2016 Experience the Mountain Parks

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EXPERIENCE 2016/2017

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The Mountain Parks

Visitors' Guide to Western Canada

17 Helpful Map Pages Via Ferrata Steel Dreams Birth of the Ski Industry Edith Cavell

Campground Directory Icefields Parkway page 27

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Experience the Mountain Parks Welcome to Canada’s Mountain National Parks! Experience the Mountain Parks is now the only regional guide with coverage of all seven of the national parks in BC and Alberta. Coverage starts in Waterton and flows northwest through Banff to Jasper. It then resumes with Fernie in southeastern BC, and flows north through Kootenay to Yoho and west to Glacier and Mt Revelstoke. We hope it becomes a trusted travelling companion for you, no matter what park you visit, so keep it close by at all times. You’ll love our maps!

shape the history and culture of this special corner of the world in “Steel Dreams” and “Birth of the Ski Industry”.

In this our 11th edition, we highlighted some of the exciting new attractions in the region. Adventurers, be sure to check out Via Ferrata (pg 10 & 49) and the Pipe Mountain Coaster (pg 50). Relaxers can learn about early pioneers who helped to

We sincerely hope that you have a magical time. We know Experience the Mountain Parks can help you enjoy your visit, and we are truly honoured to be of service. Bob Harris

The centre spread contains our popular map of the Icefields Parkway. National Geographic describes this highway as one of the “Top 10 Drives in the World”. During 2015, much of the road was resurfaced, making this not only a jawdropping experience, but a comfortable road trip, as well. You will be taking a lot of pictures in the mountain national parks. Upload a few of your best to our annual reader photo contest (pg 3) for a chance to win a Golden Getaway or a brand new camera outfit!

Seamlessly share your discoveries with your friends & family via Social Media and Email straight from the Mobile Issue of this guide. Check it out at ExperienceMountainParks.com/our-guides.

Our Contributors

Graeme Pole

Chic Scott has devoted

Cheryl Sandford

is the best-selling author of six non-fiction books. Three of his titles have been finalists in the Banff Mountain Book Festival. In 2012, his company, Mountain Vision Publishing released a new edition of Walks and Easy Hikes in the Canadian Rockies - a Canadian Rockies Companion Guide. See pg 16 to see one of Graeme’s trail descriptions. (Steel Dreams pg 16)

his life to skiing and climbing. He has worked as a mountain guide in Switzerland and written ten books. Chic is an honorary member of the Calgary Mountain Club, Association of Canadian Mountain Guides and Alpine Club of Canada. A recipient of the Banff Mountain Film Festival Summit of Excellence Award, Chic lives in Banff, where he continues to write, lecture and, of course, ski. (Birth of the Ski Industry pg 24)

a former librarian, lawyer and legal researcher who resides in Canmore with Emerson Sanford, coauthor of the Life of the Trail series, is intrigued by the stories of those who explored our mountain parks in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Delving into the details of their lives and interrelationships gives her a mountain high. (Mount Edith Cavell pg 30)

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Lynn Martel has

written 10 books celebrating the unique culture, adventurous lifestyle and intriguing personalities of western Canada’s mountain community. A keen backcountry explorer by boot or skis, she edits the Alpine Club of Canada’s newsmagazine, the Gazette, and contributes to publications including the Rocky Mountain Outlook, Whistler Pique, Highline, Canadian Geographic and Travel Alberta. lynnmartel.ca (Experience a Via Ferrata, pg 10)

Andrew Penner is an independent writer and photographer living in Calgary, Alberta. His work has been featured in Westerworld, UP!, Golf Magazine, Golfweek, NBC.com, and many other leading golf and lifestyle publications in North America. When not travelling or on assignment, he enjoys reading, movies, and just chilling out in the backyard with his wife, Dawn, and their four boys. (Postcards from the Park pg 18)


Experience the Mountain Parks Experience the Mountain Parks Welcome to the 2016-17 edition of Experience the Mountain Parks. Use it to plan your holiday and as your companion once you’ve arrived. Please support our advertisers and sponsors and kindly tell them where you saw their ad. Without their support, this guide would not be possible. CMI Publishing is a division of Complete Marketing Inc., a privately owned company with offices in Calgary, Alberta. We specialize in the production of visitor guides and maps in print as well as digital formats. Printed copies are delivered in bulk to our network of distribution outlets throughout the region. Travellers are encouraged to pick up a FREE printed copy through these outlets or use a mobile-friendly digital copy of this, or any of our current or archived guides from our On-line Library at ExperienceMountainParks.com/our-guides

Publisher: Bob Harris, CMI Publishing bob@cmipublishing.ca Ph: (403) 259.8290

Circulation: Through most Visitor Information Centres, retail stores, AMA travel offices, attractions, and hotels & motels in the region.

Designer: Christine Karchewski ckarchewski@extenddesign.ca

Cover photo: Courtesy of Mari Omori Taken: along the Lake Oesa Trail in the Lake O’Hara area in Yoho National Park

Editor: Andrew Penner

Share Your Experience: Upload your photos and videos to experiencemountainparks.com/contests to be eligible to win great prizes including a $1,500 Gift Card courtesy The Camera Store, a Dream Getaway to Golden, BC, and much more.

Maps: Rob Storeshaw Circulation Managers: Kelly & Dale Schultz Warren & Sandy Pearson Ray & Rose Johnson

Twitter: Follow us at twitter.com/BHarris_Calgary

Sister Publications Include: Experience the Cowboy Trail, Experience Calgary’s Parks ‘n Paths, The Jasper Map, and the Coal Map.

Table of Contents Destinations Banff National Park 19 Golden 46 Grande Cache 36 Hinton 36 Icefields Parkway 27 Jasper National Park 32 Kimberley & Area 56 Kootenay Rockies 38 Radium Hot Springs 44 Revelstoke 50 Waterton Lakes National Park 12 Wells Gray Provincial Park 37 Yellowhead County 36

Specialty Pages All Aboard 39 Birth of the Ski Industry 24 Campground Directory 54 Experience a Via Ferrata 10 Mount Edith Cavell 30 Postcards From the Parks 18 Reader Contest 3 Recreation is King 40 Southern Alberta Circle Tours 8 Steel Dreams 16

Map Pages

EXPERIENCE THE perfect MOUNTAIN GETAWAY. With our Best Price Guarantee, you’ll get the lowest price on hotels in the Rockies and across North America!* Book now, the mountains are calling. Visit AMATravel.ca/mountain-getaways or call us at 1.888.799.1522 *Terms & conditions apply. See website or contact AMA Travel for details.

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Alberta 7 Banff National Park 20 Banff Townsite 22 Bow Valley Parkway 26 British Columbia 6 Columbia Valley 42 Glacier & Mt. Revelstoke National Park 52 Icefields Parkway 28 & 29 Jasper National Park 32 Jasper Townsite 35 Kootenay National Park 43 Lake Louise Townsite 23 Waterton Lakes National Park 13 Waterton Townsite 14 Wells Gray Provincial Park 37 Yoho National Park 47


Experience the Mountain Parks Experience British Columbia! In 1778, Captain James Cook became the first European to reach the west coast of Vancouver Island. In 1842, James Douglas, while working for the Hudson’s Bay Company, came across a site called Camosack. A year later, Fort Victoria was constructed in the area. British Columbia (BC) has a rich history. It is Canada’s western most province, nestled between

the majestic Rocky Mountains to the east, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. Blessed with breathtaking landscapes, BC’s geography is well-suited for all manner of adventures. There are warm summer lakes with beaches to comb, mountains to ski and trails to hike. Afterwards, soak up the healing waters at one of our many Hot Springs. (pg 53)

New Denver

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Courtenay

BC Fast Facts Capital City: Victoria Population: 4.6 million History: Entered Canadian Confederation in 1871 Total Area: 944,735km sq/364,764mi sq Highest Point: Fairweather Mountain, 4,663m/15,299ft

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Lowest Point: Pacific Ocean, Sea Level Longest River: Fraser River, 1,368 km/850 mi Provincial Flower: Pacific Dogwood Provincial Tree: Western Redcedar Provincial Bird: Steller’s Jay Provincial Gemstone: Jade Provincial Motto: “Splendour Without Diminishment”


Experience the Mountain Parks Experience Alberta! Alberta is nestled between the grain fields of Saskatchewan, to the east and the majestic Rocky Mountains, to the west. National Geographic Magazine calls the Icefields Parkway “One of the World’s Ten Greatest Drives”. This jaw-dropping landscape, amidst the peaks of the Rockies, offers easy access to a vast wilderness of ancient glaciers. (pg 27-29)

First Nations peoples have lived here for more than 10,000 years. For an authentic experience visit the Head-SmashedIn-Buffalo Jump (pg 9). Numerous dinosaur bone beds have been discovered throughout the province. The Royal Tyrrell Museum houses many life-size models. It is a magical place that will keep kids of all ages amazed for hours!

Alberta Fast Facts Capital City: Edmonton Population: 4.23 million History: Entered Canadian Confederation in 1905 Total Area: 661,848 km sq/255,541 mi sq Highest Point: Mount Columbia, 3,747 m/12,293 ft Lowest Point: Slave River, 152 m/499 ft above sea level Longest River: Peace River, 1,923 km/1,195 mi Provincial Flower: Wild Rose Provincial Tree: Lodgepole Pine Provincial Bird: Great Horned Owl Provincial Fish: Bull Trout Provincial Motto: “Strong and Free”

New Denver

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Experience Southern Alberta

One Region. Unlimited Adventures. Lost Secrets.

Are you ready?

Hear our Stories

Discover our self guided tours!

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@ChinookCountry Southwest Alberta


Self-Guided Tours

Stay a night with Canalta! See a Sight!

• Drumheller: Ramada, Super 8, Canalta Jurassic Drumheller • High River: Ramada, Super 8 • Brooks: Ramada, Canalta Brooks • Cochrane: Ramada • Airdrie: Ramada • Pincher Creek: Ramada • Lethbridge: Hampton Inn & Suites, Fairfield Inn & Suites • Medicine Hat: Hampton Medicine Hat

• Atlas Coal Mine (Drumheller) • Royal Tyrrell Museum (Drumheller) • Heritage Park (Calgary) • Lougheed House (Calgary) • Fort Calgary (Calgary) • Dinosaur Provincial Park (Brooks) • Medalta Potteries (Medicine Hat) • Alberta Birds of Prey Centre (Coaldale) • Nikka Yuko Japanese Garden (Lethbridge)

When you stay at our listed hotels, you will receive a voucher to visit ANY of these attractions for FREE! Also, while you are in the area, be sure to check out the BONUS attractions that already have free entry!

• Remington Carriage Museum (Cardston) • Waterton Lakes National Park Gate Admission (Waterton) • Frank Slide Interpretative Centre (Crowsnest Pass) • Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump (Fort Macleod) • Fort Museum of the North West Mounted Police & First Nations (Fort Macleod) • Bar U Ranch National Historic Site (Longview) • Devil’s Coulee Dinosaur Heritage Museum (Warner)

FREE Attractions Passes! Attraction Admission Passes Family Pass (Up to 4 people)

BONUS attractions that already have FREE entry! Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park (Milk River) Brooks Aqueduct (Brooks) Cypress Hills Provincial Park (near Medicine Hat) Leitch Colleries (Crowsnest Pass)

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Experience a Via Ferrata

Via Ferrata at Kicking Horse, Golden BC Photo by Caitlin Percival

Mount Norquay’s Via Ferrata in Banff National Park Photo by Lynn Martel

Gripping a steel cable railing with each hand, I stepped onto the suspension bridge, which spans a rocky gully 6m below. The wooden plank swings forward, lurching me into an impromptu hula move. Walking slowly, one foot, then the next, the bridge rocks back and forth, swaying me like an uncoordinated tightrope walker. I laugh at the ridiculousness of it and eventually reach the far side. I turn to watch my 15-year-old niece, Devyn, striding confidently. She crosses quickly and smoothly, with barely a wobble. “I think it’s better if you go fast,” she declares nonchalantly. Our fun was just beginning. The suspension bridge is but one component of Mt Norquay’s via ferrata, a new summer attraction at the Banff Norquay ski hill summer.banffnorquay.com. Originating in Europe, the phrase via ferrata, is Italian for “iron road.” Dating back to the nineteenth century, via ferratas gained attention during the Second World War when iron steps, ladder rungs, as well as steel cables were permanently affixed to cliffs and ledges to provide soldiers safe passage through hazardous mountain terrain.

Mike Adolph, an internationally certified mountain guide who operates Custom Outdoor Experience (coe.ca) out of Nordegg, built Alberta’s first via ferrata in the David Thompson corridor in 2007. With a lease on the provincial land, he purchased the materials out of pocket and friends volunteered their help to build a series of rebar steps and ladder rungs up a 185-metre cliff on Mount Stelfox. While his via ferrata is open to climbers who know how to use the system correctly, Adolph recommends those who don’t, should hire a guide. “You don’t have to be a rock climber or extreme adventurer to enjoy this excellent outing,” Adolph says. “Inexperienced rock climbers can hire a professional guide. It’s such a great introductory activity and it gets people into some pretty cool terrain.”

Now numbering more than 1000 in Italy’s Dolomites, and the Alps via ferratas have become increasingly popular in recent decades as a hybrid of high-alpine hiking and rock climbing. Climbers are protected from falling by being continuously clipped onto the cables, which are bolted into the rock, with sturdy lanyards and carabiners.

Located within the Banff National Park boundary, Norquay’s via ferrata was conceived by its owners as part of the long-range plan for the hill, which has hosted skiers since the 1920s. Gaining approval from Parks Canada involved a rigorous application and environmental impact assessment process. While some individuals and groups - including the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) - remain concerned that such commercial activities run contrary to Canada’s National Parks Act and that increased summer activity at Norquay poses a direct threat to the area’s ecological integrity, Parks Canada approved the project and it opened for the 2014 summer season.

In Canada, via ferratas are most abundant in Quebec and BC. Now the Rockies boast three within a few hours’ drive of Calgary.

John Thornton, who is a senior manager at Mount Norquay, was involved throughout the planning and construction process.

