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EXPERIENCE

FREE

2015/2016

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Fish Creek Provincial Park

& the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway

10 Helpful Map Pages Hiking 101 Outdoor Weddings Creating a Legacy

Calgary’s Best Golf Holes

Reader Contest


CAPTURE YOUR FISH CREEK EXPERIENCE & ENTER OUR PHOTO CONTEST TO WIN STONEY NAKODA RESORT & CASINO & ROCKIES HELI CANADA (VALUE $450) · 2 night’s accommodation & buffet dinner for 2 people · Continental breakfast each morning · $200 Gift Certificate for a heli tour

HARVEST LAKE BED & BREAKFAST · 2 night’s accommodation & Breakfast for 2 each morning

THE CAMERA STORE (VALUE $500) · $500 Gift Certificate for their store in Calgary

For full contest details and information on how to enter go to ExperienceFishCreek.com/contests/photo-contest 2 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park


Enter to Win! Your name will be entered in a draw for an Engraved Fieldstone, courtesy of the Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society. Valued at $500, your prize will be featured in the Native Gardens and placed next to the Gazebo. Use your Engraved Fieldstone to honour the life of a loved one or to celebrate an important milestone in your own life. Learn more about the Engraved Fieldstone program at bowvalleyranche.com

We’d like to know how we did and learn how we can better serve your needs. Please complete and return the following short questionnaire for a chance to WIN When you picked up this guide, what were your expectations?

What do you like to do in Fish Creek Provincial Park?

Did we deliver?

Where is the best place to watch a sunrise and/or sunset?

1

Worst

2

3

4

5

Best

What did you like best? What is the most interesting animal you have seen, where? What would you like to see us add to the 2016 edition? Where is your favourite picnic area? Why is it your favourite? Typically, how often do you enter Fish Creek Provincial Park? Do you have a favourite fishing spot? If so will you share where? How often do you use the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway? How many people are usually in your party? Will you and your friends re-use this guide? Age range: ___Child, ____ Teen, _____20-29, _____ 30-39, _____ 40-49, _____ 50–59, _____60-69; ____ 70+

Have you accessed the guide online?

Full Name:

Phone #

Email Address:

City of Residence:

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Please mail this survey to: CMI Publishing, 116 Parkview Way SE, Calgary, Alberta, T2J 4M8 If you prefer to keep your guide intact, please forward your comments to the publisher, Bob Harris at Bob@CMIpublishing.ca Thank you for participating in this survey. In appreciation for completing and mailing this survey, you will be entered into the prize draw described above. The winner will be randomly selected by CMI Publishing on October 31, 2015 3 | ExperienceFishCreek.com


Experience Calgary’s Parks & Paths

Message from

The Honourable Shannon Phillips Welcome to one of North America’s largest natural area urban parks. Fish Creek Provincial Park preserves over 1,300 hectares of natural habitat and hosts a vast array of plants and wildlife. Home to more than 100 km of pathways, Fish Creek Provincial Park offers endless possibilities to explore nature in one of Alberta’s largest cities - Calgary. Walk, ride, or jog through open grasslands, scenic forests or along Fish Creek itself, and let the hustle and bustle of the city melt away. Take part in public events and programs like the bi-annual Star Night astronomy event or the Fish Creek Speakers Series to learn more about the world around you. Cool off on a hot summer day with a swim at Sikome Lake or cast a line in the Bow River for brown and rainbow trout. For over two decades, the Fish Creek Environmental Learning Centre has offered exceptional educational programs to Calgary and area schools. Last year, more than 14,000 students, teachers and parent volunteers experienced learning in the natural world of Fish Creek Provincial Park. Calgarians are fortunate to have such a wonderful place as Fish Creek Provincial Park in their own backyard. I encourage you to get out and explore all that it has to offer.

Shannon Phillips Minister of Environment and Parks

4 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park


Experience Calgary’s Parks & Paths

Message from

His Worship Mayor Nenshi On behalf of the citizens of Calgary and my City Council colleagues, I am pleased to welcome you to one of Calgary’s greatest treasures: Fish Creek Provincial Park. We are so lucky to have this incredible park nestled within our city limits. As one of the largest urban parks in North America, Fish Creek Provincial Park allows Calgarians and visitors the opportunity to explore and interact with nature while in a bustling city of more than a million people. There really is something for everyone to enjoy at Fish Creek Provincial Park from swimming at Sikome Aquatic Facility, to setting up a picnic, or simply just enjoying the wildlife and scenery. With more than 80 km of pathway through the park, there is ample opportunity to walk, run or bike around this beautiful space. Fish Creek Provincial Park is also part of the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway Project, which will be a 138 km network of pathways and parks encircling Calgary and connecting to 55 communities around the city. Once complete, this project will be the longest urban pathway and park in the world. Fish Creek Provincial Park also boasts some incredible facilities and educational opportunities including the Artisan Gardens at the Bow Valley Ranche. The Artisan Gardens is a unique space filled with 175 original works of art from more than 60 Canadian artists and is one of the many highlights of the park. The story of our city and its people is being told in Fish Creek Provincial Park in a remarkable way. Whether you spend one hour or a full day, the experiences one can have within the park’s borders are many and varied. This guide will ensure that all of your visits to Fish Creek Provincial Park will be memorable ones. Sincerely

