emailing speak@wmata.com.

Monday, February 3, 2014 Matthews Memorial Baptist Church 2616 Martin Luther King Jr Avenue, SE Washington, DC Anacostia station Tuesday, February 4, 2014 Montgomery County Executive Office Building 101 Monroe Street (enter on Jefferson Street) Rockville, Maryland Rockville station Wednesday, February 5, 2014 Arlington Central Library 1015 North Quincy Street Arlington, Virginia Ballston-MU station Thursday, February 6, 2014 Metro Headquarters 600 5th Street, NW Washington, DC Gallery Pl station


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Little Bicycle Love in Md. House Hearing Lawmakers appear to be skeptical of two proposed safety bills Annapolis Two bills pushed by Maryland bike safety advocates received a frosty reception in the General Assembly on Tuesday. One bill is intended to clarify the laws that apply to bicyclists using public roads and the other would expand by a foot — to four feet — the distance drivers are required to keep from cyclists while overtaking and passing them. A third bill that would allow driv-

ers to cross the double yellow line while passing bicyclists is scheduled for a hearing next week. “I’m a little shell-shocked that there are so many bike bills,” said Del. James Malone, D-BaltimoreHoward counties, who chaired the hearing before the House Environmental Matters Committee. “This year it’s four feet, and next year it’s five feet, and before you know it the cars are on the shoulders and the bikes are on the road.” Malone said many cyclists he observes “don’t pay any attention to the rules of the road.” The first bill would make a minor change in an existing law that bike advocates consider sig-

“I don’t think it’s going to have any effect whatsoever on drivers’ behavior or cyclists’ behavior.” — DEL . A NTHON Y O’DONNELL , R-CALVERT AND ST. MARY’S, WHO EXPRESSED SYMPATHY FOR THE DEATH OF TWO ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY CYCLISTS LAST YEAR BUT SAID HE DOUBTED THE FOUR-FEET PROPOSAL WOULD MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

nificant. Current law says that a bike rider has all the rights and responsibilities that a driver has. The change would say that a cyclist has those rights and “only” the responsibilities that a driver has. It’s a nuance, but the advocates explained that cyclists injured while obeying the law often have their insurance claims rejected

because insurance companies apply a different standard of conduct to bicyclists than they do to drivers. After the hearing, the bill’s sponsor, Del. Alfred Carr, D-Montgomery, was asked whether he thought the bill would be sent to the House floor. “You heard the comments of the sub-committee chair,” he responded, shaking his head.

Maryland, which passed a law in 2010, is one of 21 states that require drivers to stay a minimum of three feet from cyclists when they pass. Del. Jon Cardin, D-Baltimore, proposed to expand the distance to four feet, a step taken by Pennsylvania in 2012. The Maryland State Highway Administration, which has been working with bike safety advocates on an education campaign, spoke out in opposition of the fourfeet proposal Tuesday. Cardin pointed to the death of five cyclists and more than 800 accidents in Maryland in 2012 as evidence that laws should be stiffened. ASHLEY HALSEY III (THE WASHINGTON POST)

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Local

D.C. Man Dies After a Delay in Aid Three times people banged on the door of the Northeast D.C. firehouse door seeking help for a man who had collapsed. Each time the rescuers inside turned them away. In a nearby parking lot, Marie Mills cradled her 77-year-old father in her arms. “Help is on the way,” she told him. “There are firefighters right across the street.” But the firefighters didn’t come. When she spotted one standing in an open bay door, she ran to the curb. “Can you just come and help my dad?” she screamed. “What are you going to do, let my dad die in the street?”

Marie Mills holds a picture of her father, Medric Cecil Mills Jr., on Wednesday.

said is not in dispute. The incident, which was first reported by Fox 5, occurred about 2:30 p.m. in a shopping center across from the fire station. Officials said Mills’ daughter ran across Rhode Island Avenue and banged on the door of the station. A probationary firefighter trained in basic

life support answered and reportedly told her he couldn’t help until she dialed 911 and he was dispatched to the call. Tim Wilson, a spokesman for the Fire Department, said the firefighter contacted a supervisor, which is standard procedure when someone comes to a station seeking help. “That’s where it gets a bit muddied,” Wilson said, adding that officials are trying to figure out the sequence of events. “I’m quite disturbed and disappointed by what appears to be an inappropriate and timely response,” said Paul Quander, the deputy mayor for public safety. “The pain and the anguish that the family has gone through in unacceptable. There will be no rush to judgment, but we will be thorough, we will be precise and then we will act.” PETER HERMANN (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Controversy Over Va. Education Bill

Two cool kids in cool hats look cool against a cool Brooklyn wall. RANKINGS

A Chart Grows in Brooklyn … Leave it to Gawker, the NYC-based blog known for its snarky commentary and clickbait headlines, to identify the hippest ’hoods in other cities by comparing them to the hippest ’hoods in Brooklyn. Williamsburg = cool but waning, and Bushwick = cool and waxing. Did they get it right here? (E XPRESS) CITY

ITS WILLIAMSBURG

ITS BUSHWICK

Washington D.C.

H Street

Petworth

Baltimore

Hampden

Station North

Richmond

The Fan

Oregon Hill

Philadelphia

Northern Liberties

Fishtown

Pittsburgh

Lawrenceville

Bloomfield

SPENCER PLATT (GETTY IMAGES)

Richmond Virginia science teachers are opposing a bill in the General Assembly they say would open classroom doors to lessons challenging evolution, global warming and other mainstream scientific views. The bill, sponsored by Del. Richard Bell, would direct schools to encourage students to learn about scientific evidence and “respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about scientific controversies in science classes.” The bill says its provisions aren’t intended to promote or discriminate

against any religion, nor does it single out “controversies.” But Bell said that evolution and climate change “might fall into that category.” Such bills are part of a wave of so-called Academic Freedom legislation promoted across the country by proponents of Biblical creationism or intelligent design. Juanita Jo Matkins, past president of the Virginia Association of Science Teachers, said teachers already have the freedom to teach about scientific debates that are based on scientific evidence. MICHAEL ALISON CHANDLER AND MICHAEL L ARIS (THE WASHINGTON POST )

Hearsay

“Aguilar expresses thoughts of wanting to die and says he is ready to die. He expresses a general hatred of others.” — HOWA RD COUNT Y POLICE , TWEETING SOME OF THE FINDINGS FROM THE JOURNAL OF DARION AGUILAR, THE 19-YEAR-OLD GUNMAN WHO OPENED FIRE SATURDAY AT THE MALL IN COLUMBIA, MD. POLICE SAID AGUILAR WROTE OF KILLING PEOPLE, BUT DID NOT MENTION EITHER OF THE TWO VICTIMS OR ANY OTHER SPECIFIC PERSON.

KATHERINE FREY (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Washington

Mills said it took 15 to 20 minutes for help to show up on Saturday, and only when a D.C. police officer f lagged down an ambulance that happened to pass by. Her father, Medric Cecil Mills Jr., died of an apparent heart attack at Washington Hospital Center that afternoon. He had worked for the District parks department for more than four decades and liked his job so much he hadn’t retired. “There are no words to describe how this city has failed,” Mills said on Wednesday. District authorities are rushing to investigate Mills’ death, ordering 15 firefighters on duty that day to headquarters for questioning. One was told to drive in from his home in Pennsylvania. While details of what precisely transpired inside the station are under review, the basic outline of what Mills has

JAHI CHIKWENDIU (THE WASHINGTON POST)

Nearby firefighters refused to help until they were dispatched

In Brief

Jim Graham has represented Ward 1 on the D.C. Council since 1998. WASHINGTON

Graham Now Faces Just One Primary Challenger Longtime D.C. Council member Jim Graham will now face a sole Democratic primary challenger in his bid for a fifth term representing Ward 1. Bryan Weaver, who ran against Graham in 2010, dropped out of the primary race on Wednesday. Weaver said that he will now run in the general election as a “progressive independent.” That leaves Brianne Nadeau as the only Democrat challenging Graham. Nadeau is a publicist and former neighborhood commissioner. (AP) ANNAPOLIS

Md. Ice Breakers Clearing Chesapeake Waterways This winter’s chilly weather had crews breaking up ice on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries Wednesday for the first time in years. The Department of Natural Resources’ John Gallagher says this is likely the most ice Maryland has had in at least five years. The freezing weather has created ice about 6 inches thick. (AP) RICHMOND

Report: Va. Population Growth Slowed in 2013 University of Virginia demographers say the state’s population growth slowed last year, but it’s still outpacing the nation. They said the state’s population grew by less than 1 percent to 8.3 million between 2012 and 2013, the slowest growth since before the recession. Still, Virginia posted the 14th highest growth rate in the nation. Since 2010, the fastest-growing locality in Virginia has been Fredericksburg. (AP)


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CREATIVITY Maryland Institute college of art Graduate programs INFORMATION SESSION Thursday, February 6, 2014 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM WASHINGTON MARRIOTT AT METRO CENTER 775 12th Street NW | Washington, DC 20005

To RSVP, visit www.mica.edu/dcmica

Apply to one of our campus-based or Online graduate programs:

| |


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Cover Story

Storm Strands Southerners In schools and on snarled roadways, thousands were stuck overnight

Major League Save Among the thousands of motorists trapped on Atlanta’s frozen interstates was Atlanta Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman, who tweeted that he was stuck for 11 hours before being rescued by former teammate Chipper Jones on his four-wheeler. “A moment I’ll never forget!,” Freeman said on his Twitter account. Jones tweeted that Freeman “hugged me the whole way home!” (AP)

Kevin Moore hands out water Wednesday to one of the many stranded motorists on Interstate 285 in Dunwoody, Ga.

JAIME SARRIO (ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION/AP)

Helicopters took to the skies Wednesday to search for stranded drivers while Humvees delivered food, water and gas — or a ride home — to people who were stuck on roads after a winter storm walloped the Deep South. Students spent the night on buses or at schools, commuters abandoned cars or slept in them, and interstates turned into parking lots. The problems started when schools, businesses and government offices all let out at the same time. As people waited in gridlock, snow accumulated, the roads froze, cars ran out of gas and tractor-trailers jackknifed, blocking equipment that could have treated the roads. It wasn’t clear exactly how many people were still stranded on the roads a day after the storm paralyzed the region. By Wednesday afternoon, traffic began moving around Atlanta, though it was still slow going in some areas. The timing of when things would clear was also uncertain, but today will be warmer, around the upper 30s. Among the commuters trapped in the gridlock was Jessica Troy. “We literally would go 5 feet and sit for two hours,” said Troy, who along with a co-worker spent more than 16 hours in her car before finally getting home late Wednesday morning. Their total trip was about 12 miles. The rare snowstorm deposited mere inches of snow in Georgia and Alabama, but there were more than 1,000 fender-benders. At least six people died in traffic accidents, including five in Alabama. Elsewhere, Virginia’s coast had up to 10 inches of snow and parts of

BRANDEN CAMP (AP)

Atlanta

Stranded motorists take shelter Wednesday at an Atlanta pharmacy. Thousands were stranded across the region after a Tuesday snowstorm of less than 3 inches hit.

Local Comparison Some folks from the area were quick to draw comparisons between the D.C. region’s snowy commutes and the situation in Atlanta. “Before you complain about #DC not being able to handle snow please look at these photos from ATL,” wrote @dmbosstone on Twitter. But others found the Southern scene eerily similar to the local fiasco on Jan. 26, 2011, when federal workers were sent home early just as the snow started, snarling traffic on dozens of major commuter routes from Annapolis to Dulles. Hundreds ran out of gas or just walked away from their cars, and some commutes stretched as long as 13 hours. “Everything happening in Atlanta is deja vu. It’s crazy. Almost exact scenario to DC in 2011,” @NFLGoodwitch wrote Wednesday on Twitter. (E XPRESS/ THE WASHINGTON POST )

North Carolina had up to 8 inches. But Atlanta, hub to major corporations and the world’s busiest airport, once again found itself unprepared to deal with the chaos — despite assurances that city officials had learned their lessons from a 2011 ice storm that brought the city to its knees. Some residents were outraged that more precautions weren’t taken this time around and schools and other facilities weren’t closed ahead of time. Georgia leaders were aware of public angst and tried to mitigate it. Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed took some of the blame for schools, businesses and government all letting out at the same time, and he said they should have staggered their closings. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal also fended off criticism. “I would have acted sooner,” Deal said. “But we don’t want to be accused of crying wolf. Because if we had been wrong, y’all would have all been in here saying, ‘Do you know how many millions of dollars you cost the economies of the city of Atlanta and the state of Georgia by shutting down businesses?’ ” HR AY HENRY AND RUSS BYNUM (AP)

10,000

The number of students in metro Atlanta schools who were stranded in classrooms through the night Tuesday. Eleven school buses were stuck on the roads, forcing 239 children to spend the night on board. (AP)

70

The number of snowplows clearing roads in metro Atlanta on Wednesday. On Tuesday, many crews couldn’t get out because of the massive gridlock that crippled the region. (AP)

Forecasting Snafu? After receiving backlash, famed Alabama broadcast meteorologist James Spann conceded Wednesday that his forecast for Birmingham — which predicted only a dusting of snow later in the day, around 5 p.m., rather than 11 a.m. — was “botched,” and he accepted responsibility for the mess that followed. But Al Roker said on NBC’s “Today” show that Atlanta’s mayor and Georgia’s governor should have been prepared. “They took a gamble,” he said. “They didn’t want to pre-treat the roads. I don’t think they wanted to spend the money. This was poor planning … pure and simple.” (THE WASHINGTON POST/E XPRESS)


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Sports

No Flag for Indian Athletes Despite his country’s Sochi ban, Olympian will still compete

Sochi Olympics OPENING CEREMONY Friday, Feb. 7 7:30 p.m. on NBC

Shiva Keshavan, India’s most prominent Winter Olympics athlete, has no personal coach, funds his training largely with private donations and built his luge sled in his garage. Because India has no luge track, he often trains on wheels, shooting down winding Himalayan roads, dodging goats and noisy trucks. Despite his perseverance, Keshavan won’t be waving the tricolor Indian flag when he and two teammates enter the stadium in Sochi for the opening ceremony Feb. 7. The International Olympic Committee suspended the Indian Olympic Association a year ago for violations of its charter, including electing leaders with pending criminal charges. India’s Olympics officials failed to fix the mess in time for the start of the Sochi Games. That means the country’s three

OLIVER LANG (AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

Olympics

India’s Shiva Keshavan will be competing in his fifth Olympics next month.

“Yes, it is sad that this is the first time ever that the Indian contingent will not be carrying the national flag during the Winter Olympics. However, the Indian Winter Olympics athletes don’t stand a chance of winning any medals, either.” — AC TING PRE SIDENT OF THE INDIA N OLY MPIC A SSOCIATION V IJAY K UM A R

M A LHOT R A , TOLD THE OUTDOOR JOURNAL THIS MONTH

Mapping Team USA Olympics The delegation of athletes that the United States will send to the Winter Olympics will be the largest of any in Sochi when the games begin next week. Team USA will consist of 230 athletes (105 women, 125 men), w it h Ca lifornia sending t he most Olympians (20). Colorado and Minnesota will each send 19 with New York sending 18. Virginia has just two — Ashley Caldwell (freestyle skiing) and Ashley Wagner (figure skating). Here’s a look at the state-by-state breakdown. (THE WASHINGTON POST )

Olympic contenders — Keshavan and two skiers — can compete in Sochi as independent athletes, but they can’t carry the Indian flag or wear their country’s insignia, the IOC has said. Their national anthem will not be played during medal ceremonies. The suspension puts India in a league with other nations penalized by the IOC over the years, such as the losing countries in the two world wars, apartheid-era South Africa and the former Yugoslavia during the war in Bosnia. The Times of India called the opening ceremony, which will be watched by billions around the world, India’s “Walk of Shame.” “It’s quite sad,” Keshavan said, in a Skype interview from the French mountain town where he is training. “Rather than showcasing our country, it will be a shameful moment in the history of our country’s sport.”

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FL SOURCE: U.S. OLYMPIC TEAM; THE WASHINGTON POST

Keshavan, 32, will be competing in his fifth Olympics for India. In his first appearance, as a 16-yearold in Nagano, Japan, in 1998, he was India’s sole athlete. He won the gold medal in luge in the Asia Cup in 2011 and 2012, and a silver last year. He placed 27th at the Luge World Cup in Austria in November. Because he can’t wear an Indian uniform in the opening ceremony, he’ll don a special cap made from red, gold and yellow patterned fabric symbolizing his home village. And he will compete in a special luge suit made of fabric signed by his fans. India’s sports ministry agreed to help the athletes defray the costs of competing at Sochi. Keshavan received sufficient funds, but it has been unclear whether the other two competitors can afford to make the trip. Roshan Lal Thakur, secretary general of the Winter Games Federation of India, said he has received three-quarters of the $22,000 needed to send alpine skier Himanshu Thakur, cross-country skier Nadeem Iqbal and their coaches to the Games. Still, he doesn’t know where he will get the rest. “Maybe I have to borrow from friends,” he said. “Some miracle will happen, no?” ANNIE GOWEN (THE WASHINGTON POST )

1 ME MA10 RI 1 CT 9 NJ 4

BASKETBALL

3-on-3 in Olympics? The international basketball federation has renewed hope its streetinspired 3-on-3 game could yet be played at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. Reports in Brazil suggested new medal events could be added after IOC President Thomas Bach visited last week. “If this matter is reopened, 3-on-3 is ready,” International Basketball Federation secretary general Patrick Baumann told The Associated Press on Wednesday. (AP)


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SURPRISES IN STORE

Unassuming strip malls are home to some of the most authentic ethnic cuisine in the Washington area E8

The chorizo sope at Taco Bamba in Falls Church will make your mouth water.

GREG POWERS

The Jazz/Blues Project Soulful styling and glorious dance

WASHINGTONBALLET.ORG

Now through February 2 Sidney Harman Hall, The Harman Center

TICKETS START AT $35

shakespearetheatre.org 202.547.1122 Brooklyn Mack and Sona Kharatian, Photo by Steve Vaccariello


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THURSDAY

The best things to do this weekend

‘Ancient Ales and Archaeology’ Get a taste of history (and a buzz) at this Capitol Archaeological Institute event. You’ll hear stories about ancient shipwrecks while drinking cask ales from Baltimore’s Heavy Seas brewery. Power-

ONGOING

Nothing succeeds like “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying,” which still resonates five decades after it won the Tony for best musical. The comedic, 1960s-set story of J. Pierrepont Finch’s rapid ascent from window washer to powerful executive at the World Wide Wicket Company kicks off the Olney Theatre’s 2014 season. Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, Md.; through Feb. 23, $38.50-$63.50; 301-924-3400, olneytheatre.org.

CHRISTOPHER POLK (GETTY IMAGES)

‘How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying’

THURSDAY

J. Cole Rapper J. Cole, above, keeps good company. Artists as varied as Miguel, Cults, Kendrick Lamar, TLC and 50 Cent joined him on last year’s chart-topping “Born Sinner.” Then there’s his friendship with Jay Z, whose Roc Nation label released the album. Thursday, he’ll take the stage on his own. DAR Constitution Hall, 1776 D St. NW; Thu., 8 p.m., $42.50-$62.50; 202-628-4780, dar.org/conthall. (Farragut West)

house, 3255 Grace St. NW; Thu., 5:30 p.m., $40; 202-584-0062, capitolarchaeology.eventbrite.com.

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

Fortune Feimster A regular panelist on “Chelsea Lately,” comedian Fortune Feimster, above, has larger aspirations. She’ll star in Tina Fey’s new series for Fox, about a women’s college that starts accepting men. See her do stand-up this weekend and you can say you knew her before she was a TV star. Arlington Cinema

THURSDAY

Brazilian Girls After a brief hiatus in 2011, Brazilian Girls are back with their signature mix of jazz, reggae and electronica. The group, which is not actually Brazilian, brings its myriad instruments and eclectic sound to the Howard. Howard

& Drafthouse, 2903 Columbia Pike, Arlington; Fri., 10 p.m., and Sat., 7:30 & 10 p.m., $22; 703-486-2345, arlingtondrafthouse.com.

Theatre, 620 T St. NW; Thu., 9 p.m., $30; 202-803-2899, thehoward theatre.com. (Shaw-Howard U)

THE ADVENTURES OF ALVIN SPUTNIK: DEEP SEA EXPLORER THU FEB 6 - SUN FEB 9 / SIX SHOWS ONLY! “...akin to a theatrical Wall-E” —The New York Times

An award-winning one-man micro-epic that melds animation, live music and puppetry into a multimedia at the ed a tale a e of o enduring e du g love o ea e end of the world orld.

$18 Pre or Post-Show Dinner Special! Stop by Piola, indulge in authentic Italian cuisine, and get 20% off your meal. Sp Sponsored in part byy the Embassy of Australia; Pr ast Great Hunt; For Ages 12 + Presented by The Last

Free parking weekdays after 5pm and all day on weekends Rosslyn Metro + DC Circulator Stop: Two Blocks

www.artisphere.com 1101 Wilson Boulevard Arlington VA 22209 @Artisphere Facebook.com/ArtisphereVA


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SATURDAY

Hill Country Chili Cook-Off

Greensky Bluegrass

SUNDAY

SUNDAY

Maria Taylor

This is not your grandfather’s bluegrass. While Michigan-based Greensky Bluegrass does sound unmistakably like that banjo-happy genre, the band likes to take its songs in far-out directions, with improvisational jams that are closer to Phish than Bill Monroe. 9:30 Club, 815

Winter calls for a taste of chili — throw in a polar vortex and make it 10 tastes. That’s what a ticket to Hill Country’s Chili Cook-Off gets you, along with voting rights to determine who cooked up the best chili this side of Texas and deserves the People’s Choice Award. Hill Country Barbecue, 410 Seventh St. NW; Sat., 1 p.m., $10; 202-556-2044, hillcountrywdc.com. (Archives)

Every day should be Bill Murray Appreciation Day, but then we’d all be living in “Groundhog Day,” wouldn’t we? To cap off Super Bowl Sunday, Satellite Room honors the beloved actor with an evening of his films. Fans who attend the celebration, which falls on Groundhog Day, can enjoy Murray-inspired food and drink specials, like boozy, Stay Puft Marshmallow Man Milkshakes. Satellite

V St. NW; Sat., 7 p.m., $18; 202-2650930, 930.com. (U Street) PAGE E6

IN DINING THINKSTOCK PHOTO

One reason to see Maria Taylor on Sunday? The singer/ songwriter has worked with Moby, Bright Eyes and former R.E.M. singer Michael Stipe.