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In the Mountain Parks

Via Ferrata at Kicking Horse, Golden BC Photo by Caitlin Percival

(The Norquay via feratta was designed and installed by Prisme, the Quebec branch of a French company that has constructed more than a hundred via ferratas.) “Via ferratas are state-of-the-art designs that are meticulously planned and carefully considered in numerous ways,” explains Thornton. “They have evolved into hi-tech, masterful designs that take into account difficulty levels, the best possible routing, and a variety of quality components, including cables, bridges steel rungs, and more.” Today’s via ferratas are modern and streamlined, right down to the specialized climbing harnesses, helmets, carabiners and lanyards. These are supplied by Norquay’s rental shop. Everyone using Norquay’s via ferrata must be accompanied by a certified guide, now part of the hill’s summer staff, to ensure safety. The two-hour Explorer route offers milder exposure for tentative adventurers, while four and six hour options guarantee thrills for those ready to step onto cliff faces with nothing but thin Rocky Mountain air beneath them. The attraction’s popularity points toward additions for upcoming seasons. Like Adolph, Thornton sees via ferratas as a gateway activity that introduces people to safe, fun, climbing adventures in groups led by professional guides. “We’re really proud of our affiliation with the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides,” Thornton says. “We want to promote guided experiences. And suggest people who enjoy the via ferrata sign up for a course with Yamnuska [Mountain Adventures] or The Alpine Club of Canada.”

Mount Norquay’s Via Ferrata, Banff National Park Photo by Lynn Martel

Golden’s Kicking Horse Mountain Resort, situated three hours west of Calgary, also opened a via ferrata in 2015. It features the two-hour Discovery route and the four-hour Ascension route, which covers 465 metres on a steep cliff face on Terminator 1 peak. www.kickinghorseresort.com. Like Norquay, participants must be accompanied by a certified guide and the cost includes a gondola lift ticket as well as all necessary technical equipment. Another creation by Prisme, it boasts a professional design, incorporating plenty of natural rock steps and hand holds as well as man-made holds. “The feedback has been terrific and it’s been extremely popular,” says Matt Mosteller, Senior VP of Marketing for Kicking Horse’s parent company, Resorts of the Canadian Rockies. “Most people have no idea what a via ferrata experience is all about. When they complete the course they rave about not only the thrill and the majestic views, but about the overwhelming feeling of accomplishment. It’s a powerful experience.” Kicking Horse also plans to expand its via ferrata. With restaurants atop both Mount Norquay and Kicking Horse, the via ferrata adventure is perfectly capped with a brew and a burger. “There’s bound to be more development of via ferratas in North America,” Thornton says. “If it’s done well, it’s a benefit for communities and for mountain recreation.” Of course, they also offer an unforgettable way to experience exciting terrain in some of the most spectacular scenery in Canada. By: Lynn Martel

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Experience Waterton Lakes National Park

Tucked away in the very southwest corner of Alberta, prairie and lofty mountains meet in an unusual combination of habitats unique in Canadian National Parks. Rare wildflower species are abundant. Wildlife watching is easy. Waterton has an interesting geologic history. Water sculpts the land with abundant lakes, streams and waterfalls. The Lewis Overthrust continues to expose ancient sedimentary rock. The climate adds to the drama. Whether you are a back-country enthusiast, or someone who’d rather curl up with a good book, come bask in the natural glory of Waterton’s majestic landscape. For more than 10,000 years, travellers have made their way to this special place. Over 300 archaeological sites reveal the activities of the first people. European explorers and settlers also left their mark. In 1858, Lt. Thomas Blakiston, a member of the famous Palliser Expedition, was one of the area’s earliest explorers. He bestowed its name in honour of the 19th century naturalist Charles Waterton. In 1895, Waterton was protected thanks to the efforts of local ranchers including Fredrick Godsal. John George “Kootenai” Brown, a wilderness trapper, became the first settler in the area and the first park superintendent in 1911.

Around the turn of the 20th century, the discovery of oil in the Park led to the drilling of Western Canada’s first producing oil well. The discovery also contributed to the establishment of the Waterton community in 1910. In 1927, the Prince of Wales Hotel was built and has become one of the most photographed landmarks in Canada. Both the Prince of Wales Hotel and Oil City are designated national historic sites. Here, nature knows no political boundary. Waterton shares an important border and many natural processes with adjacent Glacier National Park, Montana. Hence, in 1932, Waterton and Glacier parks together, were designated as the world’s first International Peace Park. The Peace Park concept was spawned by Rotary Clubs in Montana and Alberta to commemorate the long friendship between the United States and Canada. The concept has evolved over time and now ecosystem management is an important consideration. However, the fundamental agreement remains the same, communicating the concept of peace and friendship. Waterton Glacier International Peace Park was the first of hundreds of peace parks globally. The United Nations recognizes it as an UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and bestowed it with the prestigious World Heritage Site designation.

Frommer’s 2009 guide describes Waterton as the least well travelled of Canada’s Rocky Mountain Parks, but “quite possibly the most spectacular”. “Waterton is positively other worldly, with its abrupt shift from prairie to mountain terrain, as well as its icy-blue lake that fills an ancient gully surrounded by mountains and glaciers,” reads the report from Frommer. 12 | View our Mobile Editions


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park See Campground Directory on pg 55 See Legend on page 55

1 Visitor Information:

Waterton Lakes National Park | Alberta, Canada

Canada’s National Parks Service: pc.gc.ca/waterton Manned information centre Mid-May to October. Year-round mywaterton.ca

2 Watertown Town Site:

Visitor services and attractions. Seasonal museum and bookstore operated by the Waterton Natural History Association.

3 Red Rock Canyon:

30 minute drive along Red Rock Parkway. Layers of red and green coloured minerals offer a brilliant contrast to lush surroundings. Self-guided walks and exhibits detail human history & geology. (open seasonally)

4 The First Oil Well in Western

Canada - National Historic Site

The site of Western Canada’s first producing oil well (1901-1906). On-site exhibit and picnic area.

5 Cameron Lake:

30 minute drive. Rent a paddle boat or canoe at this glacier-formed sub-alpine lake. Winter cross-country ski area

Waterton’s Only Lakefront Hotel

Waterton’s All-Suite Hotel

Lakefront Rooms • Serenity Spa • Glacier Bistro Thirsty Bear Saloon • Fireside Lounge Lakeside Chophouse Honeymoon Suites with Jacuzzi Tubs

Open year round Fireplace & Jacuzzi in every suite Deluxe, Romantic and Loft Suites Full Amenities

1.888.527.9555 | www.bayshoreinn.com

1.866.621.3330 | www.watertonsuites.com

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Experience Waterton

PRISTINE. WILD. EXHILARATING.

Summer Events Waterton Wildflower Festival June 19 - 24, 2016 Join in a variety of activities celebrating Waterton’s wildflowers. Visit watertonwildflowers.com

Blackfoot Arts & Heritage Festival August 22 - 24, 2016

Participate in traditional and contemporary aboriginal dancing, music, art, and cuisine.

mywaterton.ca

Waterton Wildlife Festival September 23 - 25, 2016

Waterton’s wildlife is at its best in the fall. This weekend features a variety of wildlife events. Visit watertonwildlife.com for more information.

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CAMERON BAY

See Legend on page 55


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park Admission to Canada’s national parks and historic sites will be free to all visitors in 2017 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Confederation. When frequent family visitors purchase their 2016 Parks Canada Discovery Pass, it will be valid for a full 24 months, rather than 12. Priced at only $136.40, a Discovery Pass offers unlimited admission for up to 7 people, to all 200 natural and cultural heritage sites across Canada for two years.

Cruise

Watert n Lake

Canada to Goat Haunt USA

See & Cross the International Border to Goat Haunt, MT. Informative, entertaining & personalized commentary by local tour guides View spectacular mountain scenery & wildlife scene Photo By: Rosemarie Wrobel

Red Rock Canyon, 700 m

Trailhead - At the end of the Red Rock Parkway, 14.3 km from Hwy 5

Water shuttle to remote hiking trailheads including: Crypt Lake and Vimy Peak cruise.info@watertoncruise.com 403-859-2362 www.watertoncruise.com

Watert n Sh reline Cruise C .

Cross Borders. Create Memories. Cruise Waterton.

Red Rock Canyon is the best place to appreciate the colourful rock for which Waterton is renowned. This paved trail provides many views into the canyon, which the creek has carved into brick-red mudstone. The rock is argillite (ARE-jill-ite), harder than shale but softer than slate. It

- in waterton lakes national park -

formed from iron-rich sediments that were deposited on ancient tidal mud flats. Where the mud was exposed to air, the iron in it rusted, colouring the resulting rock. The Buffalo Trail, an ancient travel route, passed the mouth of Red Rock Canyon. Seasonal camps that date to 8000 years ago were found nearby. Bighorn sheep frequent the parking area. Please do not feed them. You may want to visit nearby Blakiston Falls (1 km each way), an 11 m high cascade on Blakiston Creek.

FOR HOTEL RESERVATIONS CALL 1.888.985.6343

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•

EXPERIENCEWATERTON.COM


Steel Dreams: The Fascinating History of Canada’s Railway

Locomotive and Train in Rocky Mountains, Field, British Columbia 1903-1905 Image NA-428-1 Courtesy of The Glenbow Museum

Canada was five provinces strong and less than four years old when, in 1871, Prime Minister John A. Macdonald floated his promise. If the colony of British Columbia (BC) would enter Confederation, the federal government would link it to the east by a railway to be completed within ten years. Macdonald’s pledge acknowledged neither the political nor the physical realities of the intensely rugged mountains of BC. In crossing the province-to-be, the tracks of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) would need to make roller-coaster traverses of three mountain ranges, squeeze through the canyons of the Thompson and Fraser rivers, and, finally, make an end-run around a fourth mountain. It is probably just as well that Macdonald had never seen those mountains. For if he had known about the perils posed by the western slope of Kicking Horse Pass – a place that would become known as the Big Hill – he may well have reconsidered and his dream of uniting Canada may never have become a reality.

The Critics, the General, and the Major The many critics of the project were proved right. The fledgling country was incapable of financing a transcontinental railway. The surveys of the 1870s cost $3.5 million alone and would, by 1884, top $37 million. When construction finally got underway in 1880 it would devour $1.5 million per month.

To orchestrate the construction chaos the CPR hired William Cornelius Van Horne, a railway titan from the Midwestern US touted as “the ablest railway general in the world.” Van Horne was more than equal to the task. In fact, he had energy and ideas to spare. To the chagrin of Canadian newspapers, Van Horne hired Major A.B. Rogers, another American, to plot the route for the railway through the Rockies and Selkirks. The CPR’s charter stipulated that the grade of the railway could not exceed 2.2 percent (116.2 feet of elevation change per mile). The line that Major Rogers surveyed from Laggan (now Lake Louise) to the crest of Kicking Horse Pass climbed 1.8 percent over the 5.8 miles. This was steep for a railway, but nowhere near as steep as the plunge that lay ahead. From the outlet of Wapta Lake, the waters of the Kicking Horse River tumbled westward, dropping 1140 feet in 7.55 railway miles. For fully 3.25 miles of that distance, the grade was 4.5 percent. Major Rogers defied gravity and honored the terms of the CPR charter, staking a line for the rails across the southern flank of the Kicking Horse Valley. However, to follow the Major’s line, the CPR would have required a 1400-foot long tunnel and crossings of many avalanche paths and unstable areas. It estimated the cost at $124,775 per mile – double the average elsewhere. The work would have required an extra year and the railway would likely have gone bankrupt with the resulting delay.


The Temporary Solution After reassessing Rogers’ survey work, Van Horne put forward a “temporary solution.” He proposed to run the rails straight down the west slope of Kicking Horse Pass on the 4.5 percent grade. Van Horne’s logic was driven by an immediate need: complete the railway and open it for business in order to prevent the financial collapse of the whole venture. The government of the day reluctantly conceded. When the line was completed and opened in 1886, the resulting railway horror became known as the Big Hill. Nonetheless, Van Horne’s temporary solution would endure for 25 years until construction of the Spiral Tunnels.

Tourism, Accidentally

first two decades with a major addition in 1901 designed by F.M. Rattenbury. At its peak in 1908, Mt. Stephen House welcomed 8443 guests, boasted 60 rooms, a 200-seat dining room, a billiards room, and a library.

Tourism With Intent Van Horne took a calculated approach to establishing Banff as a resort. After appraising the potential of the local hot springs and surveying the surrounding mountains, he proclaimed: “Since we can’t export the scenery, we’ll have to import the tourists.” Van Horne chose a site for a hotel at the confluence of the Spray and Bow rivers. Construction began in 1886. When the 250-room Banff Springs Hotel opened in June 1888, it was the largest hotel in the world and was supplied with water piped from the nearby hot springs. Room rates started at $3.50 per day. Five thousand visitors arrived that first summer. Many had to be turned away to sleep in boxcars at the railway station, for which privilege Van Horne charged a mere $1.50 per day.

