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EXPERIENCE 2015/2016

FREE

The Mountain Parks

Visitors' Guide to Western Canada

19 Helpful Map Pages

Mountain Weddings Honeymoon Contest Hot Springs Tour Stand Up Paddleboarding Girls Getaway Reader Contest

Icefield Parkway Full Map pg 50


Explore

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Banff Lake Cruise Banff Gondola


CAPTURE YOUR MOUNTAIN EXPERIENCE & ENTER OUR PHOTO CONTEST TO WIN DREAM GETAWAY TO WATERTON (VALUE $1,260) · Two nights at the Waterton Glacier Suites

· Lunch at Wiener of Waterton

· Boat cruise with Shoreline Cruises for two

· Lunch at Zumms

· Green Fee for two at the Waterton lakes Golf Course

· Dinner at Pizza of Waterton

· Boat rentals at Cameron Lake boat rentals

· Dinner at Trappers Mountain Grill

· Horseback riding with Alpine Stables, one hour

· Breakfast at Vimmy’s Grill

· Breakfast at the Lakeside Chophouse

THE CAMERA STORE (VALUE $1,500) · $1,500 Gift Certificate for their store in Calgary

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Honeymoon Contest Win a Trip with Via Rail & Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge See Page 15

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For full contest details and information on how to enter go to ExperienceMountainParks.com/contests


Experience the Mountain Parks Welcome to the Mountain Parks of Western Canada! In this 10th edition of our visitor guide to the mountain national parks, you will discover the best places to paddle board and learn valuable tips on how to plan your mountain wedding. You’ll learn about some of early pioneers who shaped the history and culture of this special corner of the world. And we’ve added even more maps: everyone loves maps! This year’s guide will serve as a valuable companion, no matter what park you visit, so keep it close by at all times. Coverage starts in Revelstoke, BC and flows east to Golden, south through Radium, on to the Crowsnest Pass, and then into Alberta. From Waterton, we help you navigate through Southern Alberta, and on to Banff, Jasper and beyond.

On pg 49, you will find information on the 75th Anniversary of the opening of the Icefields Parkway. Our detailed and very popular Parkway Map is on pg 50. Lean on this map regularly as you experience a tour described by National Geographic as one of the “TOP 10 Drives in the World”. This is a must see attraction. Campers will be pleased to conveniently find our expanded Campground Directory at the back of the magazine and our annual photo Contest on pg 3. Be sure to enter to win new camera equipment or a Waterton vacation. And see our Honeymoon Getaway courtesy of Via Rail, on pg 15! We sincerely hope you have a magical time. We know that Experience the Mountain Parks can help you enjoy your visit, and we are truly honoured to be of service. Your feedback is most welcome. Bob Harris

Seamlessly share your discoveries with your friends & family via Social Media and Email straight from the Mobile Issue of this guide. Check it out at ExperienceMountainParks.com/our-guides.

Our Contributors

Heather Lea loves travelling, wine and good adventure. She has written for Canadian Geographic, CBC, Climbing, Gripped, The Canadian Alpine Journal and Kootenay Mountain Culture. In 2005, she started Reved Quarterly (reved.net) in Revelstoke BC. Come Sept. 2015 Heather and her partner will be travelling around the world on their motorcycles. You can follow the adventure at theruggedcabin.com (Hot Springs Tour pg 10)

Bill Waiser is the Distinguished Professor Emeritus and A.S. Morton Research Chair at the University of Saskatchewan. He has published over a dozen non-fiction books. He is perhaps best known for his centennial history of the province, Saskatchewan: A New History. Bill was awarded the Saskatchewan Order of Merit, named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and granted a D.Litt. (WWI Internment Camps in the Mountain Parks pg 42)

Cheryl Sandford

Jasmine Esau is the

a former librarian, lawyer and legal researcher who resides in Canmore with Emerson Sanford, coauthor of the Life of the Trail series, is intrigued by the stories of those who explored our mountain parks in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Delving into the details of their lives and interrelationships gives her a mountain high. (Mary Vaux Walcott pg 22)

founder and owner of Reflections Weddings and Events. Since starting her company in 2007 she has created over 100 weddings some which have won awards. Her team of 6 execute 30 weddings a year and are continuing to grow. Jasmine and her husband Rob are both native Calgarians and enjoy spending time in the mountains with their great dane Tifah.

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(Mountain Weddings pg 16)

Tanya Koob is a Calgary-based freelance writer and lover of all things adventurous in the mountains. She spends her weekends gliding through snow or water on her light touring skis or stand up paddleboard. She has a 6 year old son and loves hiking, camping, and exploring the backcountry with her husband and son. Visit Tanya’s Blog where she chronicles her adventures rockiesfamilyadventures.com

(Stand Up Paddleboarding pg 28)


Experience the Mountain Parks Experience the Mountain Parks Welcome to the 2015-16 edition of Experience the Mountain Parks. Use it to plan your holiday and as your companion once you’ve arrived. Please support our advertisers and sponsors and kindly tell them where you saw their ad. Without their support, this guide would not be possible. CMI Publishing is a division of Complete Marketing Inc., a privately owned company with offices in Calgary, Alberta. We specialize in the production of visitor guides and maps in print as well as digital formats. Printed copies are delivered in bulk to our network of distribution outlets throughout the region. Travellers are encouraged to pick up a FREE printed copy through these outlets or use a mobile-friendly digital copy of this, or any of our current or archived guides from our On-line Library at ExperienceMountainParks.com/our-guides

Publisher: Bob Harris, CMI Publishing bob@cmipublishing.ca Ph: (403) 259.8290

Circulation: Through most Visitor Information Centres, retail stores, AMA travel offices, attractions, and hotels & motels in the region.

Designer: Christine Karchewski ckarchewski@extenddesign.ca

Cover photo: Courtesy of Graeme Pole Taken: From the Bear’s Hump, overlooking the town site of Waterton, Alberta

Maps: Rob Storeshaw

Share Your Experience: Upload your photos and videos to experiencemountainparks.com/contests to be eligible to win great prizes including a new camera courtesy The Camera Store, a Honeymoon courtesy Via Rail and the Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge, a Dream Getaway to Waterton Lake National Park and much more.

Book Keeper: Helen Foulger Circulation Managers: Kelly & Dale Schultz Warren & Sandy Pearson

Table of Contents Communities Banff National Park 41 Golden 18 Hinton 57 Icefields Parkway 49 Jasper National Park 52 Kimberley & Area 60 Radium Hot Springs 30 Revelstoke 12 Waterton Lakes National Park 34 Wells Gray Provincial Park 56 Yellowhead County 57

Specialty Pages Biking in the Mountain Parks 27 Campground Directory 58 Girls Getaway 32 Honeymoon Contest 15 Hot Springs Tour 10 Kootenay Wildlife Crossing 26 Mary Vaux Walcott 22 Mountain Weddings 16 Reader Contest 3 Southern Alberta Circle Tours 38 Stand Up Paddleboarding 28 WWI Internment Camps 42

Map Pages

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Alberta Map 7 Banff National Park 44 Banff Townsite Map 46 Bow Valley Parkway 48 British Columbia Map 9 Columbia Valley 24 Glacier & Mt. Revelstoke National Park 14 Icefields Parkway 50 & 51 Jasper National Park 52 Jasper Townsite Map 55 Kootenay National Park 25 Lake Louise Townsite Map 47 Radium Hot Springs 31 Southern Alberta Circle Tours 39 Yoho National Park 19 Waterton Lakes National Park 35 Waterton Townsite Map 36 Wells Gray Provincial Park 56


Experience the Mountain Parks

Message from

The Honourable Maureen Kubinec Welcome to Alberta’s Mountain Parks! Whether you’ve come from afar or from just down the road, I am confident you will enjoy Alberta’s remarkable landscapes and warm hospitality. There are so many sights to see and places to explore, and this guide will help you get the most out of your stay. Whether you’re looking for a family adventure, a great outdoor experience, or a romantic getaway, you will find it in Alberta’s Mountain Parks. Hot Springs, mountain biking, and stand-up paddle boarding are just a few examples of the many activities you can participate in. Enjoy natural wildlife and scenery or learn about the history of the area at our historical landmarks and museums. There are also a variety of accommodations including beautiful campsites, RV parks, hotels, guest ranches and bed and breakfasts. Alberta is also a land of dinosaurs with many fossil discoveries old and new, some of which are discovered in our Mountain Parks and on display at museums across the province. To help you plan your next adventure in Alberta, you can also visit TravelAlberta.com, call 1-800-ALBERTA, or stop in at any of our visitor information centres where friendly staff can help show you the way to a memorable journey. Enjoy your Stay and come back soon!

Maureen Kubinec Minister ofCulture and Tourism

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Experience the Mountain Parks Experience Alberta! Alberta is nestled between the grain fields of Saskatchewan, to the east and the majestic Rocky Mountains, to the west. National Geographic Magazine calls the Icefields Parkway “One of the World’s Ten Greatest Drives”. This jaw-dropping landscape, amidst the peaks of the Rockies, offers easy access to a vast wilderness of ancient glaciers. (pg 50-51)

First Nations peoples have lived here for more than 10,000 years. For an authentic experience visit the Head-Smashed-InBuffalo Jump (pg 40). Numerous dinosaur bone beds have been discovered throughout the province. The Royal Tyrrell Museum (pg 38) houses many life-size models. It is a magical place that will keep kids of all ages amazed for hours!

Alberta Fast Facts Capital city: Edmonton Population: 4.2 million History: Entered Canadian confederation in 1905 Total Area: 661,848 km sq/255,541 mi sq Highest Point: Mount Columbia, 3,747 m/12,293 ft Lowest Point: Slave River, 152 m/499 ft above sea level Longest River: Peace River, 1,923 km/1,195 mi Provincial Flower: Wild rose Provincial Tree: Lodgepole pine Provincial Bird: Great Horned owl Provincial Gemstone: Ammolite Provincial Motto: “Strong and free”

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Experience the Mountain Parks

Message from

The Honourable Shirley Bond Every year, millions of visitors come to our province and experience the stunning beauty of Western Canada’s diverse natural environment. I’m proud of our mountain parks and I encourage everyone to experience the wide array of activities they have to offer. There is an abundance of opportunities to explore B.C.’s vast mountain parks in all regions of the province including; ancient old-growth forests, caves and hoodoos, majestic peaks, alpine meadows, glacier-fed lakes and some of Canada’s highest waterfalls. While enjoying the spectacular scenery, visitors can spot bald eagles and other birds, grizzly bears, mountain goats, and caribou to name just some of the wildlife viewing opportunities.

Whether summer visitors are looking to experience hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, mountaineering, camping, or fishing - B.C.’s mountain parks have it all. Some parks are accessible by vehicle yet others are remote and pristine and seldom have a human visitor.   Nature is a core element of B.C.’s revitalized Super, Natural British Columbia® brand and the rugged splendour of B.C.’s mountain parks is often highlighted in Destination BC’s marketing campaigns around the world.   This summer will be an exciting time to come to British Columbia and explore our diverse mountain parks. For more information on travelling in B.C., please visit our website at www.HelloBC.com  and bcparks.ca to see all of the experiences that await you. Just choose your own adventure.

Sincerely,

Shirley Bond Minister of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training and Responsible for Labour

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Experience the Mountain Parks Experience British Columbia! In 1778, Captain James Cook became the first European to reach the west coast of Vancouver Island. In 1842, James Douglas, while working for the Hudson’s Bay Company, came across a site called Camosack. A year later, Fort Victoria was constructed in the area. British Columbia (BC) has a rich history. It is Canada’s western most province, nestled between

the majestic Rocky Mountains to the east, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. Blessed with breathtaking landscapes, BC’s geography is well-suited for all manner of adventures. There are warm summer lakes with beaches to comb, mountains to ski and trails to hike. Afterwards, soak up the healing waters at one of our many Hot Springs. (pg 10)

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Courtenay

BC Fast Facts Capital city: Victoria Population: 4.6 million History: Entered Canadian confederation in 1871 Total Area: 944,735km sq/364,764mi sq Highest Point: Fairweather Mountain, 4,663m/15,299ft

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Lowest Point: Pacific Ocean, sea level Longest River: Fraser River, 1,368km/850mi Provincial Flower: Pacific dogwood Provincial Tree: Western redcedar Provincial Bird: Steller’s jay Provincial Gemstone: Jade Provincial Motto: “Splendour without diminishment”


Soak Up Healing Waters on a Hot Springs Tour For an end-of-day treat after a ski, hike, or long day of driving, or simply enjoyment’s sake, taking a dip into the warm, mineralrich waters of a hot springs is a great addition to any holiday, no matter what time of year it is in Canada. There are more than a dozen minerals found in the hot springs around Alberta and British Columbia, which could explain why it feels so darn good to immerse yourself into a pool of warm mountain water. In fact, European doctors prescribe hot springs as a healing tool for many of their patients.

health. Chlorides help rheumatic symptoms, arthritis, central nervous system conditions, and posttraumatic and postoperative disorders, plus orthopedic and gynecological issues. Copper improves brain function and immunity. Magnesium helps with energy production and heart health. Phosphorus improves bone health, brain function, body metabolism, dental care, and libido issues. Potassium helps the elimination of toxins. Silica is good for skin, hair, and nails while it also improves atherosclerosis and tissue development. Sodium stimulates the lymphatic system. Sulphates support liver and gastrointestinal conditions.

This is called balneotherapy, which is the application of the health benefits of water. So what’s in these mineral-rich pools that benefits our health? Calcium supports bone health, helps with insomnia and menstrual concerns and benefits cardio

So, if this information entices you to grab your towel and suit up for some healthy dipping, follow along on our hot spring tour. We’ll take you through some of Alberta and British Columbia’s finest hot pools.