Bill Murray Appreciation Day

Room, 2047 Ninth St. NW; Sun., 10 p.m., free; 202-506-2496, satellitedc.com. (U Street)

The Fainting Goat’s dishes may seem simple, but they’re actually full of surprises. PAGE E10

Joshua Bell plays Mendelssohn

Rock and Roll Hotel, 1353 H St. NE; Sun., 8 p.m., $12; 202-388-7625, rockandrollhoteldc.com.

SUNDAY

Upright Citizens Brigade

EZRA SHAW (GETTY IMAGES)

SATURDAY

We have improvisational and sketch comedy troupe Upright Citizens Brigade to thank for the careers of Amy Poehler, Horatio Sanz and Ed Helms. Given UCB’s track record, it’s worth heading to Sixth and I to catch the unscripted antics of the touring company’s possible future comedy stars. Sixth and I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW; Sun., 7 & 10 p.m., $20-$25; 202-4083100, sixthandi.org. (Gallery Place)

The Neverland you never knew...until now.

MATTHIAS GOERNE baritone MICHELLE DeYOUNG mezzo-soprano THE CHORAL ARTS SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

Scott Tucker, artistic director

mendelssohn Violin Concerto

hindemith

conductor

JAN. 30–FEB. 1 CONCERT HALL

Photo by Eric Kabik

CHRISTOPH ESCHENBACH

BEG TON INS IG AT 7! HT

Organ Postlude: Thu., Jan. 30 performance followed by a mini-recital on the new Rubenstein Family Organ, free with purchase of concert ticket.

“UTTERLY CHARMING!”

JOSHUA BELL

violin

EISENHOWER THEATER NOW THRU FEB. 16 The Kennedy Center Theater Season is sponsored by Altria.

Tickets on sale now! (202) 467-4600 kennedy-center.org

Comedy at the Kennedy Center Presenting Sponsor

Tickets also available at the Box Office | Groups (202) 416-8400

PHOTOBYJENNYANDERSON

When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom’d: A Requiem “for those we love”


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Weekend Pass | entertainment

History’s Better Half The nation’s pioneering women get their due in Cokie Roberts’ kids book

Deborah Sampson Known for: Dressing as a man to fight in the Revolutionary War. One Daring Dame: Sampson was a particularly valiant soldier. According to an 1898 New York Times article, “On scouting parties she would usually ride forward, a little nearer the enemy than any of her comrades dared.” DIY Surgery: After being wounded in a skirmish, Sampson removed a musket ball from her own thigh to avoid being found out. A doctor finally discovered her secret when Sampson nearly died from fever, and she quietly left the Army after her recovery.

DIANE GOODE ILLUSTRATIONS

Thanks, Uncle Sam: Congress later voted to give her a soldier’s pension and some land in recognition of her service. After she died, her husband received survivors benefits.

Books You can count on kids to tell you the unvarnished truth. That’s what Cokie Roberts found out while reading her new children’s book, “Founding Mothers: Remembering the Ladies,” to 8-year-old granddaughter Cecilia. As they were nearing the end, Cecilia said, “It’s getting kind of long, Grandma,” Roberts says. “But she hung in there, and the next morning she said to her mother, ‘Come on, I want to read you Cokie’s book.’ ” Ceci lia pa r t icu la rly loved the story of Lydia Darragh, who eavesdropped on British soldiers during the Revolutionary War and passed along the intelligence by sewing coded messages behind coat buttons. If you’ve never heard of this ballsy Colonial spy, you’re not alone: Darragh is one of America’s many founding mothers who have been overlooked by historians, says Roberts, 70. “These were very, very interesting women who had tremendous influence, and there are tons that people don’t know about,” the veteran journalist says. Part of the problem is that letters written by men such as Benjamin Franklin were carefully preserved for posterity, while those written by women were considered historically unimportant and thrown away. For instance, Ben Franklin gets all the credit for being America’s first postmaster general, but it was actually his wife, Deborah Read Franklin, who did the day-to-day work. “Ben wasn’t even in the country; he was in England,” Roberts says. “So Deborah was left to run the postal service, and she did a great job.” Just because the founding mothers were unappreciated in their own time doesn’t mean we have to continue the trend. Here are just a few of the early American patriots featured in Roberts’ book who are worth telling your kids about. SADIE DINGFELDER (E XPRESS)

Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW; Thu., 10:30 a.m., free; 202-364-1919, politics-prose.com. (Van Ness)

Phillis Wheatley Known for: Writing an acclaimed book of poetry, even though she was a slave. Stolen Childhood: After being kidnapped from Africa, Wheatley was sold to a Boston family at age 7 or 8. She later wrote, “I, young in life, by seeming cruel fate/ Was snatched from Afric’s fancied happy seat: What pangs excruciating must molest/ What sorrow labor in my parents’ breast.” Prodigy in Chains: Wheatley began writing poetry around age 12. Her works were published in local newspapers and compiled into a book. Patriotism Through Poetry: Wheatley argued passionately for American independence, and she said that her urge for the Colonies to escape England’s shackles stemmed from her experience as a slave. She was freed after her owner’s death.

Deborah Read Franklin Known for: Being Benjamin Franklin’s wife. That didn’t entail spending a whole lot of time with her husband, who preferred to cavort around Europe with other women. A Brilliant Businesswoman: Deborah ran a chain of successful printshops and made additional money through savvy real-estate dealing, all while raising a daughter and Ben’s illegitimate son. Do Not Trample Her Begonias: While Ben was representing Pennsylvania in England, colonists mistakenly believed he supported the much-hated Stamp Act. An angry mob stormed the Franklins’ Philadelphia home, and Deborah stood them down with a shotgun in her hand. One No-Good Husband: Ben skipped his daughter’s wedding and didn’t even return to America when his wife suffered a disabling stroke. After Deborah died, Ben dreamed that he tried to renew their marriage in heaven and his long-suffering wife flatly refused. Illustrator Diane Goode used antique pens and watercolor to depict the women featured in “Founding Mothers: Remembering the Ladies.”


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entertainment | Weekend Pass

“I grew up listening to jazz, and what jazz is all about is … spending our time — like a monk — doing something really good.”

Grow Your Own Way Sax man Karl Denson keeps expanding his Tiny Universe, one jazzy groove at a time Music Never get complacent. Always keep growing. That’s the mantra saxophonist Karl Denson has embodied throughout his life — going all the way back to when he first picked up the instrument at age 12. “I looked at it from a real simple standpoint,” Denson says. “[I told myself] in a year, I am going to be better than I am now, and in five years I am going to be even better.”

INDIES & ARTIES

— K A RL DENSON, LEADER OF THE BAND TINY UNIVERSE, ON HOW HE GROWS

ALICIA J. ROSE

THROUGH MAKING MUSIC

Denson, 57, got his big break in 1989 when he laid down some choice sax solos on Lenny Kravitz’s debut album, “Let Love Rule.” He spent the next five years on the road with Kravitz, then moved on to work across genres with artists as varied as jazz trombonist Fred Wesley, rock-reggae band Slightly Stoopid and classic rocker Steve Winwood. And that’s on top of his solo albums and the bands he leads: groove-minded ensemble The Greyboy Allstars, acid jazz group The Karl Denson Trio and his main project, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe. Denson has continued to find new ways to meld rock, jazz, hiphop and funk. With Tiny Universe, his high-energy jam band,

the sounds are vivacious and fun — the kind of music that makes you get up and dance, Denson says. Tiny Universe is touring behind its latest album, “New Ammo,” which drops on Tuesday. On “My Baby,” a six-minute jam with funky keyboards and groovy horns and percussion, Denson shares vocals with Nicki Bluhm of The Gramblers. The track climaxes with a wild sax solo by Denson. “New Ammo” gives non-fans some familiar entry points into Tiny Universe, with covers of the Beastie Boys’ “Sure Shot” and The White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army.” Tiny Universe’s first album in more than four years is also the first since guitarist D.J. Williams and drummer Max MacVeety

“My first 10 records were really about what I had to say and me sitting down and actually composing and doing the whole process,” he says. “This [new] record is different. … The guys really have had their own input in how this record came to be.” The other members of the group have adopted Denson’s dedication to growth, spending time away from each other to practice their instruments so that they’re even stronger musicians when they reunite, Denson says. “I grew up listening to jazz, and what jazz is all about is … spending our time — like a monk — doing something really good,” Denson says. “It gets to be more fun making music together because we’re getting better.”

FILM RIFFS PARAMOUNT PICTURES

joined the band. While Denson is still unquestionably the leader of the group, playing sax and flute and handling lead vocals, he says this album has more of a whole “band sound and identity.” Williams, keyboardist David Veith and bassist Chris Stillwell all get songwriting credits as well.

Karl Denson is the master of Tiny Universe, his highenergy jam band.

Crappy Holidays In “Labor Day,” out Friday, Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin celebrate the end of summer with brats and beer. Kidding — he’s an escaped convict who threatens her and her son. It’s just as festive as some other holiday-pegged films. KRISTEN PAGE-KIRBY (EXPRESS)

1 ‘Gremlins’ In the 1984 horror-comedy, a dad thinks he’s found the perfect Christmas present. Fine print: If the instructions that come with it aren’t followed, it could spawn dozens of hellbeasts. It’s like if Satan owned Ikea.

2 ‘Independence Day’ In America, we celebrate our freedom by blowing stuff up. Especially if, as in this 1996 uber-summer blockbuster, said stuff is a bunch of aliens coming to steal our planet.

3 ‘The Passion of the Christ’ You’d think a film that ended on Easter would be a little more about bunnies and jellybeans and less about floggings and agony. Mel Gibson disagreed and directed this 2004 film.

SCOT T SHIGEOK A (FOR E XPRESS)

4 ‘Sleepless in Seattle’ 9:30 Club, 815 V St. NW; Fri., 8 p.m., $25; 202-265-0930, 930.com. (U Street)

Opens Fri.

‘Gloria’: This Chilean comedy-drama stars Paulina Garcia as Gloria, a woman who’s approaching 60 but is no cookie-baking grandma. One night, while out at her favorite dance club, she meets the recently divorced Rodolfo (Sergio Hernandez, at left with Garcia) and the two begin a relationship that would be hot even if they were 40 years younger. It’s a funny, refreshing movie that proves that love is still a possibility even after you’re eligible for AARP. Or whatever they have in Chile.

KRISTEN PAGE-KIRBY (E XPRESS) Landmark E Street Cinema, 555 11th St. NW; opens Fri.; 202-452-7672, landmarktheatres.com. (Metro Center)

Sam and Annie arrange to meet at the top of the Empire State Building on Valentine’s Day in 1993’s sweetest romantic comedy. Realizing they failed to make dinner reservations too, they end up eating at Popeye’s.

5 ‘Halloween’ In 1978, we met a new, terrifying foe: Michael Myers, who showed up to kill a bunch of people in celebration of Arbor Day. Holiday traditions are important, after all.


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Weekend Pass | entertainment From left: Greensky Bluegrass members Michael Arlen Bont, Dave Bruzza, Anders Beck, Mike Devol and Paul Hoffman.

WHO THE HECK IS ...

Comedian Sara Schaefer, 35, could have lashed out when she got word last November that MTV would not renew “Nikki & Sara Live,” the late-night series she co-hosted with Nikki Glaser. Instead, she took to Tumblr and posted a poignant essay about one of her earliest comedic fails, a ill-conceived sketch about a German and a robot. “In both cases,” she wrote, “I dove headfirst into a world I barely understood, and I gave it my f---ing all.” This weekend, she’ll give her all during a free standup show at the Kennedy Center.

Odd Jobs Before she went all-in as a comic, Schaefer worked as a financial analyst at a New York law firm, performing comedy on the side. In 2008, she got a job editing pop culture content on VH1’s Best Week Ever blog. The next year, she became head blogger for “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon,” where her work earned her a pair of Emmy awards. In 2011, she added to her résumé with a gig writing for “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.”

Best Friends Forever With “Nikki & Sara Live,” Schaefer and comedy partner Glaser gave tween culture a talk show, cracking jokes about pop stars and living out their dream of interviewing Justin Timberlake. The two were a natural pairing on TV, thanks to the rapport built on their hilarious, intimate (and currently on hiatus) podcast, “You Had to Be There,” which they record in Schaefer’s Brooklyn apartment. RUDI GREENBERG (EXPRESS) Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW; Thu., 6 p.m., free; 202-467-4600, kennedy-center.org. (Foggy Bottom)

MICHAEL WEINTROB

SARA SCHAEFER?

On to Greener Pastures Despite the name, Greensky Bluegrass transcends the genre Music The members of Michigan-based quintet Greensky Bluegrass don’t like labels, something they probably should have considered before settling on their moniker in 2000. “We’ve certainly had to fight with the fact that the word ‘bluegrass’ is in our name,” says dobro player Anders Beck, who joined the group in 2008. “It doesn’t bother us as much as it used to [but] when we were trying to evolve past bluegrass into something else, we were like, ‘Well, do we drop the bluegrass?’ But no, then you lose the pun.” Instead, Beck says, the band lets the music speak for itself, even if it’s hard to avoid being pigeonholed because “we’ll always play banjos and mandolins.” It would be fair to classify the group as bluegrass based on its last album, 2011’s “Handguns.” Banjo, mandolin, dobro, acoustic guitar and upright bass make for an unmistakably bluegrass-y sound, as does the twang in the vocals of singers Dave Bruzza and Paul Hoffman. It’s not until one of the record’s

“We jam onstage because we like to play music. Sometimes you just don’t want the song to end because it’s going somewhere cool.” — ANDERS BECK , WHO PLAYS THE DOBRO IN GREENSKY BLUEGRASS

last songs, “Bring Out Your Dead,” that Greensky reveals a darker, distorted side, one that’s more blues than bluegrass. According to Beck, the band’s forthcoming fifth album, “If Sorrows Swim,” will build on the more folksy elements of “Handguns” while continuing to push Greensky past its namesake. “It’s probably a little more accessible on some levels,” Beck says of the record, which he hopes will be out this spring. “There’s more of a pop sensibility in the writing. … There’s a couple songs … I could hear being on the radio.” Might the album, then, be a reaction to the pop success of such folk revivalist bands as The Lumineers, Of Monsters and Men, and Mumford & Sons? “No, we’re not smart enough to do that,” Beck says. “A lot of it has to do with what we’re listening to. … The songwriting was influenced more by Arcade Fire than Bill Monroe.” You could say a similar thing about the band’s live shows — just substitute the Grateful Dead or Phish for Arcade Fire. Greensky follows in the jam band tradition, varying setlists each night and playing left-of-center covers. During those 15-minute-long jams that crop up, Greensky sounds closer to a rock band. Close your eyes and you may even forget you’re listening to banjos and mandolins.

Cover This Greensky Bluegrass is known for its live covers, which span genres. “It’s a way of saying, ‘Hey, we’re all on the same page, we all like good music,’ ” Anders Beck says. Here’s a sample: “When Doves Cry”: You wouldn’t think this synth-based Prince classic would suit Greensky’s style, “until you hear it as a bluegrass song,” Beck says. “Atlantic City”: The Bruce Springsteen epic is an example of a more straightforward cover, as the band stays faithful to the original arrangement, adding an extra dose of twang.

Even still, “jam band” is another label Beck hesitates to take ownership of. “The reason why jam bands will get flak sometimes is because if you’re exploring musically every night, there’s a good chance you might fall flat on your face,” Beck says. “We jam onstage because we like to play music. Sometimes you just don’t want the song to end because it’s going somewhere cool.” RUDI GREENBERG (E XPRESS)

9:30 Club, 815 V St. NW; Sat., 7 p.m., $18; 202-265-0930, 930.com. (U Street)


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entertainment | Weekend Pass

Stereotype Casting

THEHOWARDTHEATRE.COM .......................................

202.803.2899 .......................................

‘Yellow Face’ explores Asian representation in the theater world

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30TH

BRAZILIAN GIRLS!

Stage

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31ST

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1ST

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1ST LATE SHOW

TARRUS RILEY

C. STANLEY PHOTOGRAPHY

When the London production of the musical “Miss Saigon” came to Broadway in 1990, the casting caused a rift in American theater circles. Jonathan Pryce, a white man, was slated to reprise his leading role as the Engineer, a FrenchVietnamese pimp. In originating the part, he used eye prosthetics and skin darkening cream, to the outrage of many. At t he time, Dav id Henr y Hwang, the Tony Award-winning playwright behind “M. Butterfly,” wrote a letter to the Actors’ Equity Association protesting the portrayal of a Eurasian character by a white actor. “I had dared to suppose that the yellowface days of Charlie Chan and Fu Manchu had been relegated forever to the closets of historical kitsch,” Hwang wrote. Those words resonated with actor Stan Kang when he read the line in the script for Hwang’s semiautobiographical “Yellow Face,” in which Kang portrays the playwright. Just a couple weeks before the show opened at Theatre J, Kang joined other Asian-Americans on social media to denounce the Jan. 13 episode of “How I Met Your Mother,” which featured the allwhite cast portraying stock Asian characters in kimonos and chopstick buns. “Here we are in 2014, and yet here’s the Fu Manchu mustache, here are the Oriental girls who are supposed to be desirable,” Kang says. “If you were going to make fun of kung fu movies, why not give the opportunities to AsianAmerican actors?” “Yellow Face,” a fictionalized account of Hwang’s role in the “Miss Saigon” dispute and the flop of a play he wrote in response, asks

THE THEATRE FOR THE PEOPLE

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5TH

THE RINGERS

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THURSAY, FEBRUARY 6TH

Actor Stan Kang, above, portrays playwright David Henry Hwang in the latter’s semi-autobiographical play “Yellow Face.”

SISTER CAROL & THE ITALS

WITH THE ARCHIVES FEAT. RAS PUMA .......................................

similar questions: How do racial dynamics play out in the theater world? When is a fictional representation realistic enough? What does it mean these days to be Asian, American or both? The politics of race in casting are nothing new to Kang, who is

“Growing up, the only [Asian] people we saw were on ‘Star Trek’ or ‘M*A*S*H.’ ” — STAN K A NG, STAR OF “YELLOW FACE,” ON THE DEARTH OF ROLES FOR ASIANAMERICAN ACTORS

Korean-American (the fact that he’s playing a Chinese-American man adds another layer to matters of racial authenticity). This is the first stage role in a decade for Kang, the full-time executive director of Educational Theatre Company in Arlington. But even at the peak of his acting career, Kang found his prospects limited. “Yellow Face” director Natsu

Onoda Power, who was born and raised in Japan, says Asian-American actors often end up playing either explicitly Asian characters or characters that were written as white but cast as Asian to make a point. The son of Korean parents who encouraged him to assimilate into American culture, Kang mines his understanding of the second-generation immigrant experience to portray Hwang’s struggles with his father, who came to the U.S. from China. “I thought, at first, the show was sort of a farce or satire about race, about what it means to be politically correct in theater,” he says. “In working on the show, I’ve changed my opinion. To me, it’s starting to feel more and more like a love story to [Hwang’s] father, a tribute to his father and his father’s values.” Now that Kang is a father himself, he views Asian representation in media — whether it’s a lack of acting opportunities or the cultural appropriation of “How I Met Your Mother” — with an even more critical eye.

The Plot David Henry Hwang’s 2007 play “Yellow Face” is a semi-autobiographical story of race, art and family. After publicly condemning the casting of a white actor in an Asian role in “Miss Saigon,” Hwang (Stan Kang) mistakenly does the same thing while casting a show he’s written. As Hwang tries to conceal his error, his Chinese immigrant dad — a successful banker — comes under federal investigation, forcing Hwang to confront his own identity issues. C.C.

“Growing up, the only [Asian] people we saw were on “Star Trek” or “M*A*S*H,” and almost never did one of the Asians have a speaking part,” he says. “When you don’t see your own faces on television … you never think, ‘Oh, I could become an actor,’ or ‘These stories are about me.’ ” CHRISTINA CAUTERUCCI (FOR E XPRESS)

Theatre J, 1529 16th St. NW; through Feb. 23, $15-$65; 202-777-3210, washingtondcjcc.org. (Dupont Circle)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7TH

LATIN FUSION

THE VALENTINE’S FIESTA EVENT .......................................

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9TH

A DRAG VALENTINE’S SALUTE TO THE DIVAS

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TAMIA


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Weekend Pass | dining

Who would have thought you’d find some of the most authentic Lao food in the Washington area in a restaurant flanked by a tobacco shop and a nail salon? Or that one of the city’s best taquerias is a few doors down from a karate studio where little kids practice snap kicks?

TACO BAMBA

2190 PIMMIT DRIVE, FALLS CHURCH; 703639-0505, TACOBAMBARESTAURANT.COM

HOLLEY SIMMONS (E XPRESS)

BANGKOK GOLDEN

Bangkok Golden specializes in food from Laos.