Although Canada’s national park system arose from the discovery of hot springs at Banff in the autumn of 1883, it was Van Horne’s idea to park a dining car at the base of the Big Hill at Field that led to the establishment of tourism in the Canadian Rockies. Two locomotives were required to haul a short passenger train between Field and Laggan. The CPR could ill afford the luxury of including a heavy dining car, as this would have required a third locomotive. So Van Horne set the dining car on a siding The CPR built its first log chalet on the shore of Lake Louise and timed the arrival of trains to (hopefully) match meal times. in 1890. As with the hotels at Banff and Field, the facility went through many incarnations and by 1913 could house 400 guests. Disembarking visitors were awestruck by the mountain scenery. Whereas the CPR marketed the Banff Springs Hotel as a luxury Van Horne realized that the facility should be expanded to offer resort, it pitched Lake Louise to those with a keen interest in the overnight accommodation and made sure this was done before outdoors. As a result, Lake Louise became a beacon for artists the end of the first season of passenger train operation in 1886. and mountaineers whose published accounts helped to put the The original building underwent annual expansions during its Canadian Rockies on the global map of places to visit. By: Graeme Pole

Look for Graeme Pole’s The Spiral Tunnels and the Big Hill in bookstores throughout the Rockies. Visit his website: mountainvision.ca

Mt. Stephen House and Mountain, Field, B.C. Image CVA 2-96 Courtesy of The City of Vancouver Archives

Locomotive Entering Tunnel. Courtesy of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V263-NA-1712)


Postcards From the Parks If you were a globetrotting landscape photographer and could only take one more breathtaking image, where would you go? What would you shoot? Maritime seascape? Remote desert scene in Africa? Burning lava flows in Hawaii? For many “shooters,” the answer would be a majestic, postcard-perfect scene in the Canadian Rockies. Indeed, the baby-blue lakes, rushing rivers, and jagged, snow-dusted mountains in Alberta and British Columbia can make for the ultimate photographic prize. Perhaps the challenge, if you could only choose one location in the mountain parks, would be just that. Choosing just one! Here are five locations that would do just fine for your final postcard. Lake O’Hara – Getting into the remote Lake O’Hara region – you need to be on the ball and book a seat on the bus (serviced by Parks Canada) or hoof it up the 11 kilometer road – is not a piece of cake. However, if you find your way there you’ll be rewarded. The region – peppered with lakes, tarns, cirques, crystal-clear streams, and soaring mountains – is as good as it gets. Hike the Opabin Plateau for some of the most stunning scenes your eyes will ever see...and your camera will ever shutter. Moraine Lake – Good enough to be featured on the Canadian $20 bill for decades, the Valley of the Ten Peaks, as seen from the rock pile at the east end of Moraine Lake, is one of the most famous scenes in the Rockies. Capture this in the morning, when low-angled light paints the peaks, and you’ve got a keepsake to cherish. Include a red canoe, or two, in your shot to maximize the “Canadiana” effect. Vermillion Lakes – If you’re staying in Banff you don’t have to venture far to find some sweet scenes. The Vermillion Lakes Road serves up classic photo-ops that have been shuttered by thousands of visitors. True, you won’t be alone here, but the beauty of Mount Rundle reflected in the calm water of the spring-fed lakes is a shot every serious landscape photographer needs in their portfolio. Spirit Island – Made famous thanks to an image capturing its surreal beauty was hung in Grand Central Station for over forty years, Spirit Island is the quintessential Canadian Rockies shot. The clutch of pines on the island, the lake, the mountains, it’s simply sublime. From Jasper, drive to Maligne Lake and take the 1.5 hour boat tour ($67 for adults) to reach the island and snag your shot. Unfortunately, it’s a quick stop so make sure you’re first off the boat! Or, better yet, take the “Through the Lens Cruise” ($145 for adults), a 2.5 hour late afternoon tour geared for photographers. Waterton Lakes National Park – Perched on the wind-blasted bluff above the lake, the historic Prince of Wales Hotel is a striking subject in this classic scene. And getting the shot is simple: pull over when the hotel comes into view, get out of your vehicle, and shoot until your heart is content. (If you want, clamber up the hill beside the road for an even better view). In fall, when the aspens go gold, the scene can really “pop.” Story and Photos By Andrew Penner

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Experience Banff National Park Banff National Park (BNP) runs northwesterly from Canmore to the Columbia Icefield. It is the birthplace of Canada’s national park system. Established in 1885, after three railway workers discovered a cave containing hot springs, BNP has become a world class destination, hosting an estimated 4 million visitors each year. Our map on pg 20 details eight of the many popular attractions in the park and also provides you with the locations of the campgrounds. The international airports in Calgary and Edmonton serve travellers flying into the region. Buses run to BNP year round, from each of these large urban centres. Both Via Rail and Rocky Mountaineer Vacations operate rail passenger sightseeing trips in western Canada, with stops in Banff and Jasper from May to October. Within BNP are two important communities: the Town of Banff and the Village of Lake Louise. Both are located along the Trans-Canada Highway. They’re small, so it’s easy to get around either community without your vehicle. That’s great because parking is at a premium and some lots cannot accommodate large vehicles such as RVs. Street parking and municipal lots are free, but have time restrictions. “Roam” is the name of the local public transit system. It provides safe, affordable and environmentally friendly bus service throughout the Banff town site. You’ll find our map of the Town of Banff on pg 22, along with 15 map keys starting on pg 21, to ensure you have a magical time. If the weather is pleasant, you’ll want to be outdoors to breathe the clean alpine air. Check out the Legacy Trail. It runs 26 km along the highway right-of-way from Banff to Canmore. It is a paved, recreational trail suitable for walking, bicycling, and in-line skating. This trail is part of the Trans-Canada Trail, which winds its way through every province and territory linking close to 1,000 communities.

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If the weather turns, head indoors to shop or to learn about the art, culture, and history of the mountain parks at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies.

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The Village of Lake Louise is located 45 minutes west of Banff. The mountains that surround it are internationally renowned for their beauty, but don’t just look because Lake Louise is the Hiking Capital of Canada. In the summer, go for a physically demanding day of climbing, a simple stroll around the lake, or be whisked away in a gondola to the top of the world. That same gondola will take you to a skier’s paradise in the winter, while the lake is a hub for ice sculptures and sleigh rides. You’ll find our map of the Lake Louise on pg 23 along with important map keys and a valuable coupon for the gondola!

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Experience Banff National Park Town of Jasper, JASPER NATIONAL PARK (233 km from Lake Louise)

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Calgary (128 km from Banff)

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Experience Banff National Park Banff National Park Map Keys

Banff Townsite Map Keys

See map page 20

See map page 22

2 Johnston Canyon

1 Parks Canada Visitor Centre

25 km (30 min) from Banff Exciting cat-walks cling to the canyon walls. Interpretive Display, 1.1 km (20 min) to the Lower Falls, 2.7 km (1 hr) to the Upper Falls. Stay on the trail and away from the edge.

Banff Lake Louise Tourism: 403.762.1550

2 Cave & Basin National Historic Site

311 Cave Avenue. The birthplace of Canada’s national park system.

3 Village of Lake Louise - Most Services Parks Canada Visitor Centre by Samson Mall. Ride the Gondola mid-May to mid-Oct. “The Hiking Capital of Canada” is central to the best high elevation hiking in the Canadian Rockies including the Plain of Six Glaciers, and in adjacent in Yoho National Park, the famous Iceline Trail. Along the Icefields Parkway Hwy 93

3 Banff Park Museum National Historic Site

91 Banff Ave (by the Bow River Bridge) Discover Banff’s wildlife 403-762-1558

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Lloyd Dyk - Courtesy of

Named for the series of glaciers lining this route, the parkway is one of the world’s great mountain highroads. This drive along the “backbone of the continent” from Lake Louise to the town of Jasper takes half a day, with time to stop and admire the views. Stock up on camera supplies.

Bow Falls & Banff Springs Hotel National Historic Site Magnificent views from either side of the Bow River.

For details turn to p. 28 & 29

4 Crowfoot Glacier

34 km (25 min) from Lake Louise A century ago, there were three “toes” of ice here. How many can you see today?

Upper Hot Springs Pool

Baby Bear - Courtesy

1-800-767-1611 Mountain Avenue. Heritage Bath House Locker, swimsuit and towel rentals, Café, and Gift Shop. Open year-round. Summer 9 am - 11 pm. hotsprings.ca

of Hilke Beuck

5 Bow Summit and Peyto Lake Viewpoint

Banff Gondola & Sulphur Mountain

1-800-760-6934 Mountain Avenue. Open year-round. Take the Gondola to the summit for breathtaking views. Interpretive boardwalk to historic exhibit. Construction underway on upper terminal open August 1, 2016.

40 km (30 min) from Lake Louise - Interpretive Display 2088 m (6849’) above sea level. A short walk from the parking area leads to a view of brilliant turquoise Peyto Lake and, in July and August, an astonishing array of alpine flowers.

6 Mistaya Canyon

72 km (50 min) from Lake Louise Only 10 min by trail from the road. Look for rounded potholes and a natural arch on the canyon walls.

Buffalo Nations Luxton Museum

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403-762-2388 1 Birch Avenue. Aboriginal history, displays, live performances and demonstrations. Operated by several First Nations including the Cree, the Blackfoot Confederacy, Tsuu T’ina and the Stoney. buffalonationsmuseum.ca.

Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

77 km (55 min) from Lake Louise - Interpretive Display Three rivers converge here: the Mistaya (Great Bear) River from the south, the Howse River from the west (the route used in 1807 by David Thompson to cross the Great Divide), the North Saskatchewan from the north - arising in the Columbia Icefield and emptying into Lake Winnipeg. Services available April - October.

403-762-2291 111 Bear Street. Brings mountain history, art and culture alive. Special learning programs for young children. whyte.org.

Vermilion Lakes

The turnoff is 1 km west of Banff, on the south side of the Trans-Canada Highway. Enjoy a nature stroll through these wetlands.

8 Columbia Icefield and Info Centre

130 km (1.5 hrs) from Lake Louise 90 min Motorized Tours take you onto the glacier. Glacier Exhibits illustrate the effects of global warming. Restaurant, picnics, rooms, guided ice walks and more. Most Services available May 1 - Oct 15.

Flower gardens with walking path behind the Banff Park Administration Building. Great for families: FREE ADMISSION. Open Daily. Limited availability. Construction and closure from mid June-October 2016.

Cascade Ponds (Minnewanka Loop)

Wapiti - Courtesy of Melissa

Williamson

21 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides

10 min - A favourite with locals and visitors alike. Grassy meadows, clear shallow pools, and a small beach. Picnic areas with fire pits. Accessible on foot and bicycle via Banff Legacy Trail.


Experience Banff 13

LAKE MINNEWANKA

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Banff Townsite Map Keys

Upper Bankhead

20 min - An easy trail circles this shallow lake. A small beach and good wildlife watching. Picnic tables.

Cascade Ponds

The Hoodoos (Tunnel Mountain Road)

Lake Minnewanka

A short interpretive trail leads to this superb view point, or book a rafting trip to view the Hoodoos from the Bow River.

(Lake of the Water Spirits) Boat tours available, May 14 - Oct. 10. 800-760-6934 Leisurely lakeside stroll to Stewart Canyon (30 min).

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Charming 30-minute stroll through the surface workings of the coal mine and the outline of the old town site. Picnic area and trailhead. Road closed in winter.

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See Campground Directory on pg 54 See legend on page 55

2nd Floor - Cascade Shops

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Experience Lake Louise

See Campground Directory on pg 54 See legend on page 55

Lake Louise Visitor Centre at Samson Mall Banff/Lake Louise Tourism 403-762-8421. Parks Canada Visitor Centre 403-522-3833. Exhibits explain the geology and history of the Canadian Rockies. Open May 1; 9 am - 5 pm, extended hours June 12 - Sept. 7. Lake Louise - 5 min from the Village

Stoney Indians called it the "Lake of Little Fishes" The easy stroll around the lakeshore is stunning. Access point for more difficult hikes.

Moraine Lake - 20 min from the Village

Nestled in the Valley of the Ten Peaks. Hiking restrictions when grizzly bears in the area: tight groups of 4+ hikers. Open late May to early Oct.

Lake Louise Sightseeing Gondola

4.5 km from the village; 403-522-3555 Summer Gondola runs mid-May to mid-Oct. but come back to ski early Nov. to mid-May.

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Expect crowds! Public parking fills quickly, so arrive before 10 am or after 5 pm


Depression’s Child: During the 1930s, while the Great Depression was wreaking havoc, the sport of skiing was born in the Canadian Rockies. The roots of skiing in Alberta and BC go back to the 1890s when pioneers like Olaus Jeldness organized ski jumping competitions in Rossland, and than later to Revelstoke and Banff where winter festivals were born. But these events were largely for professional or semi-professional skiers and everyone else was a spectator. In 1928 the public came to the slopes as active participants; the first ski lodges were built; Mount Norquay, Lake Louise and Sunshine Village Ski Resorts were established; the Alpine Club of Canada held its first ski camps and the sport of ski mountaineering was born. Out of the dark days, a new industry was born. It began in March 1928 when Italian nobleman, the Marquis d’Albizi, and Norwegian ski adventurer, Erling Strom, led four clients (from the Lake Placid Club in New York State) from Banff to the stunning meadows below Mount Assiniboine. Staying in cabins built years earlier by A.O. Wheeler, founder of the Alpine Club of Canada, they discovered the deep snow and incredible scenic beauty of the region. It was a skier’s paradise.

formed the Mount Norquay Ski club and built a cabin high on the slopes above Banff. Officially opened on February 3rd, 1929, their ski camp became a big hit with locals. Soon Calgarians caught on and hundreds of people came out on the weekends walking up then sliding down the hill. There were no lifts in those days, of course, and for the first half dozen years skiers had to ski or walk up the trail from Banff to reach the cabin. Mount Assiniboine Lodge opened for guests in the spring of 1929 and it looked like skiing was off to a good start in the Canadian Rockies. But then on October 29, 1929, known today as ‘Black Tuesday’, the stock market crashed, thus plunging the world’s economy into depression. By 1932 world GDP had fallen by 15% and at the depth of the depression, in 1933, the unemployment rate in Canada reached 27%. The Western Canadian provinces were particularly hard hit.

Returning from their adventure the pair soon approached the Canadian Pacific Railway with the idea of building a lodge in the area. The CPR received the idea enthusiastically and the next summer Mount Assiniboine Lodge was built — the first backcountry ski lodge in the Canadian Rockies.

Undeterred by this, the Mount Norquay Ski Club, led by the enthusiam of Cliff White and Cyril Paris, undertook to build a skier’s cabin in Skoki Valley, in the mountains east of Lake Louise. Constructed by log builder Earl Spenser in the autumn of 1930, the cabin received its first guest, Russell Bennett, an American millionaire and ski adventurer, on March 12, 1931. Not long after the group changed their name to The Ski Club of the Canadian Rockies, a name they thought would have more appeal. Although Skoki Lodge was originally built as a base for club members only, it was really the beginning of what would become the Lake Louise Ski Resort.

