Page 1

EMM EXP ERT

MARKETER

MAGAZIN E

Quarterly Magazine Q4 - 2012, Issue 0

Joeri van den Bergh Interview Author & Master Marketer, preview of his new book

TO D AY ' S R E A D E R S A R E TO M O R R O W ' S L E A D E R S

Tapping into the power of 350 million consumers.

Interview with Mary Bergstrom Author All Eyes East

New Trends in Marketing 2013

1

NEW STIMA MEMBERSHIP ADVANTAGE


FOREWORD

MARC VAN DE PERRE

PROLOGUE

WARD VANDORPE

INTRODUCTION

4

5

6>7

COLUMN

INTERVIEW

GRANT LEBOFF

MARY BERGSTROM

GROWTH STRATEGIES

20>21

22>23

24>29

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR

INTERVIEW

LIZ CRAWFORD

MUST READ

38>43

44>45

BOOK REVIEWS

2

EMM

BOOK REVIEWS

KURT FRENIER

46>47


CONTENTS INTERVIEW Column

BRANDING

JOERI VAN DEN BERGH

BOOK REVIEWS

8>11

12>19

Grant Leboff

ARTICLE

PETER FISK

34>37

30>33 COMMU NICATION

COLUMN

ERICK DECKERS

48>55

56>57

BOOK REVIEWS

EPILOGUE/ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS/INDEXES 3

58>63


FOREWORD

MARC VAN DE PERRE Managing Partner Interface Marketing President STIMA, Belgium

Dear marketer and valued STIMA member, Welcome to this very first issue of Expert Marketer Magazine, a brand new quarterly magazine, packed with information on the latest ideas in marketing. This magazine is dedicated to our members and it fits perfectly with our vision to share with you the most up-to-date and thought-provoking knowledge about marketing. I wish you inspiring reading! Marc Van de perre President STIMA

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PROLOGUE

WARD VANDORPE Expert Marketer Magazine

We are very proud to present you the “0” issue of our new magazine EMM: Expert Marketer Magazine. Let’s call it the beta version. There may be areas you see that we can improve upon. We hope you will provide us with feedback so we can create the type of key resource you will come to rely on. Please provide your comments and suggestions to ward@expertmarketermagazine.com. We have some very exciting material in this first issue. We have an insightful interview with Joeri Van den Bergh. In this interview, we preview his new book, a revision of his already successful book

How Cool Brands Stay Hot. At the beginning of this year, the book won our 2011 Marketing Book of The Year award. Just recently, the book was also awarded the 2012 Berry-AMA Book Prize for the best book in marketing (awarded by the American Marketing Association Foundation). The anticipated release date for the new book is March 2013. On pages 6 to 9 of the magazine, you can read the interesting preview. Other interview articles include a discussion with Mary Bergstrom (author of All Eyes East) on Chinese youth and Liz Crawford (author of The Shopper Economy) on the emerging shadow economy made possible by technology. In this issue we have sections on branding, growth strategies, consumer behavior and communication, featuring a recent selection of the best books with pre-reading material and thorough analysis in each section. We provide quotes on the subjects coming from industry experts Ron Adner, Martin Lindstrom, Laurence Capron and Steven Van Belleghem. Our columnigsts in this issue are Grant Leboff, who focuses on the changing face of information distribution and Erik Deckers, who discusses Content Marketing, the wave of the future. Last, but not least is an inspiring article on new trends in marketing from the hand of Peter Fisk. Peter is a well-known business innovator, strategist, and marketer and he is the founder of the Genius Works. Enjoy reading!

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INTRODUCTION

EMM EXPERT

MARKETER

MAGAZINE

WHAT? EMM is a magazine about marketing books and marketing authors. It provides Vision, Knowledge and Wisdom in a handy digital magazine full of hyperlinks to more detailed information. EMM offers marketers all the right tools for them to select the marketing book which is right for him/her at that moment and for their specific need. Key components include: -Marketing book reviews with free chapters, thorough analysis and presentations -Marketing authors columns, interviews, articles and quotes -Book Ordering made easy via hyperlinks to several online book stores

WHY? EMM strongly believes in reading the right professional book on a regular basis. These days , there’s a lot published for free on the internet but we believe that books, for which an author conducts a thorough investigation often taking several years, is a more profound basis on which to develop one’s career. We see it this way: “Today’s Readers are Tomorrow’s Leaders.” Marketing is an evolving business and marketers should evolve with their discipline. Marketers know and admit they should read more but they don’t have time to read and certainly no time to figure out which are the right books, let alone purchase them. 6


HOW IT WORKS Leveraging the interactive beneďŹ ts of a digital magazine, every article, every page, every book links to more information on the EMM website . EMM selects the best marketing books from the last quarter and groupsthese around general marketing themes such as branding, communications, consumer behaviour, pricing, and so on. Depending upon the offer of that quarter, the subjects are chosen for each magazine. The magazine is sold on an hoc basis (single issue) or in a subscription (single or multi-year options available). The key advantages to starting a subscription are the accessibility to far more data on the site as well as access to the EMM library. The EMM library provides an extensive selection of the best marketing books. It has a robust search engine function that enables you to search on various criteria the magazine uses to analyse every book that features in the magazine. Not only is the magazine interactive with the website, there’s also interactivity with the readers/ members: - Members can write and read reviews of featured books - Members can suggest new titles for o The magazine (should be max 3 months since publication) o The EMM library (should be a MUST READ with a recommendation). Try it out and step into the world of marketing wisdom. 7


INTERVIEW 8

JOERI VAN DEN BERGH Author, How Cool Brands Stay Hot Why are you doing an update of How Cool Brands Stay Hot’? Though we have some really great stuff in the previous book, a lot has changed in this area. We have seen the lifecycle of the content covered in this book was current really for about two years. It was time to look at the latest trends in what makes a brand “hot” (or desirable).’ We have seen that branding is even more relevant these days. If you look at the prospective customer base for many of these brands, target audience characteristics are changing. By the time this new book gets released, (March 2013) most of the millennials (Generation Y) will be young adults. (They will be in the age range of 17 – 32). Looking at it from a HR perspective, rather than as a marketer, a lot of people from this group could be part of your new employees. From a marketer perspective, these individuals could be your new (and main) consumer. Considering the changing profile of this segment, we need to spend the time to really understand this audience. We need to understand their unique interests, what motivates them. So though the segment is Generation Y, in the passage of time, we see there have been some changes. This audience is also going through different life stages themselves. In this book, we not only look at what marketers should know about this segment, but also what are the expectations of this segment from the brands they select. This book is not completely new. We address and build upon many of the key points we emphasized in the previous version of this book. One of the models we spoke of was the “crush model”. There are five chapters that address each of these aspects. Some areas we see that have grown in importance is the increased collaboration of organizations with their consumers. Crowdsourcing is explored in this book. It is becoming so much more important in the past few years. Related to that, there is a new discussion on “gamification” of marketing. We explore how organizations work to engage consumers. They have created various approaches to engage their customer’s interests,

to drive increased loyalty. We have seen and we discuss in the book the concept of crowd sources and how crowd sourcing is really a method of innovation. To remain competitive, you really need to find new insights and create new products that are specifically tailored, for these young (adult) consumers. We have seen in our research that the Generation Y segment is more open to this type of collaboration, especially compared to the older consumers. We really explore how this has evolved since our previous version of the book. Do you have any examples of cases? Yes, in the book we review the Heineken “Club of the Future” case. This was a very interesting case that InSites Consulting worked out with Heineken. Heineken wanted to create a new nightclub that was in-line with the brand image of Heineken. Heineken, up to this point, has had strong brand presence within entertainment (music), sports (football) and movies like “James Bond.” They were able to create an extension of their brand that went beyond the traditional. The finished product in itself is quite remarkable. But we also spend time looking at the whole process of how they initiated and executed the process of developing this branding effect. The designed club is a combination of branded interior design, integrated video, audio, lights, TV and also packaging. They started the whole process by recruiting young designers from different parts of the world (Tokyo, Brazil…). Using their Facebook Fan Page, these designers had to pitch their ideas. Five were chosen. It was done via co-creation. There was also an ongoing community created for several weeks. They brought these Heineken Fans as part of their core design team. The collaborative team process lasted for five weeks. They established a virtual “clubbing” environment within an online community. For an interior design they leveraged a high percentage of their feedback by working with individuals from the Generation Y age group. Topics that were looked at during the design


“We look at what people are sharing on their social networks. You can capture and analyze information that’s already provided.” 9


INTERVIEW 10

concept phase include the discussion of things like: What elements contribute to creating your perfect night out? What are some of the challenges you face? What do you like or not like about some of the places you go? What would you like to see different? As a result of the feedback from their surveys, Heineken and team created a framework of the “6 stages” of the clubbing” scene. We review this in depth in the book. Through the feedback of this interactive team, recommendations of design styles were identified and provided for the designing phase. The newly designed branded club was launched during the Furniture Fair in Milan. This branding effort was done in a way that the modules of the design can be incorporated quickly in clubs throughout the world. We speak a lot about the newly branded design of the club. Design elements include not only the surrounding areas (lounges, dance floors, etc.), the costumes (uniforms) of the serving staff also include design and color that emphasizes the brand. Even the trays carried by the staff are consistent with the brand. Heineken’s approach in revitalizing its brand, in itself, is quite remarkable. As you know we really look at how brands can become “hot”. In this case, Heineken really managed to make their brand “cool” and fresh. To further enhance the attractiveness of their brand, they also incorporated interactivity into the whole club drink ordering experience. They created an interactive bar that’s quite innovative in its features. In the book we speak in depth about these additional integrated branding designs that have really elevated the whole brand experience at their clubs to a whole new level. Another really fascinating branding case we review in the book is: Luta Brazil. This is a martial arts studio for young people living in the favelas in Brazil. It was originally designed as a simple martial arts school. But something amazing happened to the brand. When they build awareness on the charity activities they were doing, they saw that these initiatives really impacted the brand of the school. Kids all over the place wanted to be associated with that school. Luta Brazil, a simple school was able to elevate itself to become an international (commercial) brand. We review this in detail in our book. What we did observe is that the brand was significantly elevated as a result of their efforts in charity.