Naheed K. Nenshi MAYOR

5 | ExperienceFishCreek.com


Experience Calgary’s Parks & Paths A Message from the Publisher Welcome to this, our third annual guide to outdoor living in Calgary. When we launched this magazine, our intention was to focus exclusively on Fish Creek Provincial Park. As residents in South Calgary for 20 years, we had come to truly appreciate the opportunity to step out of our yard, and into one of the largest urban parks in Canada. Within minutes we were able to “get out of the city”, breathe deeply, and de-stress. As a publisher of several visitor guides and maps to the national parks in western Canada as well as provincial parks and attractions in Alberta, we were happy to add Fish Creek to our family of publications.

Coincidentally, while we were launching Experience Fish Creek Provincial Park, the Calgary Parks Foundation announced the creation of the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway. By building a continuous loop of pathways and recreation areas circling the city, this project will create a network of 1,000 km of trails connecting numerous parks, including Fish Creek Provincial Park, across the entire city. In 2014, we decided to expand our coverage to include the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway and have come to realize that it only makes sense to tweak the name of this magazine. So in 2016, look for Experience Calgary’s Parks ‘n Paths. We’ll still provide you with the most comprehensive information about Fish Creek Provincial Park while sharing even more of the hidden gems across the city. We’d love to hear from you if you are willing to share your experiences. Please check out page 2 & 3 to learn how you could win some great prizes. Bob Harris

Take the Mobile Issue of this guide with you. It’s at ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com/online-library/visitor-guides

6 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park


Experience Calgary’s Parks & Paths Table of Contents Specialty Pages

Activities

Evolution of Cycling 38 Experience Heritage Park 44 Fish Creek Provincial Park Weddings 18 Follow the Mead Trail 46 Nature, Art and Legacy 14 Off-Leash Dog Parks 30 Rotary/Mattamy Greenway 20 Trail Etiquette 30 Wildlife Rehabilitation Society 43

Bow Habitat Station 43 Calgary’s Best Golf Holes 40 Calgary Rotary Challenger Park 45 Family Friendly Hikes 36 Fly Fishing on the Bow 42 Friends of Fish Creek 12 Hiking 101: How to Tie Your Boots 34 Maintaining Good Health 32

Map Pages Fish Creek Provincial Park Map 26-27 Fish Creek Single Track Map 28-29 Glenbow Ranch Map 48 Greenway NE Calgary Map 23 Creenway NW Calgary Map 22 Greenway SE Calgary Map 25 Greenway SW Calgary Map 24 Rotary/Mattamy Greenway Map 21

Welcome to the 2015 - 2016 Edition of Experience Fish Creek Provincial Park & Calgary’s Greenway Use this, our third annual edition to enhance your year-round enjoyment of one of Canada’s largest urban provincial parks as well as the growing network of trails across Calgary. This magazine is produced and distributed annually by CMI Publishing, a division of Complete Marketing Inc, a privately owned company with offices in Calgary.

Please support our advertisers and sponsors. Kindly mention where you saw their ad. Without their support this guide would not be possible. Special thanks to: Rob Lennard, Rob Storeshaw, Larry Wasyliw, Anne Payne, Jim Thompson, Roland Kirzinger, Whitney Harris, our advertisers and contributors For more info: ExperienceFishCreek.com

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The Mountain Parks

Visitors' Guide to Western Canada

19 Helpful Map Pages Mountain Weddings Hot Springs Tour Stand Up Paddleboarding Biography of Mary Vaux Walcott

Reader Contests

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Fish Creek Provincial Park & Calgary’s Greenway

10 Helpful Map Pages Hiking 101

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The Cowboy Trail

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19 Helpful Map Pages

Western Weddings A Back Country Pack Trip

Outdoor Weddings Creating a Legacy Calgary’s Best Golf Holes

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Small Town Pow Wows A Fistful of Amazing Aboriginal Characters

Reader Contests

ExperienceFishCreek.com 7 | ExperienceFishCreek.com

Cover photo: on the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway between Fish Creek and South Glenmore Parks. Publisher: Bob Harris, CMI Publishing Ph: (403) 259.8290 | bob@CMIpublishing.ca Designer: Christine Karchewski Editor: Kristine MacDougall


Experience Calgary’s Parks & Paths Our Contributors Kasia Gorski is an event manager with over seven year’s experience and another twelve in hospitality and service, Kasia Gorski is no stranger to events. She has well-rounded knowledge, having assisted in corporate and social affairs. Most recently, she is with Great Events Group, who manage the Bow Valley Ranche, Meadow Muse Pavilion and Annie’s Bakery. (8 Reasons Why You Should Get Married at Fish Creek Provincial Park pg 18)