Photo Courtesy of Tourism Revelstoke

Canyon Hot Springs

Ainsworth Hot Springs

Convenient access off the Trans-Canada highway. Canyon Hot Springs is situated between Glacier and Mount Revelstoke National Parks, and nestled in an old-growth rainforest of large cedar and hemlock trees. Its convenient location just off the Trans-Canada highway makes this pool a nice destination while travelling east or west. The pool is close to the charming town of Revelstoke, B.C. canyonhotsprings.com

Hot pool cave with stalactites. After a beautiful drive along the West Kootenay’s Hwy #31, stretch out those tense driving muscles with a dip inside the unique horseshoe cave located here. It is a wonder in itself with stalactites forming throughout and fresh, warm mineral water dripping from the cave’s roof creating a steam bath effect. There is a main lounging pool that receives so many gallons of mineral water it changes the pool’s water six times per day. hotnaturally.com

Open: mid-May to mid-September Accommodation: Campground, RV parking, rustic cabins, and mountain chalet Location: Revelstoke, BC

Open: year-round Accommodation: rooms and suites Location: south of Kaslo, BC

Halcyon Hot Springs

Nakusp Hot Springs

Amazing view and village-like atmosphere. Soak your worries away while admiring the incredible view of the Arrow Lakes and the surrounding Monashee Mountains. With its village-like atmosphere, Halcyon’s welcoming philosophy is that healing waters should be shared with the world. It’s a great spot on a hot summer’s day to utilize the mineral swimming pool on the lower deck or even take a dip in the lake. halcyon-hotsprings.com

Community owned. This community owned and operated pool is said to have some of the clearest, freshest filtered water around. Over 200,000 litres of hot water flush through the pool each day. And with 200 acres of year-round activities in the surrounding Kuskanax Valley, Nakusp hot springs is a popular destination for anyone travelling the Kootenay circuit. nakusphotsprings.com

Open: year-round Accommodation: Luxury chalets and cabins Location: between Revelstoke, BC and Nakusp, BC

Open: year-round Accommodation: camping, RV park and chalets, hotels nearby in town Location: Nakusp, BC

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Soak Up Healing Waters on a Hot Springs Tour

Ainsworth Hot Springs Photo Courtesy of David Gluns

Photo Courtesy Ainsworth Hot Springs

Photo Courtesy of Tourism Revelstoke

Fairmont Hot Springs

Miette Hot Springs

An active, fun-filled resort. Fairmont hot springs is a resort in the truest form. With a huge variety of activities available at the resort and in the surrounding Columbia and Purcell mountains, you’ll likely visit Fairmont for more than just a peaceful dip in the pool and a sniff of fresh air. Of course if lounging in the healthful waters is all you feel up to, this is the place for you. fairmonthotsprings.com

Hottest known springs in the Canadian Rockies. Pumping 800 litres per minute, the water of Miette hot springs starts out at 53.9 Celsius before being collected, cooled, and filtered then pumped into the aquacourt. Visitors can see the original aquacourt ruin as well the source of the springs via a walkway. Be sure to look closely at the boulders by the water, which are embedded with fossils called blobstromatoporoids. mhresort.com

Radium Hot Springs

Banff Upper Hot Springs

Largest hot pools in Canada. These clear, odourless pools are nestled among natural rock walls and are the largest in Canada. There is also a smaller, cooler pool for swimming. Sometimes you can even watch mountain goats on the rocks in the canyon above. The name “radium” comes from the discovery of trace amounts of radon found in the water in 1914. The radon here is harmless and gives off less radioactivity than a watch dial so don’t be afraid to go for that relaxing plunge. radiumhotsprings.com Open: year-round

Highest hot springs in Canada. They are conveniently located in the town of Banff, a spectacular destination on its own. These hot springs are significant for two reasons: one is they were part of the creation of Banff National Park, which is Canada’s first national park. Secondly, the springs are the highest in Canada at 1,585 metres. There is also a beautifully restored historic spa and bathhouse located at the pool. hotsprings.ca Open: year-round

Open: year-round Accommodation: lodge rooms, cabins, cottages, and RV park Location: Fairmont, BC

Accommodation: RV park and campground, hotels nearby in town Location: Radium, BC

Open: May to October Accommodation: cabins, chalet, motel rooms Location: Jasper, AB

Accommodation: Banff townsite Location: Banff, AB

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By: Heather Lea


Experience Revelstoke

AROUND HERE, THE AIR IS FRESHER THE MOUNTAINS ARE BIGGER THE SKY IS CLEARER THE TREES ARE TALLER AND THE GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER seerevelstoke.com

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Experience Revelstoke Apex Rafting Whitewater Rafting on the Illecillewaet River A fresh & exhilarating mountain river awaits you! The whitewater you’ll encounter is an intermediate class 2-3+ and the tranquil stretches offer the chance to appreciate our spectacular natural setting. 112 First Street East (Seasonally) | 250-837-6367 www.apexrafting.com | info@apexrafting.com

Glacier House Resort Step out to Adventure with Glacier House Resort Spacious lodge rooms, family log cabins with private hot tubs, stunning mountain views. In the heart of Revelstoke bike and hike trails! Pet friendly. 1870 Glacier Lane | 1-877-837-9594 www.glacierhouse.com | info@glacierhouse.com

SkyTrek Adventure Park Climbing Activities for big kids and small kids! In a beautiful forest setting Aerial Trekking Courses, Kids Tree Adventure, Jungle Gym, Interactive Climbing Walls, Sky Swing, Sky Drop, Logs Climb and much more‌. 7060 Hwy #1, 32 Km West of Revelstoke | 1-866-944-9744 www.skytrekadventurepark.com | info@skytrekadventurepark.com 2 hours from Kamloops

The Enchanted Forest Family Fun For All Ages! In a magical setting, you will discover over 350 handcrafted figurines in amongst 800 year old cedars. Climb BC tallest treehouse, paddle in row boats, walk the nature walk ... discover the magic! 7060 Hwy #1, 32 Km West of Revelstoke | 1-866-944-9744 www.enchatedforestbc.com | info@enchantedforestbc.com

Glacier Helicopters

8903 Hwy #1 | 250-837-9569 | www.glacierhelicopters.ca

Revelstoke Golf Club

171 Columbia Park Drive | 250-837-4276 | www.revelstokegolfclub.com

SameSun Hostel

400 Second Street West | 250-837-4050 | www.samesun.com/Revelstoke

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Experience Glacier and Mount Revelstoke National Parks Special Feature Meadows in the Sky Parkway and Day Area

Begins 1.5 km east of Revelstoke. The ONLY place in a Canadian National Park where you can driveto the top of a mountain. This road switch-backs 26 km up Mount Revelstoke to flower filled meadows. A free shuttle service takes you the last km. It usually runs 10am - 4pm from mid-July to mid-Sept. Ten trail heads at the summit including the Koo Koo Sint Trail that details David Thompson’s travels in the area. The heritage of three First Nations peoples - the Secwepemc, Ktunaxa, and Okanagan is highlighted in the First Footsteps Trail. Left unplowed in winter, the area is ideal for snowshoers, cross-country skiers; ski touring terrain lies beyond.

See Campground Directory on pg 58 See legend on page 52

2 Nels Nelsen Historic Ski Jump

Exhibit celebrates international ski jumping (1915-71). Hike from the Railway Museum or the Nels Nelsen Historic Area on Meadows in the Sky Parkway.

3 Skunk Cabbage Trail

28 km (25 min) east of Revelstoke. Unique wetlands experience, interpretive 30-min boardwalk trail loop. Great bird-watching!

4 Hemlock Grove Trail

54 km (40 min) east of Revelstoke Explore the rain forest. 10 minute interpretive boardwalk winds through ancient Western Hemlocks.

5 Loop Brook Trail

63 km (45 min) east of Revelstoke. Railway history is featured on this 1 hour hiking loop.

6 Illecillewaet/Asulkan Valleys

66 km (50 min) east of Revelstoke. Several hikes begin at this trailhead. Explore trails and mountaineering routes established more than a century ago.

7 Rogers Pass Discovery Centre

Summit of Rogers Pass: 76 km (55 min) west of Golden. 72 km (52 min) east of Revelstoke; 250-837-7500 Parks Canada Info Desk, Regular Hours: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm. Theatre & exhibits: history, wildlife & avalanches Friends of Mount Revelstoke and Glacier bookstore.

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8 Beaver/ Copperstain Valleys

79 km (1 hr) east of Revelstoke. Hike into the wilderness interior of Glacier National Park. The Beaver River Valley is home to antique stands of Western Red Cedar and western hemlock. The vast alpine meadows of Bald Mountain attract hardy adventurers on this 16+ km hike.

Beaver Valley Day-Use Area

85 km (65 min) east of Revelstoke. The Beaver Valley is a place of fragile beauty and dynamic mountainsides, shaped by mudflows and landslides. It’s home to carnivores and carnivorous plants, damselflies and dragonflies. In the warmest part of Glacier, this day-use area is one of the park’s first and last snow-free facilities every season.


Experience the West Kootenays The traditional route east from Revelstoke is along the Trans Canada Hwy #1 to Golden (see pg 20). Want to take a path less travelled? Follow scenic Hwy #23 south towards Nelson and take the free ferry at Shelter Bay across Arrow Lake. This waterway is part of the Columbia River System, so if you like water and are looking for relaxation this path may be perfect for you. The road forks as you depart the Galena Bay terminal. Hwy #23 continues south to the Halcyon and Nakusp Hot Springs, two of the attractions featured in our coverage on pg 10. Flanked by the majestic Selkirk and Monashee mountain ranges, Nakusp is a great place for rejuvenating body and mind, hiking among the cedars, lounging on the beach, soaking in hot springs, or relaxing at a spa.

sternwheelers that operated on Kootenay Lake. As enchanting music wafts over the water, the Kaslo Jazz Etc Festival offers freerange family fun July 31 - Aug 2, 2015. REUTERS calls it one of “the Top 10 places to enjoy outdoor summer music.” Either way, explore the laid back charm of the West Kootenays. You will leave with a lifetime of memories and no matter how long you stay, you’ll wish you had lingered!

Alternatively, scenic Hwy #31 from Galena Bay runs southeast following the shores of Trout and Kootenay Lakes, to Kaslo, Ainsworth Hot Springs and Balfour. A stroll down Front Street in Kaslo will bring you to the historic SS Moyie, one of the last

Honeymoon Contest The prize package includes a return trip for two between

Jasper and Vancouver on VIA Rail’s Canadian Train. You will stay in a Sleeper Plus cabin for two and your journey includes all meals in the Dining Car. You will enjoy access to all lounge areas and glass dome viewing carriages. In addition you’ll receive accommodations at the Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge.

Conditions apply, for full contest details visit honeymooncontest.ca

Submit a photo of you and your spouse enjoying the parks by Sept 15, 2015 to win a trip for two with VIA Rail 15 | Vote for your Favorite Photo


Your Mountain Park Wedding:

Courtesy of Allen Maudie

Courtesy of Cassie’s Camera

Courtesy of Yueko Images

We all know there is no such thing as perfect. All great ideas have their challenges and planning a wedding in one of Alberta or British Columbia’s mountain parks is no exception. As Miguel de Cervantes said, “To be prepared is half the victory,” and here at Reflections Weddings and Events we thoroughly agree and want to do our part in helping you fully prepare for the challenges of a mountain wedding. Here are four important things you need to consider to have a beautiful and stress free Canadian Rockies wedding: 1. Consider the Date Many couples choose long weekend or holiday wedding dates as they think their guests will make a mini vacation out of staying in the mountains. This is usually a correct assumption, but your guests are not the only ones thinking a little getaway would be nice on a long weekend. Half of western Canada is going to be joining you! Okay, maybe that’s an exaggeration but you get my point: this could result in difficulty booking hotels, or at the very least the nightly rates will be higher. The other concern with a long weekend wedding is increased traffic which could lead to travel delays for your guests (or worse, your vendors) who are coming in from out of town. The increaded traffic could also

Courtesy of Kyla Brown

result in delays throughout the day as you move from location to location, if you are not having your ceremony and reception at the same venue. Solutions: - Choose a normal weekend. While at first a long weekend can seem like the thoughtful choice (“our guests won’t have to take a day off work”), the pros do not outweigh the cons. - There are not as many venue options in the mountain parks as in the city, so it is much better to go into your planning with flexibility on your date. Choose the venue that best suits your needs, wants, and style, and then select a date based on its availability. - Because mountain towns are resort towns, some hotels do offer low season rates. If you are concerned about budget, or just want a “winter wonderland” wedding, this is an option for you. 2. Consider Your Guests While some of your guests might revel in a mountain getaway, others might find it an inconvenience. They will need to book a hotel for at least one night, families with young children may need child care, and there are the added costs of a park pass (for Banff and Lake Louise), travel, parking, and the additional meals.

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Four Essential Tips Solutions: - Hotels do offer group rates, so make sure you book a block of rooms and let your guests know that they will get a discount. - If you’ve chosen to have your wedding at the Banff Springs, the Rimrock Resort, or Chateau Lake Louise, look into more affordable accommodations for your guests. - Set up a babysitting service at the reception for young children. - To offset the cost to your guests, you can let them know that you are not expecting a gift beyond their company. It is also considerate to work an open bar into your budget when you are asking guests to travel out of town. 3. Consider Your Vendors There are many amazing local vendors in Canmore and Banff, however, you might fall in love with a photographer, planner, designer, or officiant who does not live in one of these towns. Make sure that the vendors you hire have the proper licenses for the town or even the venue that you have chosen. Canmore does not require a separate operating (business) license, but Banff and Lake Louise do, with some small nuances such as the Rimrock Hotel which requires a Parks Canada license but not a town of Banff license. Hiring vendors with the proper licenses ensures that there won’t be a problem with them being able to do their job on your special day, and it’s a good indication that they have been involved with mountain weddings before and are familiar with any challenges that may arise. Solutions: - If possible hire local vendors. - If you are bringing vendors in from out of town, be sure they have done weddings in the mountains and are familiar with licensing laws and the specific logistics of your venue(s).