There are many good branding cases in our book. Just to tease you a little on some of the other case studies in the book, we have MasterCard, Esprit, 55DSL, Mini, State Farm Insurance, KFC, Durex and many many more. We actually conducted 24 interviews. Many of these interviewed held executive titles like CMO. We interviewed Renzo and Andrea Rosso (founder of Diesel and his son creative director of 55DSL) I interviewed the CMO of Converse, Geoff Cottrill. The first book helped us to speak to high profile experts for this new book. At Heineken we spoke to the head of global design, Mark Van Iterson. We spoke to representatives from Intel, Microsoft and eBay. We found in our studies that technology brands continue to resonate with high importance. In the media space we interviewed representatives from the BBC. A lot of presentations / discussions were done in the US and Asia. We even looked at how the Swedish Army was able to create a “cool” brand. For our global audience, we include cases from multiple countries both in Europe and US. There are several books on Generation Y and the Chinese marketplace. Do you cover any of this in the book? We do provide a section reviewing global marketing, but we do not spend significant time here. We are more focused on the question “what makes a strong brand?” We do speak a bit about some research we did on Russia and China. We saw, in these regions, that there is much more emphasis on status. Over in those countries, it appears that Millennials have some typical characteristics of the Western Generation X while on the other hand they also inherited Gen Y aspects such as technology and stimulation addcition. This is especially the case as it relates to the importance of “status”. What fascinates you the most about the topics covered in the book? The things we talk about in the book – branding, engaging your audience in interactive communication, etc. are so important to marketers. We have seen that creating social and mobile marketing starts with the younger audience. We can’t emphasize enough that you really need to understand this audience.


How long did it take for you to revise this book? The research was at least five months. We did 24 different interviews in 15 countries. We reached out to urban youths in many of these different areas. Results showed that many characteristics were much more than a lifestyle. What do you think of Neuro marketing? From a business perspective, it’s an expensive method. As a researcher, I am more interested in observing than asking questions. People tend to answer how they think you want them to, versus how they actually behave. Based on our experience, we believe observational research methods tend to be more accurate. Sometimes the methods used are too simplified. Sometimes it is difficult to tell if it is positive or negative reaction to (brand) packaging. Because of the inability to determine the results, you end up having to ask the questions of your participants to get their feedback. We see it this way, when you are asking and getting verbal feedback, you are no longer observing. You are back to asking questions (thus the potential bias). This area is still challenged. It appears even the top Neuro specialists are still working on trying to get traction in this space. I do think this, like most methods, provides added value. Looking at this a little more in depth, what do you mean by ‘Observing versus Asking’? We have several methods of conducting our research. We look at what people are sharing on their social networks. You can capture and analyze information that’s already provided. InSites Consulting is a purely online organization. We may (virtually) “follow” people for a month or six weeks. We ask parents to video record their children when they are playing or opening Christmas gifts. We may then ask the parents (moms) to comment on the videos. We look at what brands are present in those living rooms. We spend time discussing those brands that we observe on the video recordings. Research communities are the most often used methods by InSites Consulting. We create online forums. Participants answer questions in the convenience of their schedules. They can put their thoughts online and discuss with others. It’s a little more effective for us as opposed to focus groups where you have moderators. This observation method tends to work quite well for us. Anything else you would like to discuss about this new book? We spent a bit of time looking at inclusiveness versus exclusiveness. This was not something that was originally part of the topics we were looking at during the interviews. Through our observation and research, we noticed it really 11

seemed to be a new trend. The concept came up repeatedly during several of our conversations across different countries. We noticed it was especially relevant when it came to our studies on the Generation Y segment. This is such a significant area that we found out Abercrombie and Fitch has created a chief officer to specifically manage inclusiveness within their brand. They have created limited offers – not everyone can afford it. Apparently it really inspires activity from the Generation Y segment. We have also identified through our research that the Generation Y segment is really motivated by brands that present the “human” side. Furthermore, the Generation Y segment is especially motivated to purchase items that are exclusive – not available to everyone. As a result of this lesson learned from this audience, we notice many more brands stress their inclusiveness rather than exclusiveness. Your previous book did quite well. What are your thoughts on it? I was quite happy with the reviews and the reception for the book. I was happy, the publisher was happy about the way the book was received (yes, sales were good). We got a few awards which was also quite nice. What do you think is the most important marketing trend of the future? I think engagement and consistency are quite important. I do cover some of these things in the book. We need many more touch points than we had before. With more touch points, you get closer to the consumer. You need consistency, perhaps even create a brand manual. Doing so, you have a better chance of managing your brand and ensuring that you keep all those touch points consistent.


“

The key to marketing success in a collaborative world is

understanding that when success depends on partners (and this is almost always the case) marketers have to think beyond their end consumer - they need to create a path for bringing the rest of the ecosystem on board as well.

“

RON ADNER

Author, The Wide Lens 12


BRANDING In this section on branding, targeting and innovation we have 3 very different but interesting books. Clyde Fessler is a legend and the brand he rebuilt and managed is more than a legend, it’s a myth...

Rebuilding the Brand: How Harley-Davidson Became King of the Road is a great story about how to build and maintain a powerful brand. A brand that sits in the hearts of its users. No need to develop brand advocates for Harley-Davidson ; every proud owner IS an advocate.

In The Lure of Luxe, Jordan Phillips opens up a new world of Luxe which is completely different to the world of Luxe in the past. New consumers, new brands and new opportunities in a global perspective. Fascinated about fashion and curious about the world of luxury as a teenager, Phillips is breathing the lure of Luxe. The third book in this section is Leapfrogging by Soren Kaplan. Leapfrogging means ”creating or doing something radically different that produces a significant leap forward”. Two core learnings in the book: 1. Embrace ‘Surprise’ (be honest, most business leaders hate and therefore avoid surprise and by doing this, they install a surprise-avoiding company culture) 2. The LEAPS process: Listen (also to yourself!), Explore (go outside!), Act (take small steps but keep taking them!), Persist (learn from failure!) and Seize (also the journey is fascinating!).

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BRANDING

HOW HARLEY DAVIDSON BECAME KING OF THE ROAD Clyde Fessler

Triple Nickel Press 128 pages August 2012

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What happens when a company’s brand needs more than a face-lift? Learn how the traction of turning negatives into Author Clyde Fessler, former Harley-Davidson vice

positives will help you gain powerful marketing

president of marketing and business development,

momentum.

takes you along for a ride through a complete brand overhaul. By examining the core principles of brand

Clyde Fessler played an integral part in the dramatic

identity, development, and extension, Fessler shows

turnaround of the Harley-Davidson brand. Fessler

how these ideas—paired with his unique “problems

was truly one of the greatest leaders in Harley-

are in the office, solutions are in the field” leadership

Davidson’s history. He helped lead the company

style—helped reestablish Harley as one of the most

reach its current position as one of the top 100

enduring and identifiable brands in the world.

brands in the world with market share leadership in virtually every customer segment. He always

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In Rebuilding the Brand, you will:

challenges conventional thinking and was a

Explore the six key components of building and

pioneer of the ‘’close to the customer’’ philosophy

maintaining a powerful brand: brand experience,

of marketing. He lives with the customer and

brand extension, brand association, brand

understands the customer better than anyone.

consistency, brand welfare, and brand team.

There is a lot of wisdom in Rebuilding the Brand. It

Discover the power of “turning left” when the

should be required reading for any business school

competition turns right and why breaking away from

marketing class. --Jeff Merten, Former Vice President

the pack will keep you at the centre of customers’

and General Manager, North American Sales, Harley-

attention.

Davidson Motor Company


“Discover the power of turning left when the competition turns right

KEYWORDS BRANDING TARGETING

Fessler is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame. He served on the board of trustees for the American Motorcycle Association and the Motorcycle Safety Foundation. He also served as an active liaison between the Muscular Dystrophy Association and Harley-Davidson, a relationship that has generated over $70 million in donations since 1981. Fessler retired from Harley-Davidson in early 2002 and is now active as a marketing consultant and motivational speaker. He enjoys fulfilling his dreams by exploring the world on one of his four HarleyDavidson motorcycles with his wife, Joan.

BOOK PRESENTATION AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

CONTENT TABLE

GROWTH STRATEGIES

BOOK CHAPTER

TARGET AUDIENCE FROM STUDENTS IN MARKETING TO VP MARKETING FOCUS ON CONSUMER GOODS B2C

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA RELEVANT ALL OVER THE WORLD ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY US, EUROPE, AUSTRALIA

CONTENT INSPIRING & PRACTICAL LOT OF REAL LIFE EXAMPLES FUN AND ENTERTAINING TO READ 15

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BRANDING

CLIMBING THE LUXURY CONSUMPTION PYRAMID Jordan Phillips

CreateSpace 256 pages July 2012 WRITE R E A D

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BOOK PRESENTATION AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY CONTENT TABLE BOOK CHAPTER

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REVIEW


The Lure of Luxe: Climbing the Luxury Consumption

and management from the Ecole Supérieure des

Pyramid provides an informative and entertaining

Arts et Techniques de la Mode (ESMOD) in Paris, and

perspective on luxury fashion brand management.

a bachelor’s degree in journalism from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. She

In the past, an upgrade in status would have remained

has worked for various marketing agencies, such

a dream or just become the reality of a few. But today,

as four years as a public relations executive at

upgrading socioeconomic status is commonplace, mostly in

international communications giant Fleishman-

emerging markets. In the nineteenth century, self-appointed

Hillard, followed by the position of vice president for

tastemaker of New York society Ward McAllister claimed that

a boutique destination marketing organization. She

four generations were necessary to breed a gentleman. Today,

now resides in New York City with her husband and

due to rapid wealth creation and accumulation, the digital

daughter.

revolution, and the relative ease and affordability of travel, the process of developing a level of taste that is deemed acceptable by high society has been sped up dramatically.