Meanwhile a group of young skiers from Banff including Cliff White, Peter Whyte, Cyril Paris and Fulton Dunsmore

A third backcountry paradise, called Sunshine Lodge, saw its first paying guests in February, 1934. Originally built for the Trail Mount Norquay Ski Camp WMCR Lloyd Harmon V108-1506

Erling Strom WMCR NA66-1366

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Birth of the Ski Industry Riders of the Canadian Rockies, this cabin and the surrounding ski potential was discovered by Jim Brewster, wife Dell, brother Pat, and Austin Standish the previous year while exploring for new terrain to ski. Located along the Continental Divide, the snow was deep and the terrain excellent. In 1936, Brewster Transport built a new 40 person lodge which still stands today at the heart of the resort. Not to be left out, skiers from Jasper — Curly Phillips, Joe Weiss and Doug Jeffery — built a beautiful cabin in the mountains near Maligne Lake. They called it Shangri La, in reference to James Hilton’s popular book about an imaginary paradise high in the Himalaya. Constructed in 1936, the cabin and several others built nearby opened up the tremendous potential of the region. Many other ski developments occurred during the 1930s. The Alpine Club of Canada held their first ski camp in April of 1937 based at the Elizabeth Parker Hut at Lake O’Hara. This began a tradition of backcountry ski camps that is still popular today. Skiers like Rex Gibson pioneered the sport of ski mountaineering, whereby the great summits of the Rockies are reached on skis during the cold winter months. Today ski mountaineering is one of the fastest growing segments of the ski industry. Between 1929 and 1933 Joe Weiss, a Swiss born adventurer from Jasper, pioneered 5 long distance ski traverses in the Rockies. On two occasions, in 1930 and 1932, he and his companions skied all the way from Jasper to Banff. Today these ‘Grand Traverses,’ as they are called, are a distinctly Canadian activity and popular with the young and hardy.

In 1938 the Mount Temple Lodge near Lake Louise was built. Owned by the Ski Club of the Canadian Rockies, it was meant to be part of a network of cabins, which included Skoki Lodge, that would bring skiers from around the world. But, unfortunately, timing was bad. In September of 1939, just as Temple Lodge opened its doors, German tanks roared into Poland and thus began the Second World War. The war marked the end of the Great Depression but it also brought to an end this creative and adventurous period in Canadian skiing. For the next six years gas was rationed and travel was restricted across the country. All of the nation’s energy, seemingly, went into the war effort. Mechanized skiing took over after the war. The skiing industry dramatically changed. The very first chairlift was built at Mount Norquay in 1948, the gondola was built at Lake Louise in 1958, and at Sunshine Village Ski Resort, in the 1960s, four chairlifts and T-bars were built. In 1965 Hans Gmoser took it all one step further with the use of the helicopter as a mobile ski lift. Today the Canadian Rockies have become one the world’s great ski destinations and the ski resorts are amongst the best in the world. The efforts of the Depression pioneers are not forgotten: Mount Assiniboine Lodge, Skoki Lodge and Shangri La have become busier than ever. Ski mountaineers explore every nook and cranny of the backcountry for powder snow. And the really hardy set off on week-long ski treks through the hills. The snow is deep and the scenery spectacular. The wilderness is at our doorstep but we are also served by all the modern conveniences. A skier in the Canadian Rockies can now truly enjoy the best of both worlds. By: Chic Scott The original Skoki Lodge about 1931. WMCR Lloyd Harmon V108 331A

Cliff White was one of the first to promote the Canadian Rockies as a ski destination. WMCR V683-Ic2b-pa139-112

25 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


Experience the Bow Valley Parkway Protecting wildlife is the foundation of a sustainable future for the mountain national parks and a great visitor experience. To ensure that this special area remains a high quality home for wildlife, from March 1st to June 25th, travel by vehicle, bicycle, or foot is not permitted between 8 pm and 8 am on the 17 km section of the Bow Valley Parkway between the Johnston Canyon Campground and the Trans-Canada Highway interchange. All businesses remain open during this period of mandatory travel restriction and are easily accessible by driving the Trans-Canada Highway and exiting at Castle Junction.

Johnston Canyon - Courtesy of: Leighton Lum

The Bow Valley Parkway is a scenic, 48 km secondary highway that runs parallel to the Trans-Canada Highway between the town of Banff and the village of Lake Louise.

This travel restriction will allow wildlife to move unimpeded across the landscape, use high-quality habitat, and engage in normal behaviour. It is part of a larger action plan to ensure the ecologically rich Bow Valley Parkway area continues as a worldclass setting for visitors to learn about and experience the park, and as a safe environment for wildlife.

Its eastern portion travels through a small but vital part of the park, called the montane, that provides critical habitat for large carnivores, including wolves, cougars and bears.

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Distance (km) from Banff/Lake Louise 3/49 Backswamp 6/46 Mule Shoe 8/44 Prescribed Burn 11/41 Sawback 13/39 Hillsdale 16/36 Pilot Pond 21/31 Moose Meadow 26/26 Castle Cliffs 28/24 Storm Mountain 40/12 Baker Creek 48/4 Morant’s Curve

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Experience The Icefields Parkway

The website, www.icefieldsparkway.com has been designed as a resource tool for travellers to make the most of their Canadian Rockies vacation. In fact, the website offers a great hotel deal; 15%-20% off hotel bookings at Mount Robson Inn, Jasper and Mountaineer Lodge, Lake Louise. Let the Mount Robson Inn, Jasper and Mountaineer Lodge, Lake Louise be your launch and landing point for your Icefields Parkway journey.

Plan your best road trip ever at ICEFIELDSPARKWAY.COM

Banff Lake Louise Tourism/Paul Zizka

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Save up to 20% on hotel stays in Jasper & Lake Louise with breakfast included included. Visit IcefieldsParkway.com

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AFTER YOUR DRIVE, TWO EXCELLENT PLACES TO CALL HOME IN JASPER & LAKE LOUISE:

More than a drive, the Icefields Parkway is a journey through natural history as well as captivating landscapes. Celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2015, the Icefields Parkway is rated as the #1 attraction in Banff National on TripAdvisor. It is possible to travel this route in just 3 hours but it would be a crime to do so because of the jaw-dropping scenery. Needless to say, a visit to the Canadian Rockies would be incomplete without experiencing the splendour of the Icefields Parkway.

One of the best resources for making the most of your Icefields Parkway road trip is found at icefieldsparkway.com. This website offers an interactive way to plan your trip with points of interest, best photo opportunities, stops for short hikes and even favorite picnic locations. Since there is no cell service on the Parkway, the site offers a downloadable “Parkway Planner” which includes maps, highlights and even a trivia section. For example, did you know that the Columbia Icefield is the largest mass of ice south of the Arctic Circle? That’s huge!

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The Icefields Parkway is a “must do” for any visit to the Canadian Rockies. It offers spectacular sightseeing of pristine turquoise lakes, tumbling waterfalls, ancient glaciers and the world famous Columbia Icefields. Along this stretch, coyotes, big horn sheep, deer, black bears are frequently spotted. Wolves, grizzlies, and goats less so. But witnessing a truly wild sight, like a trio of infant bear cubs under the protection of their mother, is not unlikely.

This road, also known as Hwy 93, runs from Jasper (mile zero) to Wickenburg, Arizona - that’s 2,768 kms (1,720 miles). The highway shares not only one of the most scenic drives in the world on the Icefields Parkway, but also with world famous spots such as the Hoover Dam and historic Freemont Street in Las Vegas.

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Linking Lake Louise with Jasper is one of the most beautiful journeys on the planet – the Icefields Parkway. Rated as one of the top drives in the world by Condé Nast Traveler, the Icefields Parkway is a 232 km stretch of double-lane highway winding along the Continental Divide through soaring rocky mountain peaks and vast sweeping valleys.

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CHABA 3020 m

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COLUMBIA ICEFIELD

ATHABASCA 3493 m PA RK ER

KITCHENER 3505 m

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SUNWAPTA PASS 2030 m

Tangle

CIRRUS 3270 m

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COLUMBIA 3750 m

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STUTFIELD 3453 m

ee SUNWAPTA 3317 m

MALIGNE 3200 m MONKHEAD 3211 m

BRAZEAU 3525 m

CHARLTON 3260 m

UNWIN 3300 m

Beaver Lake

Jacques Lake

SAMSON 3076 m

Medicine Lake

Maligne Lake

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ALBERTA WOOLEY 3622 m 3405 m

MUSHROOM 3622 m

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ROCHE BONHOMME 2459 m

CURATOR 2624 m

Honeymoon Lake Osprey Lake Buck Lake

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GEC 3130 m

NELSON 3150 m

GONG 3121 m

Gong Lake

Sunwapta Falls

CHRISTIE 3102 m

KERKESLIN 2955 m

HARDISTY 2715 m

Wabasso Lake

TEKARRA 2693 m

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FRYATT 3360 m

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Wilcox Creek Wilcox Pass Sunwapta Pass. Boundary between Banff and Jasper national parks Hilda Creek Parker Ridge

Mount Kerkeslin Goats and Glaciers Mount Fryatt HOOKER ICEFIELD Mount Christie Mount Christie Honeymoon Lake Buck and Osprey Lakes Sunwapta Falls Junction Services: (mid-May to mid-Oct) Road to Sunwapta Falls: 15 minute walk to lower falls Bubbling Springs Poboktan Creek Jonas Creek Rockslide CHABA Jonas Creek ICEFIELD Mushroom and Diadem Peaks Beauty Creek Beauty Creek Beauty Creek Tangle Falls. Watch for sheep! Sunwapta Canyon, Mount Kitchener Icefield Centre (May 1 to Oct 15) Services: Parks Canada Information and Exhibits, Brewster Ice Explorer tours and guided icewalks Columbia Icefield

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Jasper Tramway (April to November) THE RAMPARTS Wapiti (Summer and Winter) Junction with Highway 93A. Access to: Marmot Basin Ski Area, Mount Edith Cavell Road (mid June to mid October: viewpoints, hiking, Tonquin Valley) and Wabasso. Rejoins parkway at Athabasca Falls. Valley of Five Lakes Wabasso Lake Whirlpool Valley, Mount Hardisty, Mount Kerkeslin and Mount Edith Cavell Horseshoe Lake Athabasca Falls Junction with Hwy 93A Athabasca Falls

Jasper Townsite Whistlers (May to October) Jasper International

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Stretching 230 km between Lake Louise and Jasper, this worldclass journey amidst the peaks of the Canadian Rockies offers easy access to a vast wilderness of ancient glaciers. It’s complete with guided adventures onto the ice fields, majestic viewpoints and interpretive displays that will enrich your understanding of glaciers and climate change.

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National Geographic Magazine calls it “One of the World’s Ten Greatest Drives”. It has been referred to as “The Back Bone of the Canadian Rockies”. For many, it is the road trip of a lifetime.

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THE ICEFIELDS PARKWAY POINTS OF INTEREST

Experience the Icefields Parkway While plotting the border between Alberta and BC in the early 1900s, this roadway was the brainchild of Arthur O. Wheeler, who described this route as a “wonder trail”. Construction began in 1931 as part of a depression-era public works program to put men to work, but the rugged terrain and short season meant the project took 9 years to complete.

Isolated for centuries, 1940 ushered in an era of tourism to the region when the Icefields Parkway opened to the public. Today, more than a million travellers experience the parkway annually.

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Between 1799 and 1875, five different fur trading posts existed along the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. The explorations that were carried out from Rocky Mountain House by David Thompson and others played a key role in determining the future shape of Canada.

TO ROCKY MOUNTAIN HOUSE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE (175 km)

North Sa s

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MURCHISON 3333 m

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PATTERSON 3197 m

ARIES 2996 m

Chephren Lake Cirque Lake

HOWSE 3290 m

CHEPHREN 3266 m

EPAULETTE 3095 m

KAUFMANN 3109 m

SARBACH 3127 m

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See Legend on page 55

OBSERVATION CALDRON Peyto Mistaya Canyon, Sarbach Lookout, Howse Pass 3174 m 2917 m Lake Waterfowl Lake PEYTO BOW PASS 2970 m 2067 m Chephren Lake, Cirque Lake THOMPSON 3065 m Waterfowl Lakes, Mts. Chephren and Howse WAPTA CIRQUE 2993 m Bow ICEFIELD Lake Lake Snowbird Glacier Katherine Watch for CROWFOOT Turnoff to Bow Summit area 3050 m DOLOMITE highway 2782 m Peyto Lake workers BOW qui 2868 m Mos to C as repaving continues Bow Glacier re e k BALFOUR 3272 m throughout 2016 Bow Glacier Falls WAPUTIK Hector Turnoff for services: Lake ICEFIELD Bow Lake DALEY 93 MOLAR Crowfoot Glacier 3002 m Helen and Katherine Lakes, Dolomite Pass HECTOR 3394 m 1 Mosquito Creek TO FIELD, GOLDEN Molar Pass Herbert CYCLONE Lake Hector Lake 3042 m Hector Lake PTARMIGAN 3059 m LAKE VICTORIA Herbert Lake 3459 m Lake LOUISE Louise Junction: Trans-Canada Hwy and Icefields Parkway REDOUBT Lake Louise: 2 km 2902 m See Campground TEMPLE DOUGLAS 1 Banff: 59 km 3235 m 3543 m Directory on pg 54

Howse Pass

CORONATION 3170 m

FORBES 3612 m

MONS ICEFIELD

LYELL ICEFIELD

LYELL 3520 m

AMERY 3329 m

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FRESHFIELD 3337 m

Alexandra Trail, Castleguard Meadows, Thompson Pass Coleman Creek Sunset Pass and Sunset Lookout Mounts Amery and Saskatchewan Rampart Creek Glacier Lake Saskatchewan River Crossing Services (mid-March to mid-November): Junction with David Thompson Hwy (#11)

Alexandra

SASKATCHEWAN 3344 m

BANFF NATIONAL PARK

ATHABASCA 3493 m PA RK ER

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Bridal Veil Falls North Saskatchewan River, Cirrus Mountain Saskatchewan Glacier Weeping Wall

Hilda Creek Parker Ridge Nigel Pass

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Between Jasper & Banff, Alberta Custom Bike Tours Available

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Experience the Icefields Parkway

mountainmadnesstours.com

780.885.9813


Mount Edith Cavell

Photo by Lloyd W. Dykstra

Edith Louisa Cavell, was the eldest daughter of Anglican priest Frederick Cavell and his wife Louisa. She was born in the village of Swardeston near Norwich, England on December 4th, 1865. After working as a governess, including spending 1890 to 1895 with the wealthy François family of Brussels, she began training as a nurse at the London Hospital in September of 1896. Fluent in French and with over a decade of nursing experience, she arrived in Brussels in August of 1907 to take up her duties as the first directress of L’École Belge d’Infirmières Diplômées, a new nursing school established to train nurses on the English model. Edith’s high standards and dedication brought success to the school; by 1914 modern new premises were under construction. Then World War I intervened. Edith was vacationing with her widowed mother in Norwich when she received a telegram that told her war was imminent; she immediately returned to Brussels. The following day, August 4th, Germany marched into neutral Belgium. The Belgian, French, and British forces were unable to repel the Germans and by August 20th the area around Brussels was under German occupation. Henceforth, few injured soldiers were brought to the school, though Edith remained busy with teaching and administrative duties. The British army’s retreat into France following the Battle of Mons on August 24th left hundreds of British soldiers hiding in the countryside behind German lines. German posters advised enemy soldiers to give themselves up and warned that if they did not, they and anyone assisting them could be shot. Notwithstanding this threat, Belgian residents provided hiding places, food, disguises, forged identity papers, money and guides to help Allied soldiers and Belgian and French men of military age get through occupied Belgium to neutral Holland. Edith’s involvement in the rescue effort began in November of 1914 when she was asked to shelter two British soldiers. She soon became a key member of an ad hoc network of people devoted to helping as many soldiers as possible reach safety.