6395 SEVEN CORNERS CENTER, FALLS CHURCH; 703-533-9480, BANGKOKGOLDEN7CORNERS.COM

There’s no shortage of stellar Thai food in the area. But Lao food? Not as much. You can get both at Bangkok Golden, where you’ll find a separate menu for each cuisine. (Combined, the menus contain more than 80 dishes.) Though it shares its western border with Thailand, Laos has developed its own style of cooking. “We use the same kind of herbs [as Thailand], like lemon grass and ginger and fish sauce, but the matter of cooking it is different,” says Seng Luangrath, who opened the 50-seat restaurant in March 2010. Of note is the Nam Khao (crispy rice salad) served with shredded coconut, lime juice, onion and ham ($9) and the beef larb served in a spicy sauce with lime leaves, rice powder, shallots and sticky rice ($11). Bangkok Golden’s success has come mostly from word of mouth, and Toki Underground chef Erik Bruner-Yang (no stranger to standout Southeast Asian food) is a fan.

Taco Bamba’s small interior belies the big flavors of its authentic ingredients.

Chef Victor Albisu’s position in Idylwood Plaza Shopping Center is an advantageous one: His mother’s market and butcher shop, Plaza Latina, is just a few doors down. “We get a lot of our ingredients there,” says Albisu, who also owns Del Campo, a South American grill in Mount Vernon Square. Albisu’s Latin American roots influence Taco Bamba’s offerings, which include Mexican standards like barbacoa, al pastor and carne asada tacos ($3 each), as well as inventive options like grilled pork belly and sweetbread tacos ($4 each). “We try to make sure our food is on-culture,” Albisu says. “Taco Bamba will never be anything but good Mexican.”

Try the carnitas (shredded pork) filling.

BRIAN OH

Some local restaurant gems are tucked away in nondescript mini-malls

GREG POWERS

STRIP

SEAN McCORMICK

HAVE A GOOD

Strip malls are most commonly home to a hodgepodge of tanning salons, tax prep offices and discount-mattress outlets, which may be why you’re overlooking the acclaim-worthy restaurants next door to those places. Because the rents are lower than those of stand-alone restaurant locations, strip-mall spaces often appeal to first-time restaurateurs. Many of the ones who made this list are first- or second-generation immigrants with a passion for recipes that reflect their culture. “People want to bring [their recipes] to their new home and share food from their country,” says Tyler Cowen, a professor of economics at George Mason University and author of “An Economist Gets Lunch.” Even better, Cowen says, the savings from these no-frills spots can get passed on to diners. We shine a spotlight on a few of our favorite eateries, chosen for their selection of fine-tuned dishes steeped in authenticity.

Miso is the most popular broth at Ren’s Ramen.

REN’S RAMEN

11403 AMHERST AVE., WHEATON, MD.; 301-693-0806, RENS-RAMEN.COM

Founded by chef Eiji Nakamura and his wife, Yoko, in 2009, this ramen house has gained a loyal fan base for its wokprepared ramen. Of the four varieties offered (miso, tonshio, shoyu and vegetable shio), miso is the most popular, Yoko says. It’s characterized by a rich, heavy, pork-based broth mixed with soybean paste, roast pork, bean sprouts, bamboo shoots, scallions, onion and ground pork. What really separates the Nakamuras’ ramen from the rest are the thick, wavy noodles they use, which are imported from Hokkaido, Japan (all bowls are $10).

This story originally appeared in Express Sunday, a new weekend publication available for home delivery. To get the free paper, sign up at SavingsNow.washpost.com. To read Sunday stories online, go to readexpress.com.


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dining | Weekend Pass

755 HUNGERFORD DRIVE, ROCKVILLE; 301-294-0808

Dumplings are straightforward enough: seasoned meat wrapped in dough and pan-fried or boiled. But China Bistro has raised the Chinese standard to an art form with its quality stuffings. Though it also offers such traditional fare as hot and sour soup and beef

Cuba de Ayer’s traditional Cuban offerings include mojitos made with Bacardi Light Rum and mint leaves, center, and tres leches cake, right.

DAISYBLU PHOTOGRAPHY

CHINA BISTRO

with broccoli, the Rockville institution draws crowds for its 12 varieties of madeto-order dough balls. Of note are Mama’s special dumplings (12 for $7.95) filled with a perfectly proportioned mixture of pork, shrimp, chives and napa cabbage as well as the pork and ji cai (a sweet, leafy Chinese herb) dumplings (12 for $7.50). Opt for yours boiled: The pillowy dough better complements the supple filling.

CUBA DE AYER

15446 OLD COLUMBIA PIKE, BURTONSVILLE, MD.; 301-476-9622, CUBADEAYERRESTAURANT.NET

Forget everything you know about Cuban cuisine — if anything. “Most people assume Cuban food is like Mexican or that it’s very spicy,” says Cuba de Ayer owner Jessica Rodriguez. “But there are no burritos, and it’s more seasoned than spicy.” Recipes at this no-frills restaurant come from Rodriguez’s Cuba-born mother-in-law and reflect the food found in a pre-revolution Cuba. (Cuba de Ayer translates to “Cuba of Yesterday.”) One of the most popular dishes is the ropa vieja (shredded beef in tomato sauce, $14.25), which is prepared traditionally with no modern twists. The three-hour process includes boiling the meat, shredding it, sauteing it in spices, and letting it simmer in tomato sauce for 30 minutes. “We always cook with the authentic Cuban version in mind,” Rodriguez says. “We never cut corners.”

3701 Mount Vernon Ave. Alexandria, VA • 703-549-7500 For entire schedule go to Birchmere.com Find us on Facebook/Twitter! Tix @ Ticketmaster.com 800-745-3000 Jan The Bottle 31 Rockets

MARSHALL CRENSHAW Curtis Feb 1 JAMES McMURTRY McMurtry 5 TRAVIS TRITT (solo) Patrick 6 VANESSA CARLTON Sweany 7&8 ARLO GUTHRIE “HERE COME THE KID(S)”

Arlo continues his tribute to Woody’s 100th

TRACY HAMLIN FT. FRANK MCCOMB February 1

NEXT BEST THING PRESENTS: BRUCE IN THE USA February 6

JEFFREY OSBORNE 12 GINO VANNELLI Jake 14&16 eddie from ohio Armerding 19&20 GAELIC STORM 21 LAURIE ANDERSON “Language of the Future”

Discovery Series

WASHINGTON SAXOPHONE QUARTET Celebrating two illustrious centuries of the saxophone FEBRUARY 7

9

KEIKO MATSUI Lilly SHAWN COLVIN Hiatt 27 LOS LOBOS “Disconnected: 40th Anniversary Tour”

22 25

THE ALTERNATE ROUTES

RACHELLE FERRELL ZAPPA PLAYS ZAPPA “Roxy & Elsewhere 40th Anniversary Tour”

DEANNA BOGART BAND

TAB BENOIT

SLEEPY LABEEF W/ DARYL DAVIS BAND

Feb 28 & Mar 1 Mar 3 6

with

TOMMY MALONE

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL DL 8 HARMONY SWEEPSTAKES

ANNI EIGH

7

A CAPELLA FESTIVAL 2014

LEO KOTTKE

12 14&15

Raw DWELE Beauty 18 DON WILLIAMS 21 KATHLEEN MADIGAN &23

16

‘Madigan Again’

27

BRIAN CULBERTSON

February 7

The Black Cadillacs Harmony-rich alt-rockers FEBRUARY 8

February 9

VALENTINE’S DAY WITH THE SOFTONES February 14

7719 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD 20814

(240) 330-4500

www.bethesdabluesjazz.com Facebook.com/Bethesda.Blues.Jazz Follow us on Twitter: @BethesdaBlues

JOSHUA REDMAN QUARTET

Charismatic contemporary jazz FEBRUARY 9 PLUS MANY MORE!

WOLFTRAP.ORG 1.877.WOLFTRAP


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Weekend Pass | dining IN OTHER CHEWS

BRINDLEY BROTHERS PRESENTS

Do the Tryst

RADIO

As if you needed another reason to kill time at Tryst (2459 18th St. NW; 202-232-5500, trystdc.com), the cafe is offering daily specials beginning Saturday. On Mondays, catch live jazz and Manhattans; on Tuesdays, enjoy black-and-white movies on the big screen alongside $5 Old Fashioneds; Wednesday means half-price bottles of wine and 30 percent-off cheese and charcuterie plates; Thursdays bring surfer movies and $9 mai tais, below; and beer specials round things out on the weekends.

BRONZE RETURN W/ THE FALLS FRIDAY

JAN 31

LEYLA McCALLA OF THE CAROLINA CHOCOLATE DROPS:

VARI-COLORED SONGS,

a tribute to

LANGSTON HUGHES WEDNESDAY

FEB 5

ASTRID RIECKEN PHOTOS (FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

LIVE

UPCOMING PERFORMANCES

TUESDAY, FEB 4

INDIGENOUS

Bleat Your Heart Out

FRIDAY, FEB 7

YO MAMA’S BIG FAT BOOTY BAND W/ THE GOOD THING

SATURDAY, FEB 8

TOUBAB KREWE W/ SONGS OF WATER

TRYST

TUESDAY, FEB 11

NICKI BLUHM AND THE GRAMBLERS WEDNESDAY, FEB 12

LAKE STREET DIVE

The braised goat with turnip, carrots and red wine impresses.

SOLD OUT

W/ MISS TESS AND THE TALKBACKS THURSDAY, FEB 13

JOE PUG

W/ DAVID RAMIREZ FRIDAY, FEB 14

NEWMYER FLYER PRESENTS

LOVE SONGS: THE BEATLES SATURDAY, FEB 15

THE AUTUMN DEFENSE

FEAT. JOHN STIRRATT AND PATRICK SANSONE OF WILCO W/ DAWN LANDES WEDNESDAY, FEB 19

ROBERT ELLIS

FREE

LATE-NIGHT MUSIC IN THE LOFT EVERY FRI & SAT

THEHAMILTONDC.COM

Dish Upon a Star Looking for an out-of-this-world dining experience? Thursday kicks off Capella Washington D.C.’s semimonthly Constellation Dinner Experience ($175 per person, various dates through the year; 1050 31st St. NW; 202-617-2410, capellawashingtondc.com). Up to 10 guests share a three-course meal with wine pairings in The Grill Room’s private dining room followed by stargazing on the hotel’s roof. Led by graduate students of University of Maryland’s astronomy department, the cosmic experience is enhanced with binoculars, telescopes and hot cocoa.

NEW & SOON

1.31 Joe’s Seafood, Prime Steak & Stone Crab will open at 750 15th St. NW

Fainting Goat’s solid dishes will draw you back for seconds Before he helped open the Fainting Goat in the U Street corridor, James Barton was chef de cuisine at the Oval Room near the White House. Why would he ditch one of the city’s top American restaurants for a start-up? “Fine dining is not what people want to eat,” says the chef, 29. “The formality is going away.” What Barton wants to do at the Fainting Goat is pull diners in a couple of nights a week for a simple menu sprinkled with surprises. Popcorn in the “garden” salad surprises me. It’s not the first ingredient I’d think to add to greens and radishes, and honestly, the standin for croutons is not ver y appealing. But there’s enough on Barton’s concise list, its dishes arranged under clever headings (Nibble/Graze/Chomp/Feed), to draw me back a few nights after an initial dinner. Take the meat pie, a riff on pâté en croûte that finds pork, chick-

Owner Greg Algie, left, and chef James Barton, right, serve food sans pretension at Fainting Goat.

en and foie gras inside a thin pastry shell. Its filling, seasoned with Chinese five-spice powder and brandy, is good enough to eat on its own. Of the sandwiches, I’m partial to the blimp-shaped shrimp roll. Roast chicken is presented with a loose stuffing of torn bread and vinegary raisins. Winey braised goat with carrots and turnips is another main course to remember. Desserts are more deconstructed than is my preference. You might want to indulge in another cocktail instead. The bars (there are two) whip up solid drinks. The former Urban Essentials design store space makes a hand-

FIRST BI T E

some backdrop to the food. Maple floors, exposed-brick walls and small chandeliers reflect accessible style across several levels of dining room and bar. Initially, co-owner Greg Algie (Fado Irish Pub, Cantina Marina) thought his new restaurant should link to the business that preceded it via a furniture-related name. But the idea was shot down by friends after he shared a story from his past. Turns out Algie was so shy around women, his friends used to tell him he looked like a fainting goat around them. “That’s the name!” his listeners told him. TOM SIETSEMA (THE WASHINGTON POST )

1330 U St. NW; 202-735-0344, faintinggoatdc.com. (U Street)


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goingoutguide.com | Weekend Pass Modern Hospitality

venues

➜KENNEDY CENTER: 2700 F ST. NW; 202-467-4600, 800-444-1324, KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG. ➜MERRIWEATHER POST PAVILION: 10475 LITTLE PATUXENT PKWY.,

WILLIAM MEBANE

➜9:30 CLUB: 815 V ST. NW; 202-265-0930,

INDIE-ROCK TRIO HOSPITALITY made its mark in 2012 with a jaunty, poppy self-titled debut. This week, the band,

which is led by singer Amber Papini, center, returned with “Trouble,” an album that finds the group embracing a darker side, such as on the groove-minded single “Going Out.” Hospitality hits the Rock and Roll Hotel stage on Saturday.

►sound POWERED BY WWW.GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM

THURSDAY 9:30 Club: 12th Planet, Protohype, Flinch, Two Fresh, Steady, 9 p.m. Black Cat: Spirit Animal, 8 p.m. Blues Alley: Corey Harris, 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Jammin’ Java: Gambles, Christopher Graham, 7:30 p.m.; The Great Zucchini, 10:30 a.m. Kennedy Center/Concert Hall: National Symphony Orchestra, 7 p.m. Kennedy Center/Millennium Stage: Sara Schaefer, 6 p.m., free.

Music Center at Strathmore: Bill Cosby, 8 p.m. Rams Head On Stage: Meshell Ndegeocello: A Dedication to Nina Simone, 8 p.m. Rock & Roll Hotel: Throwdown Syndicate, WeedisWeed, B.S.R. Never Submit, 8 p.m. The Fillmore: Laelo with Fly Rebel Society, Cruddy Crankerz, 30/30 and Ms Xela, 7:30 p.m. The Howard Theatre: Brazilian Girls, 9 p.m. Twins Jazz: Jazz Band Masterclass Bands with Jeff Antoniuk, 7 p.m. U Street Music Hall: Valentino Khan, 10 p.m. Velvet Lounge: The Piecycles, Light Arms, Llama Trauma, 9 p.m.

COLUMBIA, MD.; 410-715-5550,

930.COM.

MERRIWEATHERMUSIC.COM.

➜ARLINGTON CINEMA & DRAFTHOUSE:

➜ MUSIC CENTER AT STRATHMORE:

2903 COLUMBIA PIKE, ARLINGTON; 703-

5301 TUCKERMAN LANE, NORTH

486-2345, ARLINGTONDRAFTHOUSE.COM.

BETHESDA; 301-581-5100,

➜BIRCHMERE: 3701 MOUNT VERNON

STRATHMORE.ORG.

AVE., ALEXANDRIA; 703-549-7500,

➜PATRIOT CENTER: 4500 PATRIOT

BIRCHMERE.COM.

CIRCLE, FAIRFAX; 202-397-7328,

➜BLACK CAT: 1811 14TH ST. NW; 202-667-

703-993-3000, PATRIOTCENTER.COM.

7960, BLACKCATDC.COM.

➜RAMS HEAD TAVERN: 33 WEST ST.,

➜BLUES ALLEY: 1073 WISCONSIN AVE.

ANNAPOLIS; 410-268-4545,

NW; 202-337-4141, BLUESALLEY.COM.

RAMSHEADTAVERN.COM.

➜DAR CONSTITUTION HALL: 18TH AND

➜RED PALACE: 1212 H ST. NE; 202-399-

C STREETS NW; 202-628-4780, DAR.ORG/

3201, REDPALACEDC.COM.

CONTHALL.

➜ROCK & ROLL HOTEL: 1353 H ST. NE;

➜DC9: 1940 NINTH ST. NW; 202-483-5000,

202-388-7625, ROCKANDROLLHOTEL

DCNINE.COM.

DC.COM.

➜EMPIRE: 6355 ROLLING ROAD, SPRING-

➜STATE THEATRE: 220 N. WASHINGTON

FIELD, VA.; 703-569-5940,

ST., FALLS CHURCH; 703-237-0300,

EMPIRE-NOVA.COM.

THESTATETHEATRE.COM.

➜THE FILLMORE: 8656 COLESVILLE

➜ U STREET MUSIC HALL: 1115 U ST. NW;

R0AD, SILVER SPRING; 301-960-9999,

202-588-1880, USTREETMUSICHALL.COM.

FILLMORESILVERSPRING.COM.

➜VELVET LOUNGE: 915 U ST. NW; 202-

FRIDAY

➜THE HAMILTON: 600 14TH ST. NW;

462-3213, VELVETLOUNGEDC.COM.

9:30 Club: Karl Densons’s Tiny Universe, 8 p.m. Birchmere: Marshall Crenshaw and The Bottle Rockets, 7:30 p.m. Blues Alley: Corey Harris, 8 and 10 p.m. DAR Constitution Hall: Neutral Milk Hotel, 8 p.m. Empire: Attila, I See Stars, Capture the Crown, Ice Nine Kills, Myka Relocate, When Cities Sleep, 6 p.m. Iota Club & Cafe: Tall Heights, Molly Hagen, 9 p.m. Jammin’ Java: Natalie York, Dave Farah, 7:30 p.m.; Irresponsible and Friends, 10 p.m., free. Kennedy Center/Terrace Theater: Luca Pisaroni, 7:30 p.m. Kennedy Center/Concert Hall:

202-787-1000, THEHAMILTONDC.COM.

➜WARNER THEATRE: 13TH AND E

➜IOTA CLUB & CAFE: 2832 WILSON

STREETS NW; 202-783-4000,

BLVD., ARLINGTON; 703-522-8340,

WARNERTHEATREDC.COM.

FEBRUARY 4-9

IOTACLUBANDCAFE.COM.

➜WOLF TRAP: FILENE CENTER: 1551 TRAP

➜JAMMIN’ JAVA: 227 MAPLE AVE. E.,

ROAD, VIENNA; 703-255-1900,

VIENNA; 703-255-1566, JAMMINJAVA.COM.

WOLFTRAP.ORG.

National Symphony Orchestra, 8 p.m. Kennedy Center/Millennium Stage: Toni Asante Lightfoot, Toni Blackman, Holly Bass and DJ Renegade, 6 p.m., free. Music Center at Strathmore: Bill Cosby, 8 p.m. Rams Head On Stage: Bob Sima and Marc Douglas Berardo, 8 p.m. Rock & Roll Hotel: The Ripples, 9 p.m.

State Theatre: The Legwarmers, 8 p.m. The Fillmore: Amon Amarth, 8 p.m. The Hamilton: The Bobby Thompson Project, 10:30 p.m., free; Bronze Radio Return, 8:30 p.m. The Howard Theatre: Tye Tribbett, JJ Hairston, Youthful Praise, 8 p.m. Twins Jazz: Radiohead Jazz Project, 8 and 10 p.m.

800.514.3849 | THENATIONALDC.COM

Continued on page E13


E12 | E X P R E S S | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | T H U R S D AY

I.M.P. PRESENTS Merriweather Post Pavilion • Columbia, MD JUST ANNOUNCED!

Jack Johnson w/

THIS WEEK’S SHOWS

Amos Lee .............................................................................................................JUNE 5 Tickets On Sale January 31 at 10am

BASS NATION DC PRESENTS THE SMOG CITY TOUR FEATURING

12th Planet w/ Protohype • Flinch • Two Fresh • Steady................................... Th JAN 30 ALL GOOD PRESENTS

feat.

Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe w/ Pigeons Playing Ping Pong & Tauk..................... F 31 Greensky Bluegrass w/ Tumbleweed Wanderers ..............................................Sa FEB 1 Darkside - Nicolas Jaar and Dave Harrington w/ High Water ........................... W 5

Kix • Extreme •Tesla and more!

.......... APRIL 25 & 26

For a full lineup, visit m3rockfest.com

ALL GOOD PRESENTS

FALL OUT BOY & PARAMORE

FEBRUARY

w/ New Politics ... JULY 18

• merriweathermusic.com • 930.com

ALL GOOD PRESENTS

Railroad Earth

(F 7 - w/ Yarn / Sa 8 - w/ Have Guns Will Travel) .............................. F 7 & Sa 8

STEEZ PROMO PRESENTS

Paper Diamond w/ Loudpvck • Gent and Jawns • RaceCarBed • Yola................................ W 12 Galactic w/ Ryan Montbleau (solo) ................................................................................................ Th 13 SpeakeasyDC’s Sucker for Love Valentine’s Day Show Early Show! 6pm Doors. This is a seated show........................................................................................ F 14 ALL GOOD PRESENTS

SHPONGLE: The Museum of Consciousness Tour w/ Desert Dwellers

Late Show! 10pm Doors ............................................................................................................................ F 14

Earl Sweatshirt............................................................................................................................. M 17 Black Joe Lewis w/ Pickwick.................................................................................................... Tu 18 G. Love and Special Sauce w/ Kristy Lee ........................................................................ Th 20 White Lies w/ Frankie Rose .......................................................................................................... Sa 22 RJD2 ...................................................................................................................................................... Su 23 Brett Dennen w/ Foy Vance ......................................................................................................... W 26 Randy Rogers Band w/ Josh Abbott Band • Wade Bowen • Stoney LaRue ...................... F 28 MARCH Added! First Night Sold Out! Second Night

St. Vincent .......................................................................................................................................... Su 2 Mayer Hawthorne w/ Quadron ....................................................................................................M 3 ALL GOOD PRESENTS AN EVENING WITH

G.M.U. Patriot Center • Fairfax, VA

Lady Antebellum

w/ Kip Moore & Kacey Musgraves ........................................................................... FEBRUARY 21

Robin Thicke w/

K. Michelle & DJ Cassidy ......................................................................... FEBRUARY 27 In association with CD Enterprises

Ticketmaster

Echostage • Washington D.C.