“today, upgrading socioeconomic status is commonplace

KEYWORDS TARGETING BRANDING CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT GROWTH STRATEGIES

TARGET AUDIENCE Luxury is relative at every level of society. While Michael Kors

FROM STUDENT IN MARKETING TO VP MARKETING

might be one woman’s Gap, the brand might be the ultimate

APPLICABLE TO CONSUMER GOODS

splurge for another woman. What marketers, retailers, and

B2C

the media tend to ignore is that very possibly describes the same woman, just in different phases of her life, geography, and socioeconomic status. The Lure of Luxe explores the

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA

metaphorical climb up the Luxury Consumption Pyramid, which

RELEVANT FOR USA, EUROPE, ASIA

determines how and why a client will spend. The book provides a new way to think about marketing to this elite segment, and offers best practices across a variety of marketing tactics. Author Jordan Phillips is the founder and director of Lure of Luxe LLC, which provides content and consulting for the luxury fashion industry. She has been fascinated with fashion as long as she can remember, and she developed an intense curiosity about the world of luxury on her first trip to Monaco as a teenager. She holds a master’s degree in fashion marketing 17

ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY US, EUROPE, ASIA

CONTENT INSPIRING & PRACTICAL FUN AND ENTERTAINING TO READ


BRANDING

HARNESS THE POWER OF SURPRISE FOR BUSINESS BREAKTHROUGHS Soren Kaplan Berrett-Koehler 208 pages

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August 2012

Today’s business climate demands breakthroughs, not incremental improvements. What makes one leader or company thrive while others languish in today’s fast-paced, ever-changing marketplace? There’s no doubt hard work is involved, but Soren Kaplan shows you can’t do it by simply creating a big vision and implementing a set plan. In his trailblazing debut, Kaplan gives business leaders the tools to do exactly what they’re taught to avoid: embrace

breakthroughs. Filled with real-world examples from innovators such as Gatorade, Intuit, Philips,

surprise—the new key to business breakthroughs.

Kimberly-Clark, Colgate-Palmolive, OpenTable, and

Instead of fighting against uncertainty, Kaplan

function can leapfrog. Using his LEAPS process

reveals how to use it to break down limiting mindsets and barriers to change the game. By highlighting specific ways to transform both good and bad surprises into unique ue opportunities, Kaplan encouragess leaders to compete by embracing acing counterintuitive ideas, eas, managing paradoxes, xes, and even welcoming ng failure. This is the key to “leapfrogging”— creating or doing something radically new or different that produces a significant leap forward. Leapfrogging connects new research, unconventional strategies, and practical tools for navigating the 18

“messy” and elusive process of achieving business

Etsy, Kaplan shows that any organisation or business (Listen, Explore, Act, Persist, and Seize), leaders learn to seek out, recognize, and respond to surprising experiences and events as a way to create solutions solutio that leap beyond the current expectations c of customers, partners, employees, the market, and em the competition. c Soren Kaplan is the author of Leapfrogging and a Manag Managing Principal at InnovationPoint LLC where he works with Philips, Grundfos, Star Alliance, Disney, Medtronic, Visa, and Dis others. others He led the internal strategy group at HP and is an Adjunct Professor within the Imagineering Academy at NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences in The Netherlands.


KEYWORDS

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA

INNOVATION

RELEVANT FOR USA & EUROPE

BRANDING

ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY US & EUROPE

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT GROWTH STRATEGIES LEADERSHIP

TARGET AUDIENCE

CONTENT

FROM BRAND MANAGER TO CEO

INSPIRING & PRACTICAL

APPLICABLE TO ALL GOODS & SERVICES

LAUNCHES NEW THEORY ABOUT MARKING

B2C & B2B

FUN AND ENTERTAINING TO READ

“learn to seek out, recognise, and respond to surprising experiences as a way to create solutions that leap beyond the current expectations of customers, partners, employees, the market, and the competition

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BOOK PRESENTATION AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY CONTENT TABLE BOOK CHAPTER

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COLUMN

GRANT LEBOFF Author, Sticky Marketing

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THE CHANGING FACE OF INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION We used to live in a world where everyone knew the places to go for information. In the main, people would obtain their news

The understanding that information distribution now

from the same few newspapers, radio stations and TV channels.

happens through conversation, rather than simply

Specialist knowledge, whether in the business-to-business or

publishing, opens up a couple of opportunities for

the consumer marketplace, would then be delivered through

business.

particular trade or consumer magazine titles.

Firstly, by monitoring the social web, with social media monitoring software, companies can really

Relative to today, the world was a simple place to understand. In

obtain an unparalleled understanding of what their

this environment, information was received through publication.

customers and prospects like and think about their

News, trends and events may be discussed around the coffee

market place and industry. This information is not

machine at work, around the family table at home or in the pub

based on ‘focus groups’ when people often say what

with friends, but those who set the agenda were generally the

they think they should say, rather than what they

people who controlled the few media channels on which we all

really feel. Rather, this knowledge is based on real

relied.

actions and proper conversations taking place. ‘Sentiment Analysis’ is becoming big business.

However, as the web has gone social, it is changing the nature of

This is because it is proving to be more accurate

the way information is discovered. We are living in a world where,

than any opinion polls. Whether it is the X factor

increasingly, information is not being disseminated through

final or the American Presidential Primaries, it is

publication but conversation.

becoming possible to predict the outcomes of votes, with a high degree of accuracy, just by monitoring

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Consider this: more and more breaking stories are first being

the popular sentiment online. In fact, there are

discovered, not through traditional news networks, but through

companies predicting things like the performance of

platforms such as Twitter.

stocks and shares just by measuring sentiment on

Fashions, the latest music acts to discover, or the latest TV smash,

the social web.

are no longer breaking simply because some ‘hip’ journalist has

Secondly, if we know that information is

written a rave review in one of the industry ‘bibles’. Instead, people

disseminated through conversation, it should

are discovering the latest music to which they should listen, the

affect the communications your business creates.

latest TV programme to watch or the latest fashion trends, through

Companies must ask themselves why and how

the sharing of information, and conversations taking place on

would people share the correspondence they are

platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google plus,

posting. If there is no definitive answer to these

YouTube, LinkedIn and others.

questions then businesses must re-evaluate the

Of course, information is still ‘published’. By definition, posting

communications they are putting out. It could well

a video on YouTube, a new blog entry or adding a page to

be they are missing out on the biggest opportunity

your website is all ‘publishing’. It is the way that information is

that the digital platform provides.

discovered that is changing. There is simply too much ‘stuff ’ out

Information has been democratised in a way

there. We may, of course, have a few websites or blogs that we

never experienced in any previous generation. The

particularly like, but so much of what gains our attention today

companies that understand this will be able to take

is those videos, articles and blogs that we discover through

full advantage in order to create better and more

conversations and recommendations by friends within our online

sustainable businesses. Those that don’t, will find

networks.

themselves left behind.


INTERVIEW

THE WORLD IS TILTING Mary Bergstrom, author, All Eyes East What are the 5 biggest differences between the

broadcast a personal stake in a modern economy.

Chinese youth you describe in your book and the

This aspiration is not reserved for luxury brands alone

youth from ‘the West’?

however. In this environment, Häagen Dazs and

In many ways, Chinese youth are flocking to iPads

Starbucks repositioned themselves from FMCG (fast

and listening to Psy just like their counterparts all

moving consumer goods) brands to an accessible

over the world. But even though they may pick up

luxury. Still, while the business of luxury is important

brands and ideas from the outside, young people in

and has been given a lot of air time, it is not the only

China are distinctly Chinese—and wouldn’t have it any

value people care about.

other way. Reasons behind their unique attitudes and

Lay’s potato chips, for example, has become

behaviors include:

China’s largest snack brand by building on the

•Youth in China are by and large only children and

values of traditional Chinese medicine. When the

as such are the focus of the family’s income and

brand noticed that behaviors associated with TCM

expectation for the future

(traditional Chinese medicine) restricted sales in

•Born to parents of the Cultural Revolution, youth are

warm seasons, Lay’s dared to re-envision the product

their own role models for defining new values in work,

itself. Adding a cooling line in flavors like lychee,

individualism, and consumerism

blueberry, and lemon iced tea, the brand moved

•With 40 million surplus bachelors, young Chinese

away from its global model to find a powerful and

are navigating new relationships and building new

unique position in the local market.

segments of single men, and women •Because of rigid academic schedules, youth often do

Could you see the trends in China transferring

not have an opportunity to explore personal interests

to other regions of the world now or in the near

and hobbies until they are out of school

future?

•Chinese youth are digital mavens who spend more

Absolutely! Outsiders are used to thinking about

time online, multi-task technologies, and depend on

China as the world’s factory, but really China is

the Internet like no other group in the world

pushing into new territories faster than anyone. Young Chinese are reframing notions of loyalty

What key lessons should companies in ‘the West’

(as consumers and as employees) and putting

take from your book?

themselves first. They are looking at entertainment,

The population of young people (under the age of

technology, and design with a lens that will inspire

30) in China is nearing 500 million, but their appeal is

youth in other parts of the world to a kind of multi-

more than just a super-sized number. They are doing

faceted consumer-centrism that hasn’t been seen

more than buying. They are re-imagining how the

before. Ultimately, All Eyes East is about more than

world should work for them. Chinese youth are not

Chinese youth or understanding how a brand can

looking to follow someone else’s culture codes. They

align with a specific value, it is about re-imagining the

are creating their own rules and building new ideas

future and exploring your place in it.

that will inspire youth outside of China’s borders. It is said that Chinese entrepreneurs easily

22

The impact for companies with luxury products

pick up new ideas / products from the West

is substantial but are there also key lessons for

and make their own versions of it. How much

FMCG (fast moving consumer goods) companies?

more attractive are foreign brands to the young

Luxury brands hold a strong position because they

Chinese versus Chinese brands?


“Chinese youth are not looking to follow someone else’s culture codes” Living in a country without established consumer protections and

ensuring position.

definitions of safety, consumers are attracted to products from

According to you: what the most interesting and

other countries and often willing to pay a premium for this security.

inspiring case in your book?

To be successful, foreign brands need to consistently prove

It is a special privilege to see and document the

themselves and own their points of authenticity, differentiation,

development of the most important consumer

and advantage.

audience of our time. All Eyes East is a token of my appreciation and a means of sharing this

You wrote the book based on experiencing the changing

privilege. I selected stories that would illustrate

trends in China. Any striking anecdotes you could share with

recent important shifts in youth’s beliefs about

our readers?

themselves and the

China has reminded me that fluctuation is constant. Being here,

world and hand-picked

I have watched young friends fearlessly establish new careers

interviewees based on

each year. I’ve also shaken my head more than a few times as

what their experiences

executives plot to “wrangle” their brand from old ladies back to

could teach readers.

cool kids.

From this perspective,

I have watched tan skin, volunteerism, solo travel, and men’s

the whole book is really

beauty products go from unthinkable to trendy. My time here has

a collection of favorites.

taught me that the world is tilting; the way things have been in the

23

past is not the way they will be in the future. For today’s leaders,

Mary Bergstrom,

this is an uncomfortable piece of news but it’s also the first step to

author, All eyes East


No matter their size or pedigree,

firms have a limited number of options: they can innovate internally (build); enter into contracts or alliances and joint ventures (borrow); or merge or acquire (buy). Three clear choices, but companies often fail to pick up the right path for growing their company, often repeating blindly what worked for them in the past. In our “Build-Borrow-Buy” framework, we help business leaders choose a balanced mix of growth modes to grow more effectively.