The work was dangerous. As they consolidated their hold on Belgium, the Germans stepped up their efforts to locate enemy soldiers and those assisting them. Edith had to be quick thinking, ready to hide both soldiers and records of her activities. In January, when German soldiers arrived for an unannounced inspection, she directed a fully clothed soldier to climb into an empty bed, pulled the covers up to his neck and told all the Germans he was suffering from severe rheumatic fever. In April another soldier was awoken during the night, taken to a shed and hidden in a barrel of green apples when Edith heard the Germans were planning a raid. By spring of 1915 a German command post had been set up on the same road as the school and by May the school had been infiltrated by at least two spies posing as injured Allied soldiers. During another search, Edith’s records of the soldiers who had passed through the school were hidden in a toilet tank. Near the end of June Edith burned the documents she was holding when she heard the sound of German army boots. The following day, she contemplated abandoning her rescue efforts but refused to do so when she learned thirty more men found hiding near Cambrai needed assistance. On July 31st, 1915 the first two members of the network were apprehended. Edith was arrested on August 5th and questioned on three separate occasions thereafter. Her German interrogators told her that they had extensive information on the network and the best way to save her friends was to make a full confession. Edith limited her admissions to what she felt that the Germans had already learned from their sources and surveillance of the school. She agreed that a couple of hundred soldiers had passed through when the figure was probably more like fifteen hundred. By early September, 22 men and 13 women who had participated in the network had been imprisoned and were tried shortly thereafter by a German military tribunal. The lawyers representing

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100th Anniversary them had to be approved by the Germans, were not allowed to meet with them prior to or during the trial, and could only make submissions on their behalf after they had been questioned by the German prosecutors. While Edith insisted her concern was simply to help the soldiers reach safety in Holland, the Germans maintained that, since the soldiers could return to fight against the Germans, she was “conducting soldiers to the enemy,” an act which constituted treason under the German Military Code. On October 11, 1915 five of the prisoners, including Edith, were sentenced to death by a firing squad. Later that afternoon Edith was told her execution was scheduled for the next morning, thereby forestalling any appeal by international governments. When Rev. Gahan gave Edith communion that evening, she told him she wanted her friends to know she willingly gave her life for her country. She then spoke the famous words, “Standing as I do in view of God and Eternity, I realize that patriotism is not enough. I must have no hatred or bitterness for anyone.” At 7 a.m. on October 12th, Edith and Phillipe Baucq, were each shot by firing squads of eight solders located six paces away. News of Edith’s death spurred enlistment in the Allied armed forces, promoted anti-German sentiment, and contributed to America’s

decision to enter the War on April 6th, 1917. Stunned by the negative reaction to her execution, the German Kaiser ordered that no further women were to be executed without his consent. The other three prisoners who were sentenced to execution had their sentences commuted to prison terms. Edith’s body was transported back home to England after the war ended. Following a state funeral in Westminster Abbey, Ms. Cavell was reburied on May 19th, 1919 just east of Norwich Cathedral. Numerous statues, books, movies, musical works and plays celebrate her life. In 1916 the Canadian government named a 3,363 metre peak - known to aboriginals as the White Ghost and to fur traders as La Montagne de la Grande Traverse in her honour. A memorial plaque at the foot of Mount Edith Cavell tells her story. The Edith Cavell Memorial Tower was added to Jasper’s Anglican Church in 1932. A 14 km road constructed in 1927 provides ready access to the north face of Mount Edith Cavell. Visitors can follow the 1.6 km Path of the Glacier Trail or enjoy the flowers and scenery from the 6 to 7 km Cavell Meadows Trail.

Murdered by the Huns, October 12th, 1915, Enlist in the 99th and Help Stop Such atrocities. Photo Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1983-28-3988

31 | Vote for your Favorite Photo

By Cheryl Standford

Photo by Lloyd W. Dykstra


Experience Jasper National Park Special Feature Miette Hot Springs 61 km (1 hr) North of Jasper on Hwy 16 & Miette Rd. The hottest mineral springs in the Canadian Rockies. Two refreshing cool pools. Towels, bathing suits & locker rentals. Open Mid-May to Oct. 1-800-767-1611

See Campground Directory on pg 54 See legend on page 55

Parks Canada continues to work to ensure that routes to Canada’s special places like Jasper National Park are protected and secured for future generations to cherish and enjoy. Bridge restoration is already well underway on sections of Hwy 16, an essential national transportation corridor that passes through the largest of Canada’s Mountain Parks. The Icefields Parkway, the iconic scenic drive that links Jasper and Banff National Park will see a continuation of paving, as it embarks on its next 75 years. Other associated projects will take place along both routes designed to continue the connection between Canadians and Jasper including revitalizing campgrounds and renovating heritage buildings. You can help by observing flag people and signs and giving yourself a little more time to get to your special spot. For the most up-to-date information on roads in Alberta, dial 511 or visit 511.alberta.ca. For BC road information call Drive BC @ 1-800-550-4997 or visit www.drivebc.ca.

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Experience Jasper National Park Jasper National Park Map Keys 1 The Town of Jasper - All Services

Jasper Park Information Centre 500 Connaught Dr.

2 Mount Edith Cavell

29 km (30 min) south of Jasper via 93A. A switchback road climbs 14.5 km (9 mi) to a popular viewpoint. Trailers or RVs larger than 7 metres are not permitted. Open mid June - Oct., as conditions permit. Road is trackset for skiing from end Feb. onwards. See pg 30 for the 100th Anniversary.

Jasper National Park is the largest of Canada’s Rocky Mountain Parks, and part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Discover the rugged mountains, glaciers, alpine meadows, forests, broad valleys, and wild rivers contained within more than 11,200 km2 of protected area. Wildlife is abundant here. It is common to see elk, bighorn sheep, deer, coyote and even black bear in the park. Jasper may have the greatest variety of accommodations in the mountain parks. Within the park, you could pitch your tent, park your RV, stay in a wilderness hostel, or be pampered in a resort. In town, your options include hotels, motels, private home accommodations and B&B’s.

3 Athabasca Falls

All of these choices are excellent. Each will appeal to a wide range of travellers and several unique properties are available in each category. If you are looking for something a little different, consider a private cabin.

4 Sunwapta Falls

Typically located on the edge of town, cabins offer a rustic charm ideal for those who really just want to get away from it all. Decompress in privacy without sacrificing comfort. Use this opportunity to read a book, go for a stroll, run a trail or just gaze at the amazing night sky.

30 km (30 min) south of Jasper via 93A or 93. A bridge and platforms give views of the thundering falls. Stay on the trail and inside the protective fences.

55 km (40 min) south of Jasper via 93. A paved road and short trail lead to the falls. Sunwapta is an aboriginal term meaning “turbulent river.” Stop at the resort for a great meal and excellent gift ideas.

5 Columbia Icefield and Athabasca Glacier

103 km (75 min) from Jasper on the Icefields Parkway, Hwy 93 Refer to p. 28 & 29 for more information. Guided glacier hikes (Icewalks) icewalks.com or phone 1-800-565-7547 (June - September) For Brewster’s Glacier Adventure, book your trip at the Icefields Centre or call 1-877-423-7433.

Did you know that Jasper National Park boasts the 2nd largest Dark Sky Preserve (DSP) in the world!

No matter what time of the year you are here, be sure to look up to see the dreamy nightscapes of planets and constellations overhead year-round. Learn more at JasperDarkSky.Travel

6 Jasper House National Historic Site

35km (30 min) North of Jasper on Hwy 16. A short walk on an easy trail leads to an interpretive viewpoint looking beyond the Athabasca River towards the Jasper House historic site.

7 Maligne Canyon

11.5 km (15 min) east of Jasper on the Maligne Valley Road. 3.7 km interpretive trail with foot bridges over canyon. Stay away from the edge. Very deep (50 m) narrow canyon. In winter take a guided tour inside the gorge. It is unsafe to descend into the canyon without a professional guide.

www.beckerschalets.com

Resort: 780-852-3779 Restaurant: 780-852-3535

8 Medicine Lake

27 km (30 min) from Jasper on the Maligne Valley Rd. The Maligne River flows in, but where does it flow out? Drained by one of the largest underground river systems in North America.

Maligne Lake

48 km (55 min) from Jasper on the Maligne Valley Rd. The beauty of this lake is legendary. A Boat Tour of this 22 km long lake is a “must see”. Chalet open mid-May to early October, 8:30 am - 7 pm. Boat tours start when spring ice conditions permit. Tour hours 10 am - 3 pm, extended to 5 pm in the summer. Call for a Reservation 780-852-3370. malignelake.com.

Your cabin in the mountains

Tel 780-852-3491 www.pinebungalows.com Parks Canada/Rogier Gruys

Celebrating 80 years in 2016! 33 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


Experience Jasper National Park Jasper National Park (JNP) runs along the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies. It is located northwest of Banff National Park and connected to it via the Icefields Parkway. First Nations people hunted within this region for centuries. They used a vast network of trails that were employed by the explorers who arrived 250 years ago. These days, hikers and horseback riders use these same trails, to enjoy Jasper’s wonders. The picturesque community of Jasper, Ab is the heart of Jasper National Park. The first recorded visit to the area was in 1810 by David Thompson and 3 years later the North West Company built a supply depot here. Jasper House was abandoned in 1884, as the fur trade declined and by 1907 there were very few people left in the area when Jasper became Canada’s fifth national park. Two years later, railway workers arrived in the new park at almost the same time as the first park officials. The first railway station was constructed at the junction of three broad river valleys that were surrounded by majestic mountain peaks. Over time, the town of Jasper grew up around the station and became the administrative centre of the park. In 1928, with the completion of a road from Edmonton to Jasper, it meant that suddenly Jasper was not so remote. It would not be long before Jasper National Park would become a busy tourist destination.

The Old Fort Point bridge was reopened in 2013. Old Fort Point is a Jasper classic hike with spectacular views of the townsite and surrounding areas. Visitors can also connect from here on foot or bike to the spectacular Lac Beauvert trail. Check out the Woodpecker Trail, part of the recently completed Easy Trails System in the park. The best of Jasper’s camping, accommodations, hiking, beaches and biking are all connected in one simple network. When the Ghost Glacier fell in 2012, it washed out hiking trails, picnic tables and forced the closure of the Cavell Road. This road re-opened in 2013 and boasts one of Jasper’s most accessible alpine areas and a dramatic landscape change. (see pg 30) oTENTiks have been installed at Whistlers Campground. These classic canvas covered shelters are perfect for a starry night. In 2011, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada designated JNP as a Dark Sky preserve making it the largest (at the time) and the only preserve in Canada with a town within the preserve. The community hosts a Dark Sky Festival every October. It has grown in popularity as interest in the dark sky continues to grow, in part due to the popularity of a variety of recent movies and television series. For more see dig.cmipublishing.ca/i/99755/36.

Experience Local Hospitality

Creative, Inspired Food · Craft Beer Selection Buffet Breakfast · Bring the Family Enjoy our Beautiful Summer Patio Terrace Kick Back & Relax in our Hidden Gem

“ The Comforts of Home ” Jasper Home Accommodation Association 150 members offering affordable lodging from modest rooms to upscale suites with kitchens

HOURS:

Check availability at

Breakfast: 6:30-11 am Dinner: 5-10 pm

In the Jasper Inn & Suites, Geikie & Bonhomme St.

StayinJasper.com

Jasper Inn & Suites P: (780) 852-3232

For even more information about Jasper and Jasper National Park, Pick up a FREE copy of The Jasper Map. See CMIPublishing.ca/Library for all our other Guides! 34 | Enter Our Photo Contest


Experience Jasper

See Campground Directory on pg 54 See legend on page 55

1 Jasper Information Centre

National Historic Site, 500 Connaught Drive. Open from 9 am - 5 pm Spring & Fall, with extended summer hours. Limited Winter hours. Friends of Jasper Gift Shop. Jasper Information Centre: 780-852-6176 Tourism Jasper Visitor Desk: 780-852-6236

2 Patricia & Pyramid Lakes

5/7 km (10/15 min) drive from Jasper. Patricia Lake has a 2-3 hour loop trail. Read plaques for WWII historical significance. Enjoy hiking, fishing, swimming, cross-country skiing, trail rides, and snow shoeing. Easy to access.

3 Old Fort Point Loop

1.5 km (5 min) drive via 93A and Old Fort Point Road - 3.8 km (1-2 hr) fairly steep hike to the top of this popular hill that overlooks the town & Athabasca River.

4 Lakes Annette, Edith & Beauvert

5 km (10 min) drive via Hwy 16 Sandy beaches, swim in spring-fed “kettle” lakes 2.4 km (45 min - 1.5 hr) interpretive trail.

5 Jasper SkyTram

7 km (15 min) drive from town Phone (780) 852-3093. jasperskytram.com. Open late Mar. to mid-Oct. (weather dependant). Guided tours and stunning views from atop Whistlers Mountain. Canada’s longest and highest aerial tramway (7,500 ft. above sea level).