4. Consider the Weather An outdoor wedding was the ultimate desire of many brides long before the Style Me Pretty blog existed, and those wanting a mountain wedding are no exception. This is all well and good, but the mountain parks can be cold with unpredictable weather changes. Nope, I don’t care that your wedding is in August, it could still snow… really! Now before you give up all hope, here are your options: an outdoor mountain ceremony is certainly possible, but an outdoor mountain reception? The costs and logistics to make that happen are simply not worth it. And even if you are not doing an outdoor wedding, the weather can affect travel for your guests, your vendors, and even you. And on the opposite end, if the weather is fantastic it may mean a lot more tourists and traffic. Solutions: - Have a Plan B and a Plan C. This is even more important if you are having an outdoor ceremony. Make sure your reception venue has a backup location. - Hire a Coordinator. In the event that plans need to change due to the weather, who is going to inform guests, move the décor, and let the sting trio know they need be at the hotel and not in the park? A wedding coordinator takes care of all these details. All things considered, we love mountain weddings! The scenery and atmosphere alone have us saying “yes” to all the brides who come our way with this dream. Knowing the challenges up front and being proactive about them will result in the most amazing day of your life! by: Jasmine Esau reflectionsweddings.ca

Courtesy of Cassie’s Camera

Courtesy of TLaw Photography

Courtesy of Cassie’s Camera

17 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides

Courtesy of Kyla Brown


Experience Golden and Yoho National Park

Photos Courtesy of Tourism Golden/Dave Best

Not far into our hike, we cross a babbling creek, its sparkling water brushing the rocks like a bronze polish. We hear the swoosh of raven’s wings flying overhead, as the trail winds along strategically laid stone steps. Then, just beyond a small stand of sub-alpine firs, there it is, a secluded alpine tarn, a gentle breeze causing delicate ripples on the glimmering water. It’s a perfect place to enjoy the fresh-baked goodies collected from Golden’s irresistible cafes, and to study our updated 2015 Golden Hiking Trail map. Available in print or digitally at tourismgolden.com/maps, it’s brimming with suggestions. For a relaxing day, we could explore Take it Easy, a 4 km trail that follows the steady-flowing Columbia River. Binoculars are a must to spot some of the common mergansers, redneck grebes, ospreys, and bald eagles that inhabit the river basin. If we’re feeling more energetic, we’ll hike the Canyon Creek trail starting from Nicholson, a 10 minute drive south of Golden. While the start of the trail is a bit steep, it quickly leads to a smooth, broad path bordering the north rim of the deep, narrow gorge. Dating back to Golden’s early history when prospectors searched for gold,

the views from three lookouts provide spectacular vistas for miles down the Columbia Valley. Just be sure to leave the earbuds at home so you can hear oncoming mountain bikers riding the trail in the downhill direction - or maybe even a woodpecker or a deer! Then by mid-July, in Glacier National Park we’ll hike the moderate trail past gushing creeks to Balu Pass, where the slopes are carpeted in dazzling, colourful wildflowers. Or, in Yoho National Park, we’ll hike the five star Canadian Rockies’ favourite, the 21 kilometre Iceline trail with its rock staircases, up-close glaciers, and see-forever high alpine views. And for a unique thrill, we’ll ride the gondola to the top of Kicking Horse Mountain Resort to hike Terminator Ridge, enjoying an eagle’s eye view of the entire Columbia Valley. Back in town, as we plan our next adventure, we’ll savour a scrumptious dinner on a restaurant patio. Maybe whitewater rafting? Mountain biking? Climbing? Or skydiving? And on the May 15-17, 2015 weekend, we’ll catch the Golden Mountain Festival (see goldenfest.ca) to meet professional mountain guides and bold adventurers, including festival headliner Will Gadd, Niagara Falls climber and National Geographic Adventurer of the Year in 2014.

tourismgolden.com or experiencemountainparks.com/our-guides 18 | Enter Our Photo Contest


Experience Yoho National Park Yoho National Park 1 Yoho Visitor Centre at Field, BC

Just off the Trans-Canada Highway. Parks Canada and Travel Alberta Information Desks Open May 1 - Oct. 12 Phone: 250-343-6783. Friends of Yoho National Park Gift Shop Burgess Shale fossil displays.

2 The Town of Field

27 km (30 min) west of Lake Louise, Alberta - most services. Quaint mountain town with numerous Guesthouses and Bed & Breakfast Accommodation.

3 Spiral Tunnels Viewpoint and Kicking Horse Pass National Historic Site 8 km (5 min) east of Field. Engineering marvel constructed in 1909 for rail safety. Interpretive exhibits. Closed in winter October - April.

4 Takakkaw Falls

17 km (25 min) from Field. In the Cree language, Takakkaw means “magnificent.” One of the highest waterfalls in Canada. Walk to the base of the falls, or start a magnificent day-hike or backpacking trip on one of the nearby trails.

5 Emerald Lake

11 km (15 min) from Field. A jewel of the Canadian Rockies. A 2 hour trail circles the lake. Sweet in the summer and incredible on snow shoes in the winter. Public parking available. Shuttle service from guest parking lot to Emerald Lake Lodge. Open year-round.

6 Natural Bridge

4 km (5 min) west of Field. A natural rock bridge arches over Kicking Horse River.

7 Wapta Falls

22 km (30 min) west of Field. In the Nakoda language of the Stoney Nation, Wapta means “running water” or “river”. Trail head is 2 km drive down dirt road, off of the Trans-Canada Highway. 90-minute round trip hike to see these impressive falls.

See Campground Directory on pg 58 See legend on page 52

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Experience Golden

Let nature take its course.

touris tour ism is mgolden golden.co .com

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Experience Golden

In the Heart of Your Parks Adventure

Auberge Kicking Horse B&B

In the heart of the mountains you will find Golden. Rich in spectacular scenery, adventure, history and cultural experience. Golden is one of the most beautiful places in the world. Surrounded by six of Canada’s most stunning National Parks.

Golden Golf Club RV Park

Golden rules when it comes to planning the perfect vacation.

Wet N’ Wild Rafting Adventures Prepare to wet yourself on the Kicking Horse River!!! • Family fun for the beginner or for the experienced rafter • We provide all the necessary gear, transportation • BBQ lunch served with most trips • Change rooms with HOT showers

1-250-344-3997 www.aubergekickinghorse.com

1-866-727-7222 www.golfgolden.com

Golden Municipal Campground 1-866-538-6625 www.goldenmunicipalcampground.com

Golden Snowmobile Rentals 1-888-SLED-NOW www.goldensnowmobilerentals.com Mountain View Cabins 1-250-439-9876 www.mountainviewcabinsbc.com Tschurtschenthaler Lodge B&B 1-866-344-8184 www.tschlodge.com

Rates from $29

1-250-344-6546 www.raftgolden.ca

Heather Mountain Lodge & Cabins Come visit our classic timber-frame lodge located halfway between Golden & Revelstoke. The mountain views of Glacier National Park are spectacular and the hospitality is warm. 1-250-344-7490 www.heathermountainlodge.com

With so much hiking on offer, we have created a unique hiking map which includes trails local to Golden and Kicking Horse, as well as individual maps for Glacier and Yoho national parks. The map is free and can be viewed or ordered online at

www.TourismGolden.com/emp

Art Gallery of Golden & Gift Shop Make your visit special by browsing the Art Gallery of Golden – fine art and home-grown gifts from over 80 regional artists. Be all AGOG! 516 9th Ave. Downtown

Not all those who wander are lost.

1-250-344-6186 www.kickinghorseculture.ca

Summer Kicks

The World Comes to Play in Golden This Summer

Check our website for weekly, free evening concerts down by our covered bridge in Golden’s Spirit Square featuring festival artists from around the world. June through August. 1-250-344-6186 www.kickinghorseculture.ca

Lush Mountain Accommodations Log & timber frame vacation homes, townhomes, condos & cabins sleeping 2 to 15 guests in comfort & style. Spectacular views, BBQs and private hot tubs await you. $49-$159/person 1-888-344-8681 www.lushmountain.com

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2015 HIKING TRAIL MAP

GOLDEN . BRITISH COLUMBIA . CANADA FEATURING YOHO & GLACIER NATIONAL PARKS


Mary Vaux Walcott:

Anemone des prairies / Mary M. Vaux, Pasque flower or prairie crocus [between 1894 and 1912]. Courtesy of the White Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V653-PS-164)

Rockies, Mary M. Vaux and George Vaux Jr. with camera on Mount Fairview (overlooking Lake Louise) 1904 Aug 24. Courtesy of the White Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V653-NA-783)

Mary Vaux Walcott was a skilled wildflower artist, photographer, amateur botanist, glaciologist, and promoter of the scenic beauty of the Canadian Selkirks and Rockies. Born July 31, 1860, the only daughter of prominent Philadelphia Quakers George Vaux Sr. and his wife Sarah, she had two younger brothers, George and William. After her mother’s death in 1880, Mary assumed the role of caregiver and manager of their Philidelphia family home, their Bryn Mawr dairy farm and country home, Llysfran.

Stephen in Yoho National Park. She felt a special kinship with the Yoho Valley:

Mary’s deep attachment to the Selkirks and Rockies began in 1887. This was the first summer that overnight accommodation was available at Canadian Pacific Railway’s Glacier House, located just west of Rogers Pass. During her family’s July stay at Glacier House, Mary and her brothers photographed and mapped the spectacular Illecillewaet Glacier. On a return visit in 1894, her father and brothers noticed how extensively the Illecillewaet Glacier had receded since 1887. The die was cast: from 1897 to 1911, under the guidance of William, an engineer, the siblings created records of the movement of the Illecillewaet, Asulkan, and, in some years, Yoho and Victoria glaciers, records which are still consulted today. After 1911 only Mary visited and she maintained the records intermittently until 1923. The siblings’ pamphlet Glaciers of the Canadian Rockies and Selkirks, first issued in 1900 and updated in 1914 and 1922, was widely distributed to tourists by the CPR. Mary revelled in the outdoor life. She captured the scenery in photographs which she developed and printed, and portrayed the wildflowers in watercolour. A member of the Alpine Club of Canada since its formation in 1906, she frequently participated in its annual camps and special trips. Her “cheerfulness in putting up with the inconveniences of camp life and her readiness to give a hand wherever needed” endeared her to companions. On July 21, 1900, she became the first woman to summit Mount

. . . I feel a sense of ownership in [the Yoho Valley] being the first white woman that visited it . . . It is to me the loveliest spot to be found, and always quickens my blood when I hear and speak of it, and I can imagine no greater delight than camping there away from the tourist, and the noise of the iron horse. She promoted mountain travel through hand coloured lantern slide talks she gave in the Philadelphia area and elsewhere. Two hundred people attended her August 15, 1912, presentation to the Women’s Canadian Club of Winnipeg featuring slides of beauty spots such as Lake Louise, Moraine Lake, Lake O’Hara, Emerald Lake, Yoho Valley, and Twin Falls. In August 1907, the Vaux family met palaeontologist Charles Walcott, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, in Field, BC, during his initial research season in the Canadian Rockies. The death of Walcott’s wife Helena, in July 1911, marked a turning point in Mary’s life. By the spring of 1912 she and Charles, who was ten years her senior, were in frequent contact by letter and in person. She courageously married Charles on June 30, 1914, despite the objections of her father who expected her to care for him until his death. During the months she and Charles lived in Washington, Mary was involved in charitable work, painting, photography. She also travelled regularly to Philadelphia to visit family and attend to Quaker business. They led an active social life, often hosting dinners for foreign ambassadors and senior American politicians.

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Wildflower Aficionado

On the Great Glacier, Illecillewaet Glacier, Selkirk Mountains [1900]. Courtesy of the White Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V653-NA-180)

Lake Louise 1909 / Mary M. Vaux 1909. Courtesy of the White Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V653-PS-118)

To Mary’s delight, they travelled to the Canadian Rockies each year from 1914 to 1925 with the exception of 1915. They usually spent three to four months moving from site to site in today’s Yoho, Banff, Jasper, and Kootenay National Parks as Charles completed field work related to his studies of Cambrian geology and the Burgess Shale fossils while Mary painted wildflowers. They rarely stayed in mountain hotels; their preferred abode was a tent. Most years Mary, often accompanied by Charles, made a brief visit to Glacier House to measure glacial movement.

visited Honolulu in 1931 and 1936 and travelled to Japan in 1936 to explore gardens. She continued to lecture on gardens, wildflowers, the production of her book, and her travels. Her expertise was recognized: her presentation on wildflowers of the Canadian Rockies given in Toronto, Ontario in January 15, 1938, in the Royal Canadian Institute’s winter lecture series drew an audience of 3000. She also gave a talk on wildflowers and conservation on the CBC.

Mary began to paint at the age of 10 after receiving a box of watercolours. She began to take her painting seriously when she was asked to paint a rare alpine flower for a botanist guest at Glacier House. She and Charles resolved to publish her wildflower watercolours. As the Smithsonian lacked funds to finance the publication, Mary diligently travelled as far as New Orleans and Saint Louis to solicit subscribers willing to advance $500 for a copy of the deluxe edition. To promote the project, she gave illustrated lectures to garden and arts clubs and displayed her sketches in private galleries and at the Smithsonian. North American Wildflowers, a five volume set containing 400 of Mary’s wildflower watercolours accompanied by text identifying the flowers and telling where each specimen had been found, was published between 1925 and 1929. Mary’s passion for painting wildflowers continued - she was preparing new sketches for publication at the time of her death. After Charles’ death in February, 1927, Mary resumed her visits to the Rockies, making her last trip in 1939. In the summer of 1938, aged 78, she painted, rode the trails, and slept outside. Described as “straight, tall and graceful” with an unlined face and “bright, blue and merry eyes,” she credited the fact that she didn’t look 60 to not drinking or smoking and spending months in the open. Her travels were not limited to North America: she

While visiting friends, Dr. and Mrs. Ross near St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Mary died of a heart attack on August 22, 1940. Mount Mary Vaux in the Maligne Lake area and one of its peaks, Llysfran, named after the Vaux family home in Bryn Mawr, serve as permanent tributes to Mary and the Vaux family. By: Cheryl Sanford

Though Glacier House was pulled down in 1929, its site can be accessed from the Illecillewaet campground. Its history is presented through the story boards erected there. Two versions of North American Wildflowers reprinted under the title Wild Flowers of America are available at reasonable prices from second

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hand book sellers.


Experience Kootenay National Park To Jasper

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In 2003, lightning started a wildfire that burnt for 40 days and consumed 17,400 hectares of mixed spruce fir forest in Kootenay National Park. When the smoke cleared, the park’s landscape had changed dramatically.

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Incredible vistas, opened by the fire, continue to draw hikers and have made locating geological features much easier for paleontologists. After exploring on foot and by air, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) announced the discovery of the Marble Canyon fossil site in February, 2014.

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Locating fossils is not without its challenges. Concealed in layers of rock, they are difficult to spot. Layers of sedimentary rock that make up the Rockies were originally deposited in shallow marine waters, then transformed into stone, and eventually lifted upwards by tectonic forces. The new fossil site is named for the carbonate rocks, deposited more than 500 million years ago from the Cathedral formation.