LAURENCE CAPRON 24

co-author, Build, Borrow or Buy


GROWTH STRATEGIES All marketing is about growing and finding new ways to increase sales and market share. Several tools are available to drive growth but in this section we are looking at strategies that impact dramatic growth. In the first book The New Emerging Market Multi-Nationals, the authors evaluate how companies from China, India, Mexico, Turkey and other emerging countries manage to gain market share by creating new brands, which then compete with the established brands which they used to produce. The authors’ thorough study reveals interesting insights in bottom-up strategies to pursue growth. This book provides great lessons for every company seeking growth in an increasingly highly competitive global market. Where the first book deals with companies and their competitive strategies executed to help them grow market share, the second book provides insight into an ever growing and changing consumer population: the Arab world. Western countries still often maintain a biased, stereotyped view of the Arab world. It’s time to dive into this ‘new world’ and discover the real Arab world and its consumers. You will see that there are plenty of growth opportunities in this huge market of 350,000,000 consumers. Many companies are at the stage of developing an Arab strategy. Some are already operating successfully. Learn from them and develop your plan sooner rather than later. Don’t miss the boat on this huge opportunity.

25


GROWTH STRATEGIES

FOUR STRATEGIES FOR DISRUPTING MARKETS AND BUILDING BRANDS Amitava Chattopadhyay, Rajeev Batra, Aysegul Ozsomer McGraw-Hill 320 pages

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From smartphones and computers to blue jeans and beer, companies from China, India, Taiwan, Mexico, Turkey, and other emerging markets are now winning leading market share

KEYWORDS GROWTH STRATEGIES

with their own-branded, high-quality

INNOVATION

products’rather than with poorly

BRANDING

produced products sold under others’

TARGETING

brand names. These emerging-market

PROMOTIONAL STRATEGIES

multinational companies (EMNCs) are giving the incumbent market leaders of North America, Western Europe, and Japan a run for their money in the areas of innovation, branding, and marketing. How have these small, under-resourced

TARGET AUDIENCE FROM MARKETING DIRECTOR TO CEO APPLICABLE TO ALL GOODS & SERVICES B2C & B2B

businesses come so far so quickly? And what can you learn from their strategies and tactics?

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA RELEVANT ALL OVER THE WORLD

Renowned experts in global branding and marketing, the authors of The New Emerging-

Market Multinationals conducted an in-depth

ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY SOUTH & LATIN AMERICA, ASIA & MIDDLE EAST, AFRICA, RUSSIA

study of 39 EMNCs to reveal the innovative compete-from-below strategies and tactics fueling these companies’ meteoric rise. The authors identify four strategies driving this growth: 26

CONTENT INSPIRING & PRACTICAL LOT OF REAL LIFE EXAMPLES RATHER SERIOUS AND HEAVY TO READ


COST LEADERS leverage existing low-cost structures and large-

are determined to be tomorrow’s market leaders.

scale volumes to extend their reach into developed markets.

Amitava Chattopadhyay is the L’Oréal Chaired

KNOWLEDGE LEVERAGERS tap their existing resources and

Professor of Marketing-Innovation and Creativity at

knowledge of home consumers and the market to build branded

INSEAD. He has served as a branding consultant for

businesses in other emerging markets.

firms in the Americas, Asia, Africa, and Europe.

NICHE CUSTOMIZERS combine their cost advantages in manufacturing with newly developed low-cost R&D capabilities

Rajeev Batra is the S.S. Kresge Professor of Marketing

to develop customized niche-segment branded offerings in other

at the Ross School of Business at the University of

emerging markets.

Michigan. He has researched, taught, and consulted

GLOBAL BRAND BUILDERS use their low-cost manufacturing

on global branding, emerging markets, and

and R&D capabilities to build branded businesses in developed

marketing topics for 30 years.

markets’ but limit their focus to specific products and segments

Aysegul Ozsomer is an associate professor of

through a process of focused innovation.

marketing at Koé University, Istanbul, Turkey. Her

Whether you run an EMNC or a developedmarket company, deep

research focuses on standardisation-adaptation

knowledge of the strategies outlined here is an absolute necessity

issues and performance implications, market

for competing effectively now and in the future. Don’t get caught

orientation, and global brand management.

off guard by the “new kids on the block”’because today’s EMNCs

BOOK PRESENTATION AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY CONTENT TABLE BOOK CHAPTER

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GROWTH STRATEGIES 28

TAPPING INTO THE POWER OF 350 MILLION CONSUMERS Vijay Mahajan Jossey-Bass 432 pages August 2012

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An expert’s guide to exploring business

Hundreds of interviews and illustrative examples

opportunities in the burgeoning Arab

peel away stereotypes about Arab consumers to

marketplace .

reveal diverse, vibrant and entrepreneurial consumer markets .

This ground-breaking book reveals the myriad

The Arab World Unbound explains how

opportunities presented by the Arab world’s market

multinational companies, such as Coca-Cola,

of 350 million consumers, who collectively wield

Unilever, and Proctor & Gamble, and leading

the ninth-largest economy in the world. Based on

regional companies are working successfully in the

the author’s first-hand research, including hundreds

Arab nations,and shows how Arab entrepreneurs,

of market visits and more than 600 interviews at

both men and women, are shaping the regional and

companies doing business throughout the region, this

global marketplaces .

book shows how globally interconnected and vibrant

As the global marketplace continues to expand, this

the Arab markets are.

book offers anyone interested in investing in the

Through a rich blend of data and anecdotal

Arab world an expert perspective on the boundless

observations, it chronicles how, by respecting the

business opportunities.

region’s culture and religious norms, hundreds of

Vijay Mahajan, author of two previous award-

local and multinational companies and entrepreneurs

winning books on emerging markets, is one of the

are creating successful businesses in this large and

world’s most-cited researchers in the business and

growing marketplace.

economics sector.


“Hundreds of interviews and illustrative examples peel away stereotypes about Arab consumers to reveal diverse, vibrant and entrepreneurial consumer markets.

KEYWORDS GROWTH STRATEGIES TARGETING

BOOK PRESENTATION AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CONSUMER TRENDS

CONTENT TABLE

BRANDING

BOOK CHAPTER

TARGET AUDIENCE FROM STUDENT IN MARKETING TO CEO APPLICABLE TO ALL GOODS & SERVICES B2C & B2B

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GEOGRAPHICAL AREA RELEVANT ALL OVER THE WORLD ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY MIDDLE EAST

CONTENT INSPIRING & PRACTICAL FUN AND ENTERTAINING TO READ

29


ARTICLE

New Trends In Marketing 2013 Peter Fisk, author, Creative Genius

30


Marketing is evolving faster than ever before. Not because of

what distinguishes winners from losers. Therefore

technology itself, but because markets and customers are

some of the trends don’t sound like rocket science,

changing in their structures and priorities, expectations and

or completely new, but they are the factors that the

aspirations, faster than any time in history.

best marketers are now making happen.

Whilst digital technologies give us fantastic new platforms on which to reach and collaborate with billions of people, fast

1.Marketing fashions = New concepts + tactical

and efficiently, marketing is still a human challenge. With more

impact

competitors, and more opportunities, we need to be focused but

•Black marketing – bringing together a range of

imaginative, evolving the fundamental basics of marketing, whilst

“below the radar” techniques including events,

also embracing the best new ideas, to inspire and engage people,

parties and sponsorship to target niche audiences,

enable and do more for them.

particularly useful where advertising is banned.

A new generation of brands is shaping markets right now.

•Augmented reality – from Google’s futuristic glasses

Rather than big western corporations, they tend to be smaller

that can tell you everything from product ingredients

entrepreneurial businesses – often led by marketers – from smaller

to special offers, to digital-wall shopping which has

and fast-developing markets. From Air Asia of Malaysia to Bosco

been a huge hit for Adidas Neo in Germany, or Tesco

in Russia, China’s Wuxi PharmaTech or Kenya’s M-Pesa, these new

in South Korea.

brands are playing a different game – new rules, new tools – and with more impact. There are big shifts and more radical disruptions, often in the margins, that shape expectations not just within, but across categories and markets. Fusion, as well as diffusion, of ideas is often key. Estee Lauder succeeded in China only by “featuring Liu Wen”, Smirnoff did a

“ “Trends come in the form of “fashions” that build on the rush for youth and social media marketing”

similar trick in India with its “Masala Marke”, a spicy vodka.

•Branded voices – building a personality behind your brand, either the founder or endorser. From Richard

What are the new trends in marketing?

Branson to Cristina Carlino and Gary Vaynerchuk’s

Trends come in the form of “fashions” that build on the rush

weekly wine-lovers show that has a huge following

for youth and social media marketing – more direct, more

across the USA.

collaborative, more engaging. Every agency will be pushing them

•Trusted at home – following the old but pioneering

at you. But there are also enduring aspects of marketing that make

model of Avon, to go out and find customers,

the bigger difference eventually, for example, the slow shift from

or better to incentivise customers to find other

product-driven to customer-centric marketing, where ideas and

customers like them. More local, more personal,

brands, not patents and production, matter most. These require

more trusted.

new capabilities, new organisations, and new mindsets.

•Spreading happiness – brands around the world

The trends are divided into four groups – the new concepts and

went happy crazy over the last year, partly as a feel-

more enduring, evolving concepts - the strategic impact and those

good response to global economic stagnation, but

with more short-term, tactical results.

also following the trailblazing funkiness of Zappos shoes, and Coke too.