6 The Discovery Trail

This trail can be accessed at several points throughout Jasper. (8.3 km loop) Portions are wheelchair accessible downtown.

Suggested Stargazing Sites 35 | Vote for your Favorite Photo

7 Jasper-Yellowhead Museum & Archives

400 Bonhomme St.; 780-852-3013 jaspermuseum.org. Discover the spirit of Jasper. Admission Fee: Adults $6. Permanent exhibits of Jasper’s history. Monthly exhibits in Showcase Gallery. Summer (mid May - mid Oct) 10 am - 5 pm Winter (Thurs. - Sun, only) 10 am - 5 pm

8 Fitness & Aquatic Centre & Arena

NEW Fitness Facility! Arena, Indoor Climbing Wall, 50m Waterslide 25m Pool, Hot Tub & Steam Room, Showers Tennis & Raquetball Courts, Meeting & Event Facilities Fitness & Pool: 780-852-3663 Activity Centre: 780-852-3381


Experience Yellowhead County & Grande Cache

Alberta Northern Rockies Three Great Stays in Seven Spectacular Days HINTON, GRANDE CACHE & YELLOWHEAD COUNTY, A.B. CANADA

Over 152 Spacious Campsites. Dozens of campgrounds, B&B’s, guest ranches, hotels, and more. Only a few hours west of Edmonton!

COME EXPLORE THE UNTOUCHED, RUGGED BEAUTY OF ALBERTA’S NORTHERN CANADIAN ROCKIES .

Each year, more and more Albertans are making Hinton, Grande Cache, and Yellowhead County in the Northern Alberta Rockies and Foothills part of their vacation plans – and it isn’t hard to see why. Abundant lodging choices of all sorts along Yellowhead Highway 16 and Highway 40 give visitors countless opportunities to explore the Canadian Rockies and the surrounding foothills. Days 1- 3

Some of the most majestic landscapes Canada has to offer.

yELLOWHEAD COUNTY

Start day one at the Pembina Provincial Park and continue on to the variety of campgrounds throughout the county or choose from an abundant array of guest ranches and lodges in the historic Brule area. Ride along one of the many scenic trails on a guided horseback adventure and discover that the Northern Rockies landscape is truly unforgettable.

Days 4&5

Beaver Boardwalk, Switzer Park & the historic Coal Branch area.

HINTON & AREA

Days 6 &7

‘Scenic Route to Alaska’ on the Bighorn Hwy. 40

GRANDE CACHE

Begin your morning with a bike ride at the Hinton Bike Park and pedal through the thick stands of trees that embrace the Happy Creek trail system. After that, pack a picnic lunch and head to Kelley’s Bathtub or Jarvis Lake for a refreshing swim – or stop at any of the other viewpoints or parks in William A. Switzer Provincial Park.

Escape into a land of sparkling lakes, rushing rivers, green valleys, and windswept peaks. Nestled on a mountain plateau, Grande Cache is located just north of Jasper National Park in the Canadian Rocky Mountains along the Bighorn Highway 40, the shortest, most scenic route to Alaska from the United States.

Return to town for a bite of dinner at any of the great restaurants in Hinton, but get your dessert to go. Dusk is the perfect time to take in the beavers hard at work at the Beaver Boardwalk.

Surrounded by 21 mountain peaks and two river valleys, Grande Cache is the gateway to Willmore Wilderness Park, Alberta’s greatest mountain treasure. Learn more about our rich cultural background at the Grande Cache Tourism & Interpretive Centre.

www. NorthernRockiesAreCalling .ca 36 | View our Mobile Editions Yellowhead County / Hinton / Grande Cache


Experience Wells Gray Provincial Park Photo Credit: Alan Fortune Photography

Wells Gray PP contains 5,250 sq km of alpine wilderness, borne from volcanoes and carved by glaciers. It boasts one of the most unique landscapes in all of BC; where your days are measured in vertical feet, big game sightings and the number of waterfall shots on your camera. Helmcken Falls is Canada’s 4th highest waterfall and just one of 39 named waterfalls you’ll find here. It’s where the Murtle and Clearwater Rivers roar into life each spring and wildlife sightings are as common as sunrise and sunset.

Murtle Lake is North America’s largest canoe only lake. It’s here, through a kaleidoscope of colour where you can hike through the wildflower meadows of the Trophy Mountains. You’ll find serenity among old-growth interior rainforests. Select Valemount, Blue River or Clearwater as your staging ground for pure wilderness adventures. Tour by car, on foot, or from high in the saddle… in the Canada you imagined. Located one hour west of Jasper on Hwy 16, drop by the Mount Robson Visitor Centre, or stop at the Info Centres in Valemount or in Clearwater. The friendly staff in each facility will ensure you get the most from your visit to this breath-taking area!

For more

Clearwater Valley Resort & KOA Campground

information on Wells Gray visit wellsgray.ca

heated outdoor pool • laundromat treed, park like setting • wifi mini golf • playground 52 RIDGE RESTAURANT with breakfast & dinner specials MOTEL AND BUNGALOWS extra large rooms • family rooms queen & king beds • kitchenettes air conditioning KOA CAMPGROUND AND KAMPING KABINS 50 & 30 amp sites • firepits & tables pull thru sites

Call: 1.888.837.1161 or 250.674.3909 www.clearwatervalley.com 373 Clearwater Valley Road, Clearwater

37 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides

Photo Credit: Alan Fortune Photography

Our coverage of the mountain parks of British Columbia (BC) begins with the communities of Blue River, Clearwater,Valemount, and Wells Gray Provincial Park.


Kootenay Rockies

攀砀瀀氀伀爀攀 琀栀攀  䬀漀漀吀䔀一䄀夀 刀伀䌀䬀䤀䔀匀

䴀漀甀渀琀 刀攀瘀攀氀猀琀漀欀攀 一愀琀椀漀渀愀氀 倀愀爀欀㬀 刀礀愀渀 䌀爀攀愀爀礀 瀀栀漀琀漀

British Columbia is the kingdom of abundance. A land of giants. A wild place where nature, not man, creates the boundaries. Glaciated mountains have a gravitational pull that is surprising and unforgettable. Amidst this nature are multi-cultural urban centers of extraordinary beauty, offering a dichotomy of refined civilization and raw wilderness. Exploring British Columbia (BC) reminds you of what it feels like to be alive. In the southeastern corner of BC, the jagged peaks of the Rockies rise in parallel with those of the Purcell, Selkirk and Monashee ranges. In between are valleys, rivers and lakes that have enabled human existence for 10,000 of years. With incomparable scenic beauty around every turn, this is BC’s Mountain Playground. Rivers include the Kootenay and Columbia, North America’s fourth largest, which from its source in the Rocky Mountains, circumnavigates the region in a wide arc. Tributaries such as the Kicking Horse, Elk, Salmo and Lardeau rivers generate some of the best whitewater conditions on the continent. This is the birthplace of adventure tourism. Visitors come to the Kootenay Rockies for a rich palette of recreational activities that include world-class mountain biking, climbing, river rafting, paragliding, canoeing, wildlife viewing, hiking and golfing. Typically, July and August are the best months for most outdoor activities and for lazy days at the beach. In the fall, trails come

alive with fabulous displays of gold and crimson, and any time of year is perfect for a therapeutic soak in a natural hot springs pool. Most hot springs in Canada occur in British Columbia. And the Kootenay Rockies is blessed with numerous hot springs ranging from wonderful resorts to wilderness backcountry pools. UNESCO has recognized Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park, together with, Yoho and Kootenay National Parks, for their ‘outstanding universal value’, and are included in the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks UNESCO World Heritage Site. With 4 national parks and over 75 provincial parks within the Kootenay Rockies, you’ll find vast areas of unspoiled wilderness and everything in between. Every town and city in the region has a fascinating story to tell. Along your travels, discover the rare scenic beauty and warm, friendly people. Hike the trails of mountain parks or wander the streets of quaint downtowns. Follow one of the circle routes that winds its way through the region. For everything you’ll want to know before you arrive connect with KootenayRockies.com or download the Kootenay APP. For a Kootenay Rockies travel package call 1.800.661.6603 or email info@kootenayrockies.com

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All Aboard Photo Courtesy of Kimberley Underground Mining Railway

Get the Passport at Visitor Reception at any of the 3 locations and save! Once you have received your first stamp, receive a 20% discount on admission to the next 2 attractions. Conditions apply and are listed on the Passport.

Kimberley Underground Mining Railway

Take a short walk to the Sullivan Mine Powerhouse for a guided tour featuring the huge compressors and generators that used to power the mine before boarding the train again to learn more about Kimberley and enjoy spectacular scenery and glimpses of the occasional wild life as you travel back to the station. Explore the Orpheum Theatre, the North Star Schoolhouse, the Miner’s Cabin and the Caboose as part of your adventure into history.

The Cranbrook History Centre

The collection includes the 7 cars of the 1929 “Trans-Canada Limited” (a classic “Jazz Era Art Deco” design), 2 cars of the 1907 “Soo-Spokane Train” (a deluxe example of “Edwardian Art Nouveau Elegance”), and the 1887 “Pacific Express.” This was a

Learn about life as a miner at the Underground Interpretive Centre as our guide describes hardrock mining and demonstrates some of the equipment used in the Sullivan Mine. • Mining Tours: 11:00 am, 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm • Open Weekends from May 21 • Open Daily July 1 to September 5

250-427-0022 www.kumr.ca

Victorian-era train representing the first transcontinental service in Canada. Also featured at the Cranbrook History Centre are the Cranbrook Museum, the Cranbrook Archives, the Royal Alexander Hall, and a Model Railway exhibit.

Fort Steele Heritage

The Fort Steele Steam Railway is an operating museum, which interprets the experience of branch-line rail travel to the logging, mining and ranching communities of the East Kootenay. Ride on the steam train, and check out historic railway equipment and stationary steam engines displayed outside the engine house. Our vintage locomotive “1077” is a source of fascination for our visitors and for Hollywood: it has been used in several movies shot north of the border.

A visit to Cranbrook starts with a journey back in time. Climb aboard the vintage railcars of the Trans-Canada Limited. Railway heritage at its finest!

250-489-3918 cranbrookhistorycentre.com

The Heritage Tourism Marketing group gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Regional District of East Kootenay and Columbia Basin Trust which supports efforts to deliver social, economic and environmental benefits to the residents of the Columbia Basin.

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Fort Steele’s steam train ride is an astonishing experience, putting you in the seats of earlier adventurers who saw this spectactular country side for the first time more than 100 years ago.

250-417-6000 www.fortsteele.ca


Recreation is King Teeming with alpine meadows, snow-capped peaks, rivers, lakes, and waterfalls, the Kootenay Rockies region is one of the most beautiful destinations in BC. Visitors to the area are invited to stay and play in charming mountain towns - such as Fernie and Kimberley - where they are treated to exceptional dining, awesome resorts, and a wealth of activities…in every season. With white-water rafting, cat-skiing, championship golf, world-class hiking, and more, this is truly a destination for all who loves the outdoors. In fact, the biggest challenge in this region is deciding what to do first! Unquestionably, cat-skiing is one of the most notable wintertime activities in Fernie. As you effortlessly glide through the powder on your super-wide skis, not passing any other visitors, it is easy to be drawn to backcountry powder skiing at Island

Lake Lodge. One of the most popular cat-skiing destinations in North America, the lodge opened in 1988 to lots of fanfare. With five-star cuisine, luxurious rooms, beautiful timberframed lodges, a full-service spa, and some of the best bowl and glade skiing on the planet, Island Lake Lodge is a place that every serious powder skier should put on their radar. Of course, it isn’t always winter! Summer brings a wealth of activities to the lodge. One of the most notable is the worldclass hiking. The property, which totals 7,000 acres, includes 14 marked trails. Heiko’s Trail, one of the most popular at Island Lake, is quickly gaining the reputation of being one of the best trails in the area. The hike offers an incredible array of scenery including beautiful mountain passes, waterfalls, caves, and snowfields.

Photos Courtesy of Andrew Penner 40 | View our Mobile Editions


In Kimberley and Fernie The town of Fernie offers a wealth of trails right in town (with more coming in the near future.) Currently the most popular trails include the 7.6 km Mountainview Loop and the 5.7km Great Northern Loop. Just outside the town there are close to 100 different trails, rated by difficulty in a beautifully colourcoded system much like the ski hills rate their runs. The popular sport of fly fishing draws many visitors to the Fernie and Kimberley. While many fishing enthusiasts choose to stay at Island Lake Lodge, there are a number of options when it comes to booking your adventure. Obtaining a professional guide, who will provide all the necessary gear, including a drift boat, is key! Regardless of which outfitter you choose, Fernie’s clear lakes, freestone rivers, and trout-rich waters make it a North American hot spot for fly fishing. Home to some of the largest remaining populations of westslope cutthroat trout and a monster bull trout, the Elk River is often the star of the show. However, not far away in Kimberley, the legendary St. Mary River (try an adventure with Kimberley Fly Fishing) can be every bit as good! If you need an even greater adrenaline rush, you might want to consider the awesome mountain biking in both Fernie and Kimberley. And the best part? You don’t have to venture very far out of town to experience the stunning trails! Located at the north end of Trail Street in Kimberley are the Lois Creek Trails, which offer nice mix of single and double-track trails. The trails here wind their way through rock outcroppings, along spirited creeks, and through beautiful forests. Although there are some challenging sections, many of these trails are ideal for beginner and intermediate riders. If it’s lift-access mountain biking you’re after, Fernie is home to some of the best downhill trails in Canada. Ranging from wide, machine-made trails for beginners to steep single-track trails for experts, Fernie Alpine Resort offers 37 different trails for riders of all abilities. You can expect plenty of gorgeous mountain views as you make your way down these epic mountain trails. It is known as one of the best kept secrets for mountain biking in all of Canada, the Fernie Alpine Resort is your ticket for an adrenaline rush you won’t forget. If you want to keep your “rush” going, canoeing, kayaking, and white-water rafting are also popular activities in the region. The Elk and Bull Rivers are known for outstanding scenery, including towering mountains, vertical canyon walls, and regular wildlife sightings. And of course, their glorious rapids! Not surprisingly, these two rivers possess their own unique characteristics.