CUT COPY

Lindsey Stirling

Mike Gordon .................................................................................................................................... Tu 4 Bob Mould: 25 Years of Workbook w/ Chris Brokaw ................................................. W 5 Broad City ........................................................................................................................................... Th 6 Jim Breuer This is a seated show....................................................................................................... F 7 Uhh Yeah Dude Early Show! 6pm Doors. This is a seated show................................................ Sa 8 U STREET MUSIC HALL & STEEZ PROMO PRESENTS THE NEW MOON TOUR WITH

Alvin Risk and more! Late Show! 10pm Doors .............................................................................. Sa 8 Dr. Dog .................................................................................................................................................. F 14 Typhoon w/ Lady Lamb the Beekeeper & Wild Ones................................................................... W 19

9:30 CUPCAKES

...............................................................................JUNE 24

2135 Queens Chapel Rd. NE D.C. • echostage.com • Ticketmaster

Verizon Center • Washington D.C. SECOND NIGHT ADDED!

AEG LIVE PRESENTS THE PRISMATIC WORLD TOUR

Katy Perry

The best thing you could possibly put in your mouth

w/ Capital Cities .......................................... JUNE 24 & 25 Ticketmaster

Cupcakes by BUZZ... your neighborhood bakery in Alexandria, VA. | www.buzzonslaters.com

MANY MORE SHOWS ON SALE!

................................................................................. MARCH 20

930.com

Lincoln Theatre • Washington, D.C. THIS THURSDAY!

9:30 CLUB PRESENTS AT U STREET MUSIC HALL The Wild Feathers w/ Saints of Valory & Jamestown Revival ............................... Tu FEB 4 Yuna w/ Jarell Perry ....................................................................................................... W 5 ALL GOOD PRESENTS

The Stepkids .................................................................................................................. F 7 Lanterns on the Lake w/ Boxelders ............................................................................ Sa 8 Lionize Jetpack Soundtrack Record Release Show w/ Delegation .......................... Th 20 Augustines w/ My Goodness......................................................................................... W 26 Gems ...................................................................................................................... Sa MAR 1 Cheatahs ........................................................................................................................ Th 6 The Orwells w/ Twin Peaks & Silver Palms .................................................................. Sa 8 Sabina Sciubba (of Brazilian Girls) ........................................................................... Tu 18 • Buy advance tickets at the 9:30 Club box office

LUNAFEST 2014: films by, for, about Women™ ............. JANUARY 30 AN EVENING WITH

To benefit the Breast Cancer Fund

Ms. Lauryn Hill .................................................................................................FEBRUARY 9 Steve Hackett Genesis Revisited 2014 ................................................ MARCH 26 EXPERIENCE HENDRIX FEAT. Billy Cox • Buddy Guy and more! .....MARCH 30 For a full lineup and more info, visit experiencehendrixtour.com

Dream Theater.......................................................................................................... APRIL 1 Neil Finn (of Crowded House) ...................................................................... APRIL 12 THE BEST OF

Rufus Wainwright w/ Lucy Wainwright Roche..................................................... APRIL 16 DOCTOR DREDD PRESENTS

Stephen “Ragga” Marley w/ Joe Mersa • Wayne Marshall • Zedicus All 10/23 tickets honored. ...........................APRIL 17

• thelincolndc.com


T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | E13

goingoutguide.com | Weekend Pass Continued from page E11

A Man and His Guitars

1811 14TH ST NW

U Street Music Hall: Blond:ish, Sam Burns, Charles Martin, 10 p.m. Velvet Lounge: Drunk Tigers, Railsplitter, Sunset Guns, Collapser, 9:30 p.m.

FRI 31

DJ REKHA $12 BHANGRA DANCE NIGHT

SATURDAY

FRI 31

DR. WHO HAPPY HOUR

FRI 31

DOLLARS FOR DAINTY

Kennedy Center/Millennium Stage: Mandragora Circo, 6 p.m., free. Rock & Roll Hotel: Maria Taylor, PJ Bond, 8 p.m. The Howard Theatre: Harlem Gospel Choir, 1 p.m. Twins Jazz: BSQ Jazz Sundays, 8 p.m. BSQ Jazz Sundays, 10 p.m.

1 EPISODE & DRINK SPECIALS

BURLESQUE SHOW (21+) BENEFITTING THE GW LGBT HEALTH PROGRAM $12/$15

BLACK CLOUDS TONE

SAT 1

HIGHWAY CROSS

BLUESMAN COREY HARRIS, above, sets up shop at Blues Alley this weekend for three nights of performances. The

Denver native is known for melding the sounds of reggae, soul and African music with the blues. Most recently, he appeared on the compilation album “True Blues,” collaborating with Shemekia Copeland and Alvin Youngblood Hart.

$12

SAT 1

CYLON HAPPY HOUR

SAT 1

RICH MOREL’S HOT SAUCE

WED 5

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DJ NIGHT W/ RICH MOREL $8

THU 6

TEEN MOM $12 BASS DRUM OF DEATH

FRI 7

PISSED JEANS

FRI 7

THE BLACK & WHITE SHOW

SAT 8

MIXTAPE $10

SAT 8

MOON/BOUNCE DANCING AFFAIR

SHARK WEEK $12/$14

PURLING HISS PRIESTS $15

BURLESQUE (21+) $12/$15

$7

TUE 11

TOGETHER PANGEA $10

FRI 14

THE BLACK ANGELS WITH ROKY ERICKSON GOLDEN ANIMALS $25

UPCOMING SHOWS

►sight POWERED BY WWW.GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM

Addison/Ripley: “Mira Hecht: All Things Vanish,” the artist presents her paintings and works on paper, through March 15. 1670 Wisconsin Ave. NW; 202338-5180, addisonripleyfineart.com. American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center: “Washington Art Matters II: 1940s-1980s,” an exhibition highlighting the history of Washington art from the 1940s through the 1980s, through March 16. 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW; 202-885-1300, american.edu/cas/katzen. Anacostia Community Museum: “Black Baseball in the District of Columbia,” an examination of the national pastime in the African-American community, indefinitely. “Home Sewn: Quilts From the Lower Mississippi Valley,” an exhibition examining the generational, social and economic fabric of an African

American quilting community in rural

bition reflecting the museum’s mis-

Mississippi, through Sept. 21. “Ubuhle

sion to promote artists and designers

Women, Beadwork and the Art of Inde-

from member and observer countries,

pendence,” this exhibition features a

through March 16. 201 18th St. NW;

new form of bead art, the ndwango (which translates as “cloth”), developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZuluNatal, South Africa, through Sept. 21. 1901 Fort Place SE; 202-633-4820, anacostia.si.edu. Arlington Arts Center: “CSA: Forty Years of Community-Sourced Art,” features veteran artists Ken Ashton, Martha Jackson Jarvis, Soledad Salame, Erik Thor Sandberg, and Foon Sham, alongside the more recent arrivals Tariq Tucker, J.J. McCracken, Nikki Painter, Alex Podesta, and Dane Winkler, through April 18. “Here and Now,” features the work of the art center’s 12 resident artists, through April 13. 3550 Wilson Blvd., Arlington; 703-248-6800, findyourartist.org. Art Museum of the Americas: “Transforming Cityscapes,” an exhi-

202-370-0147, museum.oas.org. Arthur M. Sackler Gallery: “Eyes of the World: Ara Guler’s Anatolia,” the photographer’s iconic snapshots of medieval Seljuk and Armenian buildings from 1965, through May 4. “Perspectives: Rina Banerjee,” the contemporary artist draws inspiration from her birthplace of India, creating a sculptural river of glass bottles on the floor of the museum pavilion, through June 8. 1050 Independence Ave. SW; 202-633-1000, asia.si.edu. Artisphere: “#Coping,” a collection of artist Claire Brigg’s crocheted wall hangings that reflect the power of words, through March 15. “Alicia Eggert: Everything You Are Looking For,” kinetic, electronic and interactive sculpture that plays on the notion of time and the tension between the visible and the invisible, Continued on page E14

2/15-CIBO MATTO 2/22-WHITE DENIM 2/25-TWO COW GARAGE 2/28-STEPHEN MALKMUS & THE JICKS 3/1-DAVID KOECHNER (18+) 3/2-TOUCHÉ AMORÉ & MEWITHOUTYOU 3/3-WEEKEND 3/5-EX HEX 3/6-SPEEDY ORTIZ 3/7-WE WERE PROMISED JETPACKS 3/22-DUM DUM GIRLS 3/24-WARPAINT 4/11-THEE SILVER MT ZION

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9:30 Club: Greensky Bluegrass, 7 p.m. Birchmere: James McMurtry with Curtis McMurtry, 7:30 p.m. Black Cat: Black Clouds, Tone, Highway Cross, 9 p.m. Blues Alley: Corey Harris, 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Comet Ping Pong: Dot Dash, History Repeated, 10 p.m. Empire: The Last Martyr, 6 p.m. Jammin’ Java: The Nighthawks, 7 p.m.; The Fishermen Band, the Pocket Band, 10 p.m. Kennedy Center/Terrace Theater: Pianist Benjamin Hochman, 2 p.m. Kennedy Center/Concert Hall: National Symphony Orchestra, 8 p.m. Kennedy Center/Millennium Stage: Kenneth Whalum III, 6 p.m., free. Music Center at Strathmore: “Chaplin’s Back!,” 8 p.m. Rams Head On Stage: Good Deale Bluegrass and Eastman String Band, 8 p.m. Rock & Roll Hotel: Hospitality, 8 p.m.; DJs Rex Riot and Basscamp, 11:30 p.m., free. State Theatre: The Legwarmers, 8 p.m. The Fillmore: Walk off The Earth, 8 p.m. The Hamilton: 19th Street Band, 10:30 p.m., free. The Howard Theatre: Stephanie Mills, 8 p.m.; Tarrus Riley, 11:30 p.m. Twins Jazz: Radiohead Jazz Project, 8 and 10 p.m. U Street Music Hall: White Ford Bronco, 7 p.m.; Ryan Hemsworth, 10 p.m. Warner Theatre: The Spring Quartet with Jack DeJohnette, Joe Lovano, Esperanza Spalding and Leo Genovese, 8 p.m.

www.blackcatdc.com


E14 | E X P R E S S | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | T H U R S D AY

Weekend Pass | goingoutguide.com Work in Progress

omy inspire her whimsical drawings

ings and sculpture collection orga-

through Sun. “Gary Kachadourian: Phase

and paintings, through March 16. 201

nized around the theme of the changing

One - Progress Report,” the Baltimore

Prince St., Alexandria; 703-548-0035,

notion of place in the history of Amer-

artist will make an installation encom-

nvfaa.org.

ican art, indefinitely. “Mia Feuer: An

LAST CHANCE BlackRock Center for

Unkindness,” an installation inspired

books, scenarios and large scale prints

the Arts: “Tamryn McDermott,” an exhibit featuring work by the Missouri artist, Thu.-Sat. 12901 Town Commons Drive, Germantown, Md.; 301-528-2260, blackrockcenter.org. Capitol Hill Arts Workshop: “Urban Eyes,” a photography exhibit featuring work by photographer Camille Clifton, through Feb. 25. 545 Seventh St. SE; 202-547-6839, chaw.org. Corcoran Gallery of Art: “Alex Prager: Face in the Crowd,” Prager displays her elaborate crowd scenes in both photography and video, through March 9. “American Journeys — Visions of Place,” a new installation of the museum’s pre-1945 American paint-

by the artist’s experiences in lands

DIEGO RIVERA-ANAHUACALLI AND FRIDA KAHLO MUSEUMS

passing drawings, ephemera, posters, outlining his ongoing scale drawing project that began in 2007, through Feb. 16. “May I Have the Piano Delivered to You?,” resident artist Emily Francisco manipulates the deconstructed parts of an antique baby grand piano. It is related to her interactive piece “The Trans-Harmonium: A Listening Device,” which allows guests to play an antique piano keyboard connected to tuned radios, through April 6. 1101 Wilson Blvd., Arlington; 703-8751100, artisphere.com. Athenaeum: “Katie Runnerstrom,” the artist’s work is rooted both in science and a fertile imagination. The study of botany, marine science and astron-

5 0

DIEGO RIVERA’S FAMOUS MURAL, once at New York’s Rockefeller Center, is the focus of “The Man at the Crossroads,” now at the Mexican Cultural Institute. The exhibit includes other paintings as context for the unique mural.

where oil is produced, through Feb. 23. “Recent Acquisitions: American Art from the Johns Collection,” an exhibit celebrating the museum’s acquisition of 61 prints and drawings and one painting from San Francisco collectors Roy C. Bud Johns and Fran Moreland Johns, through Feb. 9. 500 17th St. NW; 202639-1700, corcoran.org. Flashpoint: “Everything that Rises,” Lindsay Pichaske’s three-dimensional installation is connected to the ceiling, walls and floor into a web of threads suspending an animal frame made out of knotted human hair, through Feb. 15. Pichaske explores notions of time,

African Art celebrates 50 years! Black History Month at the National Museum of African Art PERFORMANCE

WORKSHOPS

LECTURE

Earth Matters: Performance, Participation, and Perspective

Weaving with Kwasi Asare

Innovative Africa: Blue, Green, and Brown Technologies

Feb. 1 | 6:30–9:30 p.m.

An interactive, multidisciplinary celebration of the exhibition Earth Matters: Land as Metaphor and Material in the Arts of Africa includes music, performances, and other events.

Earth Matters, Fashion Matters Feb. 22 | 6:30–9:30 p.m. rsvp required, 202.633.4646

Katie Rost, member of The Vogue 100, hosts this evening of music and ecofriendly fashions inspired by Earth Matters: Land as Metaphor and Material in the Arts of Africa. Grammy-nominated French-Cameroonian artists Les Nubians will perform.

Smithsonian National Museum of African Art

Sat., Feb. 8, 15 | 1–4 p.m. Ages: 10 and up Space limited; reservations required, 202.633.4632

Join master weaver Kwasi Asare for kente weaving demonstration and hands-on workshop.

Batik with Tunde Odunlade Feb. 11 | 11 a.m.–12 p.m. Feb. 12 | 1–3 p.m. Feb. 13 | 10 a.m.–12 p.m. Feb. 14 | 11 a.m.–1 p.m. Space limited; reservations required, 202.633.4646 Bowie State Univer sity, Black Box Theater

Participate in batik workshop with master artist Tunde Odunlade.

africa.si.edu

Feb. 13 | 5:30–8:30 p.m.

Panel discussion, moderated by Lawrence E. Jones, Ph.D., explores Africa’s technological innovations in water, energy and agriculture and their impact on sustainable development. Evening also includes curator-led tour and reception. Co-organized with Center for Sustainable Development in Africa (csda)

UPCOMING EXHIBITION

Visions from the Forests: The Art of Liberia and Sierra Leone April 9–August 17, 2014

Visions from the Forests focuses on the peoples and cultures of Liberia and Sierra Leone, recognizing their rich cultural traditions and long histories of exquisitely made artworks.

9 5 0 i n d e p e n d e n c e a v e s w | o p e n d a i l y 1 0 a . m . – 5 : 3 0 p. m . | ta k e m e t r o t o s m i t h s o n i a n s tat i o n | f r e e a n d o p e n t o t h e p u b l i c

les nubians photograph by delphine diallo

Continued from page E13


T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | E15

goingoutguide.com | Weekend Pass

Comedy Club & Restaurant 1140 Connecticut Ave. Washington, DC 20036

ALL SHOWS 18 & OVER JEFF CALDWELL

Message in a Lightbulb

JIM NORTON

CHRISTIAN FINNEGAN

SEBASTIAN MANISCALCO

FEB 13-16

FEB 20-22

Special Event

JAN 31 & FEB 1

FEB 6-8

Showtime, Comedy Comedy Central & "Late Comedy Central, HBO Comedy Central, Show w/ David Letterman” and Opie & Anthony Chappelle’s Show, Conan Central & Lopez Tonight

JO KOY

MICHAEL BLACKSON

FLIP ORLEY

PABLO FRANCISCO

LOUNGE SHOWCASE

FEB 22 Comedy School grads perform in our Lounge

JOHN HEFFRON

FEB 27-MAR 1

MARCH 7-9

MARCH 13-16

Special Event MARCH 20-23

MARCH 27-30

Comedy Central & Chelsea Lately

Next Friday & HBO's Def Comedy Jam

America’s Premier Comic Hypnotist

Mad TV, HBO & Comedy Central

Last Comic Standing, Tonight Show & Comedy Central

Special Event

Special Event

Buy tickets @ dcimprov.com or 202.296.7008

ALICIA EGGERT

9 Zany Characters Caper Through This Wild Physical Comedy. Hilarity Ensues.

Now Playing!

“EVERYTHING YOU ARE LOOKING FOR,” is an example of artist Alicia Eggert’s interactive sculpture. The tube lighting letters are a jumbled phrase until the lights flash, forming a hidden message. Eggert’s kinetic language-themed work will be on display in the Artisphere’s Terrace Gallery until Feb. 2.

mortality and the relationship of

nese Buddhist Sculpture,” a collection

ing work by local artists, Eileen O’Brien,

humans to animals in this site-respon-

of stone and gilt bronze Buddhist sculp-

Cheryl Leibovitz and Pamela Underhill,

sive installation. 916 G St. NW; 202-315-

tures highlight two flourishing ages, the

through Feb. 15. 1801 N. Quaker Lane,

1305, culturaldc.org.

late Six Dynasties and the High Tang

Folger Shakespeare Library: “Shakespeare’s the Thing,” in honor of the Bard’s 450th birthday anniversary, the Folger staff is showing off some of its favorite objects among the collection, including early editions of plays, forgeries and a sanskrit translation of “Hamlet.” The free exhibition’s opening coincides with the premiere of Folger Theatre’s “Richard III,” which, under the direction of playwright Robert Richmond, will be the first production to be performed in the round at Folger’s Elizabethan Theatre, through June 15. 201 East Capitol St. SE; 202-544-4600, folger.edu. LAST CHANCE Foundry Gallery: “Staples and Gravy,” Edward Bear Miller blends realism and expressionism in his landscape paintings, Thu.-Sun. 1314 18th St. NW; 202-463-0203, foundrygallery.org. Freer Gallery of Art: “Charles Freer and the Arts of Japan,” Freer’s Japanese painting collection is on display, through Feb. 9. “Korean Style in Japanese Ceramics,” works from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries in the Korean ceramic style are shown, through Feb. 9. “Promise of Paradise: Early Chi-

(sixth to eighth century). The exhibi-

Alexandria; 703-998-6260. ger On!,” photos by Max Baumann, Iris

tal Cosmological Buddha: a life-size

Brosch, Reinhard Hentze, Carina Linge,

stone sculpture covered in intricate rep-

Matthias Ritzmann and Robert Schlot-

resentations of the earthly realms. It

ter, Thu.-Fri. 812 Seventh St. NW;

indefinitely. “Sylvan Sounds: Freer, Dewing and Japan,” American tonalism — shadowy paintings in muted hues — became a gateway to Japanese art for patron Charles Lang Freer. His namesake museum explicitly shows the connection, exhibiting works by American artist Thomas Dewing alongside Japanese pieces Freer collected in the late 1890s, through May 18. “The Nile and Ancient Egypt,” high quality artifacts from the collections of Freer Gallery are showcased to illuminate the role and importance of water animals for ancient Egyptian religion and afterlife, indefinitely. “Women in Chinese Painting,” an exhibit featuring 30 works introducing goddesses, court ladies, empresses and more examines the role of women in the art world, through April 27. Jefferson Drive and 12th Street SW; 202-633-1000, asia.si.edu. Gallery at Convergence: “Collaborative Color Play,” an exhibit featur-

by Bill Irwin and Mark O’Donnell

directed by Kathryn Chase Bryer

LAST CHANCE Goethe-Institut: “Lin-

tion’s dramatic focus is the monumen-

is the only one of its kind on the world,

adapted from Moliére

202-289-1200, goethe.de/ins/us/was. Hemphill: “Marly Dawson,” Dawson presents a sequence of objects inspired by a curiosity for American material culture such as automobiles, model rockets and soapbox cars, through March 29. “Martin Puryear,” a number of Puryear’s experimental, mixed-media works are presented, through March 29. 1515 14th St. NW; 202-234-5601, hemphillfinearts .com. LAST CHANCE Hillyer Art Space: “Creating Space: Concept, Content, Context,” artist Greg Braun used drywall to create sculptures, through Sat. “Half Wild,” Fawna Xiao’s artwork celebrates natural formations and landforms, through Sat. JD Deardourff, screen prints by the artists inspired by comic books, through Sat. 9 Hillyer Court NW; 202-338-0680, hillyerartspace.org. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden: “Barbara Kruger: Belief + Doubt,” the entire museum space Continued on page E17

ConstellationTheatre.ORG


E16 | E X P R E S S | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | T H U R S D AY

THE TALLEST TREE IN THE FOREST WRITTEN AND PERFORMED BY DANIEL BEATY | DIRECTED BY MOISÉS KAUFMAN

NOW PLAYING

YOUR CREATIVE S CAREER IG ly AnoIwTfoIr N W oran.edu/app Fall 2014 corc ly p p

“MAGNETIC.” –Washington Post

“MESMERIZING.” –Woman Around Town

ES. SMALL CLASS RTUNITIES. HUGE OPPO

“HHHHH”

–DC Metro Theater Arts

“IMPRESSIVE.”