31

The challenge however is to take the concepts and make them

•Freemium pricing – from apps to games, customers

happen – it’s easy to read about cool new techniques, but much

are now familiar with the idea of getting the product

harder to implement them in relevant and profitable ways. That’s

free, and then paying for the addiction-driven


ARTICLE

>> New Trends In Marketing 2013 updates and upgrades. Now its time to apply the model to every other market. •Viral advocacy – word of mouth is free and believable, but digital gave it even more impact. Instead of one

“ “brands are seen as superficial, stories give them more depth, and are easier for people to tell others.”

delighted customer telling three others, they now tell 300 or 30,000 others with their likes, tweets and reviews. 2. Marketing breakthroughs = New concepts + strategic impact

• Horizon planning – forget trying to plan incrementally in fast and volatile markets. Start with a vision, then work backwards thinking about what you want to achieve at each horizon with more flexibility within a set of principles and directions. • Participation platforms – campaigns are out, platforms are in. Campaigns push short-term messages, quickly forgotten, platforms build enduring ideas on ongoing participation. Think IBM’s “Smarter Planet” or Coke’s “Live Positively”. • ‘Solomo’ consumers – the biggest shift in consumer

behaviour is guided by their smartphone, and • Zero moment of truth – in a search-driven, digitally enabled engagement process there is a clear moment when potential customers will choose to love or hate you – we call it the ZMOT – the Tripadvisor rating, or carbon emission of cars. • Upward innovation – the best ideas come from the bottom upwards, not the top down – the poorest, most deprived markets; or the youngest, most openminded consumer; or the freshest un-normalised employee. • Diffusion brands – most brands recognise that one brand just can’t work for everyone, and to address the aggressive price strategies, they need a second brand. Hollister for Abercrombie, Skoda for Volkswagen.

Peter Fisk Author ‘Cre tive Genius 32


4. Marketing transformations = Evolving

•Subscription pricing – the biggest trend in pricing is not to sell

concepts + strategic impact

products around transactions but to sell a subscription, like a

•Emerging markets – marketers are the growth

magazine – from cloud computing to Zipcars, vegetable boxes to

drivers, and their biggest opportunity is obviously the

Regus serviced offices – with enduring revenues.

fast-growing economies east and south, but don’t forget other types of markets – women will grow

eas’

3. Marketing enhancements = Evolving concepts + tactical

faster than India and China!

impact

•Borderless segments – we obsess about

•Urban formats – now that most of us live in cities, marketers

geographical boundaries, thinking domestic and

need to adapt to urban priorities, in particular space, time and

international, but customers are more similar in their

convenience. From small format retailers like Carrefour Express to

clusters across geographies than within them. Forget

smaller format packs and vending

nationalism, think niches

machines.

and motivations.

•Brand storytelling – as people

•New tribal communities

seek authenticity, and brands are

– community building is

seen as superficial, stories give

simple, you just create a

them more depth, more enduring,

Facebook page don’t you?

and easier for people to tell others.

No. Tribes grow around a

From Marlboro Man to Red Bull

common purpose, cause

adrenalin, what is your story?

and passion. You need to

•Predictive economics – data is a

help them define it and

huge challenge and opportunity

share it, in new ways.

for every marketer. We can

•Crowd creativity – the

drown in it, or dive deep and find

best ideas are out there,

amazing insights. But its most powerful when it can predict future

not in your business. So build a crowdsourcing

behaviour, and link it to commercial potential.

platform and let customers solve your toughest

•Wellbeing themes – more enduring than the happiness wave, is

problems, or together build the best new ideas. Look

health and wellbeing which goes well beyond healthcare and food.

at Kickstarter or Threadless.

It was the insight that drove the WiiFit from Nintendo and Nike

•Concept innovation – brands are not about

Fuelband.

products, not about companies, but about bigger

•Guest designers – much more than celebrity endorsement, then is

ambitions to make life better. Innovate around a

about using the skills, and image, of others to enhance your brand.

concept like learning, or exploring, in a way that

H&M fashion by Kylie Minogue, school meals from Jamie Oliver,

connects but is more than what you do.

disposables by Philippe Starck.

•New business models – like Apple and Google,

•Brand gaming – “gamification” is not just a gimmick for kids, but

rethink how you create value for customers through

more engaging ways to immerse your customers in your brand,

your partnerships with distribution and supply

before or after purchase. From Drench drinks, sold by playing a

partners and networks, and thereby rethink revenue

game, or Nike GRID on urban streets.

streams, cost models, and value creation.

•Integrated communication – the fastest cost-saving, and impact

•Social innovation – ultimately we are all here not

gain can come by connecting your messages and media – bringing

just to make money, but to make the world a slightly

together agencies and activities to talk with one voice, building a

better place. How can you innovate around a higher

more interactive and coherent experience.

purpose that creates value for customers, for society, as well as your shareholders?

33


STIMA You, as a marketing professional, are at the heart of STIMA, the largest community for marketing professionals in Belgium. Through a range of services, products and activities, STIMA guarantees permanent training and networking opportunities. With more than 1000 members and close to 40 activities per year, STIMA has grown to become the most important marketing platform for marketing-minded professionals. Cooperation with the best Belgian marketers enables us to be at the forefront of every marketing trend....

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Networking & know how transfer


“Not only do our earliest preferences and impressions as children stay with us for life, but we’re also drawn to products that capture and allow us to relive the feeling of being young

MARTIN LINDSTROM author, Brandwashed

38


CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Understanding consumer behaviour is at the heart of every well-developed consumer strategy. Because it has been such an unknown, it’s where marketing research has dedicated significant time and focus. Recent digital and technological evolutions are shining different lights on the consumer. It might be helping us get a better understanding of consumer behaviour. We deliberately use the word ‘might’ because the ‘better understanding’ might be a ‘lesser understanding’ because the better understanding might prove that human behaviour is and will always be unpredictable by nature. Worth a debate... Our first book on Neurobranding from the neuroscience expert Peter Steidl sets the scene. While the consumer of today is living in a new world (other economic circumstances; digital communications), we need a better understanding of what motivates the consumer to do what they do, to behave like they behave, to buy like they buy. Once we know this we can develop the right strategies, tools, messages, and images to attract our target audiences, to reach our marketing objectives. The book is ‘user friendly’ for marketers. It avoids medical vocabulary to make it more complex. It’s a must-read for every marketer interested in his consumer. And which marketer isn’t? The second book is from Mark Ingwer, a business psychologist and marketer. It describes in detail the 6 core emotional needs of the consumer: the need for control, for self-expression, for recognition, for belonging and for care. In Empathetic Marketing, Mark provides both the psychological theory underlying these consumers’ emotional needs, as well as concrete business examples that demonstrate the incredible effectiveness of unleashing the power of deeper needs and emotions for success in the marketplace.

39


CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

NEUROMARKETING: MARKETING FAD OR MARKETING’S FUTURE? Peter Steidl CreateSpace 184 pages July 2012

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Consumers are reinventing their world. On the

We now know what is driving the consumer’s

one hand they are adjusting their expectations

purchases. We understand habitual buying and

and purchasing behaviour in light of the new

categorization. We now know what is driving the

economic circumstances. On the other, they

consumer’s purchases. We understand habitual

are also reinventing the way they socialise,

buying and categorisation. We know why brand

communicate, gather information, make

communication has to be ‘on code’ to deliver the

purchases and entertain themselves and others.

desired impact. These and more topics are covered

These changes are facilitated by technology but

in this book. Importantly, this book provides a

driven by consumers. It follows that we need a

readable overview of neurobranding. It is written

much deeper understanding of how the consumer

for the marketing practitioner and avoids medical

thinks and makes decisions.

terminology. Dr. Peter Steidl has lived in Austria, Germany, the United Kingdom and Australia and

40

We can see their behaviour change - but why is it

has carried out assignments in 20 countries

changing? Why are certain choices made? Why are

on five continents. His clients include a number

some brands successful while others fail? What is

of Fortune Global 100 corporations, start-up

driving their purchases? Why are they receptive to

companies, professional services firms, federal

some communications and not to others? Most

and state government agencies and not-for-profit

importantly, armed with this understanding, how

organisations. Steidl is Chairman of Aegis Media’s

can we improve the effectiveness of marketing

Asia-Pacific Neuromarketing Council, supporting the

communications efforts? Progress in neuroscience has

development of a neuromarketing practice across

delivered insights into how the mind works.

the region.


“I believe this is the most advanced book on neurobranding available today

-Pacific, Aegis Media Singapore, July 2012-

KEYWORDS CONSUMER BEHAVIOR MARKETING MANAGEMENT

BOOK PRESENTATION AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY

ADVERTISING INNOVATION

CONTENT TABLE

BRANDING

BOOK CHAPTER

TARGET AUDIENCE FROM STUDENT IN MARKETING TO VP MARKETING APPLICABLE TO ALL GOODS & SERVICES, GOVERNMENT SERVICES B2C & B2B, PUBLIC SERVICES

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA RELEVANT ALL OVER THE WORLD ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY US & EUROPE

CONTENT INSPIRING & PRACTICAL FUN AND ENTERTAINING TO READ

41

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CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

HOW TO SATISFY THE 6 CORE EMOTIONAL NEEDS OF YOUR CUSTOMERS Mark Ingwer

Palgrave Macmillan 252 pages July 2012

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REVIEW

KEYWORDS

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR

RELEVANT ALL OVER THE WORLD

EMOTION IN MARKETING

ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY US

ADVERTISING BRANDING GROWTH STRATEGIES

TARGET AUDIENCE

CONTENT

FROM BRAND MANAGER TO CMO

INSPIRING & PRACTICAL

APPLICABLE TO FMCG, SERVICES,

LAUNCHES NEW THEORY ABOUT MARKETING

CONSUMER GOODS

FUN AND ENTERTAINING TO READ

B2C & B2B 42


The business community has progressively embraced the

business leaders.

role of emotion in the marketplace, but far too often it

Mark Ingwer is a business psychologist and the

fails to practice empathy in its marketing and thus falls

founding partner of Insight Consulting group,

short of truly connecting with customers. In Empathetic

a global marketing and strategy consultancy

Marketing, Dr. Ingwer argues that before the business

specializing in consumer and business insights. He

community can make use of emotion, it must acquire a

has over 25 years experience applying his unique

revised understanding of human needs and a passion

blend of psychology, marketing, and business

for meeting them at every step of the way. Empathetic

acumen to helping companies optimise their brand

Marketing outlines a needs-based strategic approach that

and marketing strategy based on an in-depth

will help business leaders be better equipped to provide

understanding of their customers. He has worked

long-term engagement for their customers and grow their

with a diverse range of companies across numerous

companies’ bottom lines.

industries, with a special focus on consumer packaged goods, healthcare, and advertising.

In today’s competitive and global marketplace it is  becoming increasingly essential for companies and brands to understand why customers buy—or don’t buy—their products and services. Only by understanding the whys can companies grow their business and develop loyal customers. In

BOOK PRESENTATION

Empathetic Marketing, Dr. Ingwer presents a groundbreaking approach to understanding consumers’ core emotional needs. This innovative book provides both the psychological

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY

theory underlying consumers’ emotional needs, as well as concrete business examples that demonstrate the incredible effectiveness of unleashing the power of deeper needs and

CONTENT TABLE

emotions for success in the marketplace.