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The Marble Canyon site is diverse, with an abundance of well preserved fossils of soft-bodied marine creatures. In the two seasons the ROM team spent working in Kootenay, they discovered many fossil species not previously known to science. According to researchers, they have only scratched the surface of a fossil find that has been so far described as the “mother lode.” Kootenay National Park’s land use manager once compared the Burgess Shale to a classic rock band—it has been around a really long time and yet it manages to keep coming up with amazing hits! Many new fossils, including the Stanleycaris and Metaspriggina, have already been identified. Back at the ROM, paleontologists will study and preserve these fossils. After a successful summer of fieldwork this story is far from over …

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Visit Burgess-Shale.rom.on.ca or register with Parks Canada at parkscanada.gc.ca/burgessshale to learn even more about Burgess Shale. Or for a guided hike contact the Burgess Shale Geoscience Foundation.

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Experience Kootenay National Park Kilometres 0 Miles 0

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Radium Hot Springs Pools 3 km From Radium; Admission fee. Mid-May to Mid-Oct: 9 am - 11 pm Winter Noon - 9 pm (10 pm Fri & Sat) Hot, relaxing pool is 40˚C (104˚F) Cool, refreshing pool is 29˚C (84˚F) Locker, swimsuit and towel rentals.

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16 km (20 min) from Radium. Stop here for exhibit & dramatic view of: The Kootenay River Valley, The Mitchell & Vermilion Ranges.

Banff (132 km from Radium)

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13 km (15 min) from Radium. Interpretive trail bordering a clear, shallow lake.

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63 km (45 min) from Radium. Located at Vermilion Crossing. Gift Shop, Cabins & Dining. Lodge Open Mid-May to Mid-Sept.

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88 km (1 hr) from Radium. Enjoy the sights and sounds of thundering glacial meltwater and the diverse vegetation resulting from the 2003 wild fire.

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85 km (1 hr) from Radium. Cold, iron-rich mineral springs bubble up through small pools, staining the earth a deep ochre.

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Kootenay National Park is on Mountain Time – 1 HR AHEAD of Pacific Time (and most of B.C.)

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Vermilion Pass, Fireweed Trail 95 km (1.2 hr) from Radium. Elevation: 1640 m. The Continental Divide is the dividing line between the Pacific and Atlantic watersheds. A 15-min interpretive trail loops through a regenerating forest.

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1.5 km from Radium. The iron-rich cliffs of the Redwall Fault provide a dramatic entrance to the park. Watch for bighorn sheep.

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1 km trail with exhibit. Learn why grasslands and open forests are so important for wildlife.

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In the village of Radium Hot Springs. Tourism Radium Information Desk OPEN YEAR ROUND 250-347-9331 Friends of Kootenay Gift Shop Parks Canada Info Desk 250-347-9505 Ktunaxa Nation culture & history exhibit.

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Kootenay National Park Wildlife Crossing Question: Why did the moose cross the road in Kootenay National Park? ........ To get to the other side—if it can. It is not easy being an animal in the mountains. To find food, connect with a mate, or rear their young, animals need to move between patches of habitat through a landscape that is pinched by rivers, rock, ice, and predators. Unlike us, wildlife live here year round. As they move between winter and summer ranges their routes often cross a busy highway. Kootenay National Park is a highway park. It was created in 1920 as part of an agreement between the federal and provincial governments to build a road across the central Rockies. But highways and animals don’t mix well. In the decade between 2002 and 2012, 500 large animals were killed and many others injured in wildlife-vehicle collisions in Kootenay National Park. These accidents also endanger people. Highways change animal behaviours and alter ecosystem health. Commonly seen animals, like deer, are attracted to roadsides that provide forage and easy travel. But wary species, such as wolves, grizzlies, and wolverines are reluctant to approach and cross roads. With time, populations can become isolated from each other and from vital habitat. How can we improve highway safety and reconnect habitats? Fortunately there is a solution. Parks Canada built 38 underpasses and six overpasses in Banff National Park from 1983 until

2013. The crossing structures work! Fences keep animals off the Trans-Canada Highway while crossing structures stitch together habitats. They are being used by all species. Wildlife-vehicle collisions have been reduced by about 80% for all species and by 96% for deer, elk, and moose. Kootenay is applying the lessons learned in Banff National Park to make Hwy #93 South safer. In 2013, three wildlife underpasses and 4.7 km of fencing were built in a high collision zone by the Dolly Varden Day Use Area. In August 2014, the Government of Canada announced an additional $9.6 million in investment for phase two of the Kootenay Wildlife Crossing Project that will support construction of at least four wildlife crossings and approximately 6.5 km of further fencing along this busy highway in 2015. Funds earmarked for this project are part of a multiyear, agency-wide investment to achieve tangible conservation outcomes while connecting Canadians to nature as part of our National Conservation Plan. Parks Canada is monitoring how animals are using the new crossing structures that will inform further mitigations and help make future highway travel safer for all animals— including humans. This spring, a new exhibit about crossing structures will be installed inside the pedestrian underpass at the Radium Hot Springs pools. Follow the walking animal silhouettes under the highway to learn how moose, wolves, bear, and other species are crossing the Kootenay valley in safety. Updates on the Wildlife Crossing Project in Kootenay National Park will be posted on the website: parkscanada.gc.ca/hwy93s

Occasionally, an animal gets into the highway right-of-way. To allow it to escape, gaps have been left in the fence with jump outs.

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Biking in the Mountain Parks

Photos Courtesy of Tourism Golden/Dave Best Photos Courtesy of Tourism Golden/Dave Best

Photos Courtesy of Huge Photography

Photos Courtesy of Tourism Golden/Dave Best

For more than a decade, cycling has been gaining popularity in Canada as people seek a low impact way to improve their health while reducing their carbon footprint. In 2014, Calgary implemented a new pilot project to provide more and safer cycling corridors within the downtown and across the city. That same year, the Rocky Mountain Legacy Trail was completed connecting Canmore to Banff. This multi-use paved path has become very popular with young and old alike as a great way to experience the mountain parks in an environmentally friendly way. For six days in September, 15 professional cycling teams race through Alberta as they compete in the annual Tour of Alberta. It is a road race that rolls rolling across the prairies and through the foothills and mountains. Many other communities within and near the mountain parks have built and maintain bike trails. Hinton and area is a bike enthusiast’s dream with 100 km of backcountry trails at their Bike Park. And whether you are in the mood for a scenic cruise, a grueling climb, or some downhill adrenaline, you will find your trail in Kimberley, BC.

In July 2014 Golden, BC hosted two legs of the Transrockies Singletrack 6 race. 315 athletes from 18 countries took part in this event that included stops in Revelstoke, Nipika, Invermere and Bragg Creek (Alberta). With over 100 km of single track cross country trails, Golden wholeheartedly welcomes the mountain biking culture. There is something for everyone from easy-to-ride smooth flowing trails to gnarly downhill. After a cushy gondola ride up, get ready for an epic 10 km long downhill at Kicking Horse Mountain Resort. While Mount 7, is one of the most challenging downhill systems in Canada. It was host to Psychosis, an event which evolved into the steepest, longest and fastest downhill mountain bike race in the world. Thinking of a unique mountain wedding (see pg 16)? Lisa and Mark Ewan are two mountain biking enthusiasts who live in Calgary but got married in Golden on the top of Mount 7. After a very cute ceremony, two dozen attendees, including the bride and groom, hopped on their trusty bicycles and rode 1200 vertical meters down the mountain! Everyone had a great ride which was followed by a reception at Beaverfoot Lodge.

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Stand Up Paddleboarding

Moraine Lake

Stand up Paddleboarding (SUP) is one of the most popular water sports across the world today, and what better place to try it for the first time than on one of Alberta’s beautiful mountain lakes? Paddlers can glide across tranquil waters with loons calling in the background at sunrise, or catch some easy waves while riding the Bow River from Banff to Canmore. For more of an adventure, try the newest craze to hit the Canadian Rockies. Rent an inflatable board and go SUP Hiking to pristine backcountry lakes. Getting Started – Where to Rent and Get Outfitted Before you jump on your first lake, you’ll need to equip yourself with a board, paddle, and personal floatation device (pfd). A rental package will also usually include an ankle leash, and should include other safety gear such as a whistle and a rescue throw bag which are both required by all paddlers in Canada. There aren’t many lakeside rental companies operating in the Rockies so you may want to rent a board in Calgary, Canmore, or Banff and transport it to your destination. Inflatable boards are the easiest to transport, and the Banff Canoe Club rents them out by the day with a pump and all required gear. Kananaskis Outfitters rents boards on weekends at the Barrier Lake Day Use Area in Kananaskis. Nervous to try SUP for the first time without a lesson? Bow Valley SUP, operating out of the Banff and Canmore area, can get you set up with a lesson, rental, and guided first trip. They also offer family-friendly trips and a rental service for those wanting to head out alone. Top 10 Lakes to SUP Across the Canadian Rockies 1. Vermillion Lakes, Banff—These three lakes are located right next to the Banff townsite and provide great opportunities for wildlife viewing. Mt. Rundle provides a stunning backdrop

and the water is usually calm for novice paddlers. There are docks located along Vermillion Lakes Drive at each lake and parking can be found along the side of the road. The first lake can also be reached from the Banff Canoe Club docks in town by paddling up Echo Creek. This trip offers beginners a chance to try moving water with a small current that can be paddled both up and downstream. 2. Two Jack Lake and Johnson Lake, Banff—These two lakes are located just outside the town of Banff on Lake Minnewanka Loop Road. Lake Minnewanka is a great place to paddle, however wind and big waves make it much more dangerous than the smaller Two Jack and Johnson Lakes. Both lakes have day use parking with beach areas for families. 3. Lake Louise and Moraine Lake, Banff—These iconic Banff lakes should be on every paddler’s bucket list. Views don’t get better than from Lake Louise with Mt. Victoria as your backdrop, or from Moraine Lake circled by the 10 classic peaks that were once featured on the Canadian 20 dollar bill. 4. Bow Lake, Banff—This lake is the crown jewel for paddlers travelling along the famous Icefields Parkway. (see pg 50) It’s also one of the hardest lakes to tackle by SUP because of the strong winds that frequent the area. If you are travelling the Icefields Parkway with a board and it’s a calm day, consider it your lucky day, seize the chance to paddle this magnificent lake! For an added adventure, paddle to the far end of Bow Lake and then proceed on foot to the beautiful Bow Falls. Just remember to bring along a pair of dry shoes. 5. Cameron Lake, Waterton Lakes National Park—While the 3 Waterton Lakes see heavy wind and large waves, Cameron Lake is smaller, calmer, and perfect for novice paddlers.

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Touring Across the Canadian Rockies 6. Middle and Upper Waterton Lakes—If you are experienced on a board, you’ll want to take the time to try the paddle from Middle Waterton Lake to Upper Waterton Lake through the Bosporus. If you pay attention to the wind, you can also do the paddle one-way as an incredible down winder that just might be the highlight of your trip to the Rockies. There are many docks and day use areas available for launching, and you can set up a shuttle with the help of a bicycle using the Kootenai Brown Bike Trail. 7. Pyramid and Patricia Lakes, Jasper—If you are visiting Jasper National Park, these are the two lakes you are going to want to SUP for calm water, stunning reflections, and the chance to paddle with loons at sunrise. Both lakes are located on the Pyramid Bench, within close proximity, and the two paddles can be broken up with breakfast or lunch at the Pyramid Lake Resort. Unfortunately, there are no SUP rentals in the Jasper area at this time.

10. Lower and Upper Kananaskis Lakes—If you want to go for a paddle in Kananaskis and have some experience under your belt, try either the Lower or Upper Kananaskis Lake in Peter Lougheed Provincial Park. The Upper Lake has several small islands that make the perfect spot for a picnic lunch and the Lower Lake has multiple day use areas if you want to set up a oneway shuttle in advance. For a real adventure, reserve a campsite at the Point Backcountry Campground on Upper Kananaskis Lake and try your first SUP backpacking trip. Recruit some friends in a canoe for the outing and you won’t have to worry about how to transport your gear! Special Caution when SUP Paddling in the Canadian Rockies Our lakes are glacier fed, and beginners will want to choose a warm day with little to no wind when heading out for a paddle on larger lakes. Falling off your board would not be a pleasant experience, and beginners may even want to consider renting a wetsuit for these paddles.

8. Emerald Lake, Yoho National Park—Emerald Lake is named for the color of the water that practically glows beneath you as you stand on a board. If you are fortunate, you can even stay overnight at the Emerald Lake Lodge and get out on the water at sunrise and sunset for a rare chance to be alone on this popular lake. While you can rent canoes onsite, there are no SUP rentals in the area.

If you are at all nervous about your SUP ability, stay close to shore and test your balance before paddling to the far end of a lake. You may even want to consider paddling next to friends or family members in a canoe or kayak in case you fall in and have problems getting back on your board. Many lakes offer canoe and kayak rentals onsite including Lake Louise, Moraine Lake, Pyramid Lake, and Cameron Lake.

9. Barrier Lake, Kananaskis Country—Barrier Lake is a good lake for novice paddlers and is one of the closer mountain lakes to Calgary if you want to take a day trip from the city. Kananaskis Outfitters rents boards lakeside at the Barrier Lake Day Use Area on summer weekends, making this one of the easiest spots to try your first paddle.

See you on the water this summer! Banff Canoe Club - banffcanoeclub.com Bow Valley SUP - bowvalleysup.ca Kananaskis Outfitters - kananaskisoutfitters.com

Upper Kananaskis Lake Photo Courtesy of Tanya Koob

By: Tanya Koob

Lake Louise

29 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


Experience Radium Hot Springs The charming Mountain Village of Radium Hot Springs greets you with the promise that “The Mountains Shall Bring Peace To The People” as you emerge from Kootenay National Park through the sheer cliff walls of the Sinclair Canyon only moments after passing the world famous Radium Hot Springs Mineral Pools along Highway 93.

to golf, you’ll love our two world-class golf courses. There are plenty of fresh water back country lakes for you to explore or take in a guided fishing tour with Reel Axe Adventures. Nearby you’ll find white water rafting, hiking and walking trails, climbing, trail rides, mountain biking and Radium’s own Pump and Jump Track.

The sweeping vistas of snow-dusted mountains, the Columbia Wetlands (the largest, continuous wetlands in North America), and the mighty Columbia River flowing right past the edge of the village make for a spectacular setting for any adventure. The Village of Radium Hot Springs has scenery unparalleled to anywhere else.