“MAGNIFICENT.”

“PITCH PERFECT.”

“FASCINATING.”

–DC Theatre Scene

–San Diego Reader

–MD Theatre Guide

–BroadwayWorld

Photo of Daniel Beaty by Don Ipock.

A

MOTHER COURAGE AND HER CHILDREN BY BERTOLT BRECHT TRANSLATED BY DAVID HARE DIRECTED BY MOLLY SMITH

BEGINS TOMORROW

“A RAPTUROUS DAZE is the condition you find yourself in after an evening with Kathleen Turner.”–Washington Post

ORDER TODAY! 202-488-3300 WWW.ARENASTAGE.ORG

Photo of Nicholas Rodriguez,Kathleen Turner, Erin Weaver and Nehal Joshi by Tony Powell.

KATHLEEN TURNER IN

Join Us for Our Spring Open Houses Undergraduate Open House Saturday, February 1, 12-4 p.m. Graduate Open House Saturday, February 22, 12-3 p.m. Register online at corcoran.edu

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DOWNTOWN CAMPUS 500 SEVENTEENTH STREET NW WASHINGTON, DC 20006 NEAR FARRAGUT WEST METRO STATION


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goingoutguide.com | Weekend Pass

JANET WHEELER AND TOUCHSTONE GALLERY

One Man’s Trash

JANET WHEELER is one of five artists featured in Touchstone Gallery’s new exhibit, “Form Transformed,” on display until Feb. 2. Wheeler and the other sculptors make collage-like art from clay, earthen materials and even garbage.

Continued from page E15

to create strategies for mitigating the

— walls, floor, escalator sides — is

impacts of climate change. “Life Lab,”

wrapped in text on vinyl by the artist,

contains information about the science

immersing visitors in halls of voices

of healthy living, how the brain works

that address conflicting perceptions

and how to plan healthy meals. 525 E St.

of democracy, power and belief, indef-

NW; 202-334-1201, koshland-science-

initely. “Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950,” international art that has risen since the end of World War II, through May 26. Seventh Street and Independence Avenue SW; 202-6331000, hirshhorn.si.edu. Honfleur: “Common Ground,” an exhibit featuring work by painter Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann and photographer Michael B. Platt, through Feb. 28. 1241 Good Hope Road SE; 202-365-8392, honfleurgallery.com. Jerusalem Fund: “Nabila Hilmi — A Retrospective,” paintings, drawings and collage by Hilmi explore light and shadow, form and line, through March 7. 2425 Virginia Ave. NW; 202-338-1958, thejerusalemfund.org. Koshland Science Museum: Ongoing exhibits, “Earth Lab,” provides the latest data models and decision tools

museum.org. Mexican Cultural Institute: “Man at the Crossroads: Diego Rivera’s Mural at Rockefeller Center,” an examination of the history, creation and ultimate destruction of a controversial New York mural by the Mexican artist, through May 17. 2829 16th St. NW; 202-728-1628, icm.sre.gob.mx/imw. National Air and Space Museum: Ongoing exhibits, explore the evolution of flight through displays, handson exhibitions and historic aircraft and spacecraft, from the Wright Brothers’ plane to Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis to the Apollo 11 command module Columbia. The museum also has a planetarium and Imax theater, which for a fee shows educational films on flight and outer space. Sixth Street and Independence Avenue SW; 202-633-1000,

nasm.si.edu. National Building Museum: “House and Home,” an ongoing exhibition that explores what it means to live at home. “Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future, 1940-1990,” an exhibition divided into five sections details the transformation of Los Angeles, through March 10. Ongoing exhibits, learn about the history of buildings and their environmental impact. 401 F St. NW; 202-272-2448, nbm.org. National Gallery of Art, West Building: “Civic Pride: Dutch Group Portraits From Amsterdam,” rare depictions by Govert Flinck and Bartholomeus van der Helst of meetings inside the Kloveniersdoelen, the gathering place of one of Amsterdam’s three militia companies. “From the Library: The Transformation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses,” an exhibition focused on the popularity of “Metamorphoses” features selections from the National Gallery of Art Library’s rare book collection, prints, drawings, medals and decorative art objects, through Feb. 9. “Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium From Greek Collections,” an exhibition divided into five thematic sections includes manuscripts, jewelry and ceramics, through March 2. “Masterpieces of American Furniture From the Kaufman Collection, 1700-1830,” one of the largest collections of Early American furniture in private hands, acquired over the course of five decades by George M. and Linda H. Kaufman, is on display, indefinitely. Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue NW; 202-737-4215, nga.gov. National Museum of African Art: “Africa Re-Viewed: The Photographic Legacy of Eliot Elisofon,” in celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, an exhibition focused on the photographer’s work capturing images of African culture, through Aug. 24. “Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa,” the exhibit surveys artwork that portrays African land as something revered and exploited, through Feb. 23. 950 Independence Ave. SW; 202-6334600, africa.si.edu. National Museum of American History: “American Stories,” a crosssection of the museum’s collection of artifacts shows how stories and history have shaped our national identity. Continued on page E20

Moving into a new condo?

digs The third Wednesday of each month in Express.

XX0469 2x2

To advertise, call 202.334.4130 or e-mail ads@readexpress.com.


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THEATRE La Señorita de Tacna

Feb 6-March 9 Thurs – Sat at 8 pm Sun at 2 pm

Peruvian Nobel Prize Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa explores family secrets in which memories of youthful love fade in and out of the present.

Lewis Black One-Act Plays

Jan 23-25, 30Feb 1@7:30; Jan 26, Feb 2 @2:00

WA Premier of one-act plays written by the world famous comedian Lewis Black.

Shear Madness

Regular Schedule: Tuesday–Friday at 8 Saturday at 6 & 9 Sunday at 3 & 7

The Kennedy Center Theater Lab

Synetic Theater Presents

Twelfth Night 10th “silent Shakespeare” adaptation! David Henry Hwang’s

Yellow Face

GALA Theatre 3333 14th Street, NW 202-234-7174 www.galatheatre.org James Lee Community Center 2855 Annandale Road Falls Church, VA 22042 (703) 615-6626

$20-42

In Spanish with English subtitles

$12-20

ZemfiraStage @gmail.com

The Kennedy Center Theater Lab Tickets: 202-467-4600 Groups: 202-416-8400 www.shearmadness.com

$50 Great Group Rates

Superbowl Sunday $20 tickets 7PM Show Use code SUPER

Wed-Sat at 8pm, Sun at 2pm Jan 9 – Feb 16

In this wordless, roaring 20s rendition of Shakespeare’s classic romantic comedy, fraternal twins Viola and Sebastian are separated in a shipwreck. Viola falls in love with Duke Orsino and disguises herself as a man to enter his services.

Synetic Theater 1800 S. Bell St Crystal City 866.811.4111 synetictheater.org

$35 & up

PWYC preview Thu 1/30 at 7:30 $30 previews Sat 2/1 at 8, Sun 2/2 at 7:30

A riotously satirical look at race, politics and the media. “Keeps you laughing – and leaves you thinking.” – Seattle Times

Theater J 1529 16th St. NW 800-494-8497 or www.theaterj.org

PWYC & $30 preview

Washington’s hilarious whodunit. It’s fresh, funny, and different every time you see it. “Shrieks of laughter night after night.” -The Washington Post

Writer speaks 2/1 at Theater J, Busboys & Poets

MUSIC - CONCERTS The award winning

Catalyst Quartet

Sunday, Feb. 9 at 3pm

An inspiring program that includes: String Quartet Op. 11 by Samuel Barber; Lyric for Strings by George Walker; Strum by Jessie Montgomery; String Quartet in C minor, Op. 51, No.1 by Johannes Brahms; Wapango by Paquito D'Rivera. Reservations at: www.catalyst-quartet.eventbrite.com

Luca Pisaroni, bass-baritone and

Wolfram Rieger,

Friday, January 31, 7:30 pm

In Recital: Selections by Beethoven, Brahms, Liszt, and Reichardt

National Academy of Sciences Auditorium 2101 Constitution Ave, NW Washington, DC Info. 202.334.2436 or www.cpnas.org Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center 202-467-4600 kennedy-center.org/tickets

Free Photo ID required

In honor of African American History Month

$50

Program Info: 202-669-1463, www.VocalArtsDC.org

piano

COMEDY Washington, DC’s Premiere Political Satire Troupe

Fridays & Saturdays at 7:30pm

A musical, political satire. We put the MOCK in Democracy! www.capsteps.com Info: 202.312.1555

Ronald Reagan Building 1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Tix available at 202.397.SEAT ticketmaster.com

$36

Discounts available for groups of 10+. 202-312-1427

Jack DeJohnette, Joe Lovano, Esperanza Spalding, & Leo Genovese

Rosanne Cash

Saturday, February 1 at 8pm • Warner Theatre

The River & The Thread

THE

Spring Quartet THIS WEEKEND!

Friday, February 14 at 8pm GW Lisner Auditorium

WPAS.org • (202) 785-WPAS (9727) Presented by Washington Performing Arts Society


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MUSIC - CONCERTS Weird, Wild Stuff

Marine Band

Sunday at 2 p.m.

The things that set this music apart are the very same things that make it great. This concert features Ives’s Country Band March; Bernstein’s Prelude, Fugue and Riffs; and Respighi’s Feste Romane.

Schlesinger Concert Hall Northern Virginia Community College 3001 N. Beauregard Street Alexandria, VA 202-433-4011 www.marineband.marines.mil

Free, no tickets required

Parking is available for $6

Because exploring D.C. should be fun. (And asking strangers isn’t.) Insider advice on what to see, where to go and what’s family friendly

Time-saving guides to the monuments, museums and more

Highlights of exhibits and events, handpicked by our editors

Street maps with step-by-step walking and Metro directions

Download Today! iPhone is a registered trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

XX0628 5x7


E20 | E X P R E S S | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | T H U R S D AY

Weekend Pass | goingoutguide.com Continued from page E17

More Complex Than It Looks

by his personal photographer, through

“Camilla’s Purse,” a display of Holocaust

March 16. “G-Men and Journalists,” an

survivor Camilla Gottlieb’s purse and

exhibit exploring the FBI’s effort to com-

its contents including her 1884 birth

bat crime features photographs, news-

certificate, through May 4. “Changing

papers and interactive displays, through

America: The Emancipation Proclama-

Jan. 4, 2015. 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW;

tion, 1863, and the March on Washing-

888-639-7386, newseum.org. Phillips Collection: “Jean Meisel: 50-65 Horizon Line,” more than 50 small watercolors of horizon lines by D.C.based artist Meisel, through May 4. “John F. Simon, Jr.: Points, Lines, and Colors in Succession,” an exhibition inspired by the progression of movement in the natural world incorporates drawing, software and computer-generated fabrication, through Feb. 9. “Laib Wax Room,” German artist Wolfgang Laib originally created this fragrant, illuminated beeswax chamber for the Phillips family home. It will be the museum’s first permanent installation since the Rothko Room in 1960. “Van Gogh Repetitions,” an exhibition organized by the Phillips Collection and the Cleveland Museum of Art features more than 30 portraits and landscapes by the artist, through Sun. 1600 21st St. NW; 202-387-2151, phillipscollection.org. Smithsonian American Art Museum: “Landscapes in Passing: Photographs by Steve Fitch, Robbert Flick, and Elaine Mayes,” three photographers’ works, all focusing on the passing American landscape, are exhibited, through Feb. 23. “Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art,” more than 90 works of art across all media by significant Latino artists who have been active since the mid-20th century, through March 2. Eighth and F streets NW; 202-633-1000, americanart.si.edu. Susan Calloway Fine Arts: “New Landscapes: Scenes From the Shenandoah to the Chesapeake,” Ed Cooper reflects the subtleties of early morning and late afternoon light and color in his landscapes, capturing the interplay of sun and shade on trees, water and grass, through Feb. 15. 1643 Wisconsin Ave. NW; 202-965-4601, callowayart.com. The Old Print Gallery: “2013 Winter Contemporary Show,” features 11 artists who primarily use printmaking for artistic expression, through Feb. 15, 10 a.m. to 5:20 p.m. 1220 31st St. NW; 202-9651818, oldprintgallery.com. LAST CHANCE Torpedo Factory Art Center/Art League Gallery: “Abstract Expressionism Revisited,” a

ton, 1963,” a collection of photos and artifacts commemorating two major events in American history, through Sept. 7. “Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950 to 2000,” from food production to who does the cooking to where meals are consumed to what we know about what’s good for us, this exhibit explores how new technologies and social and cultural shifts have influenced major changes in food, wine and eating in America. “Puppetry in America,” artifacts from stage and FAWNA XIAO AND HILLYER ART SPACE

screen that cover more than 160 years of puppetry, through April 13. “The Birth of Biotech,” a display featuring lab and factory equipment used for recombinant insulin and historical objects used to treat diabetes, through Sat. 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW; 202-633-1000, americanhistory.si.edu. National Museum of Natural History: “Dom Pedro,” the 14-inch obelisk is a 10,363-carat aquamarine. “Living on an Ocean Planet,” a new permanent exhibit that explores the ocean space and its relationship to human life. “Nature’s Best Photography Awards,” portraits of plants, animals and people by the world’s best amateur and professional photographers, through March 31. “Portraits of Planet Ocean: The Photography of Brian Skerry,” an underwater journey through different marine environments by the award-winning photojournalist. “Whales: From Bone to Book,” traces the journey of fossil bones from sea cliff to museum drawer and illustration in a science book, through May 31. 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW; 202-633-1000, mnh.si.edu. National Museum of the American Indian: “As We Grow: Traditions, Toys and Games,” a new permanent exhibition at the museum displays more than 100 objects that show how Native American children play. The toys, games and clothing in these cases come from all over North, Central and South America and represent more than 30 tribes, indefinitely. “Ceramica de los Ancestros: Central America’s Past Revealed,” Central American ceramics from 1000 B.C. to the present, through Feb. 1, 2015.

FAWNA XIAO, specializes in making 3-D shapes from minimalist geometric forms. “Floating Islands,” above, is just one of

her works that uses vibrant color and stark backgrounds to evoke complex landscapes and emphasize the beauty of the natural world. Xiao’s work is on display at Hillyer Art Space.

“Making Marks: Prints from Crow’s

through March 9. “Workt by Hand: Hid-

a one-room exhibition highlighting the

Shadow Press,” features 18 works by

den Labor and Historical Quilts,” a show-

civil rights icon in honor of the 50th anni-

seven Native American artists including

case of 35 18th-to-20th-century quilts

versary of the March on Washington, fea-

Rick Bartow, Phillip John Charette and

from the Brooklyn Museum’s decora-

tures photos and memorabilia, through

Joe Feddersen, through May 26. Fourth

tive arts collection, through April 27.

June 1. “Outwin Boochever Portrait Com-

Street and Independence Avenue SW;

1250 New York Ave. NW; 202-783-5000,

petition 2013,” a juried exhibit of mixed-

202-633-1000, nmai.si.edu.

nmwa.org.

media portraits, through Feb. 23. “The

National Museum of Women in the Arts: “Circa ’75: Judy Chicago,” features selected works by Chicago in honor of her 75th birthday. Chicago’s work explores female identity and women’s cultural achievements, through April 13. “Equal Exposure: Anita Steckel’s Fight Against Censorship,” artwork, papers and photographs detail the life of Steckel, who created the Fight Censorship Group. Hours for this exhibition are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., through May 9. “New York Avenue Sculpture Project: Chakaia Booker,” Booker exhibits her rubber-tire-based pieces outside the museum along New York Avenue as part of a series of changing installations of contemporary works by female artists,

National Portrait Gallery: “Dancing the Dream,” an exhibit featuring choreographers, impresarios and performers such as Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Michael Jackson and Beyonce, through July 13. “Mathew Brady’s Photographs of Union Generals,” studio portraits by one of the most famous photographers of the Civil War, through May 31, 2015. “Meade Brothers: Pioneers in American Photography,” a collection of daguerreotypes from the 19th-century American photographers and brothers, through June 1. “Mr. Lincoln’s Washington: A Civil War Portfolio,” features large-format reproductions of photographs, drawings and maps that document the Civil War and its impact on Washington, through Jan. 25, 2015. “One Life: Martin Luther King Jr.,”

Network,” artist Lincoln Schatz recombines interviews with famous politicians, scholars and other notables into a singlescreen video. Eighth and F streets NW; 202-633-1000, npg.si.edu. Newseum: “Anchorman: The Exhibit,” an exhibition dedicated to the fictional exploits of anchorman Ron Burgundy and the Channel 4 Evening News team features costumes, props and footage from the film, through Aug. 31. “Civil Rights at 50,” a three-year changing exhibit follows the civil rights movement from 1963 to 1965 with images and the front pages of newspapers and magazines from the time. “Creating Camelot: The Kennedy Photography of Jacques Lowe,” intimate shots of President John F. Kennedy’s family taken


T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | E21

goingoutguide.com | Weekend Pass

►stage

juried exhibition featuring work created during the 1950s Abstract Expressionist movement, Thu.-Sun. Art League Gallery, Room 21, 105 N. Union St., Alexan-

Transformed: Five Sculptors,” Thu. and Fri. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sat. and Sun. noon to 5 p.m. 901 New York Ave. NW; 202347-2787, touchstonegallery.com.

American Century Theater presents

house, 508 Main St., Laurel, Md.; 301-

the story of a baseball team in which

617-9906, laurelmillplayhouse.org.

one of the players has a terminal ill-

LAST CHANCE Aquarium: Jack and

POWERED BY WWW.GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM

dria; 703-683-1780, theartleague.org. LAST CHANCE Touchstone: “Form

seniors and students. Laurel Mill Play-

ness, through Sat., $32-$40. Gunston Arts Center Theater II, 2700 S. Lang St.,

Calypso lead children and caregiv-

45 Seconds from Broadway: Take a behind-the-scenes look of New York’s theater district in this Neil Simon comedy featuring washed-up and on-therise players, through Feb. 8, $15, $12

ers through a magical and interactive world, through Sun., $8. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE; 202-3997993, atlasarts.org. LAST CHANCE Bang the Drum Slowly:

Arlington; 703-998-4555. Crimes of the Heart: Three Mississippi sisters band together after streaks of misfortune, through Feb. 9, $32-$60. Everyman Theatre, 315 W. Fayette St.,

Local movie times DISTRICT

AMC Loews Georgetown 14

3111 K Street N.W.

www.AMCTheatres.com

Gravity 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D: 1:05-3:20-5:40-8:00-10:15Movie Times I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC;Digital Presentation: (!) 1:00-6:00-10:35 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) CC;RealD 3D: (!) 3:30-8:15 August: Osage County (R) AMC INDEP;CC;Digital Presentation: 1:20-4:157:10-10:10 Dallas Buyers Club (R) AMC INDEP;Digital Presentation: 6:20-9:00 Devil ' s Due (R) Digital Presentation: 12:15-2:30-4:45-7:05-9:20 Her (R) AMC INDEP;CC;Digital Presentation: 1:50-4:55-7:50-10:45 That Awkward Moment (R) CC;Digital Presentation: 10:00 I, Frankenstein: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) IMAX;RealD 3D: 12:00-2:254:40-7:00-9:30 Frozen (PG) Digital Presentation: 1:10-3:45 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) Digital Presentation: 1:15-3:50-6:25-8:55 Ride Along (PG-13) Digital Presentation: 12:45-3:35-6:05-8:35 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) Digital Presentation: 1:05-5:00-8:45 American Hustle (R) Digital Presentation: 12:55-4:05-7:20-10:30 Lone Survivor (R) Digital Presentation: 1:35-4:25-7:15 The Nut Job (PG) Digital Presentation: 12:05-4:35-9:05 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) RealD 3D: 2:20-6:50 12 Years a Slave (R) AMC INDEP;Digital Presentation: 1:15-4:20-7:30-10:35

MARYLAND

AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Center 8633 Colesville Road

www.afi.com/silver

Inside Llewyn Davis (R) 1:00-5:10-7:20-9:40 Dallas Buyers Club (R) 11:20-4:30-9:30 Philomena (PG-13) 11:00-3:10-7:25 12 Years a Slave (R) 1:45-7:00-9:20

AMC Loews Center Park 8 4001 Powder Mill Rd.

www.AMCTheatres.com

I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC;Digital Presentation: 1:00 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC;Digital Presentation: 12:15-2:45-5:458:30 Ride Along (PG-13) CC;Digital Presentation: (!) 2:30-5:00-7:30 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) CC;RealD 3D: 3:15-5:30-7:45 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC;Digital Presentation: 12:45-4:30-7:15 American Hustle (R) CC;Digital Presentation: 2:15-5:20-8:20 Lone Survivor (R) CC;Digital Presentation: 1:00-4:00-7:00 The Nut Job (PG) CC;Digital Presentation: (!) 12:30-4:50 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC;RealD 3D: (!) 2:40-7:00 Devil's Due (R) CC;Digital Presentation: (!) 2:00-4:45-8:15