With no roads or trails along it, the Elk is a classic river that serves up a great adventure for families. And the only real way to experience it is by boat. Adrenaline junkies flock here during May and June when the spring snowmelt creates the biggest waves and most powerful rapids. The Bull River, on the other hand, has lower volumes but still offers intense class two and three rapids in a wilderness setting near the Continental Divide. This small mountain river runs through beautiful mountains and lush green forests and offers some of the most exciting rapids in the area. Check out Canyon Raft Company or Mountain High Adventures for all your rafting needs. If you stay at Island Lake Lodge, they will arrange any whitewater rafting excursion for you. For many people, summer wouldn’t be complete without a few rounds of golf. Fortunately, both Fernie and Kimberley have you covered in terms of breathtaking courses. The scenery alone is worth the green fee in this region! Fernie boasts an 18-hole championship course that’s tucked away in a peaceful, parkland setting on the edge of town. Kimberley, with three exceptional mountain courses, is actually a golf destination on its own. Carved out of the forest on the slopes of North Star Mountain, Trickle Creek in Kimberley offers the ultimate mountain golf experience. With dramatic elevation changes, large ravines, natural ponds and creeks, and exceptional views of the Rocky Mountains, you’ll be on the edge of your seat throughout the experience. Bootleg Gap Golf and the Kimberley Golf Club, also exceptional mountain golf courses, round out the golf in Kimberley. They also feature challenging layouts with tree-lined holes and a rugged wilderness feel. Just outside of Kimberley, additional courses such as Shadow Mountain, St. Eugene Golf Resort & Casino, Wildstone (in Cranbrook), and the Cranbrook Golf & Country Club also boast outstanding golf experiences with challenging, mature layouts. Excellent course conditions and great value are par the course on all of the courses in the region. Cat-skiing, hiking, mountain biking, golfing and rafting; it’s just the tip of the iceberg in Fernie and Kimberley! Besides the aweinspiring scenery, wealth of dining and accommodation options, and, of course, the plethora of activities, these two mountain towns are home to some of friendliest folks in the country. From epic winter sports to an abundance of summer activities, this year-round destination will appeal to many outdoor enthusiasts. So what are you waiting for? This year book your stay and explore all that these mountain towns have to offer. By Lindsay MacNevin

41 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


Experience Highway 93 To Jasper

93

To Revelstoke

Lake Louise

Field

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YOHO NATIONAL PARK

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Highway 93 runs north from Wickenburg, Arizona, 2,768 kms to Jasper, Ab. American visitors cross into Canada at the Roosville Border Crossing which is open 24/7 year round. For much of the 330 km within BC, Hwy 93 follows the Columbia River Valley and passes through historic communities like Fort Steele, resorts such as Fairmont Hot Springs, and the quaint town of Radium Hot Springs, before veering northeast through Kootenay National Park. Unplug, slow down and drink in the charm of this section of your journey.

Brisco

Windermere Creek

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Bed & Breakfast Cabins

Koo

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Radium Hot Springs

• 107 forested acres • Private secluded log cabins with kitchens and jacuzzis • Creekside hammocks and picnic areas, hours of trails • $109 - $159 +tax/couple includes breakfast

iver

Invermere

Panorama Windermere Windermere Lake 95 93

Fairmont Hot Springs

Columbia Lake

1-800-946-3942

www.WindermereCreek.com

• Luxury Log Cabins • Guided Alpine Day Hikes • Wetland Paddling • Birding Tours • Whitewater Rafting

Simply Spectacular... Spectacularly Simple.

18 km south of Kootenay National Park - Windermere, BC

Canal Flats

British Columbia

Alberta

Skookumchuck

95A

Kimberley

95 93

Fort Steele To Sparwood and the Crowsnest Pass

Cranbrook 93

3

Fernie 3

Elko

3

To Vancouver

Creston 95

93

CANADA U.S.A.

2

Eureka 93

To Coeur d’Alene

95

2

To Kalispel

To Whitefish, Kalispel

www.nipika.com

MOUNTAIN RESORT

For more information: local 1-250-342-6516 toll free 1-877-647-4525

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Experience Kootenay National Park Kilometres 0 Miles 0

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Radium Hot Springs Pools 3 km from Radium; Admission fee. Hot pool is a relaxing 39 oC (102 oF). Cool pool is a refreshing 29 oC (84 oF). Lockers, swimsuit and towel rentals available. Visit hotsprings.ca for hours and fees.

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16 km (20 min) from Radium. Stop here for exhibit & dramatic view of: The Kootenay River Valley, The Mitchell & Vermilion Ranges.

Banff (132 km from Radium)

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5 Kootenay Valley Viewpoint

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13 km (15 min) from Radium. Interpretive trail bordering a clear, shallow lake.

Shanks

Sim pson River

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6 Kootenay Park Lodge

MOUNT ASSINIBOINE PROVINCIAL PARK

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63 km (45 min) from Radium. Located at Vermilion Crossing. Gift Shop, Cabins & Dining. Lodge Open Mid-May to Mid-Sept.

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Panorama, Invermere, Windermere, Fairmont Hot Springs, Cranbrook, Fort Steele & U.S.A.

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4 95

250-347-6525 www.friendsofkootenay.ca

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See Campground Directory on pg 54

Kootenay National Park is on Mountain Time – 1 HR AHEAD of Pacific Time (and most of B.C.)

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Vermilion Pass, Fireweed Trail 95 km (1.2 hr) from Radium. Elevation: 1640 m. The Continental Divide is the dividing line between the Pacific and Atlantic watersheds. A 15-min interpretive trail loops through a regenerating forest.

na ote

85 km (1 hr) from Radium. Cold, iron-rich mineral springs bubble up through small pools, staining the earth a deep ochre.

88 km (1 hr) from Radium. Enjoy the sights and sounds of thundering glacial meltwater and the diverse vegetation resulting from the 2003 wild fire.

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1.5 km from Radium. The iron-rich cliffs of the Redwall Fault provide a dramatic entrance to the park. Watch for bighorn sheep.

ley

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2 Redstreak Restoration Trail

1 km trail with exhibit. Learn why grasslands and open forests are so important for wildlife.

9 Pass

Whymper

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In the village of Radium Hot Springs. Tourism Radium Information Desk OPEN YEAR ROUND 250-347-9331 Friends of Kootenay Gift Shop Parks Canada Info Desk 250-347-9505 Ktunaxa Nation culture & history exhibit.

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1 Kootenay National Park Visitor Centre

Lake Louise and JASPER NATIONAL PARK

5


Experience Radium Hot Springs

TourismRadium.com | 888.347.9331 Set between the beautiful Purcell & Rocky Mountain ranges, Radium offers simple ways to reconnect with the natural world. From the world famous hot springs to incredible golf courses, magnificent wildlife viewing and a labyrinth of hiking paths, Radium always offers something to be discovered.

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Experience Radium Hot Springs

1

Find Your Peace by Getting Lost in the Moment Cobblestone Creek Cottage

Kootenay National Park

Vacationing with Cobblestone Creek is a chance to escape the hustle and bustle of city living and enjoy a slower pace of life.

Glaciers and grasslands with incredible hiking trails, viewpoints and campgrounds in between.

CobblestoneCreek.ca | 1-888-711-3722

parkscanada.gc.ca/Kootenay | 1-250-347-9505

Old Salzburg Restaurant

Radium Hot Springs Pools

Austrian & Continental Cuisine Schnitzel | Steak | Seafood Homemade Pasta & Desserts Daily 3 course dinner specials

Come soak in Canada’s largest hot springs with a striking canyon setting in Kootenay National Park.

OldSalzburgRestaurant.com | 1-250-347-6553

HotSprings.ca | 1-800-765-1611

Radium Park Inn

Radium Hot Springs Visitor Centre

Contenential Breakfast | Indoor Pool Hot Tub | WiFi | Near By Parks Only 3km from the Radium Hot Springs. RadiumParkInn.com | 1-800-858-1155

Open Daily 9:00 - 5:00 Winter 9:00 - 7:00 Summer

Closed Christmas, Boxing & New Years Day

RadiumHotSprings.com | 1-250-347-9331

BIGHORN MEADOWS RESORT BighornMeadows.com | 1-250-347-2323

RADIUM ELK PARK BED & BREAKFAST RadiumElkParkBnb.com | 1-250-347-9522

MISTY RIVERS LODGE BACKPACKER’S MistyRiverLodge.ca | 1-855-347-9912

LA CABINA & CARRINGTONS LOUNGE LaCabina@telus.net | 1-250-347-2340

@TourismRadium

Facebook.com/Tourism.Radium 45 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides

@Tourism_Radium


Experience Yoho National Park and Golden

Photo Courtesy of Tourism Golden/ Dave Best

Photo Courtesy of Tourism Golden/ Patrick Garbutt

Photo Courtesy of Tourism Golden/ Dave Best

Get off the Beaten Path in Golden BC. Golden is one of those places that is hidden in plain sight. Thousands of people daily drive past on the Trans-Canada Highway - even stop for gas or a bite to eat - and then carry on thinking that they have seen Golden. They have not. But they were so close to experiencing one of the most charming towns in the Canadian Rockies. Take just a short detour off the highway to the quaint downtown and you will not only find the longest freestanding timber frame bridge in Canada crossing the famous Kicking Horse River as it dissects the downtown, great cafes and restaurants, and a myriad of amazing outdoor adventure activities, but truly an authentic mountain town, full of down-to-earth people who just love to live in the mountains and share their stories. So many places lay claim to that word ‘authentic’, but their purpose-built condos and multiple souvenir shops belie their words. Golden is steeped in the history of pioneers such as David Thompson, James Hector and the Palliser Expedition. Ultimately it was Col. A.B. Rogers whot found a route through the mountains to complete the railway joining east to west and cement the confederation of Canadian provinces. The completion of the railway signalled the start of tourism, and once again Golden took its place in history as C.P. Rail uniquely constructed the Edelweiss Village in Golden for the Swiss mountain guides and their families. As you walk or bike

the Rotary Trail alongside the Kicking Horse and Columbia Rivers, you may catch a friendly smile and conversation with one of the locals who may be descended from those original Swiss Guides who led the growth of many alpine activities in Golden, or the subsequent alpinists and adventurers in the decades following who helped to shape Golden to become the outdoor adventure paradise it is today. Thanks to them, a visit to Golden can include any number of adventures from mountaineering, climbing and hiking in the nearby Yoho and Glacier national parks, to white water rafting on the Kicking Horse River, or gently paddling the Columbia River and Wetlands, to mountain biking the 100 km of cross country trails, even tandem paragliding or sky diving above the two mountain ranges that surround Golden. In winter Golden’s heli-skiing outfits, backcountry touring lodges and guiding operations, and groomers at Kicking Horse Mountain Resort, even snowmobiling at Quartz Creek, are all supported by those early Swiss Guides. They brought the skills that allow us to safely enjoy all those activities that make Golden the ideal mountain adventure town. So, next time you travel the Trans-Canada, take time to step of the highway and stay a few days in Golden. We guarantee you will fall in love with our unpretentious town, its people and outdoor opportunities.

Visit tourismgolden.com to plan your trip. 46 | Enter Our Photo Contest


Experience Yoho National Park

Yoho National Park 1 Yoho Visitor Centre at Field, BC

Just off the Trans-Canada Highway. Parks Canada and Travel Alberta Information Desks Open May 1 - Oct. 10 Phone: 250-343-6783. Friends of Yoho National Park Gift Shop Burgess Shale fossil displays.

2 The Town of Field

27 km (30 min) west of Lake Louise, Alberta - most services. Quaint mountain town with numerous Guesthouses and Bed & Breakfast Accommodation.

3 Spiral Tunnels Viewpoint and Kicking Horse Pass National Historic Site

8 km (5 min) east of Field. See Steel Dreams pg 16. Engineering marvel constructed in 1909 for rail safety. Interpretive exhibits. Closed in winter October - April. The Sprial Tunnel Viewpoint is ONLY open in July and August this year due to highway construction. If you are there when it is closed visit the interpretive signs about Kicking Horse Pass between Monarch and Kicking Horse Campgrounds.

4 Takakkaw Falls

17 km (25 min) from Field. In the Cree language, Takakkaw means “magnificent.” One of the highest waterfalls in Canada. Walk to the base of the falls, or start a magnificent day-hike or backpacking trip on one of the nearby trails.

5 Emerald Lake

11 km (15 min) from Field. A jewel of the Canadian Rockies. A 2 hour trail circles the lake. Sweet in the summer and incredible on snowshoes in the winter. Public parking available. Shuttle service from guest parking lot to Emerald Lake Lodge. Open year-round.

6 Natural Bridge

4 km (5 min) west of Field. A natural rock bridge arches over Kicking Horse River.

7 Wapta Falls

22 km (30 min) west of Field. In the Nakoda language of the Stoney Nation, Wapta means “running water” or “river”. Trail head is 2 km drive down dirt road, off of the Trans-Canada Highway. 90-minute round trip hike to see these impressive falls. See Campground Directory on pg 55 See legend on page 55

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Experience Golden

Not all those who wander are lost.

At the heart of your Parks Adventures. Golden is located between three mountain ranges and surrounded by six of Canada’s most stunning national parks, each famous for their epic hiking trails and heritage sites. The Golden Hiking Trail Map features hiking trails in Golden and Yoho and Glacier national parks. View online or order your Hiking Trail Map at www.tourismgolden.com/emp

tourismgolden.com

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Experience Golden

Mardals Hideaways

Golden Municipal Campground

Tastefully decorated 1, 2 and 3 bedroom fully self-contained rental options available. Spectacular mountain views, minutes from downtown, great for families or friends.

Open Year Round! Along the Kicking Horse River. Power and Water and Sani Dump. Coin Showers, Laundry, Wi-Fi ,Fire Pits, in Downtown. Near Pool.

1-250-344-1640 www.mardalshideaway.com

1-250-344-5412 www.goldenmunicipalcampground.com

Cedar House Restaurant & Chalets

LUSH Mountain Accommodations

Spring & Fall hiking packages! Visit website for details. Luxury accommodations in the heart of the Rockies with 3 diamond restaurant on site. Relax. Indulge. Explore.