Those visiting in the winter can enjoy free outdoor skating at Legends Field, nearby snowmobiling, snowshoeing, groomed cross country skiing at Nipika Mountain Resort, and two neighbouring ski resorts: Panorama Mountain Resort and Fairmont Hot Springs Resort.

While visiting relax in the world famous Radium Hot Springs Mineral In summer, camp in one of our three convenient village campgrounds. Pools, dine in one of our many fine restaurants, enjoy a massage at one Enjoy our community parks and outdoor fitness equipment. If you like of our local spas, and stay with one of our many accommodators.

However you define peace; you’ll find it here in Radium Hot Springs.

T H E O R I G I N A L S S I N C E 1976

NATURALLY WILD Save

10% on your trip

Experience Rocky Mountain whitewater.

With three rivers to choose from, the Rockies have adventure for the first-timer and the seasoned veteran.

Call or book online: www.raftingtherockies.com

1.800.599.4399

• Luxury Log Cabins • Guided Alpine Day Hikes • Wetland Paddling • Birding Tours • Whitewater Rafting

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Simply Spectacular... Spectacularly Simple. MOUNTAIN RESORT

For more information: local 1-250-342-6516 toll free 1-877-647-4525

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Experience Radium Hot Springs

Roughing It, Redefined! Charming and exceptionally comfortable 1 to 8 bedroom vacation home rentals nestled in the picturesque mountains surrounding Radium Hot Springs, Lake Windermere and Panorama, BC

1.888.711.ESCAPE(3722) www.cobblestonecreek.ca

See map keys on pg 25 See legend on page 52

Restaurant ant & Lounge High Season: Lunch, 11:30am-4pm; Dinner, open 5pm Daily

. Fresh Food..

Austrian & Continental Cuisine Schnitzel, Steak, Seafood, Homemade Pasta & Desserts

Hwy 93 93, Radium Hot Sp Springs, ings BC

Private Functions for or Groups Daily lly 3 Course Dinner Special Reservations recommended www.OldSalzburgRestaurant.com .OldSalzbu Restau R ant.com (250) 347-6553

WISH U WERE HERE ÉTAIS SI SEULEMENT TU Y

Windermere Creek Bed & Breakfast Cabins

Open daily, year-round Ouvert tous les jours, toute l’année 1-800-767-1611

• 107 forested acres • Private secluded log cabins with kitchens and jacuzzis • Creekside hammocks and picnic areas, hours of trails • $109 - $159 +tax/couple includes breakfast

1-800-946-3942

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www.WindermereCreek.com

18 km south of Kootenay National Park - Windermere, BC


A Girls Getaway There may not be a science to putting together the perfect girls weekend, but there is definitely an art! And the ideal getaway for a group of friends looking to relax, recharge, and indulge can be found in the beautiful Windermere valley. This striking location, ringed by mountains and centering on a serene lake, is peaceful and relaxing, the pace of life iscalmer, and there is a feeling that you can take things slower, breathe deeper, and soak it all in. If soaking it all in involves great food and drink, unique shopping, and the chance to take in some local colour, so much the better!

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A Girls Getaway

Here are some “can’t go wrong” recommendations for a memorable weekend getaway in the Windermere Valley: Kicking Horse Café

The location, the food, the people, and the atmosphere of the Kicking Horse Café can not be matched. But most of all, it’s all about the coffee! I dare you to find better anywhere. Located on the road into Invermere, next to Kicking Horse Coffee’s 60,000 square foot production facility, this friendly café feels like the center of town with a steady stream of locals and tourists finding their way through the front doors (do not be daunted by a long lineup—it’s worth the wait!). Samosas, baked treats, sandwiches, and soups are all on the menu, and fresh sushi is brought in daily from local favourite Fubuki. Grab a quick hit of caffeine or, better yet, settle in on the sunny patio, indulge in some delicious food and drink, and watch the world go by.

Bavin Glassworks

The vibrant artistic community of the Columbia Valley is well represented at this family owned gallery. It is located on Athalmer Road on the way into Invermere. Beautiful glass art and jewelry is on offer from a number of local artists, as well as unique metal and clay pieces. You may be lucky enough to stumble across a glass blowing demonstration in the “hot box,” typically taking place in the spring and fall.

Invermere Farmer’s Market

This superb farmer’s market is open on summer Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm on 12th Avenue and 6th Street in downtown Invermere. You’ll want to arrive early, bring plenty of shopping bags, and allow a few hours to take it all in. The market includes more than 50 vendors of everything from ceramics, jewelry, photography, and woodworking, to prepared foods, fresh baking, and of course a wide variety of outstanding local produce. Whether you’re looking for some tasty snacks for the weekend, or to put together a gourmet meal, this market has you covered.

The Painted Porch

If you’ve ever looked at a beautifully painted antique shelf, dresser, or even simple wooden crate and thought “I wish I could do that,” this is your place! The Painted Porch is full of gorgeous shelves, signs, stools, and other furnishings to buy for your home or admire for inspiration. Even better, they offer painting workshops so you can learn to make your own unique pieces. This local treasure moved to a new location on 6th Street in downtown Invermere early in 2015, and is open Thursdays-Sundays, 10 am-4 pm.

Eagle Ranch Resort In a picturesque region filled with beautiful scenery and

great restaurants, the Eagle Ranch Resort stands out. The view from their clubhouse patio is out of this world, with an impressive vista of the surrounding mountains and sparkling Lake Windermere. It’s the perfect setting for lunch, cocktails, snacks, or a multi-course dinner in the Rustica steak house. The food is delicious, the service is warm and inviting, and you’ll be planning your next visit before you’ve even left.

The White House A girl’s weekend tradition, is not all about the shopping and eating (although it may be all about the beverages!). So visit a local Windermere watering hole like The White House. Brought to the area in 1900 as one of the original family homes in town, the White House later operated as a hotel before being converted to a beer parlour in the 1940s. Today it still stands as a place where everyone may not know your name, but all are welcome. I love a joint where you may be one of only a dozen people sipping a drink, chatting, or perhaps there is a packed house complete with a live band and bouncer. This is your opportunity for some local colour and a spontaneous experience. And face it, any pub with a good old fashioned jukebox is a must! By: Kris MacDougall

33 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park

Tucked away in the very southwest corner of Alberta, prairie and lofty mountains meet in an unusual combination of habitats unique in Canadian National Parks. Rare wildflower species are abundant. Wildlife watching is easy. Waterton has an interesting geologic history. Water sculpts the land with abundant lakes, streams and waterfalls. The Lewis Overthrust continues to expose ancient sedimentary rock. The climate adds to the drama. Whether you are a back-country enthusiast, or someone who’d rather curl up with a good book, come bask in the natural glory of Waterton’s majestic landscape. For more than 10,000 years, travellers have made their way to this special place. Over 300 archaeological sites reveal the activities of the first people. European explorers and settlers also left their mark. In 1858, Lt. Thomas Blakiston, a member of the famous Palliser Expedition, was one of the area’s earliest explorers. He bestowed its name in honour of the 19th century naturalist Charles Waterton. In 1895, Waterton was protected thanks to the efforts of local ranchers including Fredrick Godsal. John George “Kootenai” Brown, a wilderness trapper, became the first settler in the area and the first park superintendent in 1911.

Around the turn of the 20th century, the discovery of oil in the Park led to the drilling of Western Canada’s first producing oil well. The discovery also contributed to the establishment of the Waterton community in 1910. In 1927, the Prince of Wales Hotel was built and has become one of the most photographed landmarks in Canada. Both the Prince of Wales Hotel and Oil City are designated national historic sites. Here, nature knows no politica1 boundary. Waterton shares an important border and many natural processes with adjacent Glacier National Park, Montana. Hence, in 1932, Waterton and Glacier parks together, were designated as the world’s first International Peace Park. The Peace Park concept was spawned by Rotary Clubs in Montana and Alberta to commemorate the long friendship between the United States and Canada. The concept has evolved over time and now ecosystem management is an important consideration. However, the fundamental agreement remains the same, communicating the concept of peace and friendship. Waterton Glacier International Peace Park was the first of hundreds of peace parks globally. The United Nations recognizes it as an UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and bestowed it with the prestigious World Heritage Site designation.

Frommer’s 2009 guide describes Waterton as the least well travelled of Canada’s Rocky Mountain Parks, but “quite possibly the most spectacular”. “Waterton is positively other worldly, with its abrupt shift from prairie to mountain terrain, as well as its icy-blue lake that fills an ancient gully surrounded by mountains and glaciers,” reads the report from Frommer. 34 | Enter Our Photo Contest


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park See Campground Directory on pg 58 See legend on page 52

1 Visitor Information:

Canada’s National Parks Service: pc.gc.ca/waterton Manned information centre Mid-May to October. Year-round mywaterton.ca

Book online at Waterton.ca

Waterton Lakes National Park

2 Watertown Town Site:

Visitor services and attractions. Seasonal museum and bookstore operated by the Waterton Natural History Association.

3 Red Rock Canyon:

30 minute drive along Red Rock Parkway. Layers of red and green coloured minerals offer a brilliant contrast to lush surroundings. Self-guided walks and exhibits detail human history & geology. (open seasonally)

4 The First Oil Well in Western

Canada National Historic Site

The site of Western Canada’s first producing oil well (1901-1906). On-site exhibit and picnic area.

5 Cameron Lake:

30 minute drive. Rent a paddle boat or canoe at this glacier-formed sub-alpine lake. Winter cross-country ski area

Waterton’s Only Lakefront Hotel Lakefront Rooms • Serenity Spa • Glacier Bistro Thirsty Bear Saloon • Fireside Lounge • Lakeside Chophouse Honeymoon Suites with Jacuzzi Tubs 1.888.527.9555 | www.bayshoreinn.com

Waterton’S All-Suite Hotel Fireplace & Jacuzzi in every suite • Open year round Deluxe, Romantic and Loft Suites • Full Amenities 1.866.621.3330 | www.watertonsuites.com

35 | Vote for your Favorite Photo


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park Summer Events

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Waterton Wildflower Festival June 19 - 27, 2015 Join in a variety of activities celebrating Waterton’s wildflowers. Visit watertonwildflowers.com

Blackfoot Arts & Heritage Festival August 11 - 13, 2015

Participate in traditional and contemporary aboriginal dancing, music, art, and cuisine.

Waterton Wildlife Festival September 18 - 20, 2015

Waterton’s wildlife is at its best in the fall. This weekend features a variety of wildlife events. Visit watertonwildlife.com for more information.

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CAMERON BAY

See legend on page 52


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park Waterton is an international tourism destination with over 400,000 visitors annually. The tiny Waterton community (pop. 100) greet all who come with the spirit of the Peace Park. Peace Park businesses carry Peace Park values. The community is steeped in the essence of place and a sense of friendship pervades. Most businesses here are family-based. For more information mywaterton.ca

Cruise

Watert n Lake

Canada to Goat Haunt USA

See & Cross the International Border to Goat Haunt, MT. Informative, entertaining & personalized commentary by local tour guides

Cameron Lake 1.6 km

Trailhead - At the end of the Akamina Parkway, 15.7 km from its junction with Highway 5 This outing takes you into the extreme southwest corner of Alberta - a place where three parks, two provinces, and two countries meet. The trail follows

View spectacular mountain scenery & wildlife scene Water shuttle to remote hiking trailheads including: Crypt Lake and Vimy Peak cruise.info@watertoncruise.com 403-859-2362 www.watertoncruise.com

Watert n Sh reline Cruise C .

Cross Borders. Create Memories. Cruise Waterton.

the west shore of Cameron Lake through a true snow forest - this area receives the most snowfall in Alberta. Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir are the common trees. The undergrowth features many wildflowers that prefer cool, damp habitat. The ridgecrest to the west separates Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta, from Akamina-Kishinena Provincial Park in B.C. The boundary between Canada and the U.S.A. cuts across the southern end of Cameron Lake.

Your next

big adventure awaits

Mt. Custer (2707 m), centrepiece in the view, is entirely within Glacier National Park, U.S.A. The peak was not named for the famous general, but for a surveyor. If you would like to

IN WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK

explore more nearby, visit Akamina Lake (500 m) on a trail that begins at the east side of the parking lot.

FOR RESERVATIONS PLEASE CALL 1.888.985.6343

37 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides

•

EXPERIENCEWATERTON.COM


Experience Southern Alberta

Millions of Secrets. What will you dig up? Canadian Badlands Circle Tour

Secrets in the Badlands Day 1

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology Atlas Coal Mine National Historic Site

Day 2

Dinosaur Provincial Park-UNESCO Heritage Site • Hike in the Badlands and Tour Interpretive Centre Brooks Aqueduct Centre-National Historic Site

Day 3

Fort Whoop-Up National Historic Site Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park

Walk through the deep sculptured river valleys of the Canadian Badlands where dinosaurs once roamed. Journey through time and meet them face to face in nine dynamically displayed ever-evolving galleries. Unearth fossils in a realistic quarry or make your own fossil replicas. Experience the iconic pottery and beehive kilns, set against the dramatic clay cliffs of the South Saskatchewan River. Visit our historic sites and hear true tales of mines and men. Relive ghost stories about an industrial site gone bad! This is the Badlands, come hear our story and while you’re at it, create your own.

Day 4

Photo: Canadian Badlands

Fort Calgary National Historic Site Lougheed House National Historic Site Free attraction passes when you book with Canalta Hotels.

Receive free admission passes when you book with Canalta hotels in: Pincher Creek • High River • Brooks • Drumheller 38 | Enter Our Photo Contest

TourSouthernAlberta.com


Experience Southern Alberta

Create your own story...

Discover our other self guided tours! TourSouthernAlberta.com eum

rell Mus

Royal Ty

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Fort W h

Buffalo Jump Head-Smashed-In

CANADA U.S.A.

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CANADA U.S.A.

Receive free admission passes when you book with Canalta hotels in: Pincher Creek • High River • Brooks • Drumheller 39 | Vote for your Favorite Photo

TourSouthernAlberta.com


Experience Southern Alberta

Secrets of the Crown

Day 1

Head-Smashed-in UNESCO Heritage Site Fort Museum of Northwest Mounted Police and First Nation Interpretive Centre

It’s raw, It’s magical. It’s the real west.