AMC Magic Johnson Capital Center 12

American Hustle (R) CC;Digital Presentation: 3:45-7:00

That Awkward Moment (R) CC/DVS: 10:00

AMC Mazza Gallerie

Landmark Bethesda Row Cinema

5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW

www.AMCTheatres.com

www.AMCTheatres.com

800 Shoppers Way

7235 Woodmont Avenue

www.AMCTheatres.com

www.landmarktheatres.com

Frozen 3D (PG) CC/DVS;RealD 3D: 12:10 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: (!) 12:15-2:50-5:40-8:10 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: (!) 12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00 August: Osage County (R) AMC INDEP;CC/DVS: 12:00-3:10-6:10-9:10 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS: 12:15-4:00-7:50 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS: (!) 12:05-2:55-5:45-8:30 Her (R) AMC INDEP;CC/DVS: 12:20-3:20-6:20-9:20 Frozen (PG) Digital Presentation: 2:45

Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) 1:20-4:00-7:00-9:45 Inside Llewyn Davis (R) 1:50-4:40-7:40-10:05 August: Osage County (R) 1:30-4:10-7:10-9:50 Nebraska (R) 1:40-4:30-7:35-10:00 The Past (Le passe) (PG-13) 1:35-4:20-10:10 Philomena (PG-13) 1:10-3:55-6:55-9:30 Her (R) 1:45-4:35-7:30-10:15 12 Years a Slave (R) 1:05-3:50-6:50-9:40

Avalon

Regal Bethesda 10

5612 Connecticut Avenue

www.theavalon.org

The Wolf of Wall Street (R) Best Picture- Actor- Director Nominee- Academy Awards!: 12:00-3:45-7:30 American Hustle (R) 10 Oscar Nominations including Best Picture and all acting categories!: 1:45-5:00-8:15

Landmark E Street Cinema 555 11th Street NW

www.landmarktheatres.com

Inside Llewyn Davis (R) 2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45 The Past (Le passe) (PG-13) 12:50-3:50-6:40-9:25 Dallas Buyers Club (R) 1:10-4:10-7:10-9:35 Nebraska (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00 The Great Beauty (La Grande Bellezza) (NR) 1:45-5:00-8:15 Philomena (PG-13) 12:40-3:00-5:20-7:40-9:50 The Invisible Woman (R) 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:40 Her (R) 2:00-5:00-8:00

Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 707 Seventh Street NW

www.regalcinemas.com

Frozen (PG) CC/DVS: 1:10-4:30 Gravity 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS-Closed Captions ' Descriptive Vide;RealD 3D: (!) 7:30-10:05 Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:45 I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC/DVS: 4:00-6:30-9:00 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) CC/DVS: 3:50 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:40-4:15-7:10-10:10 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:00-2:30-3:40-5:00-6:20-7:30-8:50-10:00 August: Osage County (R) CC/DVS: 1:00-4:20-7:15-10:15 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS-Closed Captions ' Descriptive Vide;RealD 3D: (!) 1:00-7:30-10:00 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS: 1:50-6:10-9:50 American Hustle (R) CC/DVS: 12:05-3:15-6:30-9:40 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS: 1:30-4:50-8:00-10:45 The Nut Job (PG) CC/DVS: 2:20-7:00 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC/DVS-Closed Captions ' Descriptive Vide;RealD 3D: (!) 12:00-4:40 Devil's Due (R) CC/DVS: 12:20-2:50-10:30 The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (PG-13) 12:30 12 Years a Slave (R) CC/DVS: 1:25-4:20-7:20-10:20 Gimme Shelter (PG-13) 1:30-4:00-6:50-9:30

West End Cinema 2301 M Street NW

http://westendcinema.com/

August: Osage County (R) Academy Award Nominees Meryl Streep ' Julia Roberts!: 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) Nominated for 5 Oscars- incl. Best Picture!: 1:30-5:00-8:30

theatre.org. Death by Chocolate: A resort manager and amateur sleuth must find the murderer among the resort staff in this comedy whodunit, through Feb. 9, $17, $14 seniors and youth. Port Tobacco Players, 508 Charles St., La Plata, Md.; 301-932-6819, ptplayers.com. Continued on page E22

(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket The Square (Al Midan) (NR) Academy Award Nominee -- Best Documentary!;English Subtitles: 2:20-4:40-7:20-9:40

AMC Loews Uptown 1 3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.

Baltimore; 410-752-2208, everyman

7272 Wisconsin Avenue

The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS: 1:10-4:50-8:45 American Hustle (R) CC/DVS: 11:45-2:45-6:00-9:15 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS: 1:00-4:15-7:15-10:10 The Nut Job (PG) CC/DVS: 1:25-6:10-8:30 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 3:40 Nebraska (R) CC/DVS: 2:05-5:15-7:55-10:40 The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:55-10:15 Devil's Due (R) CC/DVS: 12:40-3:00-5:30-8:05-10:25 I, Frankenstein: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) CC/DVS ;IMAX: (!) 12:00-2:305:00-7:30-10:00 The Legend of Hercules (PG-13) CC/DVS: 10:20 Her (R) 1:40-4:30-8:00-10:55 Gimme Shelter (PG-13) 12:30-3:10-5:45-8:15-10:55

Xscape 14 Theatres 7710 Matapeake Business Drive

www.xscapetheatres.com

Frozen (PG) Stadium Seating: 10:00-1:00-4:10 Gravity 3D (PG-13) Stadium Seating: 11:00-1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40 I, Frankenstein (PG-13) Stadium Seating: (!) 11:00 Paranormal Activity 4 (R) Stadium Seating: 4:10-10:30 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) Stadium Seating: 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:3010:20 Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) Stadium Seating: 11:40-3:00-6:00-9:00 Ride Along (PG-13) Stadium Seating: 10:00-11:50-2:30-5:15-7:20-8:00-10:0010:50 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) Stadium Seating: 12:00-6:30 American Hustle (R) Stadium Seating: 12:40-3:50-7:00-10:20 Lone Survivor (R) Stadium Seating: 12:50-4:00-7:10-10:40 The Nut Job (PG) Stadium Seating: (!) 10:00-10:30-1:10-3:50-6:10-8:40 Devil's Due (R) Photo ID Required;Stadium Seating: 12:40-3:10-5:40 That Awkward Moment (R) Stadium Seating: (!) 10:00 12 Years a Slave (R) Stadium Seating: 12:00-3:10-6:30-9:50 The Legend of Hercules (PG-13) Stadium Seating: (!) 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:3010:10 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) Stadium Seating;Xtreme: (!) 11:50-2:30-5:10-7:5010:40 Ride Along (PG-13) Stadium Seating;Xtreme: (!) 11:40-2:20-5:00-7:40-10:30

VIRGINIA

AMC Courthouse Plaza 8 www.regalcinemas.com

Frozen (PG) CC/DVS: 1:20-4:00 Gravity 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 1:30-4:20-7:40 I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC/DVS: 3:00-5:20 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: 1:50-4:50-7:50 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: 1:40-4:10-7:20 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 12:45-7:55 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS: 1:00-4:40-7:30 American Hustle (R) CC/DVS: 12:40-3:50-7:00 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS: 1:10-4:30-6:50 The Nut Job (PG) CC/DVS: 3:00 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC/DVS;RealD 3D: (!) 12:50-5:10 Dallas Buyers Club (R) CC: 6:40 Devil's Due (R) CC/DVS: 2:00-5:00-7:10

Regal Hyattsville Royale Stadium 14 6505 America Blvd.

Frozen (PG) CC/DVS: 1:05-3:45-6:45 I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC/DVS: 4:15-6:55-9:25 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: 1:55-4:55-7:50-10:30 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:45-1:30-2:10-3:10-4:00-4:45-5:30-6:30-7:158:00-9:15-10:30 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS;RealD 3D: (!) 12:50-3:15-5:35-8:10-10:35 August: Osage County (R) CC/DVS: 1:15-4:20-7:20-10:20 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS: 12:55-5:00-9:00 American Hustle (R) CC/DVS: 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS: 1:35-4:30-7:30-10:25 The Nut Job (PG) CC/DVS: 3:00-7:35-10:05 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 12:45-5:10 Devil's Due (R) CC/DVS: 2:00-4:35-6:50-9:10 12 Years a Slave (R) CC/DVS: 1:00-4:05-7:00-10:00 The Legend of Hercules (PG-13) CC/DVS: 1:45 That Awkward Moment (R) CC/DVS: 10:00

Regal Majestic 20 & IMAX 900 Ellsworth Drive

Frozen (PG) CC/DVS: 2:00-4:40-7:35 Gravity 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 11:50-2:15-4:35-7:10-9:35 I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC/DVS: 1:30-3:50-6:30-9:00 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: 1:20-4:00-6:50-9:30 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) CC/DVS: 11:55-3:45-7:25-11:00 Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:50-7:00 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:05-12:45-1:45-2:25-3:15-4:10-5:10-5:50-6:407:40-8:25-9:10-10:05-10:45 Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom (PG-13) CC/DVS: 3:55-9:50 August: Osage County (R) CC/DVS: 12:20-3:20-6:45-9:40

2150 Clarendon Blvd.

www.AMCTheatres.com

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) CC/DVS;Digital Presentation;Reserved Seating: 1:15-9:15 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug in 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS;RealD 3D;Reserved Seating: 12:15 Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) CC/DVS;Digital Presentation;Reserved Seating: 10:451:40-4:35-7:30-10:30 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS-Closed Captions ' Descriptiv;RealD 3D;Reserved Seating: (!) 11:15-1:45-4:15-6:45-9:00 August: Osage County (R) AMC INDEP;CC/DVS;Digital Presentation;Reserved Seating: 10:15-1:15-4:15-7:30-10:30 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS;Digital Presentation;Reserved Seating: 10:15-2:15-6:15-10:00 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS;Digital Presentation;Reserved Seating: 10:30-1:204:20-7:15-10:15 The Nut Job (PG) CC/DVS;Digital Presentation;Reserved Seating: 11:00-4:45-7:00 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC/DVS;RealD 3D;Reserved Seating: 10:00-3:45-6:00 Her (R) AMC INDEP;CC/DVS;Digital Presentation;Reserved Seating: 10:00-1:004:00-7:05-10:05 That Awkward Moment (R) CC/DVS;Digital Presentation;Reserved Seating: (!) 10:00

AMC Hoffman Center 22 206 Swamp Fox Rd.

www.AMCTheatres.com

Frozen (PG) CC/DVS: 1:35-7:05-9:50 Gravity 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS;RealD 3D: 10:30-1:00-3:25-5:50-8:15-10:35 The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (PG-13) CC/DVS: 11:45-3:10-6:35-10:00 I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC/DVS: (!) 11:30-4:30-9:30 Frozen 3D (PG) CC/DVS;RealD 3D: 10:45-4:20 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: 10:55-1:40-4:25-7:10-9:55 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) CC/DVS: 11:35-6:50 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug in 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS;RealD 3D: 3:15-10:25 Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) CC/DVS: 11:10-2:05-7:35 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: 10:40-11:30-12:20-1:20-2:10-3:00-4:00-4:50-5:306:40-7:30-8:00-9:20-10:30 August: Osage County (R) AMC INDEP;CC/DVS: 10:15-1:05-4:15-7:15-10:20 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS: 10:20-2:15-6:10-10:05 American Hustle (R) CC/DVS: 12:50-4:05-7:20-10:30 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS: 10:50-12:20-1:50-3:20-4:50-6:20-7:50-9:20 The Nut Job (PG) CC/DVS: (!) 2:35-7:25 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: 12:10-5:00-9:45 Dallas Buyers Club (R) AMC INDEP;Digital Presentation: 11:00-1:45-7:40 Devil's Due (R) CC/DVS: 11:20-1:50-4:10-6:30-8:55 Her (R) AMC INDEP;CC/DVS: 11:15-2:20-5:20-8:30 That Awkward Moment (R) CC/DVS: (!) 10:00 12 Years a Slave (R) AMC INDEP;CC/DVS: 4:35-10:35

I, Frankenstein: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) IMAX;RealD 3D: (!) 12:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:30 Gimme Shelter (PG-13) AMC INDEP;Digital Presentation: (!) 10:15-12:55-3:306:00-8:40 The Legend of Hercules 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: 5:05-10:40 Girl, Boy, Bakla, Tomboy (NR) AMC INDEP;Digital Presentation: 12:05-2:455:25-8:10-10:40 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D: (!) 2:00-7:00

Angelika Film Center Mosaic 2911 District Ave

Gravity 3D (PG-13) 11:25-3:55-8:30-10:35 Inside Llewyn Davis (R) 1:35-6:10 August: Osage County (R) 10:15-1:35-4:20-7:15-10:05 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) 11:40-3:30-7:00-10:40 American Hustle (R) 10:10-1:15-4:20-7:40-10:55 Lone Survivor (R) 10:45-1:30-4:15-7:25-10:10 Dallas Buyers Club (R) 5:30-8:00-10:45 Nebraska (R) 10:00-12:30-3:00-5:15 Her (R) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:30-10:15 12 Years a Slave (R) 11:15-2:10-8:05-10:50

Arlington Cinema 'N' Drafthouse 2903 Columbia Pike

http://www.arlingtondrafthouse.com/

Thor: The Dark World (PG-13) 9:50 Captain Phillips (PG-13) 7:10

Regal Ballston Common 12 671 N. Glebe Road

www.regalcinemas.com

Frozen (PG) CC/DVS: 1:20-4:20-7:00 Gravity 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS;RealD 3D: (!) 12:50-3:30-6:30 Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues (PG-13) CC/DVS: 2:00-4:55-7:50 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: 2:10-4:50-7:30 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: 2:20-5:00-7:40 American Hustle (R) CC/DVS: 12:40-1:40-3:50-4:50-7:10-8:00 Dallas Buyers Club (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:15 Devil's Due (R) CC/DVS: 1:50-4:40-7:20 Philomena (PG-13) CC/DVS: 1:45-4:25 12 Years a Slave (R) CC/DVS: 12:55-4:00-7:05 Gimme Shelter (PG-13) 1:00-3:40-6:50

Regal Kingstowne 16 & RPX 5910 Kingstowne Towne Center

Frozen (PG) CC/DVS: 1:40-4:10-6:45 Gravity 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 2:00-4:50-7:15-10:00 I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC/DVS: 2:50-5:10-7:30-9:50 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: 2:10-5:00-8:00-10:35 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) CC/DVS: 3:20 Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:25-6:50 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:00-1:35-2:40-4:05-5:20-6:35-7:50-9:05-10:25 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS: RealD 3D: (!) 1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00 August: Osage County (R) CC/DVS: 1:00-4:25-7:20-10:20 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS: 12:10-4:20-8:05 American Hustle (R) CC/DVS: 12:40-3:50-7:10-10:15 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS:RPX: (!) 1:50-4:40-7:40-10:35 The Nut Job (PG) CC/DVS: 2:20-7:00-9:25 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 12:05-4:30 Devil's Due (R) CC/DVS: 12:45-3:00-5:30-7:45-10:05 12 Years a Slave (R) CC/DVS: 12:00-3:10-6:25-9:35 The Legend of Hercules (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:20 That Awkward Moment (R) CC/DVS: 10:00 Her (R) 9:20 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS: 12:30-3:30-6:20-9:15

Regal Potomac Yard 16 3575 Jefferson Davis Highway

www.regalcinemas.com

Frozen (PG) CC/DVS: 1:10-4:10-7:10 Gravity 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 4:20-9:35 I, Frankenstein (PG-13) CC/DVS: 2:25-5:00-7:40 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:00-2:30-5:10-7:50-10:20 Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:05-2:50-6:00-8:50 Ride Along (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:00-1:30-2:00-2:40-4:00-4:40-5:20-6:40-7:208:00-9:20-10:00-10:30 I, Frankenstein 3D (PG-13) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 1:40-7:00 August: Osage County (R) CC/DVS: 12:10-3:00-6:10-9:10 The Wolf of Wall Street (R) CC/DVS: 12:30-4:50-9:00 American Hustle (R) CC/DVS: 12:10-3:20-6:30-9:45 Lone Survivor (R) CC/DVS: 12:50-3:50-6:50-9:40-10:20 The Nut Job (PG) CC/DVS: 2:20-6:55-9:30 The Nut Job in 3D (PG) CC/DVS; RealD 3D: (!) 12:15-4:40 Devil's Due (R) CC/DVS: 12:40-3:10-5:40-8:10-10:30 The Legend of Hercules (PG-13) CC/DVS: 12:00 That Awkward Moment (R) CC/DVS: 10:00 Her (R) 12:20-3:30-6:20-9:15 Gimme Shelter (PG-13) 12:00-2:20-4:50-7:30-10:15


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EVERY DAY AT 6 P.M. NO TICKETS REQUIRED *Unless noted otherwise

JANUARY 30–FEBRUARY 12 ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ IN THE TERRACE THEATER

30 THU ★ Capital One® Comedy Night: Sara Schaefer

Emmy-winning comedian, blogger, podcaster, and co-host of MTV’s Nikki and Sara Live Schaefer follows comedian Brian Parise, who was recently selected for the Just for Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. Special post-show happy hour from 7–8 p.m. features a signature cocktail and a discount on selected food items. This program contains mature themes and strong language.

31 FRI ★ It’s Your Mug

Poetry 20th Anniversary Reading

From February 1994 to August 1996, the Tuesday night open mic at It’s Your Mug was a community event that had a lasting impact on Washington’s poetry scene. In celebration of the 20th anniversary, original host and founder Toni Asante Lightfoot takes to the stage with a group of Mug regulars.

1 SAT ★ Kenneth Whalum III Specifically requested by Kennedy Center Artistic Advisor for Jazz Jason Moran, the saxophonist for Grammy®winning R&B artist Maxwell brings his band and bold, creative artistry.

2 SUN ★

Family Night: Mandrágora Circo Two performers use a combination of circus skills, music, and aerial acrobatics to tell their story in this wordless theatrical performance.

IN THE THEATER LAB

3 MON ★ White Rabbit, Red Rabbit

Theater Alliance presents this play written by Iranian playwright held in isolation, Nassim Soleimanpour, which involves audience volunteers and requires one actor who has never seen the script to impersonate characters, read, and ad lib the story of a rabbit that attends the circus without a ticket. Free general admission tickets will be distributed in the States Gallery starting at approximately 5:30 p.m., up to 2 tickets per person.

4 TUE ★ The Channa-Upuli Dance Ensemble

To commemorate the 66th Anniversary of Sri Lankan Independence, the world-renowned Sri Lankan dance company presents traditional dancers, drummers, a vocalist, and violinist. Presented in cooperation with the Embassy of Sri Lanka.

5 WED ★ Underground 2 SUN ★ MANDRÁGORA CIRCO

System

The New York band is a huge and diverse group that blends funk MCing, Italian folk, Afrobeat, and much more.

6 THU ★ Lowland Hum

The North Carolina husband-andwife folk duo crafts a multi-sensory performance experience.

7 FRI ★ Jinfan Dance Troupe of Beijing School No. 9

10 MON ★ KURT BRAUNOHLER

DAILY FOOD AND DRINK SPECIALS. 5–6 P.M. NIGHTLY ★ GRAND FOYER BARS The Millennium Stage was created and underwritten by James A. Johnson and Maxine Isaacs to make the performing arts accessible to everyone in fulfillment of the Kennedy Center’s mission to its community and the nation. Additional funding for the Millennium Stage is provided by DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, The Isadore and Bertha Gudelsky Family Foundation, Inc., Jaylee M. Mead†, The Meredith Foundation, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A.J. Stolwijk, U.S. Department of Education, and the Millennium Stage Endowment Fund.

The 25 Chinese students perform various regional Chinese traditional dances.

Live Internet broadcast, video archive, artist information, and more at

kennedy-center.org/millennium TAKE METRO to the Foggy Bottom/ GWU station and ride the free Kennedy Center shuttle departing every 15 minutes until midnight. FREE TOURS are given daily by the Friends of the Kennedy Center tour guides. Tour hours: Monday thru Friday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m.–1 p.m. For information, call (202) 416-8340.

8 SAT ★ NSO Prelude

National Symphony Orchestra and Kennedy Center Music Director Christoph Eschenbach (piano) plays with NSO principals Aaron Goldman (flute), Nicholas Stovall (oboe), Loren Kitt (clarinet), Sue Heineman (bassoon), and Laurel Ohlson (horn) in works by Widor, Debussy, and Mozart.

9 SUN ★ Gregorio Uribe Big Band

The 16-piece musical experience blends Afro-Colombian rhythms with funk grooves and powerful big band arrangements. Presented in cooperation with the Embassy of Colombia.

IN THE THEATER LAB

10 MON ★ Capital One® Comedy Night: Kurt Braunohler

Recently named one of Variety’s “Top 10 Comics to Watch,” Braunohler follows comedian Sara Armour, who has performed her comedy all over the D.C. area. Special post-show happy hour from 7–8 p.m. features a signature cocktail and a discount on selected food items. This program contains mature themes and strong language. Free general admission tickets will be distributed in the States Gallery starting at approximately 5:30 p.m., up to 2 tickets per person.

11 TUE ★ Listen Local First D.C. presents Hailu Mergia

The Ethiopian accordion and keyboardist extraordinaire began his career as part of the Walias Band and has since released several solo recordings.

12 WED ★ Listen Local First D.C. presents Nappy Riddem

A D.C. favorite, the 6-piece, uplifting and conscious reggae band started by Mustafa Akbar and Rex Riddem has developed its own brand of “Dancehall Funk.” ALL PERFORMERS AND PROGRAMS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.

For more information call: (202) 467-4600 GET CONNECTED! Become a fan of Millennium Stage on Facebook and check out artist photos, upcoming events, and more!

PLEASE NOTE: There is no free parking for free performances.

The Kennedy Center welcomes persons with disabilities.