BOOK CHAPTER Empathetic Marketing shows how brands like NPR, Universal Studios, Nivea and Google perform in-depth analyses of their customers’ emotional reactions and harness the power of deep psychological insights to optimize their marketing and brand strategy. As the founding partner at Insight Consulting Group, global marketing and strategy consultancy, Mark Ingwer has conducted and analyzed countless in-depth studies of customers, from neurological data to in-field observational studies. Through his extensive experience he has identified six basic emotional needs that every company must consider to fully impact and motivate the customer. Empathetic Marketing provides readers with a deeper understanding of customers’ core emotional needs, and a framework for incorporating these concepts into their business to optimise customer engagement and achieve a significant return on this investment. The strategies provided will not only lead to a better immediate connection between the customer and the company, but also to deeper and longer-term satisfaction for both customers and 43

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INTERVIEW

SHOPPERS PURCHASE BRANDS -BRANDS PURCHASE SHOPPER BEHAVIOUR Liz Crawford, author, The Shopper Economy Can you provide a high level overview of your

What inspired you to write this book?

book?

I thought it was fascinating that digital technology,

The book is built on the observation of an emerging

especially mobile technology, was enabling new

shadow economy, which is made possible by

kinds of transactions between buyers and sellers. In

technology. This economy has a new type of

addition to shoppers purchasing brands - brands

transaction at its centre. The transaction is between

were purchasing shopper behaviour. I believe this is a

a shopper (I mean a potential buyer) and a seller. The

relatively new phenomenon.

shopper agrees to perform some task in exchange for

While earned value can come in various forms such as

value, usually digital scrip. This is not purchasing a

miles and points, we are also seeing brands pay hard

product. And, it is different from a simple promotion,

cash for behaviours, especially advocacy. Recently,

which is typically a ‘buy-to-get’ discount.

the New York Times featured an article which

Instead, the shopper will do something beyond […just the act of the purchase]– such as pay attention to an ad, tell a friend about a brand, walk into a store, or pick up a product – and in consideration for this,

“ “I thought it was fascinating that digital technology was enabling new kinds of transactions between buyers and sellers”

the seller will tender some form of value. These are called Value Exchanges.

showcased shopper-as-paid-advocate programs at

The value can be in the form of Shopkick Kicks,

Beso (parent: Shopzilla), Pose.com, TheFancy.com

Facebook Credits, Bitcoins, points, or even hard cash.

and Refer.ly. Daivd Weinrot, Chief Marketing Officer

This is real currency – it can be stored, recognized

for Shopzilla was quoted as saying, “If they drop a link

by third parties and redeemed at will. There are a

onto Twitter about a pair of shoes that they’re dying

few clearinghouse websites, like Points.com, which

for, or a new handbag they’re coveting, and they refer

allow shoppers to convert all manner of scrip into fiat

users to Neiman’s or whoever sells that item, they

currency, which can be downloaded into a PayPal

could actually be rewarded.” (NYT, Sept 30, 2012).

account. And with digital wallets, PayPal is accepted

This is the Shopper Economy in action.

at cash-wraps, not just online. 44


Do you have any plans for writing another book? If so, what

(“curate” if you like), as well as act like a bargaining

trending topic do you find is compelling enough to write a

agent getting the best deals (buy-sell timing like

book about?

the stock market), and will represent the consumer

Yes! I am working on a new book, tentatively titled, The Surrogate

in commercial transactions and perhaps social

Self and the Role of Brands in the 21st Century. The sheer tidal

transactions too.

wave of data, communications, and transactions threatens to overwhelm consumers and marketers. Shoppers will have more

Do you read a lot of books yourself?

choices, and more ways to interact in the world, than ever before.

Yes! I prefer reading books about sociology, human

In fact, there is already such a sea of information available that

behaviour, and the future of technology. I believe

artificial intelligence services, like Apple’s SIRI, have emerged to

change originates with society and technology.

help consumers navigate. This is the first wave of change: data

Marketing responds to those changes. So, in my

will be vast enough to create an urgent marketplace need to filter

view, a marketer is an interpreter of trends. A

and retrieve relevant data. Savvy Brand Marketers (like those

marketer is one who understands implications and

at Apple) will take advantage of this need early, by positioning

works to take advantage of change. As a writer I like

themselves as lifestyle filters and concierge services. In the second

to be closer to the source of those changes.

wave of change, simple filters will become less important and

Some of my favorites are: Traffic (Tom Vanderbilt),

avatars will represent the buyer in the marketplace – both as a

How Cities Work (Alex Marshall), Home (Witold

filter for information, as well as an agent for the buyer. This is the

Rybczynski), and When the Rivers Run Dry: Water the

Surrogate Self.

Defining Crisis of the 21st Century (Fred Pearce). In

The Surrogate Self will filter and retrieve information and choices

terms of technology, I have enjoyed: Out of Control:

The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems and the Economic World (Kevin Kelly) and of course, Ray Kurzweil’s The Singularity is Near. What is your favorite marketing book and who’s the author? The most useful marketing book I have ever read is Barry Schwartz’s The Paradox of Choice: Why Less

is More. His findings and conclusions are intensely practical regardless of technological change, selling environment, or shopper demographic. Do you think EMM’s service offering is beneficial to marketers? Do you think it will help marketers quickly identify the materials they should read? This is a very timely service. Because the rate of change itself is accelerating, we need filters to stay abreast of change and to identify thought leadership. Expert Marketer’s very qualified staff is acting as a vital filter for savvy marketers.

45


MUST READ

BE LIKEABLE, BE TRUSTWORTHY, HAVE A GREAT CAUSE Echantment Review by Kurt Frenier

MUST READ Entrepreneur extraordinaire and ex-Apple evangelist, and one of my personal marketing gurus, Guy Kawasaki wrote an interesting book about how to “enchant”. Very relevant for all those who want to seek a deep connection with their consumers through a product, a retail transaction, a Facebook comment, or a brand event/experience and create believers, followers and loyalists.

Enchantment is an easy, quick read, written by a flamboyant author and master storyteller.

46

This is Kawasaki’s 10th business book. It has

of enchantment”:

a lot of interesting brand stories (from Amazon,

(1) Be likeable, (2) Be

Apple and Zappos to E!, Google and Twitter) and

trustworthy, (3) Have a great cause. It’s not

explains in detail how to prepare for a journey to

the first marketing book that preaches principles like

lift up your marketing. Enchantment for a brand is

these, but Enchantment presents them in a fun-to-

really about finding that bit of magic that will create

read way. It is not rocket-science for marketers. But it

“unique experiences” for consumers and therefore

is always good to be reminded from time to time of

change the minds and most importantly the hearts of

what contemporary marketing is about, and of what

consumers. Kawasaki puts forward three main “pillars

really matters. Largely put: word-of-mouth rules these


days, not TV advertising. And everyone will agree: you are only as good as your word is! Enchantment tries to help you to be as good as your word is. What I actually like about the book is the “personal” touch Kawasaki gives to some important marketing principles. In short, palatable chapters Kawasaki explains how to become more attractive, more believable, how do deal with cynicism and critique, and how to deploy push and pull techniques to charm consumers, customers, employees and management alike. Each chapter ends with a nice

“written by a flamboyant author and master storyteller”

anecdote that puts proof to the theory. And as much as this book is about marketing, it is also about life. While reading you will find a lot of tips and examples on how to get better at interpersonal relationships –not surprising…the bond between a brand and its consumers is not so very different from the relationship between two people! A must-read for marketers, but actually a nice read for anyone. Kurt Frenier Sr. Marketing Director PepsiCo Beverages, and marketing blogger http://www.redhotmarketingblender.com/blog/

47


It’s one of those business paradoxes: we all understand the power of word-of-mouth, but we don’t manage it. That’s why every company has unused conversation potential. Companies can maximize their potential by investing in 4 C’s: Customer Experience, Conversation Management, Content Marketing and Collaboration

STEVEN VAN BELLEGHEM author, The Conversation Company

48


COMMUNICATION In the last section of this magazine we’ll be focussing on communication with three very different but interesting books.

Good Works!, co-authored by Philip Kotler, is an indispensable handbook on cause marketing. Now that purpose-driven marketing has moved from a nice-to-do to a must-do for businesses, this guide is written for business leaders and marketers attempting the delicate balancing act of simultaneously generating financial and social dividends. The book gives you a practical step-by- step guidance on effectively executing marketing and corporate- level campaigns. The second book, Brand Advocates from Rob Fugetta builds upon the concept of word-ofmouth marketing, which in the social media scene, acquires a different content and scope. In this book you‘ll learn how to indentify your advocates, how to energise them, and how to track the results. Rob starts from the concept that EVERY company HAS advocates and should use the huge marketing power that they represent. The book is a very practical step-by-step playbook full of real-world inspiring examples. There are so many great suggestions; you won’t have finished the book before you will have already started your own brand advocacy campaign. Last but not least, in this section on Communication is Story Wars from Jonah Sachs. This book is a “call to arms” for business communicators and marketers to cast aside broken traditions and join a revolution to build the iconic brands of the future. Jonah’s enthusiasm is contagious and the examples are inspiring. He throws insights from mythology, advertising, history, evolutionary biology and psychology on the table to take the reader into a fascinating world of enormous opportunity for brands and marketers. There’s no need to add the fact that Good Works!, Brand Advocates and Story Wars go hand-inhand-first the case, then the story, followed by the brand advocates to spread the word... and success is yours.

49


COMMUNICATION

MARKETING AND CORPORATE INITIATIVES THAT BUILD A BETTER WORLD...AND THE BOTTOM LINE Philip Kotler, David Hessekiel, Nancy R. Lee Wiley 282 pages June 2012

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Businesses can do well by doing good -- Kotler, Hessekiel, and Lee show you how! Marketing guru Philip Kotler, cause marketing authority David Hessekiel, and social marketing expert Nancy Lee have teamed up to create a guide rich with actionable advice on integrating marketing and corporate social initiatives into your broader business goals. Businesspeople who mix cause and commerce are often portrayed as either opportunistic corporate “causewashers” cynically exploiting nonprofits, or visionary social entrepreneurs for whom conducting trade is just a necessary evil in their quest to create a better world. Marketing and corporate social initiatives requires a delicate balancing act between generating financial and social dividends. Good Works! is a book for business builders, not a Corporate Social Responsibility treatise. It is for capitalists with the hearts and smarts to generate positive social impacts 50

“you’ll find that you can generate significant resources for your cause while achieving financial success


KEYWORDS

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA

CSR

RELEVANT FOR US, CANADA & EUROPE

CAUSE MARKETING

ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY US, CANADA

SOCIAL MARKETING

& EUROPE

MARKET TRENDS DIGITAL & WEBMARKETING

TARGET AUDIENCE

CONTENT

FROM BRAND MANAGER TO CEO

INSPIRING & PRACTICAL

APPLICABLE TO ALL CONSUMER GOODS

RATHER FUN AND ENTERTAINING

& SERVICES, NON PROFIT

TO READ BUT STILL SERIOUS

B2C

and bottom-line business results.