Day 2

Waterton Lakes National Park UNESCO Heritage Site • Boat Cruise • Hike in the Rockies • Horseback riding

Day 3

Remington Carriage Museum Galt Museum and Archives Fort Whoop-Up National Historic Site

Day 4

Crown of the Continent Circle Tour

Hear the stories of early settlement, where horse-drawn vehicles and steam engines carried people and cargo across the prairies. Learn how the ancient plains people hunted buffalo for their survival. Visit historic sites where North West Mounted Police confronted whiskey traders and brought law and order to the west. Let your jaw drop while drinking in the magical beauty of the Rocky Mountains. Join in authentic, raw experiences that will leave you breathless. This is real western living. Come uncover our roots and you may just find a piece of yourself that’s always been missing.

Frank Slide Interpretive Centre Bar U Ranch National Historic Site Heritage Park Historic Village

Photo: Waterton Lakes National Park

Free attraction passes when you book with Canalta Hotels.

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Experience Banff National Park Banff National Park (BNP) runs northwesterly from Canmore to the Icefields Parkway. It is the birthplace of Canada’s national park system. Established in 1885, after three railway workers discovered a cave containing hot springs, BNP has become a worldclass destination, hosting an estimated 4 million visitors each year. Our map on pg 44 details eight of the many popular attractions in the park and also provides you with the locations of the campgrounds. The international airports in Calgary and Edmonton serve travellers flying into the region. Buses run to BNP year round, from each of these large urban centres. Both Via Rail and Rocky Mountaineer Vacations operate rail passenger sightseeing trips in western Canada, with stops in Banff and Jasper from May to October. Within BNP are two important communities: the Town of Banff and the Village of Lake Louise. Both are located along the Trans-Canada Highway. They’re small, so it’s easy to get around either town without your vehicle. That’s great because parking is at a premium and some lots cannot accommodate large vehicles such as RVs. Street parking and municipal lots are free, but have time restrictions. “Roam” is the name of the local public transit system. It provides safe, affordable and environmentallyfriendly bus service throughout the Banff town site. You’ll find our map of the Town of Banff on pg 46, along with 15 map keys starting on pg 45, to ensure you have a magical time. If the weather is pleasant, you’ll want to be outdoors to breathe the clean alpine air. Check out the Legacy Trail. It runs 26 km along the highway right-of way from Banff to Canmore. It is a paved, recreational trail suitable for walking, jogging, bicycling, and in-line skating. Should you ride your bike, the trip from Banff to Canmore is downhill and usually with the wind so it takes less time than the return trip. The Legacy Trail is part of the Trans-Canada Trail, which winds its way through every province and territory linking close to 1,000 communities. If the weather turns, head indoors to learn about the art, culture, and history of the Canadian Rockies. The Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies is an exciting place to explore. Founders Peter and Catharine Whyte were philanthropists and artists, so if you like art, “The Whyte” should be on your bucket list. For more information, see Chic Scott’s feature story on pg 16 of our 2013 edition which you can view on your mobile device at dig.cmipublishing.ca/i/143417. The Village of Lake Louise is located 45 min west of Banff. The mountains that surround it are internationally renowned for their beauty, but don’t just look because Lake Louise is the Hiking Capital of Canada. In the summer, go for a physically demanding day of climbing, a simple stroll around the lake, or be whisked away in a gondola to the top of the world. In the winter, that same gondola will take you to a skier’s paradise, while the lake is a hub for ice sculptures and sleigh rides. You’ll find our map of the Lake Louise on pg 47 along with important map keys and a valuable coupon for the gondola! 41 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides

Planning a Mountain Wedding See pg 16

Photo courtesy of Allen Maudie


WWI Internment Camps in the Mountain Parks

useum of the Whyte M astle. Courtesy 5/LC-77) 29 (V ies On Sentry at C ck Ro n of the Canadia

Back to Camp. Courtesy of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V295/LC-36)

As Canada went to war in August 1914, unwelcome foreigners were turned overnight into enemy aliens. While Germans were generally favoured new citizens before the war, there had always been doubts about the “suitability” of immigrants from the AustroHungarian Empire, in particular Ukrainians, and their ability to assimilate to the British-Canadian way of life. Oxford graduate Elizabeth Mitchell sensed this unease when she toured the prairies in 1913 and asked in her book In Western Canada Before the War: “Can Canada ... afford to base herself on an ignorant, non-English-speaking peasantry, winning a bare living by unceasing labour?” Any toleration of these “pauper” immigrants was soon overridden by the war and suspicions about their loyalty. Those who had been worried that Ukrainians would drag down the Canadian society and destroy forever the British character of the country now used the war as the justification to do something about them. The Robert Borden Conservative government initially called for public restraint in dealing with enemy aliens and resisted implementing any restrictive measures. In fact, Royal Northwest Mounted Police surveillance reports found that Canadians had absolutely nothing to fear. Such assurances did little to ease public hysteria. Many of these men, in most cases recent immigrants, had been laid off from the

railways and construction projects during the pre-war recession and drifted into towns and cities in search of work and relief. They were soon joined by hundreds more who had been fired from their jobs for patriotic reasons. The presence of these destitute men in such large numbers alarmed the public and made the need for action all the more imperative. Arthur Meighen, one of Borden’s ablest ministers and a future Canadian prime minister, bluntly summed up the problem: “they were out of work and in that state were a menace to the community.” Ottawa consequently responded quickly in October 1914 with an enemy alien registration and internment policy proclaimed under the provisions of the new War Measures Act. Ukrainians and Germans living in cities or within their immediate vicinity were required by law to register and report monthly. Those in rural in Canada were deliberately excluded because they were not regarded as a problem, real or potential. Within weeks of the cabinet order, as one of the first acts of a new interventionist state, several hundred unemployed workers were detained by local registrars or rounded up by the police and sent to work camps. Eventually over 8,000 individuals, including a handful of women and children, would be held in some two dozen stations across the country, including four national parks.


In implementing its internment policy, the federal government made a clear distinction between enemy aliens from Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It regarded German nationals as a genuine security threat and tried to ensure that they were separately confined in jail-like settings. Otherwise, most German immigrants who became naturalized Canadians were generally left alone, if not shunned. Ukrainians, on the other hand, not only constituted the majority of the internees, but were treated differently. These men had tackled heavy, manual jobs under primitive, at times appalling, conditions for resource industries and the railways before the war. And it made perfect sense, from the Borden government’s point of view, to call upon them to perform the same kind of demanding work during their detention. The majority of internees were stationed at Banff National Park, alternating between a summer site near Castle Mountain and winter facilities at the Cave and Basin pool in the town site, while constructing a new road to Lake Louise. The Jasper internees devoted their energies to building a road to Maligne Lake. Similar work was performed at Mount Revelstoke, only this time up the side of the mountain. With the approach of winter, the men were transferred to Yoho, where they worked on a new highway and a bridge to the Kicking Horse River. The remains of that camp still exist today; it was simply left to decay. By the end of the first season, parks officials found the work to be satisfactory but complained about the slow progress and the almost constant supervision that the men required. One must wonders, though, what more could have been accomplished with only hand tools and wheelbarrows. The internees were also desperately unhappy. Not only did the men bitterly resent their captivity–many could not understand

why they were being treated effectively as traitors - but they recoiled at the forced labour under difficult conditions. Some quietly waited for the right moment to escape even though guards were under orders to shoot. Release, if it could be called that, came in 1916 when Canadian military commitments overseas translated into a serious labour shortage at home. The government reasoned that the interned aliens might as well fill wartime vacancies on the understanding that they had to accept their job placement and report regularly to the local police office. Beginning in April 1916, prisoners began to be discharged to various companies. The men at Yoho, in the meantime, decided to speed up their release. Using a shovel and cutlery from the mess, they started to dig their way to freedom. By the time their burrowing activity was discovered, the tunnel reached beyond the stockade wall and was only eight feet from the bush. The Jasper and Yoho camps closed in the fall of 1916. The Banff operations came to an end the following summer. The Dominion Parks Service regarded the internment camp experience as something of a mixed blessing. Parks officials had expected great things from the internees and were disappointed by what had been achieved. At the same time, Commissioner J.B. Harkin had to admit that the men had tackled jobs that would have been otherwise impossible during the war. There was a sadly ironic aspect to park internment operations. Throughout the war, Harkin was forever extolling the virtues of the national park system and how these special places would provide much-needed sanctuary when the guns fell silent. But in making the wonders of Banff, Jasper, Mount Revelstoke, and Yoho more accessible, the internees had known only exhaustion, suffering and desolation. The Canadian Ukrainian community would be forever scarred by its wartime treatment. Bill Waiser

Prisoners from Banff to Castle. Courtesy of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V295/LC-19)

25 Degrees Under Rundle. Courtesy of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V295/LC-35)


Experience Banff National Park Town of Jasper, JASPER NATIONAL PARK (233 km from Lake Louise)

See Campground Directory on pg 58 Kilometres 0 Miles 0

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44 | View our Mobile Editions

Calgary (128 km from Banff)

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Distance (km) from Banff/Lake Louise 3/49 Backswamp 6/46 Mule Shoe 8/44 Prescribed Burn 11/41 Sawback 13/39 Hillsdale 16/36 Pilot Pond 21/31 Moose Meadow 26/26 Castle Cliffs 28/24 Storm Mountain 40/12 Baker Creek 48/4 Morant’s Curve

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Stop at roadside viewpoints and interpretive exhibits along this scenic road between Banff and Lake Louise.

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Experience Banff National Park Banff National Park Map Keys

Banff Townsite Map Keys

See map page 44

See map page 46

2 Johnston Canyon

1 Parks Canada Visitor Centre

25 km (30 min) from Banff Exciting cat-walks cling to the canyon walls. Interpretive Display, 1.1 km (20 min) to the Lower Falls, 2.7 km (1 hr) to the Upper Falls. Stay on the trail and away from the edge.

Banff Lake Louise Tourism: 403-762-1550

2 Cave & Basin National Historic Site

The birthplace of Canada’s national park system.

3 Banff Park Museum National Historic Site

3 The Village of Lake Louise - Most Services

Parks Canada Visitor Centre by Samson Mall. Ride the Gondola mid-May to mid-Oct. “The Hiking Capital of Canada” is central to the best high elevation hiking in the Canadian Rockies including the Plain of Six Glaciers, and in adjacent in Yoho National Park, the famous Iceline Trail.

Along the Icefields Parkway Hwy 93

91 Banff Ave (by the Bow River Bridge) Discover Banff’s wildlife 403-762-1558

The Cascades of Time Garden

sh Red Paintbru

- Courtesy of

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Jerre Paquet

Bow Falls & Banff Springs Hotel National Historic Site

Named for the series of glaciers lining this route, the parkway is one of the world’s great mountain highroads. This drive along the “backbone of the continent” from Lake Louise to the town of Jasper takes half a day, with time to stop and admire the views. Stock up on camera supplies.

Magnificent views from either side of the Bow River.

Upper Hot Springs Pool

For details turn to p. 50 & 51

4 Crowfoot Glacier

34 km (25 min) from Lake Louise A century ago, there were three “toes” of ice here. How many can you see today?

Bighorn Sheep - Court

esy of Joey Olivieri

Banff Gondola & Sulphur Mountain

40 km (30 min) from Lake Louise - Interpretive Display 2088 m (6849’) above sea level. A short walk from the parking area leads to a view of brilliant turquoise Peyto Lake and, in July and August, an astonishing array of alpine flowers.

Buffalo Nations Luxton Museum

6 Mistaya Canyon

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7 Saskatchewan Crossing

403-762-2388 1 Birch Avenue. Aboriginal history, displays, live performances and demonstrations. Operated by several First Nations including the Cree, the Blackfoot Confederacy, Tsuu T’ina and the Stoney. buffalonationsmuseum.ca.

Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

403-762-2291 111 Bear Street. Brings mountain history, art and culture alive. Special learning programs for young children. whyte.org.

77 km (55 min) from Lake Louise - Interpretive Display Three rivers converge here: the Mistaya (Great Bear) River from the south, the Howse River from the west (the route used in 1807 by David Thompson to cross the Great Divide), the North Saskatchewan from the north - arising in the Columbia Icefield and emptying into Lake Winnipeg. Services available April - October.

Vermilion Lakes

The turnoff is 1 km west of Banff, on the south side of the Trans-Canada Highway. Enjoy a nature stroll through these wetlands.

Cascade Ponds (Minnewanka Loop)

8 Columbia Icefield and Info Centre

130 km (1.5 hrs) from Lake Louise 90 min Motorized Tours take you onto the glacier. Glacier Exhibits illustrate the effects of global warming. Restaurant, picnics, rooms, guided ice walks and more. Most Services available May 1 - Oct 15.

1-800-767-1611 Mountain Avenue. Heritage Bath House Locker, swimsuit and towel rentals. Café, Day Spa 403-760-2500, and Gift Shop. Open year-round. Summer 9 am - 11 pm.

1-800-760-6934 Mountain Avenue. Open year-round. Take the Gondola to the summit for breathtaking views. 20 min stroll along an interpretive boardwalk to historic exhibit.

5 Bow Summit and Peyto Lake Viewpoint

72 km (50 min) from Lake Louise Only 10 min by trail from the road. Look for rounded potholes and a natural arch on the canyon walls.

Flower gardens with walking path behind the Banff Park Administration Building. Great for families: FREE ADMISSION. Open Daily.

10 min - A favourite with locals and visitors alike. Grassy meadows, clear shallow pools, and a small beach. Picnic areas with fire pits. Accessible on foot and bicycle via Banff Legacy Trail. Bear Cubs - Courtesy of Joey

Olivieri

45 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


Experience Banff National Park 13

LAKE MINNEWANKA

NOT TO SCALE CASCADE FIRE ROAD

Banff Townsite Map Keys

Upper Bankhead

20 min - An easy trail circles this shallow lake. A small beach and good wildlife watching. Picnic tables.

Cascade Ponds

The Hoodoos (Tunnel Mountain Road)

Lake Minnewanka

A short interpretive trail leads to this superb view point, or book a rafting trip to view the Hoodoos from the Bow River.

(Lake of the Water Spirits) Boat tours available, May 14 - Oct. 10. 800-760-6934 Leisurely lakeside stroll to Stewart Canyon (30 min).

TWO JACK MAIN

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Two Jack Lake TWO JACK LAKESIDE

ROAD

Charming 30-minute stroll through the surface workings of the coal mine and the outline of the old town site. Picnic area and trailhead. Road closed in winter.