Weekend Pass Continued from page E21

Ella Fitzgerald, First Lady of Song: The rise of the legendary singer is told by her manager, her cousin and in her own words, through March 16, $55$60. MetroStage, 1201 N. Royal St., Alexandria; 800-494-8497, metrostage.org. Glassheart: Rorschach Theatre reimagines the story of “Beauty and the Beast” as if the Beast’s spell was never broken and he lives in an apartment, through Feb. 16, $30, $20 students and seniors. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE; 202-399-7993, atlasarts.org. How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying: The musical follows a man as he ascends his company’s corporate ladder, through Feb. 23, $31-$63.50. Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, Md.; 301-924-3400, olneytheatre.org. Impossible!: Happenstance Theatre presents a vintage circus-themed show, opens Fri. through Feb. 9, $25, $20 seniors and ages 13 to 30, $15 younger. Round House Theatre, 8641 Colesville Road, Silver Spring; 240644-1100, roundhousetheatre.org. LAST CHANCE Mariinsky Ballet: The St. Petersburg company performs Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake,” through Sun., $29-$150. Kennedy Center, Opera House, 2700 F St. NW; 202-467-4600, kennedy-center.org. Miss Nelson Is Missing: When Miss Nelson disappears, her misbehaving class is subjected to a strict substitute, Viola Swamp, through March 9, $19. Glen Echo Park, Adventure Theatre MTC, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo, Md.; 301-634-2270, adventuretheatre-mtc.org. Mother Courage and Her Children: Kathleen Turner of “Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins” returns to star in Artistic Director Molly Smith take on the anti-war story, opens Fri. through March 9, $50-$99. Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW; 202-488-3300, arenastage.org. Peter and the Starcatcher: The origins of Peter Pan are explained in this musical, through Feb. 16, $55-$135. Kennedy Center, Eisenhower Theater, 2700 F St. NW; 202-467-4600, kennedy -center.org. Ragtime: E.L. Doctorow’s novel about Americans at the turn of the 20th century is given a musical turn on the

Before Peter Pan

JENNY ANDERSON

★★★ FREE PERFORMANCES 365 DAYS A YEAR ★★★

NOW AT THE KENNEDY CENTER, the family-friendly pro-

duction “Peter and the Starcatcher” follows the young heroes of Neverland as they face pirates, crocodiles and growing up.

stage, through Feb. 15, $22-$27. Little Theatre of Alexandria, 600 Wolfe St., Alexandria; 703-683-0496, thelittletheatre.com. Richard III: NextStop Theatre Company stages Shakespeare’s history play, through Feb. 23, $20-$27. Industrial Strength Theatre, 269 Sunset Park Drive, Herndon; 703-481-5930. Scapin: Constellation Theatre Company’s comedy follows two men as they attempt to rescue the women they love by coming up with lots of money, through Feb. 16, $15-$45. Source, 1835 14th St. NW; 202-204-7800, sourcedc.org. Shear Madness: The audience plays armchair detective in the comedy, $50. Kennedy Center, Theater Lab, 2700 F St. NW; 800-444-1324, kennedy -center.org. The Best Man: The drama follows two candidates as they do anything to win their party’s nomination, through Feb. 22, $35, $30 seniors and students. Andrew Keegan Theatre, 1742 Church St. NW; 703-892-0202, keegantheatre.com. LAST CHANCE The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged): More than 35 of Shakespeare’s plays are crammed into a two-hour show, through Sat., $20, $18 seniors and students. Silver Spring Stage,


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goingoutguide.com | Weekend Pass 10145 Colesville Road, Silver Spring;

‘Violet’ in Bloom

The Importance of Being Earnest: Two wealthy Englishmen make up tales to entertain themselves in Oscar Wilde’s comedy, through March 2, $20$110. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 Seventh St. NW; 202-547-1122, 877-487-8849, shakespearetheatre.org. The Old Masters: Washington Stage Guild presents Simon Gray’s story of an art critic and an art dealer who face off over a painting’s origins, through Feb. 9, $40-$50, $30-$40 seniors, $20-$25 students. Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church, Undercroft Theatre, 900 Massachusetts Ave. NW; 202347-9620. The Tallest Tree in the Forest: Daniel Beaty stars in the true story of Paul Robeson, the African-American singer and actor brought down by accusations during the McCarthy era, through

CAROL ROSEGG

301-593-6036, ssstage.org.

“VIOLET,” AT FORD’S THEATRE, stars Erin Driscoll, above, as Violet, a woman traveling through the South in search of a miracle. Along the way, she finds courage and the strength to move on.

Feb. 16, $40-$120. Arena Stage,

ises that the 10th installment in its

1101 Sixth St. SW; 202-488-3300,

Silent Shakespeare series will be its

arenastage.org.

most comical. The Bard’s gender-bend-

The Vagina Monologues: Women explore their sexuality in this production by the Rude Mechanicals, through Feb. 8, $17, $14 students and seniors, $12 children. Greenbelt Arts Center, 123 Centerway, Greenbelt; 301-4418770, greenbeltartscenter.org . This: A group of friends navigate middle age, through Feb. 7, $13, $11 students and seniors. Vienna Community Center, 120 Cherry St. SE, Vienna; 703-2556360, viennava.gov. Tribes: A boy who was born deaf and forced to conform to a hearing world gets another perspective when he meets a girl who is losing her hearing, through Feb. 23, $39-$75. Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW; 202-332-3300, studiotheatre.org. Twelfth Night: Synetic Theater prom-

ing story of ship-wrecked twins will be set in the 1920s, infusing the romantic comedy with a Charlie Chaplin vibe, through Feb. 16, $10-$75. Synetic Theater, 1800 S. Bell St., Arlington; 866811-4111, synetictheater.org. Violet: A disfigured young woman follows a televangelist around the 1960s South only to end up learning selfworth from two soldiers, through Feb. 23, $20-$62. Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW; 202-347-4833, fordstheatre.org. Yellow Face: In this comedy about identity, a director protests the casting of a white man in a role of an Asian character, only to accidentally do the same thing in his own show, through Feb. 23, $30-$65, $40-$60 seniors, $15-$25 age 35 and younger. Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW; 800-494-8497, theaterj.org.


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A s p a r t o f t h e B L AC K H I S T O RY M O NTH FA M I LY DAY at t h e

S M ITH S O N I A N ’S N ATI O N A L M US E U M O F A M E R I C A N H I S T O RY

FILM SCREENING

DIRECTED BY STANLEY NELSON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2–4 PM A special preview screening of Freedom Summer, which will broadcast nationally on PBS’s American Experience on June 24. Freedom Summer recounts the 1964 campaign to register voters and improve education for blacks in Mississippi. A discussion with Freedom Summer veterans follows. WARNER BROS. THEATER NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY Constitution Ave., between 12th and 14th Streets NW Metro—Federal Triangle or Smithsonian  FREE TICKETS REQUIRED  For reservations visit http://americanhistory.si.edu/events

Come out to our Black History Month Family Day February 1, 2014 10 am-5 pm

Continue the Conversation The National Youth Summit FREE Webcast on Freedom Summer February 5, 2014, 12:00 noon Register at http://americanhistory.si.edu/nys

Smithsonian National Museum of American History Kenneth E. Behring Center


T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | 15

Sports

JOHN BAZEMORE (AP)

A Legend’s View of a Legacy Elway says Manning can’t seal ‘best ever’ label by winning title

A man stands on the frozen roadway Wednesday in Macon, Ga.

Super Bowl John Elway says Peyton Manning can’t stamp himself as the greatest quarterback in NFL history even if he wins the Super Bowl on Sunday. Elway told The Associated Press on Wednesday that he’s come to realize the argument over who’s the best QB ever is a lot like beauty: It’s in the eye of the beholder.

Manning to Seattle? Not long ago, Pete Carroll and John Schneider sat in a private plane in Denver wondering if Peyton Manning would accept a request to meet with the brain trust of the Seattle Seahawks and see if that could be a potential landing spot for the free agent quarterback. This was in March 2012 before Manning decided to sign with Denver and before Seattle drafted Russell Wilson. Carroll, above, described Seattle’s attempts to land Manning as “brief” on Wednesday. (AP)

Super Bowl XLVIII

“I don’t think there’s ever going to be a ‘very best.’ I think there’s always going to be a conversation,” said Elway, the Broncos’ Hall of Fame quarterback-turned-executive vice president who lured Manning to Denver after his release from Indianapolis two years ago. Manning has the chance to become the first starting quarterback to lead two franchises to Super Bowl titles when the Broncos play the Seahawks at MetLife Stadium this weekend. When Manning signed with the Broncos on March 20, 2012, Elway declared, “My goal is to make Peyton Manning the best quarterback that’s ever played the game.” But at the team hotel on the Hudson River on Wednesday morning, Elway said he now realizes that question will never truly be answered, “even though when he walks away Peyton may well have broken every single record. “So, you’re going to always have

DAVID ZALUBOWSKI (AP)

Broncos vs. Seahawks MetLife Stadium Sun., 6:25 p.m. on Fox

Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning talks with team executive John Elway.

“A lot of them had a note: ‘Sign this for me.’ So I must have signed 10 jerseys for my teammates, which makes me think they think I probably should be out of here after this game.” — BRONCOS QUARTERBACK PEYTON MANNING

your detractors, but he may have a large percentage of ‘who’s the best,’ you know what I mean?” Elway said. “Yeah, all he can do is he can continue to cement his legacy, especially if he continues to keep going like the year he had this year. And I’m going to try to make sure he has all the weapons to be able to do that.” Manning said he still enjoys the game and all that goes into preparing his 37-year-old body and his surgically repaired neck for the rigors of a season, and plans to play in 2014 and beyond if he can. Manning is the NFL’s only fourtime MVP and is expected to capture his fifth award at the NFL Honors on Saturday night after setting records by throwing for 55 touchdowns and 5,447 yards while directing the highest-scoring team in the league’s 93-year history. HOWARD FENDRICH (AP)

Kobe to Miss Out: Due to continued pain and swelling in his injured left knee, Kobe Bryant is expected to miss the NBA All-Star game. The Los Angeles Lakers said Bryant will be out for at least three more weeks before he is reexamined. Bryant was voted a starter in the All-Star game, which is in New Orleans on Feb. 16. He had previously said he hoped fans wouldn’t vote for him, but Bryant was elected to the game for the 16th straight time anyway. (AP)

NBA Game In Atlanta Postponed Weather The deep freeze that engulfed the Southeast on Tuesday forced the Detroit Pistons’ game at the Atlanta Hawks set for Wednesday night to be postponed and threatened the status of other contests. Alabama decided to postpone Wednesday’s men’s basketball game at Auburn to today. The winter storm trapped thousands of motorists on Atlanta’s frozen interstates, including Atlanta Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman, Tennessee coach Butch Jones, Ohio State offensive coordinator Tom Herman and Georgia Tech sports information director Dean Buchan. Jones tweeted a photo showing he was stuck in Atlanta traffic. A Michigan native, he included the hashtags “SnowInTheSouth” and “MichiganderProblems.” CHARLES ODUM (AP)

TV Lineup CAPITALS (7 P.M., CSN) After a seven-game skid, the Capitals have won two straight heading into tonight’s game at Columbus. Washington has scored 10 goals in its past two wins. NBA (8 P.M., TNT) Carmelo Anthony, who has scored 121 total points in his past three games, leads the Knicks against the Cavaliers at Madison Square Garden.


16 | E X P R E S S | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | T H U R S D AY

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T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | 17

CAREER TRAINING

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SE

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2343 Green Street SE • Wash. DC 20020

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Jetu Apartments

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NE

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NE

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XX195 1x1

XX740 1x.50

DENTAL ASSISTANT

FAIRWAY PARK A P A R T M E N T S

DC RENTALS


18 | E X P R E S S | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | T H U R S D AY

Hyattsville

A partm ents

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# Occupants

Maximum Income

1

$41,180

2

$51,600

3

$58,080

4

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Close to the Forest Glen Metro Off-Str. Prking/Controlled Access Ceiling Fans Housing Vouchers Welcome UTILITIES INCLUDED

only

$

599

(when you sign a 12mo. lease)

Super Convenient Location Close to shops & rec. ctr

XX740 1x.25

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• • • • • • •

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MOVE IN SPECIAL

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LANDOVER

OXON HILL

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MT. RAINIER

On residential street next to DeMatha HS Off-st parking • Ceiling Fans (tenant pays electric • carpet extra)

301.277.6610

Call today to schedule an appointment tour!

1 BR Special- $949 2 BR Special- $1400* 3 BR Special- $1750*

866.914.9712

st

1 BR at $800 • 2 BR at $875

• Enormous Floor Plans • Noise Dampening Floors • Close to Shopping • Pet Friendly • Washer & Dryers in all 3 BR units

11658 South Laurel Drive Laurel, MD 20708

$599 price is for 1 Mo. Rent/ 1 BR only

IMMEDIATE MOVE-IN SPECIALS

WINDSOR COURT AND TOWER APTS

The Villages At Montpelier

Arts District

Hyattsville

Silver Spring

Present this ad and receive a free application fee

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MD RENTALS

: 1 and Dens : 2 Bedrooms : 2 and Dens : 3 Bedrooms

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Hyattsville

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CASTLE MANOR

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Summer Ridge

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$

your lifestyle

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Transform

MD RENTALS

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TEMPLE HILLS

HEATHER HILLS Apartments

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SUITLAND

PARKWAY TERRACE 1 BRs fr

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1439 Southern Ave.

888.480.1693

920

2 BRs fr

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• Walk to Metro • W/W Carpet or Hardwood avail • Secure Buildings • Parklike setting w/picnic tbls & grill

Silver Spring

HILLBROOK TOWERS MOVE-IN SPECIAL $599 price is for 1 Mo. Rent/1 BR only

3415 Parkway Terr. Dr. Suitland, Md.

1 BR’s are $1050

RENTS FROM $950*

Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm. Sat. by app’t. only

st

877-608-6548

(when you sign a 12 mo. lease).

Hillbrook Towers Apartments Central Air • Disposables Off St. Parking • Elevator • Mid-Rise Apts All Utilities Included

• Renovated apts available • Controlled access entry • Bus stop on property with direct service to 2 Metro Stations • All Credit Considered

888-833-9784 SILVER SPRING five star, $395/bi weekly includes utilities/cable. Edi. 240-286-5451

CAPITAL CROSSING

DC Rider

METRO NEWS ON YOUR iPHONE AND ANDROID DOWNLOAD FREE.

866-571-9958

3930 Suitland Rd, Suitland, MD 20746 XX609 1x.75

MD RENTALS

*

limited time offer on select apts.


T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | 19

1 brs from $899 2 brs from $1059

$599 price is for 1st Mo. Rent/1BR only (on a 12 mo. lease)

• • • • •

1 BR’s from $899 • 2 BR’s from $1095

HILLWOOD MANOR 202-499-2082 ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED (a/c extra)

Highrise or garden style apts Dishwashers Gas cooking & heat Convenient to 3 Metro Lines Pet friendly (some restrictions)

SOUTHERN TOWERS

Marlow Plaza

SOUTH POINTE

CoMe in for Great rent sPeCiaLs

Mon, tue, wed, thu 9-7 • fri, sat 9-5 • sun 11-5

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• Wall-to-wall carpet • Off-Street Parking • Walk to Metro • Immediate Move-In

Ask about our 2nd Chance Program HURRY - Limited Availability!

Your audience reads Express.

www.southpointemd.com

*Restrictions apply, prices subject to change daily. Please ask a Leasing Consultant for more info.

XX740 1x.25

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SHEEHY HONDA

WOODBRIDGE, VA 1-800-879-4701 ALEXANDRIA, VA 14211 JEFFERSON DAVIS HWY. LUSTINEONLINE.COM 7434 RICHMOND HWY

LEXUS OF SILVER SPRING

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Bowie— Room in a house, utils and FIOS TV Included. No pets, no smoking, $560. 703-2826431

Laurel Bsmt for rent, BR w/ pvt BA, rec/den. Share kit & W/D, $1000/mo. No smoking/ pets. Call 240-281-1535

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Up Marlb- Furnished Rm in SFH. Shrd KIT & BA. Nice & Clean. Nr Pub. Trans. $625/mon 240-280-5493

LINDEN PARK APARTMENTS 3600 Jurgensen Drive Triangle, VA 22172

ROOMMATES

Contact us at 202.334.6732 or ads@readexpress.com

Call Now! 866.708.7251

301.289.7565

CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT!!!

*All Prices & Specials Subject to change without notice.

ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED

Limited Time Only • Renovated Apartments Available • Central A/C & Heating • 2 Playgrounds • Five Minutes for 95 South & North GYM, Lounge and Business Center

Come on in and take a tour.

• All utilities paid • No Security Deposit or move-in fees • Metrobus at front door to Pentagon & Van Dorn Metro • Free parking • Convenient to Pentagon, Shopping & I-395

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 1 Brs $870 • 2Brs $1050

marlowheightsrentalapts.com

LUSTINE DODGE

Studios from the $900s* 1BRs from the $1100s*

APARTMENT HOMES

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4901 Seminary Rd., ALEXANDRIA, VA

Temple Hills

*limited time offer

OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK MON-FRI 8:30-5:30 • SAT 10-4PM

99 South Bragg St, Alexandria, VA 22312 703-354-6300  www.BraggTowers.com

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• Spacious closets • Lots of windows • Walk to shopping & community center • Minutes to 2 Metro stations

Furnished Efficiencies: $399 Wk  $1470 Mo Cable  Internet  Utilities  Housekeeping

EXTENDED STAY HOTEL

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BRAGG TOWERS

NEW Special

Alexandria

TEMPLE HILLS

MOVE-IN SPECIAL! $599

VA RENTALS

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VA RENTALS

NE/Ft Totten Metro- Prof. Fem N/S. to shr unfurn BR. 3BR, 2.5BA shr SFH. -$935. W/D, Cbl, WiFi, maid svc. CAC/Heat, all inc utils 202-494-3692

SPRINGFIELD- M pref, $560/mo includes internet, utilities & cable. Call 703-402-3337

DARCARS NISSAN

703-660-0100 SILVER SPRING, MD 1-800-266-4874 ROCKVILLE, MD WWW.SHEEHYHONDA.COM 2505 PROSPERITY TER. LEXUSOFSILVERSPRING.COM 15911 INDIANOLA DRIVE

ROOMMATES TEMPLE HILLS & WALDORF Rooms at $625$750/utils incl/public transp./ nwly renovated, Very NICE! Call 301-537-2247 or 240-432-0751 TEMPLE HILLS - Male pref. $175/wk. Lg rm in bsmt w/ pvt BA, furn, carpet. Call 202-714-7939

LOTS & ACREAGE FOR SALE MOUNTAIN GETAWAY! 3+ AC - $54,900 Forever Mountain Views

Rare chance to own this perfect mountain retreat! Mature hardwoods, level setting, breathtaking views, easy access - like walking through a park! Enjoy hunting, fishing, hiking, boating, camping and many other great adventures. Less than 100 miles to DC. All mineral rights included, perc approved & warranty deed to give you peace of mind about this incredible land. Ready for you to use and enjoy. No time frame to build. Excellent financing with little down. CALL NOW TO SEE 800-888-1262.

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355 TOYOTA

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AN APP FOR iPHONE® BY

Because exploring D.C. should be fun. (And asking strangers isn’t.) Insider advice on what to see, where to go and what’s family friendly

Highlights of exhibits and events, handpicked by our editors

Street maps with step-by-step walking and Metro directions

iPhone is a registered trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

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XX0628 5x4


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Sears Home Services Get a Deep-Down Clean with Sears “GREEN.” Our “GREEN” carpet cleaning solutions are safe for kids, pets and the environment.

Sears Ultra Care 2-Step Deep Cleaning

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An area is defined as a room up to 250 square feet. Combination areas Living Room/Dining Room and other areas over 250 square feet are considered as separate areas. Baths, staircases, landings, halls, walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Valid for residential areas only. Prices may vary for specialty fabrics, loose back cushions, wool and oriental carpet and special services. Specialty spotters may not qualify as Green. Additional fee applies to all jobs 3rd floor or higher. Air duct pricing valid on single furnace homes only. Extra charge may apply for homes with multiple heating/cooling systems or homes with furnaces or vents that are not easily accessible. Energy savings may vary depending on the size of your home and the condition of your heating/cooling system. Offer/service not available in all areas. Minimum order may apply. Other restrictions may apply. Call for details. Not valid with any other coupon or offer. Void where prohibited. Services supplied by Sears franchises. Sears cards are issued by Citibank (South Dakota) N. A. Offer expires 3/1/14. A temporary fuel charge may be added.


T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | 21

He Looks Familiar … Selena Gomez is dating pop singer/Bieber clone Austin Mahone 27

An Unlikely Thriller

Broadcast Muse

Mema’s Mouth

She blithely pops her false teeth in and out. Her motto? “I love to cuss. It makes me feel good.” She’s Delores Hughes, aka “Mema,” above, star of the reality show “Hollywood Hillbillies” (9 p.m., Tuesdays, Reelz), in which her Georgia family heads west so grandson Michael, who made the viral “Gingers Do Have Souls!!” video, can find fame. Mema has interesting views about Jews. She’s skeptical about Michael’s boastful talent manager but concedes: “The one thing he has going for him is By Marc he’s a Jew. You know, Silver Jesus was a Jew.” When the manager mounts a mechanical bull at a restaurant, she says, “I’ve never seen a Jew on a bull before. I wonder if that’s even kosher.” Mema’s commentary comes in the wake of high-profile prejudicial remarks by reality stars. “Duck Dynasty’s” patriarch called homosexuality a sin and said black cotton pickers he knew in the pre-civil rights era were “singing and happy.” Juan Pablo, the current “Bachelor,” said casting gay men in the show would not be “a good example for kids.” So far, I think Mema’s OK. To my Jewish ears, her stereotypes aren’t offensive. And they serve as teachable moments: There’s nothing non-kosher about riding a mechanical bull! Read Marc’s previous columns at: www.washingtonpost.com/muse

Q&A Chilean author Isabel Allende is best known for her works of magical realism. Now, at 71, she’s taken a completely new direction with her first thriller, “Ripper,” out now ($28.99, Harper). Set in San Francisco (Allende’s adopted home) in 2012, the novel is about a holistic healer and her daughter, a bright yet introverted teen who spends her free time playing an online mystery game called “Ripper.” The girl’s hobby turns serious when her mom disappears.