Good Works!

BOOK PRESENTATION

-Is rich with actionable advice on integrating marketing and corporate social initiatives into your broader business goals.

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY

-Makes the case that purpose-driven marketing has moved from a nice-to-do to a must-do for businesses -Explains how to balance social and business goals With Good Works!, you’ll find that you can generate significant resources for your cause while achieving financial success.

CONTENT TABLE BOOK CHAPTER

Although filled with stories and examples, Good Works! is not a book-length feature story about corporations doing good. Written by an eminent authority on marketing, and co-authored by two leaders in cause marketing and social marketing respectively, Good Works! is a practical, actionable guide for today’s executives seeking to achieve the dual, related goals of doing good and doing well. Philip Kotler is one of the world’s leading authorities on marketing David Hessekiel is founder and President of Cause Marketing Forum, the world’s leading information source on how to do well by doing good; Nancy Lee is a corporate social marketing expert, and has coauthored books on social marketing with Philip Kotler 51

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COMMUNICATION

TURNING ENTHUSIASTIC CUSTOMERS INTO A POWERFUL MARKETING FORCE Rob Fuggetta Wiley 304 pages

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August 2012

Getting more customer recommendations is considered the Holy Grail in the social media age. For example, restaurants that boost their Yelp ratings by only one star can increase revenues by a whopping nine percent, according to recent

KEYWORDS BRAND ADVOCACY

research by Michael Luca from Harvard

WORD OF MOUTH MARKETING

Business School. For a large restaurant

SOCIAL MEDIA

chain, this can mean millions of dollars

SOCIAL MARKETING

in sales. Now, a ground-breaking new

CUSTOMER ADVOCACY

book shows marketers how to generate thousands of customer recommendations by turning their best customers into a

TARGET AUDIENCE

volunteer marketing force. FROM STUDENT IN MARKETING TO CEO The book, Brand Advocates: Turning

APPLICABLE TO FMCG, SERVICES, CONSUMER GOODS

Enthusiastic Customers into a Powerful

B2C & B2B

Marketing Force provides a step-by-step guide on how marketers, small business owners, and others can:

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA

-Discover who their Brand Advocates are

RELEVANT ALL OVER THE WORLD

and what makes these influential customers tick Energise Advocates, generating thousands of positive recommendations on Amazon. com, TripAdvisor, Yelp, Facebook, Twitter and elsewhere without paying for or providing incentives to Advocates -Reward Brand Advocates by giving them 52

ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY US

CONTENT INSPIRING & PRACTICAL LOT OF REAL LIFE EXAMPLES FUN AND ENTERTAINING TO READ


what they crave most (here’s a hint: it isn’t money)

agencies, and NGOs (non-governmental

Measure results and ROI from advocacy programs.

organisations) plus those working in political

Brand Advocates is the first book that focuses on these

campaigns

influential consumers and shows marketers exactly how to engage and energise them to drive positive word-of-mouth,

Rob Fuggetta is the world’s foremost authority on

referral leads, and sales.

brand advocacy. Fuggetta is the founder and CEO

Brand Advocates is valuable for a wide range of audiences:

of Zuberance, a leading social media marketing

- B2C and B2B marketers in a variety of roles: branding, online/

company that powers award-winning advocacy

digital, social media, demand generation, eCommerce, corporate

programs for consumer and business brands. A

communications, market research, and more

twenty-year veteran of Silicon Valley, Fuggetta has

- Sales executives and managers

played a leadership role in three start-ups including

- Customer experience and loyalty program professionals

Genuity, a Verizon spinout. He was formerly a

- Executives and managers in ad agencies, digital agencies,

partner at Regis McKenna, Inc., the legendary

public relations firms, and other marketing services providers

Silicon Valley marketing and communications firm

- Small business owners and entrepreneurs

that helped put Apple on the map.

- Professionals in non-profit organisations, government

BOOK PRESENTATION AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY CONTENT TABLE BOOK CHAPTER

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COMMUNICATION

WHY THOSE WHO TELL - AND LIVE - THE BEST STORIES WILL RULE THE FUTURE Jonah Sachs HBR 288 pages

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July 2012 The Story Wars are all around us — they are the battle to be heard in a world of noise and clamour. In our post-broadcast world, most brand and cause messages are swallowed up and forgotten before they reach the light of day. Just a few have been able to breakthrough this clutter by using the only tool that has ever moved minds and changed behaviours — great stories.

need to passively consume. This story strategy had its day, but with the death of

Winning the Story Wars is a call to arms to build iconic

the broadcast era, audiences are seizing power back

brands and causes in service of a better future. And

and ushering in a new, digitally empowered oral

it’s an invitation to see today’s marketing challenges

tradition. Now they don’t consume messages, they

as an adventure through a world of wonder, danger

share them, make them their own and decide which

and limitless opportunity. Since the 1950s, marketers

live and which die. And today’s audiences are loudly

have claimed the powerful role of mythmakers in a

demanding the kinds of stories that the human

world out of touch with its traditional stories. These

mind has always preferred — stories of uplift and

marketers — legends like Stanley Resor, Edward

empowerment.

Bernays and Leo Burnett — revolutionised society, but

Winning the Story Wars traces the quiet supremacy

in the process,turned the power of myth on its head.

of Empowerment Marketing from the early days

Where once our great stories called us to adventure, higher values and citizenship, most of our current myths play on fear, insecurity and an endless

54

of Volkswagen, Apple and Nike to the viral breakthroughs of Yes We Can, theTea Party


movement, The Story of Stuff and Patagonia. It offers three

neuroscience, comparative mythology, advertising

simple tools any brand can use to break through, earn fans and

history and psychology. And like the great stories

become an icon: Be Interesting, Tell the Truth and Live the Truth.

that came before it, Winning the Story Wars casts the

True to its name, the book immerses readers in entertaining and

reader in the role of unlikely hero, full of potential to

important stories — the adventures of Moses, the Bhagavad Gita,

contribute something truly meaningful to the world.

the creation of the atom bomb, the rise of the Arab Spring and the

Jonah Sachs is a Story Expert, Filmmaker and

unexpected birth of the viral marketing era. It offers insights from

Entrepreneur. As the co-founder and CEO of Free Range Studios, Sachs has helped hundreds of major

“Be Interesting, Tell the Truth and Live the Truth.

KEYWORDS MESSAGING BRANDING

brands and causes break through the media din with unforgettable campaigns. His work on legendary viral videos like The Meatrix and The Story of Stuff series have brought key social issues to the attention of more than 65 million people online. A constant innovator, his studio’s websites and stories have taken top honors three times at the South by Southwest Film Festival.

BOOK PRESENTATION AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY

ADVERTISING DIGITAL & WEBMARKETING

CONTENT TABLE

SALES STRATEGIES

BOOK CHAPTER

TARGET AUDIENCE FROM STUDENT IN MARKETING TO CEO APPLICABLE TO ALL GOODS & SERVICES B2C

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA RELEVANT ALL OVER THE WORLD ORIGIN EXAMPLES MAINLY US & CROSS-CULTURAL MYTHOLOGIES

CONTENT LAUNCHES A NEW THEORY ABOUT MARKETING INSPIRING & PRACTICAL FUN AND ENTERTAINING TO READ 55

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COLUMN

ERIK DECKERS

author, No Bullshit Social Media

56


CONTENT MARKETING IS THE WAVE OF THE FUTURE I’m always surprised at the number of people who say they hate

What that means is the average customer has

writing. That’s like saying “I hate talking.” The people who hate

learned to tune out the bullshit. They ignore what’s

writing have always been able to get by, because they can write

bad, and search for what’s good. Because the

well enough to express themselves (mostly). It’s not enough to “get

Internet has made it possible for more and more

by” anymore. Marketing is changing so dramatically that people

people to produce a lot of excellent material.

who hate writing will soon find themselves left behind by people who love it. That’s because writing has become one of the most

3. Your personal brand is now becoming a part

important factors in marketing, thanks to three major shifts in the

of your marketing. Google’s new AuthorRank is

Internet marketing world.

a measure of your trustworthiness and reputation. If you write interesting and useful information,

1. Google changed its algorithms to favour good content,

Google will give you a higher AuthorRank. If it’s

not SEO trickery.

uninteresting and spammy, Google will give you a

Many SEO companies have gone out of business, thanks to

lower AuthorRank. AuthorRank is like the reputation

Google’s new changes in their search algorithms, Panda and

of your favourite author: when they come out with

Penguin. Now, the search giant is giving strong preferences to sites

a new book, you race to buy it. You buy it strictly

that are well-written and well-produced.

on the author’s past reputation. As their reputation

Companies that relied on SEO tricks like keyword stuffing, creating

improves, so do book sales.

thousands of low-value backlinks on link farms, and spitting out

That’s how AuthorRank works. Google sees an author

barely understandable gibberish have disappeared because of

producing valuable information, so their articles rank

Google’s rankings, never to be seen again.

a little higher. Which means more people read those

This means that people who write well are being rewarded. Now,

articles, their AuthorRank goes up, and the articles

with new algorithms, like Google’s upcoming AuthorRank, good

rank even higher. And so on.

writers will soon dominate the new SEO.

Then, when they write a brand new article, Google will look at their AuthorRank, assume this new article is also good, and give it a higher search rank.

2. The bar has been raised by people creating excellent

Good marketing is no longer about full-motion

content.

graphics, expensive websites, and high budget

People are more selective about the content they read these days.

marketing campaigns. It’s about providing good,

Back in the early days of the Internet, in the early 1990s, a lot of the

well-produced information that people can easily

stuff found online was just plain awful, but there were plenty of

share. The marketers who understand these changes

decent and good writers to make it bearable.

will be the first to find success. The ones who cling

Nearly 20 years later, the amount of awful content has threatened

to the old methods will soon find themselves out of

to overrun us. Amazon makes it easy for anyone to publish their

a job.

own book, no matter how awful. Print-on-demand services makes

Where will you be?

it affordable for people to actually produce them. And 40+ free blogging platforms let mediocre writers share half-baked, poorlywritten ideas. 57


EPILOGUE

WE HOPE YOU ENJOYED READING

Finalising this “0” issue is very satisfying.