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not to scale

See Campground Directory on pg 58 See legend on page 52

2nd Floor, Cascade Shops

46 | Enter Our Photo Contest


Experience Lake Louise

See Campground Directory on pg 58 See legend on page 52

Lake Louise Visitor Centre at Samson Mall Banff/Lake Louise Tourism 403-762-8421. Parks Canada Visitor Centre 403-522-3833. Exhibits explain the geology and history of the Canadian Rockies. Open May 1; 9 am - 5 pm, extended hours June 12 - Sept. 7. Lake Louise - 5 min from the Village

Stoney Indians called it the "Lake of Little Fishes" The easy stroll around the lakeshore is stunning. Access point for more difficult hikes.

Moraine Lake - 20 min from the Village

Nestled in the Valley of the Ten Peaks. Hiking restrictions when grizzly bears in the area: tight groups of 4+ hikers. Open late May to early Oct.

Lake Louise Sightseeing Gondola

4.5 km from the village; 403-522-3555 Summer Gondola runs mid-May to mid-Oct. but come back to ski early Nov. to mid-May.

47 | Vote for your Favorite Photo

Expect crowds! Public parking fills quickly, so arrive before 10 am or after 5 pm


Experience the Bow Valley Parkway Protecting wildlife is the foundation of a sustainable future for the mountain national parks and a great visitor experience. To ensure that this special area remains a high quality home for wildlife, from March 1st to June 25th, travel by vehicle, bicycle, or foot is not permitted between 8 pm and 8 am on the 17 km section of the Bow Valley Parkway between the Johnston Canyon Campground and the Trans-Canada Highway interchange. All businesses remain open during this period of mandatory travel restriction and are easily accessible by driving the Trans-Canada Highway and exiting at Castle Junction. The Bow Valley Parkway is a scenic, 48 km secondary highway that runs parallel to the Trans-Canada Highway between the town of Banff and the village of Lake Louise.

This travel restriction will allow wildlife to move unimpeded across the landscape, use high-quality habitat, and engage in normal behaviour. It is part of a larger action plan to ensure the ecologically rich Bow Valley Parkway area continues as a worldclass setting for visitors to learn about and experience the park, and as a safe environment for wildlife.

Its eastern portion travels through a small but vital part of the park, called the montane, that provides critical habitat for large carnivores, including wolves, cougars and bears.

Jasper

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Stop at roadside viewpoints and interpretive exhibits along this scenic road between Banff and Lake Louise.

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Consolation Lakes

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48 | View our Mobile Editions

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Distance (km) from Banff/Lake Louise 3/49 Backswamp 6/46 Mule Shoe 8/44 Prescribed Burn 11/41 Sawback 13/39 Hillsdale 16/36 Pilot Pond 21/31 Moose Meadow 26/26 Castle Cliffs 28/24 Storm Mountain 40/12 Baker Creek 48/4 Morant’s Curve

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Experience The Icefields Parkway

THE ICEFIELDS PARKWAY?

Banff Lake Louise Tourism/Paul Zizka

Plan your trip today at: WWW.ICEFIELDSPARKWAY.COM Banff Lake Louise Tourism/Paul Zizka

75

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HAVE YOU

The website, icefieldsparkway.com was designed as a friendly resource tool for travellers to make the most of their Canadian Rockies vacation. If you are looking for accommodations, let the Mount Robson Inn in Jasper and the Mountaineer Lodge in Lake Louise be your launch and landing point for your Icefields Parkway journey. Take your time, take lots of photos and most of all, take it all in.

T

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More than a drive, the Icefields Parkway is a journey through natural history and captivating landscapes. Celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2015, the Parkway is rated as the #1 attraction in Banff National Park on TripAdvisor. It is possible to travel this route in three hours, but it is a crime to do so because of the jawdropping scenery. Needless to say, any visit to the Canadian Rockies would be incomplete without experiencing the splendor of the Icefields Parkway.

One of the best resources for making the most of your Icefields Parkway road trip is found at icefieldsparkway.com. This website offers an interactive way to plan your trip with points of interest, best photo opportunities, stops for short hikes, and even favorite picnic locations. Because there is no cell phone service on the Parkway, the site offers a downloadable “Parkway Planner” which includes maps, highlights, and a trivia section. For example, did you know that the Columbia Icefield is the largest mass of ice south of the Arctic Circle? That’s huge!

PA R K W

Banff Lake Louise Tourism/Paul Zizka

The Icefields Parkway is a “must do” when visiting the Canadian Rockies. It offers spectacular sightseeing of pristine turquoise lakes, tumbling waterfalls, ancient glaciers, and the world famous Columbia Icefields. Along the road, big horn sheep, deer, black bears, and coyotes are frequently spotted. Wolves, grizzlies, and goats less so. But witnessing a truly wild sight, like a trio of infant bear cubs under the protection of their mother, is not unlikely.

Hwy #93, which encompasses the Icefields Parkway, extends from Jasper all the way to Wickenburg, Arizona - that’s 2,768 km. In addition to the Parkway, this highway also features world famous spots such as the Hoover Dam and historic Freemont Street in Las Vegas.

A

Linking Lake Louise with Jasper is one of the most beautiful journeys on the planet - the Icefields Parkway. Rated as one of the top drives in the world by Condé Nast Traveler, the Icefields Parkway is a 232 km stretch of double-lane highway winding along the Continental Divide, through soaring Rocky Mountain peaks and vast sweeping valleys.

AFTER YOUR DRIVE, TWO EXCELLENT PLACES TO CALL HOME IN JASPER & LAKE LOUISE: · On Jasper’s Main Street · · Rooms & Suites · · Super Comfy Beds · · Free Breakfast & WiFi · · Air Conditioned ·

One Call Books Lake Louise & Jasper to SAVE

20% 49 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides

· in Village of Lake Louise · · Rooms & Suites · · Super Comfy Beds · · Free Breakfast & WiFi · · Steam Room & Hot Tub ·


Experience the Icefield Parkway National Geographic Magazine calls it “One of the World’s Ten Greatest Drives”. It has been referred to as “The Back Bone of the Canadian Rockies”. For many, it is the road trip of a lifetime. Stretching 230 km between Lake Louise and Jasper, this worldclass journey amidst the peaks of the Canadian Rockies offers easy access to a vast wilderness of ancient glaciers. It’s complete with guided adventures onto the ice fields, majestic viewpoints and interpretive displays that will enrich your understanding of glaciers and climate change.

While plotting the border between Alberta and BC in the early 1900s, this roadway was the brainchild of Arthur O. Wheeler, who described this route as a “wonder trail”. Construction began in 1931 as part of a depression-era public works program to put men to work, but the rugged terrain and short season meant the project took 9 years to complete. Isolated for centuries, 1940 ushered in an era of tourism to the region when the Icefields Parkway opened to the public. Today, more than a million travellers experience the parkway annually.

50 | Enter Our Photo Contest


Experience the 75th Anniversary

780.885.9813

51 | Vote for your Favorite Photo

See legend on page 52

mountainmadnesstours.com

See Campground Directory on pg 58

Between Jasper & Banff, Alberta Custom Bike Tours Available


Experience Jasper National Park Special Feature Miette Hot Springs 61 km (1 hr) North of Jasper on Hwy 16 & Miette Rd. The hottest mineral springs in the Canadian Rockies. Two refreshing cool pools. Towels, bathing suits & locker rentals. Open Mid-May to Oct. 1-800-767-1611 (see p. 49)

See Campground Directory on pg 58 See legend on page 52

Legend Camping (Vehicle Access)

Downhill Ski Area

Off-Highway Vehicle Zone

Downhill Ski Area

Cross-Country Ski Area

Commercial Lodge

Canoeing

Hostel

Snow Vehicle Zone

Restaurant

Fishing

Universal Accessibility

Store

Hot Springs

Visitor Information Centre

Public Telephone

Exhibit

Parking

Heliport

Hiking

Hospital

Golf Course

Post Office

Train

Tennis

Showers

Skating Gift store

Group Camping (Tent Only)

Parks & Protected Areas Office

Gas Station

Telephone

Motel/Hotel

Amphitheatre

Interpretive Trail

Recycle

Food and Lodging

Group Camping

Dumping Station

Canoe Launch

Gondola

RV Parking

Camping (Tent Only)

Viewpoint

Equestrian Facility

Groups

52 | View our Mobile Editions


Experience Jasper National Park Jasper National Park Map Keys 1 The Town of Jasper - All Services

Jasper Park Information Centre 500 Connaught Dr.

2 Mount Edith Cavell

29 km (30 min) south of Jasper via 93A. A switchback road climbs 14.5 km (9 mi) to a popular viewpoint. Trailers are not permitted. Open June - Oct., as conditions permit. Road is a ski touring trail from late March onward.

Jasper National Park is the largest of Canada’s Rocky Mountain Parks, and part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Discover the rugged mountains, glaciers, alpine meadows, forests, broad valleys, and wild rivers contained within more than 11,200 km2 of protected area. Wildlife is abundant here. It is common to see elk, bighorn sheep, deer, coyote and even black bear in the park. Jasper may have the greatest variety of accommodations in the mountain parks. Within the park, you could pitch your tent, park your RV, stay in a wilderness hostel, or be pampered in a resort. In town, your options include hotels, motels, private home accommodations and B&B’s.

3 Athabasca Falls

All of these choices are excellent. Each will appeal to a wide range of travellers and several unique properties are available in each category. If you are looking for something a little different, consider a private cabin.

4 Sunwapta Falls

Typically located on the edge of town, cabins offer a rustic charm ideal for those who really just want to get away from it all. Decompress in privacy without sacrificing comfort. Use this opportunity to read a book, go for a stroll, run a trail or just gaze at the amazing night sky.

30 km (30 min) south of Jasper via 93A or 93. A bridge and platforms give views of the thundering falls. Stay on the trail and inside the protective fences.

55 km (40 min) south of Jasper via 93. A paved road and short trail lead to the falls. Sunwapta is an aboriginal term meaning “turbulent river.” Stop at the resort for a great meal and excellent gift ideas.

5 Columbia Icefield and Athabasca Glacier

Did you know that JNP boasts the second largest Dark Sky Preserve (DSP) in the world!

103 km (75 min) from Jasper on the Icefields Parkway, Hwy 93 Refer to p. 50 & 51 for more information. Guided glacier hikes (Icewalks) icewalks.com or phone 1-800-565-7547 (June - September) For Brewster’s Glacier Adventure, book your trip at the Icefields Centre or call 1-877-423-7433.

are here, be sure to look up to see the

6 Jasper House National Historic Site

Learn more at JasperDarkSkyFest.com

35km (30 min) North of Jasper on Hwy 16. A short walk on an easy trail leads to a viewpoint looking beyond the Athabasca River towards the Jasper House historic site.

7 Maligne Canyon

11.5 km (15 min) east of Jasper on the Maligne Valley Road. 3.7 km interpretive trail with foot bridges over canyon. Stay away from the edge. Very deep (50 m) narrow canyon. In winter take a guided tour inside the gorge. It is unsafe to descend into the canyon without a professional guide.

No matter what time of the year you dreamy nightscapes of planets and constellations overhead year-round.

Restaurant: 780-852-3535

www.beckerschalets.com

Your cabin in the mountains

Tel 780-852-3491 www.pinebungalows.com

Parks Canada/Rogier Gruys

Jasper

N NA AT T II O ON NA AL L

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Patricia Lake bungalows

8 Medicine Lake

27 km (30 min) from Jasper on the Maligne Valley Rd. The Maligne River flows in, but where does it flow out? Drained by one of the largest underground river systems in North America.

Maligne Lake

48 km (55 min) from Jasper on the Maligne Valley Rd. The beauty of this lake is legendary. Boat tour of this 22 km long lake is a “must see”. Chalet open mid-May to early October, 8:30 am - 7 pm. Boat tours start when spring ice conditions permit. Tour hours 10 am - 3 pm, extended to 5 pm in the summer. Call for a Reservation 780-852-3370. malignelake.com.

Resort: 780-852-3779

Magnificent forested resort

pure Canada

along the Athabasca River with charming heritage and luxurious deluxe log cabins Large outdoor hotpool Fireplaces, kitchens, barbeques

“listen to our quiet, experience our adventure.” Cozy Cabin rentals on peaceful Patricia Lake. Scuba Diving, boating, biking, hiking, swimming, outdoor hot tub, wildlife and more.

780 852 3560 or 1 888 499 6848 for reservations patriciala patricialakebungalows.com

53 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


Experience Jasper National Park Jasper National Park (JNP) runs along the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies. It is located northwest of Banff National Park and connected to it via the Icefields Parkway. First Nations people hunted within this region for centuries. They used a vast network of trails that were employed by the explorers who arrived 250 years ago. These days, hikers and horseback riders use these same trails, to enjoy Jasper’s wonders. The picturesque community of Jasper, Ab is the heart of Jasper National Park. The first recorded visit to the area was in 1810 by David Thompson and 3 years later the North West Company built a supply depot here. Jasper House was abandoned in 1884, as the fur trade declined and by 1907 there were very few people left in the area when Jasper became Canada’s fifth national park. Two years later, railway workers arrived in the new park at almost the same time as the first park officials. The first railway station was constructed at the junction of three broad river valleys that were surrounded by majestic mountain peaks. Over time, the town of Jasper grew up around the station and became the administrative centre of the park. In 1928, with the completion of a road from Edmonton to Jasper, it meant that suddenly Jasper was not so remote. It would not be long before Jasper National Park would become a busy tourist destination.

The Old Fort Point bridge was reopened in 2013. Old Fort Point is a Jasper classic hike with spectacular views of the townsite and surrounding areas. Visitors can also connect from here on foot or bike to the spectacular Lac Beauvert trail. Check out the Woodpecker Trail, part of the recently completed Easy Trails System in the park. The best of Jasper’s camping, accommodations, hiking, beaches and biking are all connected in one simple network. When the Ghost Glacier fell in 2012, it washed out hiking trails, picnic tables and forced the closure of the Cavell Road. This road re-opened in 2013 and boasts one of Jasper’s most accessible alpine areas and a dramatic landscape change. oTENTiks have been installed at Whistlers Campground. These classic canvas covered shelters are perfect for a starry night. In 2011, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada designated JNP as a Dark Sky preserve making it the largest (at the time) and the only preserve in Canada with a town within the preserve. The community now hosts a Dark Sky Festival every October. No doubt, this festival will continue to grow as interest in the dark sky continues to grow due to the recent popularity of the television series, Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey.