“My sleuth is not James Bond. My sleuth is an autistic nerdy kid with a hood.” “Ripper” came to be because your agent suggested you and your husband [crime novelist Willie Gordon] write a book together. Why didn’t you complete it together?

My husband writes in English. He has an attention span of 11 minutes. He doesn’t research much. Me, I write in Spanish, I can write for 11 hours, and I research thoroughly, so, I thought, I will end up writing the whole book, and he will get half the credit. No way.

ISABEL ALLENDE

REELZ

Isabel Allende finds horror in the most unusual places for her new book ‘Ripper’

“Ripper” is the first thriller from magical realism author Isabel Allende.

You’re known as a magical realist author. Does “Ripper” fit into that genre?

It’s very funny because when astrology and that kind of stuff — crystals or aromatherapy — happens in Latin America, it is called magic realism. When it happens here, it’s called New Age. In the book, it’s tongue-in-cheek. “Ripper” has some grisly murders. How did you come up with this stuff?

I attended a mystery writers’ conference. The questions from the students were unbelievable. Here’s an

example: “If I inject a blood thinner to my victim and I stab her 13 times and hang her upside down in the shower, would the blood congeal on the bathtub?” Aside from inventing gruesome crimes, what was most challenging about writing “Ripper”?

Keeping suspense. You have to plant clues, but you also plant red herrings. At the same time I wanted to … stick to the formula of the detective novel, but also make fun of it. That’s why my sleuth is not James Bond. My sleuth is an autistic nerdy kid with a hood.

You always start new books on Jan. 8. What’s the rest of your process like?

I sit down with a vague idea. Day by day, the story unfolds itself slowly. Sometimes I find myself in a dead end. I have to turn around and start again. Must be a lot of revision.

Yes. But also I have discovered … that writing has an element of unconsciousness. If I am nervous, anxious, trying to follow a plan, then there’s no playfulness. I only enjoy it when the characters dance with me. K ATIE ABERBACH (FOR E XPRESS)

Expect Dancing: NBC has announced Ellen DeGeneres, left, will serve as executive producer for a new comedy about lesbians. “One Big Happy” will be about a lesbian who becomes pregnant just as her best friend, a straight man, gets married. This will be the first gay-themed show from NBC since “Sean Saves the World,” which the network canceled Wednesday, and “The New Normal,” which was canceled after one season in 2013. (E XPRESS)


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Here’s another reason to love Sundays. Get the Express Sunday delivered to your front door, absolutely free of charge.

Introducing Express Sunday: our new weekend edition appearing exclusively in The Washington Post’s home-delivered Savings Now package of inserts and coupons. Filled with engaging lifestyle stories and features, it’s a great way to add some enjoyment to those relaxing Sundays in your pajamas.

Get it for the very special low price of $0.00. Don’t get Savings Now? Subscribe for free. savingsnow.washpost.com | 1-800-218-7436 (ext. 1) Not available in all areas. XX13-1020-02 5x10.5


T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | 23

entertainment lookout

FIND OUT WHY UMUC IS CONSISTENTLY RANKED ONE OF THE BEST SCHOOLS FOR VETERANS

Miles Teller Gears Up for a Busy Year The star of ‘That Awkward Moment’ piles on the awards

BY MILITARY TIMES EDGE

Miles Teller is a name movie fans can expect to hear a lot this year. The 26-year-old actor stars alongside Zac Efron and Michael B. Jordan in the comedy “That Awkward Moment,” opening Friday. He appears in the dystopian adventure “Divergent” this spring. And he dazzled Sundance Film Festival audiences with his performance in “Whiplash,” which won both jury and audience honors Saturday at the festival’s awards ceremony. “It’s rare to get a script where they really trust an actor, especially an actor my age, to really do some heavy lifting and some hard work, and that’s my favorite,” he said. In “Whiplash,” Teller plays a jazz drummer determined to succeed. As a student at the nation’s leading music conservatory, he fights for a spot in the competition band, led by an intimidating and often abusive instructor (played by J.K. Simmons).

DANNY MOLOSHOK (AP)

Film

Miles Teller, above, plays a hard-working jazz drummer in “Whiplash.”

Teller earned accolades for his Sundance debut in 2013, playing opposite Shailene Woodley in the coming-of-age drama “The Spectacular Now.” (He and Woodley reunite in “Divergent.”) “As a young actor, you just know about Sundance and all the great film festivals, and you think about what it would be like to get up there,” he said. “And last year it completely lived up to that. And now to come back with this film and have it open up and have the response that we’re getting … it feels good.”

Participate in the Veterans Appreciation Virtual Open House Tuesday, February 11, 2014, 3–4 p.m. ET • Get help applying for VA benefits and answers to questions about financial aid, admissions, accessibility and career services from members of our dedicated veterans advising team. • Talk to an academic advisor to plan your degree path in more than 95 online undergraduate and graduate programs.

SANDY COHEN (AP)

• Find out how your military experience can translate into college credits—and a civilian career path.

At Least the Teddy Bears Weren’t Invited

Prospective students who participate in the February 11, 2014, event will be eligible to have the $50 application fee waived.* *The $100 application fee for the Doctor of Management program cannot be waived.

SANDY M. COHEN (AP)

AT YOUR SERVICE SINCE 1947

MADONNA, above left, joins Miley Cyrus for a duet at Cyrus’ “MTV Unplugged”

special, which aired Wednesday. The duo performed Cyrus’ hit “We Can’t Stop” and Madonna’s 2000 song “Don’t Tell Me” at the Western-themed show.

Veterans who are current students are also welcome. Plan to participate now. RSVP to military.umuc.edu/virtualoh For more information, call 800-939-UMUC (8682)


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lookout online

GETTY IMAGES

“Suddenly paying  $18/day in parking and battling DC rush hour traffic seems like a logical solution over counting on @wmata” — @KIEPEONKIEPENON

reacts on Twitter to the latest round of Metro delays Wednesday morning. Metro had issues on four of its five lines because of disabled trains, The Washington Post reports.

“I think one of the things that makes a bad movie enjoyable is a complete lack of self awareness.” — COMMENTER FINNEGANSCAKE AT THEDISSOLVE.COM adds to a conversation

about why objectively bad movies are often enjoyable to watch. He uses the example of Tommy Wiseau’s “The Room,” which has become a cult classic of the good bad-movie genre, noting, “Part of what makes ‘The Room’ so amazing [...] is that Tommy Wiseau [the enigmatic director/star of the film] had absolutely no idea how his film would be received.”

“You didn’t ask them about the flags that go on these bloody things. Are they hectare-sized and made of reinforced material? I think we should be told…” — COMMENTER TOBY GUISE AT VICE .COM comments on an interview

of two Americans who started a company called Trident Support Corporation, which builds the world’s tallest flagpoles for authoritarian regimes. The current tallest flagpole, built by Trident, juts 541 feet in the air (roughly the height of a 50-story building), and is located in Dushanbe, the capital of Tajikistan.

“Hey, you made it. Nice. I’m glad you found your pants.” — COMMENTER ROB_ON_DRUMS AT GAWKER.COM adds a caption

to an animated GIF that went viral Wednesday that shows Vice President Joe Biden smiling wide and pointing at someone in the audience during Tuesday night’s State of the Union address.

“Why not get Kool-Aid to sponsor our trail snowplow person who could wear that costume whilst clearing the way.” — COMMENTER KAM AT ARLNOW.COM

comes up with a solution to satisfy all in the ongoing debate about whether Arlington County should provide resources to clear its bike trails of snow. KAM’s idea to get Kool-Aid to sponsor the trail’s clearing comes after County Board Chairman Jay Fisette referred to bike commuters as “those who have drunk the Kool-Aid.”

MAKE

Translating Research into Solutions for our World

HISTORY

Volunteer in a malaria research study.

We seek healthy adults 18 to 50 years of age to be immunized by mosquito bites in order to accelerate malaria vaccine development.

live closer to all the action (oh yeah, and work too). The Metro Rider ’s Guide. Every second and fou th Wednesday ednesday of the month. t fourth

Compensation is provided.

Volunteer Today! 301-295-4298 301-233-9640

malariactc.nmrc@med.navy.mil NMRC Clinical Trials Center Located at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Campus 8901 Wisconsin Ave., Bldg 17, Suite 2B, Bethesda, MD 20889

Version 1.0 01 October 2013

Advertisers: Have a metro-accessible location to advertise? rentalads@washpost.com

0185 3X3


T H U R S D AY | 0 1 . 3 0 . 2 0 1 4 | E X P R E S S | 25

puzzles lookout Scrabble Grams

HOROSCOPE

PAR SCORE 145-155, BEST SCORE 236

Sudoku

DIFFICULT

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your exploration of certain unconsidered realities can answer many questions before you ask them. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You’re not likely to find yourself in the position you most desire if you are unwilling to step up and put it on the line right now. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You are not aware of the central realities that are governing a certain key situation, but you certainly can be by day’s end. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “Never” is a long time. The moment you say “never,” you are likely to find yourself fighting the temptation to forget you ever did!

Wednesday’s Solution

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You can get a great deal of work done, and you need not tend to it all at once. Indeed, regular short breaks can provide inspiration. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You may want to take one, two or even three short walks in order to clear your head and contemplate what is really going on. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You can come to a few important conclusions that guide you toward a decision you have long wanted to make. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You must be sure to give yourself the opportunity to discover what you can on your own terms today. Don’t be too rigidly hemmed in.

Wednesday’s Solution

FOUR RACK TOTAL Make a 2-7-letter word from the letters in each row. Add points of each word using scoring directions at right. Seven-letter words get a 50-point bonus. Blank tiles used as any letter have no point value. Scrabble is a trademark of Hasbro in the U.S. and Canada.

Comics

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Like your Scorpio neighbors, you run the risk of taking yourself — and what you do — a bit too seriously. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It’s a good day for you to get out and about. Try exploring new territory or circulating among a new group of people.

DAILY CODE

GW

Forecast

30 23

POOCH CAFE | PAUL GILLIGAN

Today: Mostly sunny and cold today. Patchy clouds tonight.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The quality of your work today is not likely to come under fire, but the quantity may make some wonder what is keeping you so busy. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You needn’t give up all of your reasons for doing this or that. Some mystery can serve you well, provided you remain lighthearted about it.

Need more Sudoku? Find another puzzle in the Comics section of The Post every Sunday and in the Style section Monday through Saturday.

46 33 Tomorrow: Milder tomorrow with clouds and sun. Mostly cloudy tomorrow night.

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE | STEPHAN PASTIS

Looking Ahead

SAT

SUN

MON

48 35 50 28 42 30 Sun and Moon Sunrise today: 7:16 a.m. Sunset today: 5:27 p.m. Moonrise today: 6:41 a.m. Moonset today: 5:37 p.m.

Almanac Normal high: 44 Record high: 76 Normal low: 29 Record low: 2

FORECAST BY ACCUWEATHER.COM ©2014


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February is

Fabulous! Great Homes and Gardens and Lecture Series

Mansion and gardens open for touring, 6pm Members’ reception, 6–6:45pm Lecture, 7–8pm Book signings, Feb 6 and 27, 8pm

Passion of the Empress: The Art Patronage of Catherine the Great

Special Exhibition Opens Feb 15 Member Preview Day, Feb 14

Be dazzled by the artistic treasures from the golden age of Catherine the Great, one of Russia’s foremost art collectors and shrewdest leaders.

Celebrate La Chandeleur! Sat, Feb 1, 10am–5pm

Join Alliance Française de Washington and Hillwood for family fun, food, and games to mark the festive French holiday La Chandeleur, “Crêpe Day”.

Best Short French Films of 2013 Wed, Feb 12, 6:30–7:30pm

Spend a cozy winter evening watching a selection of the best French short films of 2013.

These films may contain mature themes and are intended for an adult audience.

Queen of Hearts: A Valentine’s Day Opening Benefit Fri, Feb 14, 7pm

Celebrate the opening of the special exhibition Passion of the Empress with hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, and festive music. Call (202) 243-3974 for tickets and information.

Serene Sundays Sun, Feb 16, 1–5pm

Don’t miss your first chance to see the special exhibition Passion of the Empress.

Immerse yourself in the beauty of some of America’s most splendid gardens with this four-part lecture series. Longwood Gardens—100+ Years of Garden Splendor by Colvin Randall Thu, Feb 6 Escape to a paradise that has become one of the world’s great horticultural showplaces since industrialist Pierre S. du Pont purchased a small farm a century ago. The Golden Age of American Gardens by Eleanor Weller Reade Thu, Feb 13 Venture from New England to the West Coast by way of the country’s most splendid estates and gardens from the turn of the 20th century. Winterthur: An American House and Garden by Christopher Strand Wed, Feb 19 Experience the glorious naturalistic gardens and pastoral landscape of Winterthur, the treasured country estate refined and expanded by three generations of the du Pont family. Doris Duke’s Shangri La by Thomas Mellins Thu, Feb 27 Explore Shangri La, philanthropist Doris Duke’s idyllic paradise, a magical Hawaiian retreat that inventively synthesizes modernist architecture, Hawaii’s lush landscape, and Islamic art.

Where Fabulous Lives

lookout puzzles Crossword ACROSS 1 Collapsed 5 Beyond large 9 Big hit 14 Touched the tarmac 15 Long time period 16 Tunable drum 17 Ark builder 18 Woes 19 Cookies in a box lunch, perhaps 20 Classic bouquet tosser 22 Snow White and the dwarfs, e.g. 23 Punch-drunk 24 Near 26 Profit’s other side 29 Go over old ground 33 Certain Buddhist 37 “The Gift of the ___” 39 “The Night of the Hunter” screenwriter 40 Chicago business area 41 Roadies travel on them 42 CD-___ (computer inserts) 43 Ill-mannered type 44 Leering look 45 Breastplate of Zeus or Athena 46 Maintain as true 48 Cotton on a stick 50 Wolf of Mexico 52 Dick Tracy’s topper 57 Sternward 60 Vessel of the Pilgrims 63 Word before Puffs or Krispies 64 Lightbulb in toons 65 Stick for spreading 66 Clairvoyant’s deck 67 South American monkey 68 National League team 69 Inscribed pillar 70 Move, emotionally 71 Unsightly eyelid problem

DOWN 1 Jamaican marijuana 2 So one can hear

EDITED BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER

3 Tasty dish 4 Lucy’s best friend 5 Afro or fade 6 Wrinkly tangelo 7 Neuter 8 Big Bertha’s birthplace 9 Moe or Larry 10 “Alice in Wonderland” character 11 Whistle when a cop comes 12 Gin flavor 13 “... why ___ thou forsaken me?” 21 Martial arts award 25 Eye part with color 27 Dirty air 28 Bellow and Steinberg 30 Highly excited

31 It’s good for the long haul 32 Oil giant 33 Goya subject Duchess of ___ 34 House topper 35 Deer foot 36 Prank victim once a year 38 Increased 41 Grant has a famous one 45 First homicide victim 47 Take for a spin? 49 Cause of many a split 51 Leaves out 53 Morrison’s band 54 Little hooter 55 Like an oboe’s sound 56 Levitated

57 Recites lines 58 Vessel with rows? 59 “God’s Little ___” 61 Mine opening 62 Himalayan mystery creature

Wednesday’s Solution

TODAY IN HISTORY

1933 1948

Adolf Hitler becomes chancellor of Germany.

Indian political and spiritual leader Mohandas K. Gandhi, 78, is shot and killed in New Delhi by Nathuram Godse, a Hindu extremist.

1968 For mor e inf or mation call 202.686.5807 or visit HillwoodMuseum.org 4155 Linnean Ave. NW, Washington DC Free parking

SPRING FORWARD

The Tet Offensive begins during the Vietnam War as Communist forces launch surprise attacks against South Vietnamese provincial capitals.

Who We Are: Published by Express Publications LLC, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington, DC 20071, a subsidiary of WP Company, LLC

How to Reach Us: To place a display ad: Call 202-334-6732 or email ads@readexpress.com. To place a classified ad: Call 202-334-6200. To nominate a hawker as Star Distributor: Email circulation@readexpress.com. For circulation: Call 202-334-6992 or email circulation@readexpress.com. Spot a mistake? Let us know at corrections@readexpress.com. The newsroom: Call 202-334-6800, fax 202-334-9777 or reach out to us on Twitter @WaPoExpress.

Publisher: Arnie Applebaum Executive editor: Dan Caccavaro General manager: Ron Ulrich Circulation manager: Charles Love Managing editor, features: Holly J. Morris Managing editor, news: Lori Kelley Creative director: Jon Benedict Features editor: Jennifer Barger Senior news editor: Diana D’Abruzzo Story editor: Adam Sapiro Deputy creative director: Adam Griffiths Senior editors: Sadie Dingfelder, Vicky Hallett, Kristen Page-Kirby Section editors: Michael Cunniff, Rudi Greenberg, Beth Marlowe, Marissa Payne, Rachel Sadon, Holley Simmons, Jeffrey Tomik Art director: Allie Ghaman Copy editors: Samantha Dean, Sean Gossard Designer: Rachel Orr Production supervisor: Matthew Liddi

Founding publisher: Christopher Ma, 1950-2011


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people lookout CAREERS

‘Kitchen Nightmares’ and ‘Hotel Hell’ Star’s Next Venture: ‘Irony Chef’ A chef is suing Gordon Ramsay, saying he bit into a burger containing a ceramic shard at Ramsay’s restaurant in New York’s The London hotel. According to The New York Post’s Page Six, Markus Barthel’s lawsuit says he “suffered serious injuries that rendered him unable to continue working in his occupation.” (EXPRESS)

CHILDREN

Selena Swears She’ll Raise This One Right Selena Gomez has moved on from Justin Bieber and is dating 17-year-old pop singer Austin Mahone, according to Us Weekly, and Taylor Swift was the matchmaker. Gomez, 21, and Mahone are keeping their romance low-key, sources told Us, and recently sneaked out of a concert separately before leaving in the same car. Gomez recently told Seventeen magazine, “I haven’t found someone yet who could understand my lifestyle, support it, love me through it and not be threatened by it. It’s hard.” (E XPRESS)

DE AL-SWEE TENERS

Breeding

Alleged Victim Also to Be Ringbearer at the Wedding Kanye West settled with a man he allegedly assaulted, TMZ reported. The 18-year-old reportedly shouted racial slurs at Kim Kardashian when West and Kardashian were out and about in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Jan. 13. Unnamed sources told TMZ that the settlement is well over $250,000 but remains in the six-figure range. TMZ’s sources said it’s unlikely the Los Angeles District Attorney will bring charges against West. (EXPRESS)

FRANCOIS GUILLOT (AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

Stance on Giant Ducks Causes Bitter Fan Schism George Clooney did a Reddit AMA on Tuesday and revealed he would rather fight 100 duck-sized horses than one horse-sized duck. He also joked Sandra Bullock “drinks so much that oftentimes it’s just hard to keep her upright” and said the perfect sandwich is “ham and avocado and a little tomato and a little mustard.” (EXPRESS)

“Go back to Canada, Justin. … America, stick with my brother.”

Hugh’s Genetic Legacy Grows Hugh Grant has a third child, The Sun reported. The boy, whose mother is Swedish TV producer Anna Elisabet Eberstein, was born in September 2012; Grant’s name was added to the birth certificate in December 2013. If The Sun story is true, both Eberstein and Grant’s other baby-mum, Tinglan Hong, were pregnant at the same time. (E XPRESS)

— NICK CA RTER TOLD TMZ THAT HIS FORMER TEEN-IDOL BROTHER, AARON CARTER, SHOULD BE ENOUGH FOR THE U.S.: “JUSTIN BIEBER’S COOL AND ALL … BUT HE’S CANADIAN.”

Are you a DC Resident diagnosed with AIDS or HIV, Cancer, Glaucoma or Muscle Spasticity?

Bring your valid Doctor’s Recommendation to Takoma Wellness Center and we will Need a valid Doctor’s Recommendation? Download the form at www.takomawellness.com/ physicians and give it to your doctor today.

6925 Blair Rd NW • Washington, DC 20012 (202) 465-4260 • www.takomawellness.com • Info@TakomaWellness.com

A Master’s Degree

That Focuses On Management Skills Master of Science in Management

To advertise: 202-334-6732 or

• Track Options: Federal Acquisition & Contract Mgmt., Federal Program Mgmt.,

ads@readexpress.com

Human Resource Mgmt., Leadership, Organization Development, Organizational Communication, Project Mgmt., or Social Entrepreneurship

• Evening and online course options • Metrorail convenience • Complete the program in as few as 12 months

INFORMATION SESSION: Thursday, Feb. 6, 5:30–7p.m.

express

To R.s.v.p., email metropolitan@cua.edu or call 202-319-5256. Location: Pangborn Hall, Room 323A XX05671x3

MARIJUANA CAN HELP! • Help you complete the paperwork • Take the photos you need • Hand deliver your application to the Health Department (we pay the $100 Fee!) • Schedule your first appointment

CONTROVERSY

Catholic University admits students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, or disability. If you need accommodations for a disability, contact us at the phone number listed above.


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