Log & timber frame vacation homes, townhomes, condos & cabins sleeping 2 to 15 guests in comfort & style. Spectacular views, BBQs and private hot tubs await you. RATES: $69 -$169/person

1-250-290-0001 www.CedarHouseChalets.com

1-888-344-8681 www.lushmountain.com

Get vertical at the most exhilarating Via Ferrata (Italian for iron path) in Western Canada! Beginner and expert climbers alike will tackle Terminator Peak’s north face & venture through 2 custom courses and 1 suspension bridge. Giddy up!

tourismgolden.com

49 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


Experience Revelstoke

MOUNTAIN COASTER

O P E N S S P R I N G 2 016

Ride the gondola up to the start, from there the unique single-track coaster drops 279 vertical meters (915 feet) over 1.4 km (0.87 miles) of high-speed rail, twisting and turning across ski runs, between glades, and through a tunnel all the way to the finish line in the Village Plaza.

W W W. R E V E L S T O K E M O U N T A I N R E S O R T. C O M

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Experience Revelstoke

R e d e f i n i n g : STOK E {stok} verb; past tense: stoked; to be stoked

Excitement or thrill that one will experience while adventuring in Revelstoke, British Columbia. #TheRealStoke

BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

SeeRevelstoke.com

Rafting Trips starting at

$71

per person

Group Youth Rate, plus taxes

All Gear Included · Professional Guides · Families Welcome · Group Discounts · Intermediate Class 2/3+ Whitewater · Stay & Play Packages · Spectacular Setting 250.837.6376 RaftInRevelstoke.com ExpMtnParks2016.indd 1

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2016-04-22 3:13:02 PM


Experience Glacier and Mount Revelstoke National Parks Special Feature Meadows in the Sky Parkway and Day Area

Begins 1.5 km east of Revelstoke. The ONLY place in a Canadian National Park where you can drive to the top of a mountain. This road switch-backs 26 km up Mount Revelstoke to flower filled meadows. A free shuttle service takes you the last km. It usually runs 10am - 4pm from mid-July to mid-Sept. Ten trail heads at the summit including the Koo Koo Sint Trail that details David Thompson’s travels in the area. The heritage of three First Nations peoples - the Secwepemc, Ktunaxa, and Okanagan is highlighted in the First Footsteps Trail. Left unplowed in winter, the area is ideal for snowshoers, cross-country skiers; ski touring terrain lies beyond.

See Campground Directory on pg 54 See legend on page 55

2 Nels Nelsen Historic Ski Jump

Exhibit celebrates international ski jumping (1915-71). Hike from the Railway Museum or the Nels Nelsen Historic Area on Meadows in the Sky Parkway.

3 Skunk Cabbage Trail

28 km (25 min) east of Revelstoke. Unique wetlands experience, interpretive 30-min boardwalk trail loop. Great bird-watching!

4 Hemlock Grove Trail

54 km (40 min) east of Revelstoke Explore the rain forest. 10 minute interpretive boardwalk winds through ancient Western Hemlocks.

5 Loop Brook Trail

63 km (45 min) east of Revelstoke. Railway history is featured on this 1 hour hiking loop.

6 Illecillewaet/Asulkan Valleys

66 km (50 min) east of Revelstoke. Several hikes begin at this trailhead. Explore trails and mountaineering routes established more than a century ago.

7 Rogers Pass Discovery Centre

Summit of Rogers Pass: 76 km (55 min) west of Golden. 72 km (52 min) east of Revelstoke; 250-837-7500 Parks Canada Info Desk, Regular Hours: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm. Theatre & exhibits: history, wildlife & avalanches Friends of Mount Revelstoke and Glacier bookstore.

52 | View our Mobile Editions

8 Beaver/ Copperstain Valleys

79 km (1 hr) east of Revelstoke. Hike into the wilderness interior of Glacier National Park. The Beaver River Valley is home to antique stands of Western Red Cedar and Western Hemlock. The vast alpine meadows of Bald Mountain attract hardy adventurers on this 16+ km hike.

Beaver Valley Day-Use Area

85 km (65 min) east of Revelstoke. The Beaver Valley is a place of fragile beauty and dynamic mountainsides, shaped by mudflows and landslides. It’s home to carnivores and carnivorous plants, damselflies and dragonflies. In the warmest part of Glacier, this day-use area is one of the park’s first and last snow-free facilities every season.


Experience the West Kootenays The traditional route east from Revelstoke is along the TransCanada Hwy 1 to Golden (see pg 46). Want to take a path less travelled? Follow scenic Hwy 23 south towards Nelson and take the free ferry at Shelter Bay across Arrow Lake. This waterway is part of the Columbia River System, so if you like water and are looking for relaxation this path may be perfect for you. The road forks as you depart the Galena Bay terminal. Hwy 23 continues south to the Halcyon and Nakusp Hot Springs, two of the attractions featured in our coverage below. Flanked by the majestic Selkirk and Monashee mountain ranges, Nakusp is a great place for rejuvenating body and mind, hiking among

sternwheelers that operated on Kootenay Lake. As enchanting music wafts over the water, during the 25th anniversary of the Kaslo Jazz Etc Festival enjoy family fun July 29-31, 2016. “One of the Top 10 places to enjoy outdoor summer music” REUTERS Either way, explore the laid back charm of the West Kootenays. You will leave with a lifetime of memories and no matter how long you stay, you’ll wish you had lingered!

the cedars, lounging on the beach, soaking in hot springs, or relaxing at a spa. Alternatively, scenic Hwy 31 from Galena Bay runs southeast following the shores of Trout and Kootenay Lakes, to Kaslo, Ainsworth Hot Springs and Balfour. A stroll down Front Street in Kaslo will bring you to the historic SS Moyie, one of the last

Hot Springs in the West Kootenays Ainsworth Hot Springs Hot pool cave with stalactites. After a beautiful drive along the West Kootenay’s Hwy 31, stretch out those tense driving muscles with a dip inside the unique horseshoe cave located here. It is a wonder in itself with stalactites forming throughout and fresh, warm mineral water dripping from the cave’s roof creating a steam bath effect. The main lounging pool receives so many gallons of mineral water it changes the pool’s water six times per day. hotnaturally.com Open: year-round Accommodation: Rooms and Suites Location: south of Kaslo, BC

Photo Courtesy Ainsworth Hot Springs

Halcyon Hot Springs Amazing view and village-like atmosphere. Soak all your worries away while admiring the incredible view of the Arrow Lakes and the surrounding Monashee Mountains. With its village-like atmosphere, Halcyon’s philosophy is that healing waters should be shared with the world. It’s a great spot on a hot summer’s day to use the mineral swimming pool on the lower deck or even take a dip in the lake. halcyon-hotsprings.com Open: year-round Accommodation: Luxury Chalets and Cabins Location: between Revelstoke, BC and Nakusp, BC

Nakusp Hot Springs Community owned. This community owned and operated pool may have some of the clearest, freshest filtered water around. Over 200,000 litres of hot water flush through the pool each day. And with 200 acres of year-round activities in the surrounding Kuskanax Valley, Nakusp Hot Springs is a popular destination for anyone travelling the Kootenay circuit. nakusphotsprings.com Open: year-round Accommodation: Camping, Chalets, Hotels nearby in town Location: Nakusp, BC

53 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


te r Fl p Pr u s og h T ra Sh oil m ow ets e Sa rs ni Du Di m sa p bl e Fir d A ep c its ces s

In

s

Open Dates

Fe e

Phone Number

of

Websites

#

Campground

Sit

es

Campground Directory

Banff National Park - Map on pg 20 1

Castle Mountain

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888 May 28 - Sept 14 43

$21.50

• • •

2

Johnston Canyon

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888 May 28 - Sept 28 132

$27.40

• • • • • •

3

Lake Louise Tent*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783 May 30 - Sept 27 206

$27.40

• • • • • •

4

Lake Louise Trailer*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

Year Round

189

$32.30

• • • • • •

888-773-8888

June 1 - Oct 10

32

Soft-Sided camping in winter only (mid-November to Mid-April) 5

Mosquito Creek

pc.gc.ca

6

Protection Mountain

pc.gc.ca 888-773-8888 Closed for the season 89

$21.50 • • •

$17.60

• •

7

Rampart Creek

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 1 - Oct 10

50

$17.60

8

Tunnel Mt. Village I*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 14 - Oct 5

618

$27.40

• • • • • •

9

Tunnel Mt. Village II* reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

Year Round

188

$32.30

• • • • • •

10

Tunnel Mt. Trailer *

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 14 - Oct 5

321

$28.20

• • • • •

11

Two Jack Main

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 25 - Sept 8 380

$21.50

• • •

12

Two Jack Lakeside

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

May 14 - Oct 5

74

$27.40

• • • •

13

Waterfowl Lakes

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 24 - Sept 5 116

$21.50

• • • • • • •

• •

Kootenay National Park - Map on pg 43 1

Marble Canyon

pc.gc.ca/knp-camping

888-773-8888

June 24 - Sept 5

61

$21.50

2

McLeod Meadows

pc.gc.ca/knp-camping

888-773-8888

June 24 - Sept 5

88

$21.50

• • • • •

3

Redstreak*

pc.gc.ca/knp-camping

877-737-3783

May 6 - Oct 10

242

$27.40 - $38.20

• • • • • •

888-773-8888

May 20 - Oct 10

33

$15.70

June 23 - Sept 5

35

$15.70

Jasper National Park - Map on pg 32 1

Icefield pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

2

Honeymoon Lake

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

3

Icefield Centre RV

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

Apr 1 - Oct 31

100

$15.70

4

Jonas pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

May 20 - Sept 5

25

$15.70

5

Kerkeslin pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

June 23 - Sept 5

42

$15.70

6

Pocahontas pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888 May 20 - Sept 11 140

7

Snaring River

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888 May 20 - Sept 11 66

8

Wabasso*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

June 23 - Sept 5 231

$21.50 - $27.40

• • • •

9

Wapiti (Summer)*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783 May 20 - May 23 364

$27.40 - $32.30

• • • • •

10

Wapiti Winter

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888 Oct 10 - May 5/17 93

$27.40 - $32.30

• • •

11

Whistlers*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 6 - Oct 10

$27.40 - $38.20

12

Wilcox Creek

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 3 - Sept 25 46

Tent

$21.50

• • •

$15.70

June 17 - Sept 18 364 781

• • • • • •

$15.70

• •

Glacier and Mount Revelstoke National Parks - Map on pg 52 1

Illecillewaet

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888 June 28 - Sept 25 60

$21.50

• • • •

2

Loop Brook

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

July 1 - Sept 5

20

$21.50

• • •

3

Mount Sir Donald

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

July 1 - Sept 5

15

$15.70

For more campground information see our sister publications Experience The Cowboy Trail. ExperienceTheCowboyTrail.com/our-guides

All Open Dates are weather dependant. All fees are subject to change without notice. A fire permit is required for fires in Parks Canada’s campgrounds. * These Campgrounds accept reservations.

54 | Enter Our Photo Contest


In

s

Open Dates

Fe e

Phone Number

of

Websites

#

Campground

Sit

es

te r Fl p Pr u s og h T ra Sh oil m ow ets e Sa rs ni D Di u m sa p bl Fir ed A ep c its ces s

Campground Directory

Yoho National Park - Map on pg 47 1

Hoodoo Creek

pc.gc.ca/ynp-camping

888-773-8888

June 25 - Sept 5

30

$15.70

2

Kicking Horse

pc.gc.ca/ynp-camping

888-773-8888

May 20 - Oct 10

88

$27.40

3

Monarch pc.gc.ca/ynp-camping 888-773-8888

May 6 - May 19 44 June 25 - Sept 5 44

$17.60

4

Takakkaw Falls

888-773-8888

June 24 - Oct 10

$17.60

pc.gc.ca/ynp-camping

35

• •

• • • • • • • • •

Waterton Lakes National Park - Map on pg 13 1

Waterton Townsite

pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 1 - Sept 20 237

$22.50 - 38.20

• • • • •

2

Crandell Mountain

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

May 14 - Sept 6 129

$21.50

• • • •

3

Belly River

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

May 9 - Sept 13

$15.70

44

• •

Campground Operators are encouraged to submit your information early to be included in our multi-page coverage next year. Barrhead, Alberta Rotary Park

barrhead.ca

780-674-2532

Year Round

21

$20.00 - $25.00

403-722-2378

Year Round

46

$20.00 - $30.00

• • •

cougarcreekcabinsandrv.ca

780-865-4481

Year Round

36

$30.00 - $45.00

• • •

stonyplainlions.org

780-963-4505

Year Round

56

$30.00 - 35.00

• • • •

Caroline, Alberta Clearwater Trading Co clearwatertrading.ca Hinton, Alberta Cougar Creek Cabins Stony Plain, Alberta Stony Plane Lions RV

Barkerville, British Columbia Bowron Lake Park

bowronlakeinfo.com

778-373-6107 May 15 - Sept 30 25

$16.00

• •

Reservations: Discover Camping https://secure.camis.com/Discovercamping or Phone: 1.800.689.9025 World-renowned 6-10 day, 116 km wilderness canoe circuit: Full Circuit $60 pp; West Side Trip $30 pp

Kaslo, British Columbia Mirror Lake

mirrorlakecampground.com

250-353-7102

Apr 15 - Oct 15

95

$24.00 - $74.00

• • •

kimberleycampground.com

877-999-2929

Apr - Oct

140

$25.00 - $41.00

• • • • •

coahmancapground.com

250-265-4212

Apr - Oct

40

$20.00 - 35.00

• • •

Kimberly, British Columbia Kimberley Riverside

Beautiful wilderness camping with clean modern amenities. Enjoy serviced sites, pool, putting course, wifi, and more

Nakusp, Bristish Columbia Coachman

55 | Vote for your Favorite Photo


A good place to be

out & about. Full service RV & tenting • 18 hole putting course • Resort pool

• Showers • Laundry

• Stunning scenery • Store

• Internet access

1.877.999.2929 KimberleyCampground.com Turn on St. Mary Lake Rd. off Hwy 95A, 6kms south of city centre

Kimberley Riverside

CAMPGROUND