For even more information about Jasper and Jasper National Park, pick up a FREE copy of our sister publication, The Jasper Map.

Creative, Inspired Food · Craft Beer Selection Buffet Breakfast · Bring the Family Enjoy our Beautiful Summer Patio Terrace Kick Back & Relax in our Hidden Gem

HOURS Breakfast: 6:30 -11 am · Dinner: 5 - 10 pm Located at Geikie & Bonhomme St., in the Jasper Inn & Suites

Reservations: 780.852.3232

Honeymoon Contest See page 15 to win a trip for two with via rail from Jasper to Vancouver

54 | Enter Our Photo Contest


Experience Jasper National Park Cottonwood Slough

To Patricia & Pyramid Lakes (5 and 7 km)

2 Pyramid Bench trails

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780-852-4767

NOT TO SCALE

3

Banff, Calgary

4 Becker’s Chalet

See Campground Directory on pg 58 See legend on page 52

1 Jasper Information Centre

National Historic Site, 500 Connaught Drive. Open from 9 am - 5 pm Spring & Fall, with extended summer hours. Limited Winter hours. Friends of Jasper Gift Shop. Jasper Park Information Centre: 780-852-6176 Tourism Jasper Visitor Desk: 780-852-6236

2 Patricia & Pyramid Lakes

5/7 km (10/15 min) drive from Jasper. Patricia Lake has a 2-3 hour loop trail. Read plaques for WWII historical significance. Enjoy hiking, fishing, swimming, cross-country skiing, and snow shoeing. Easy to access.

3 Old Fort Point

1.5 km (5 min) drive via 93A and Old Fort Point Road - 3.4 km (1-2 hr) fairly steep hike to the top of this popular hill that overlooks the town & Athabasca River.

4 Lakes Annette, Edith & Beauvert

5 km (10 min) drive via Hwy 16 Sandy beaches, swim in spring-fed “kettle” lakes 2.4 km (45 min - 1.5 hr) interpretive trail.

5 Jasper SkyTram

7 km (15 min) drive from town Phone (780) 852-3093. jasperskytram.com. Open late Apr. to mid-Oct. (weather dependant). Guided tours and stunning views from atop Whistlers Mountain. Canada’s longest and highest aerial tramway (7,500 ft. above sea level).

6 The Discovery Trail

(Shown in a purple dotted line. ) This trail can be accessed at several points throughout Jasper. Portions are wheelchair accessible downtown.

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7 Jasper-Yellowhead Museum & Archives

400 Bonhomme St.; 780-852-3013 jaspermuseum.org. Discover the spirit of Jasper. Admission Fee: Adults $6. Permanent exhibits of Jasper’s history. Monthly exhibits in Showcase Gallery. Summer (May - Sept.) 10 am - 5 pm Winter (Thurs. - Sun, only) 10 am - 5 pm

8 Activity & Aquatic Centre

NEW Fitness Facility! Arena, Indoor Climbing Wall, 25m Pool, Hot Tub & Steam Room, Showers Tennis & Raquetball Courts Meeting & Event Facilities Fitness & Pool: 780-852-3663 Activity Centre: 780-852-3381


Experience Wells Gray Provincial Park Imagine a place where the wild things are, free of crowds, with plenty of wide, open spaces. Helmcken Falls is Canada’s 4th highest waterfall and just one of 39 named waterfalls you’ll find here. It’s where the Murtle and Clearwater Rivers roar into life each spring and wildlife sightings are as common as sunrise and sunset. Visualize yourself in this place where there is plenty of room to breathe, to dream, and for you.

Clearwater Valley Resort & KOA Campground

heated outdoor pool • laundromat treed, park like setting • wifi mini golf • playground 52 RIDGE RESTAURANT with breakfast & dinner specials MOTEL AND BUNGALOWS extra large rooms • family rooms queen & king beds • kitchenettes air conditioning

Clearwater Lake Tours 250.674.2121 clearwaterlaketours.com

KOA CAMPGROUND AND KAMPING KABINS 50 & 30 amp sites • firepits & tables pull thru sites

Call: 1.888.837.1161 or 250.674.3909 www.clearwatervalley.com 373 Clearwater Valley Road, Clearwater

Guided Trips: - Boat Tours - Canoe & Hiking - Water Taxi - Camping all incl. Rentals: - Canoe - Kayaks - Fishing & Camping Gear Check out our Café and Art Display

Wells Gray Provincial Park is the place you invision, with 5,250 sq km of alpine wilderness, borne from volcanoes and carved by glaciers, one of the most unique landscapes in all of BC; where your days are measured in vertical feet, big game sightings and the number of waterfall shots on your camera. Murtle Lake is North America’s largest canoeonly lake. It’s here, through a kaleidoscope of colour where you can hike through the wildflower meadows of the Trophy Mountains. It is among old-growth interior rainforests that you’ll find serenity. It’s your staging ground for pure wilderness adventures… camping, hiking, white-water rafting, canoeing, dog-sledding or touring; by car, on foot, or from high in the saddle… in the Canada you imagined. Pull up a lawn chair and join in the party – plan your getaway around one of our signature events. There’s no better way to mingle with the locals than raising a pint, sharing a dance, or staring into space together. Serenity Music, Stargazing, a celebration of the First Fish and one big-time Canoe Regatta are just some of the ways we like to celebrate around here. Drop by the Clearwater Visitor Centre located on Hwy #5, halfway between Valemount and Kamloops, and the staff will ensure you get the most from your visit to this breath-taking area!

For more info visit wellsgray.ca 56 | View our Mobile Editions


Experience Hinton & Yellowhead County

Alberta Northern Rockies in Hinton & Yellowhead County Days 1-3

yELLOWHEAD COUNTY Abundant open wilderness. Well worth the stop.

Stretching from the Pembina River in Evansburg in the east to the Jasper National Park gates in the west, Yellowhead County has something for anyone wanting to explore some of the most majestic and eclectic landscapes Canada has to offer. Start at the Pembina Provincial Park, continue on to the variety of campgrounds surrounding the Edson area, and then move on to the abundant choices of bed and breakfasts or guest ranches near the hamlet of Brule before going down to the explore the historic Coal Branch.

Days 4-7

HINTON & AREA

Beaver Boardwalk, Switzer Park & the historic Coal Branch area.

The natural landscape and choice of outdoor activities to enjoy are what make this area a must for your vacation bucket list.

wilderness” are often bandied about when describing what visitors experience in this area, but what will that mean for you? No matter which adventures you choose, you’ll discover that the landscape of the northern Rocky Mountains and foothills is unforgettable.

When you visit, make sure you leave enough time – you’ll be surprised at just how much there is to see and do in this magnificent area of the Alberta Rocky Mountains. No matter what you’re doing you’ll marvel at the vast forest backdrop overlooking inviting lakes and towering mountaintops in the distance as you trek through William A. Switzer Provincial Park. Terms like, “rugged splendour” and “unspoiled

The Alberta Northern Rockies Are Calling You. Grande Prairie

Grande Cache Evansburg

Over 152 Spacious Campsites. Dozens of campgrounds, B&B’s, guest ranches, and more. Only a few hours west of Edmonton!

Edmonton

Hinton

Each year, more and more Albertans are making Hinton and Yellowhead County in the Northern Alberta Rockies and Foothills part of their vacation plans – and it isn’t hard to see why. Abundant lodging choices

of all sorts along Yellowhead Highway 16 and Highway 40 give visitors countless opportunities to explore the Canadian Rockies and the surrounding foothills.

www.NorthernRockiesAreCalling.ca 57 | ExperienceMountainParks.com/Our-Guides


te r Fl p Pr u s og h T ra Sh oil m ow ets e Sa rs ni Du Di m sa p bl e Fir d A ep c its ces s

In

s

Open Dates

Fe e

Phone Number

of

Websites

#

Campground

Sit

es

Campground Directory

Banff National Park - Map on p. 44 1

Castle Mountain

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

May 28 - Sept 14

43

$21.50

2

Johnston Canyon

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

May 28 - Sept 28 132

$27.40

• •

3

Lake Louise Tent*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 29 - Sept 27 206

4

Lake Louise Trailer*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

$27.40

• •

Year Round

189

$32.30

• •

Soft-Sided camping in winter only (mid-November to Mid-April) 5

Mosquito Creek

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 1 - Oct 12

32

$17.60

6

Protection Mountain

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 26 - Sept 7

89

$21.50

7

Rampart Creek

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 1 - Oct 12

50

$17.60

8

Tunnel Mt. Village I*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 14 - Oct 5

618

$27.40

• •

9

Tunnel Mt. Village II* reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

Year Round

188

$32.30

• •

10

Tunnel Mt. Trailer *

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 14 - Oct 5

321

$28.20

• •

11

Two Jack Main

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 25 - Sept 8

380

$21.50

12

Two Jack Lakeside

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

May 14 - Oct 5

74

$27.40

• •

13

Waterfowl Lakes

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 26 - Sept 7

116

$21.50

• •

Kootenay National Park - Map on p. 25 1

Marble Canyon

pc.gc.ca/knp-camping

888-773-8888

June 25 - Sept 7

61

$21.50

2

McLeod Meadows

pc.gc.ca/knp-camping

888-773-8888

June 25 - Sept 7

88

$21.50

3

Redstreak*

pc.gc.ca/knp-camping

877-737-3783

May 7 - Oct 12

242

$27.40 - $38.20

• •

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

May 15 - Oct 12

33

$15.70

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

June 19 - Sept 7

35

$15.70

Jasper National Park - Map on p. 52 1

Columbia Icefield

2

Honeymoon Lake

3

Icefield Centre RV

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

Apr 1 - Oct 31

100

$15.70

4

Jonas Creek

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

May 15 - Sept 7

25

$15.70

5

Mt. Kerkeslin

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

June 19 - Sept 7

42

$15.70

6

Pocahontas

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

May 15 - Sept 13 140

$21.50

7

Snaring River

pc.gc.ca/jaspercamping

888-773-8888

May 15 - Sept 13

66

$15.70

8

Wabasso*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

June 20 - Sept 1

180

$21.50 - $27.40

9

Wapiti (Summer)*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 15 - May 18 276

$27.40 - $32.30

• •

Tents Only

• •

June 19 - Sept 20 278 10

Wapiti Winter

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888 Oct 12 - May 6/16 53

$27.40 - $32.30

11

Whistlers*

reservation.pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 1 - Oct 12

535

$27.40 - $38.20

12

Wilcox Creek

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 5 - Sept 27

46

$15.70

• • •

• •

• •

• •

Glacier and Mount Revelstoke National Parks - Map on p. 14 Illecillewaet

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 23 - Sept 27

60

$21.50

2

Loop Brook

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 30 - Sept 4

20

$21.50

3

Mount Sir Donald

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

June 30 - Sept 4

15

$15.70

1

Sponsored By:

All Open Dates are weather dependant. All fees are subject to change without notice. A fire permit is required for fires in Parks Canada’s campgrounds. * These Campgrounds accept reservations.

58 | Enter Our Photo Contest

• • •


s

In

Open Dates

Fe e

Phone Number

of

Websites

#

Campground

Sit

es

te r Fl p Pr u s og h T ra Sh oil m ow ets e Sa rs ni D Di u m sa p bl Fir ed A ep c its ces s

Campground Directory

Yoho National Park - Map on p. 19 1

Hoodoo Creek

pc.gc.ca/ynp-camping

888-773-8888

June 25 - Sept 7

30

$15.70

2

Kicking Horse

pc.gc.ca/ynp-camping

888-773-8888

May 15 - Oct 12

88

$27.40

3

Monarch

pc.gc.ca/ynp-camping

888-773-8888

May 7 - May 14 June 25 - Sept 7

44 44

$17.60

4

Takakkaw Falls

pc.gc.ca/ynp-camping

888-773-8888

June 25 - Oct 12

35

$17.60

• •

• •

Waterton Lakes National Park - Map on p. 35 1

Waterton Townsite

pc.gc.ca

877-737-3783

May 1 - Sept 20

237

$22.50 - 38.20

• •

2

Crandell Mountain

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

May 14 - Sept 6

129

$21.50

3

Belly River

pc.gc.ca

888-773-8888

May 9 - Sept 13

44

$15.70

Campground Operators are encouraged to submit your information early to be included in our multi-page coverage next year. Barrhead, Alberta Rotary Park

barrhead.ca

780-674-2531

Year Round

21

$20.00 - $25.00

403-722-2378

Year Round

46

$20.00 - $30.00

• •

cougarcreekcabinsandrv.ca

780-865-4481

Year Round

36

$30.00 - $45.00

• •

Stonyplainlionsclub.com

780-963-4505

Year Round

56

$30.00 - 35.00

• •

778-373-6107

May 15 - Sept 30

25

$16.00

140

$25.00 - $41.00

• •

May 15 - Sept 30 180

$18.00 - $25.00 $20.00 - 35.00

Caroline, Alberta Clearwater Trading Co clearwatertrading.ca Hinton, Alberta Cougar Creek Cabins Stony Plain, Alberta Stony Plane Lions RV

Barkerville, British Columbia Bowron Lake Park

bowronlakeinfo.com

• •

• •

Reservations: Discover Camping https://secure.camis.com/Discovercamping or Phone: 1.800.689.9025 World-renowned 6-10 day, 116 km wilderness canoe circuit: Full Circuit $60 pp; West Side Trip $30 pp

Kimberly, British Columbia Kimberley Riverside

kimberleycampground.com

877-999-2929

Apr - Oct

Beautiful wilderness camping with clean modern amenities. Enjoy serviced sites, pool, putting course, wifi, and more

Mount Robson, British Columbia Mount Robson

bcparks.ca

250-566-4811

coahmancapground.com

250-265-4212

Nakusp, Bristish Columbia Coachman

Apr - Oct

40

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A good place to be

out & about. Full service RV & tenting • 18 hole putting course • Resort pool

• Showers • Laundry

• Stunning scenery • Store

• Internet access

1.877.999.2929 KimberleyCampground.com Turn on St. Mary Lake Rd. off Hwy 95A, 6kms south of city centre

Kimberley Riverside

CAMPGROUND

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