One of the featured topics will be a preview of the competition for the Marketing Book of The Year

It was hard work to get everything in the right place in

2013. Voting will be open to the public. We encourage

the right words and with all the right extra downloads

you to provide your thoughts in this selection

(free chapter downloads and other great resources).

process. Let’s see how we narrow the long list from 25 books to the top 5. In the final selection process,

We hope you enjoyed reading this magazine, and

our members voting will count for 50% while a

that our book reviews, tools, and analysis are helpful

professional jury’s votes will count for the other 50%.

in deciding which is the right book for you at this

The process for reviewing of the short list will begin

time. Do not hesitate to buy more than one book if

by Feb 15, 2013. The final winner will be announced

you find the content right for your needs. We strongly

during the first week of March.

believe in the knowledge and wisdom benefits that can be gained from professional marketing books. It

An additional section we will highlight is the subject

is our experience that looking at one book may not

of “Selling.” We will include details of several

be enough. Getting access to the right content could

interesting book reviews and analysis. Though we are

significantly help your professional endeavors. Often

primarily focused on marketing, the functions of sales

it’s worth making the extra time to read the books.

and marketing are strongly integrated. As we see the

Have a look at our site for some reading tips and if you

trend of continued further integration, we believe it is

don’t mind us saying so… Get yourself ramped up for

valuable to you to provide a section dedicated to this

a strong 2013—Start reading some of these really good

area.

books!

Keep an eye on your mailbox for more preview news on the next issue.

We look forward to your feedback. We will start working on our first ‘official’ issue as of tomorrow.

In the meantime, have glass of something good

Release date is anticipated for Jan 15, 2013.

and enjoy reading!

Want a short preview? 58


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

THE MARKETING AUTHORS ARE OUR HEROES

This magazine could not have been written or put together without the help and effort of many people. First of all I want to thank Leen for her efforts in getting and keeping in touch with all the authors who have their books presented and analysed in this magazine. She’s the driving force behind interviews, quotes, pictures, columns, biographies, reviews, analysis, etc. Tanja did a great job in editing, copywriting, transcribing and proofreading most of the texts. She faced Hurricane Sandy during the time we were working on this magazine and her electricity was cut off for more than two weeks... Nevertheless she managed to get everything done in time. Ezri joined our editing team when the magazine was almost finished but helped us in the final proofreading. Kurt is responsible for the kick off of our Must read section with a very personal and convincing plea for Guy Kawasaki’s book Enchantment. But the marketing authors are our heroes. - For their help in supplying the book reviews, the analysis, the free chapters, etc. we thank in alphabetical order: Amitava Chattopadhyay, Clyde Fessler, David Hessekiel & Nancy Lee, Jonah Sachs, Jordan Phillips, Mark Ingwer, Peter Steidl, Rob Fuggetta, Soren Kaplan, Vijay Mahajan - For their columns: Erik Deckers, Grant Leboff - For the article: Peter Fisk - For the quotes: Laurence Capron, Martin Lindstrom, Ron Adner, Steven Van Belleghem - For the interview: Joeri Van den Bergh, Liz Crawford, Mary Bergstrom Last and not least, we’d like to thank the members of our Advisory Board for their ongoing support and advice in selecting and recommending the right books! A big thank you to all the contributors to this issue!

59


INDEX BY BOOK

BOOK TITLE AUTHOR All Eyes East Brand Advocates Brandwashed Build, Borrow, or Buy Creative Genius Empathetic Marketing Enchantment Good Works! How Cool Brands Stay Hot

22

Fuggetta Rob

52

Lindstrom Martin

38

Capron Laurence, Mitchell Will

24

Fisk Peter

30

Ingwer Mark

42

Kawasaki Guy

46

Kotler Philip, Hessekiel David, Lee Nancy

50

Van den Bergh Joeri

8

Kaplan Soren

18

Neurobranding

Steidl Peter

40

No Bullshit Social Media

Deckers Erik

56

Rebuilding the Brand

Fessler Clyde

14

Sticky Marketing

Leboff Grant

20

Mahajan Vijay

28

Van Belleghem Steven

48

Phillips Jordan

16

Chattopadhyay Amitava, Batra Rajeev

26

Crawford Liz

44

Adner Ron

12

Sachs Jonah

54

Leapfrogging

The Arab World Unbound The Conversation Company The Lure of Luxe The New Emerging Market Multinationals The shopper Econmy The Wide Lens Winning the Story Wars

60

Bergstrom Mary


INDEX BY AUTHOR

AUTHOR BOOK TITLE The Wide Lens

12

The New Emerging Market Multinationals

26

All Eyes East

22

Build, Borrow, or Buy

24

The New Emerging Market Multinationals

26

Crawford Liz

The shopper Econmy

44

Deckers Erik

No Bullshit Social Media

56

Rebuilding the Brand

14

Creative Genius

30

Brand Advocates

52

Good Works!

50

Empathetic Marketing

42

Kaplan Soren

Leapfrogging

18

Kawasaki Guy

Enchantment

46

Kotler Philip

Good Works!

50

Leboff Grant

Sticky Marketing

20

Good Works!

50

Brandwashed

38

The Arab World Unbound

28

Build, Borrow, or Buy

24

The Lure of Luxe

16

Winning the Story Wars

54

Neurobranding

40

The Conversation Company

48

Adner Ron Batra Rajeev Bergstrom Mary Capron Laurence Chattopadhyay Amitava

Fessler Clyde Fisk Peter Fuggetta Rob Hessekiel David Ingwer Mark

Lee Nancy Lindstrom Martin Mahajan Vijay Mitchell Will Phillips Jordan Sachs Jonah Steidl Peter Van Belleghem Steven Van den Bergh Joeri

61

How Cool Brands Stay Hot

8


INDEX BY KEYWORD growth strategies Build, Borrow, or Buy The Arab World Unbound The New Emerging Market Multinationals The Wide Lens Leapfrogging

Empathetic Marketing Brandwashed Neurobranding Winning the Story Wars All Eyes East

Mark Ingwer

42

Martin Lindstrom

38

Peter Steidl

40

Jonah Sachs

54

Mary Bergstrom

22

30

Rebuilding the Brand

Clyde Fessler

14

Leapfrogging

Soren Kaplan

18

Jordan Phillips

16

The Lure of Luxe Winning the Story Wars The New Emerging Market Multinationals All Eyes East Empathetic Marketing How Cool Brands Stay Hot Neurobranding The Arab World Unbound

Jonah Sachs

54

Amitava Chattopadhyay, Rajeev Batra

26

Mary Bergstrom

22

Mark Ingwer Joeri Van den bergh

42

Rebuilding the Brand

Clyde Fessler

14

Jordan Phillips

16

Soren Kaplan

18

Amitava Chattopadhyay, Rajeev Batra

26

The Wide Lens

Ron Adner

12

Brandwashed

Martin Lindstrom

38

Mary Bergstrom

22

Creative Genius

Peter Fisk

30

Neurobranding

Peter Steidl

40

The shopper Econmy

Liz Crawford

44

Build, Borrow, or Buy

Laurence Capron, Will Mitchell

24

Grant Leboff

20

Soren Kaplan

18

The Lure of Luxe

innovation

All Eyes East

Sticky Marketing

product development

Peter Steidl

40

Leapfrogging

Vijay Mahajan

28

The Wide Lens

Ron Adner

12

Creative Genius

Peter Fisk

30

Clyde Fessler

14

Jordan Phillips

16

Grant Leboff

20

Steven Van Belleghem

48

Rob Fuggetta

52

Martin Lindstrom

38

Rebuilding the Brand The Lure of Luxe

42

Neurobranding

Peter Steidl

40

Martin Lindstrom

38

social media

Liz Crawford

44

Sticky Marketing

Peter Fisk

30

The Conversation Company

46

Brand Advocates

8

Brandwashed

Enchantment How Cool Brands Stay Hot

Guy Kawasaki Joeri Van den bergh

Rebuilding the Brand

Clyde Fessler

14

Enchantment

The Arab World Unbound

Vijay Mahajan

28

No Bullshit Social Media

Jordan Phillips

16

The Lure of Luxe

18

42

Mark Ingwer

Creative Genius

12

Soren Kaplan

30

Empathetic Marketing

The shopper Econmy

Ron Adner

8

consumer behavior

Brandwashed

26

Peter Fisk

The New Emerging Market Multinationals Peter Fisk

Creative Genius

28

Amitava Chattopadhyay, Rajeev Batra

Mark Ingwer

Leapfrogging

branding

24

Vijay Mahajan

Empathetic Marketing

Creative Genius

advertising

Laurence Capron, Will Mitchell

Guy Kawasaki

46

Erik Deckers

56

Jordan Phillips

16

Mary Bergstrom

22

targeting The Lure of Luxe

digital & web marketing The shopper Econmy The Conversation Company Winning the Story Wars Brandwashed Good Works! 62

Liz Crawford

44

All Eyes East

Steven Van Belleghem

48

How Cool Brands Stay Hot

Jonah Sachs

54

Rebuilding the Brand

Clyde Fessler

14

Martin Lindstrom

38

The Arab World Unbound

Vijay Mahajan

28

Philip Kotler, David Hessekiel, Nancy Lee

50

The New Emerging Market Multinationals

Amitava Chattopadhyay, Rajeev Batra

26

Joeri Van den bergh

8


ABOUT EMM

EMM, Expert Marketer Magazine, is a digital magazine designed specifically for the marketing community. Its focus is to inform its members about the leading marketing books and authors. Spreading the vision, knowledge and wisdom from professional marketing authors and books is what EMM is about. It is EMM’s mission to inspire marketers to read at least four different marketing books a year. It’s our belief that Today’s Readers are Tomorrow’s Leaders. EMM is a brand from Brand & Soul, a Belgian-based company with more than 25 years experience in all aspects of marketing. EMM’s editorial board is international with contributors from the US, UK and other European countries

www.expertmarketermagazine.com For more information, contact: ward@expertmarketermagazine.com 63


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EMM, Expert Marketer Magazine  

EMM is a magazine about marketing books and marketing authors. It provides vision, knowledge and wisdom in a handy digital magazine full of...

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