Dr. Don Findlay and his brother Dan Findlay operate Chiropractical, a high-energy chiropractic and massage clinic offering state-of-the-art diagnostic techniques in south Calgary. They are very committed to bringing people back to wellness, and educating them about what it means to be truly healthy. Married with 2 kids, Don enjoys weight training, running and dancing with his sweetheart Kyla. Visit chiropractical.ca for more information (Maintaining Good Health pg. 32)

Reanne Heuston owns and operates a Calgary based dog training company Pest-to-Pet Training. She owns 4 dogs, 2 cats and a tarantula while taking in rescues, boarding and training dogs for behaviour modification. Reanne’s Pest-to-Pet training techniques are based on positive reinforcement and the knowledge that not all animals respond to one method of training. Reanne actively attends seminars, trade fairs, clinics and trials to keep up to date with current tools and techniques in dog training. Visit pest2pet.com for more information (The Off-Leash Dog Park Rules pg 30)

Tanya Koob is a Calgary-based freelance writer and lover of all things adventurous, especially in

the mountains. She spends her weekends gliding through snow or water on her light touring skis or stand up paddleboard. She and her husband have a 6 year old son, together they love hiking, camping and exploring the backcountry. Visit Tanya’s blog where she chronicles her adventures at rockiesfamilyadventures.com (Family-Friendly Rambles in Calgary’s Natural Areas pg 36)

Cameron Melin is an avid cyclist and enthusiast of outer space, economics, kitty-cats and beer. He was born and raised in Calgary and currently works as a electrician where he can only bother other construction workers, leaving decent people to shuffle like zombies from home to work and back again. He has dabbled in animation, photography and moderate extremism. (The Evolution of Cycling pg 38)

Andrew Penner is a writer and photographer living in Calgary, Alberta. His work has been featured

in Westerworld, up!, Golf Magazine, Going Places. Avenue, NBC.com, and many other leading golf and lifestyle publications in North America. When not travelling or on assignment, he enjoys reading, movies, and just chilling out in the backyard with his wife, Dawn, and their four boys. (Calgary’s Best Golf Holes pg 40)

8 | Let us be your guide to the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway


Experience Calgary’s Parks & Paths Memorial Forest Program As you walk and ride through the park, you may notice areas set aside for this program and wonder what it’s all about. The Memorial Forest program began in 1996 as joint venture between Fish Creek Provincial Park and McInnis & Holloway Funeral Homes. It provides families with a meaningful way to deal with the loss of a loved one. A tree planted will remain a living memorial to which family and friends can return every year. Over the years, this program has expanded to other areas of the city and more than 40,000 trees have been planted to date. McInnis & Holloway is responsible for the maintenance of the forest. Throughout the spring and summer they apply 30,000 litres of water each day to ensure the health and longevity of the trees. For more information on the Memorial Forest Program mhfh.com.

Experience the Rotary Nature Park The Rotary Club of Calgary Chinook developed and maintains a very special 40 acre (16 hectare) place in the southeast corner of Fish Creek Provincial Park. This unique project is described as a Nature Park because the land was used for years as a gravel pit prior to being reclaimed to its original natural state. The park now contains engineered wetlands, ponds, and a trail system to allow visitors to enjoy a variety of wildflowers and native plant species. The wetlands attract waterfowl and upland birds, making this park the perfect sanctuary for bird watching. To enhance your enjoyment of the park 5 gazebo shelters and several park benches were constructed as well as a bridge between the ponds. The Rotary Club of Calgary Chinook Nature Park is located adjacent to the Bow River and south of Hwy 22X. Residents of Cranston are able to walk down the hill into the park via a trail from their community. Cyclists can ride south from Sikome Lake and take the overpass to the east side of the river. For others, this Nature Park is easily accessed by car via McKenzie Meadows Drive to a paved parking lot. For more information, go to rotarychinook.org. 9 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com


A Walk Through History

William Roper Hull, Calgary, Alberta Courtesy of Glenbow Archive; PB-896-3

Group preparing for tennis on William Roper Hull ranch, Fish Creek, Midnapore, Alberta. Courtesy of Glenbow Archive; NA-5090-2

You’ve come here to the east side of Fish Creek Provincial Park via Macleod Trail, or perhaps by taking Bow Bottom Trail further east. Maybe you’ve come by car or bike, or perhaps you’re taking an after-dinner walk. You may have heard of the fine dining establishment in the area: the Bow Valley Ranche. You may have even stopped at the newly renovated Annie’s Bakery Cafe for a coffee and a muffin before wandering through the Native Gardens, but have you ever thought about the story of the historic Fish Creek valley?

In 1877, the Blackfoot, Sarcee, and Stony Tribes exchanged their lands in the Bow Valley for cash and land reserves. According to the terms of the treaty they signed, Treaty 7, the Canadian government was to set up “instructional farms” to teach them how to farm this land. Eventually, the government purchased John Glenn’s homestead for $350 to pursue this undertaking, and a superintendent was hired as an instructor. However, within a few years the program was shut down and the property was again put up for sale.

Fish Creek Provincial Park begins at the Tsuu T’ina Nation in the west and extends 20 km east to the Bow River. Carved from a glacier, the area was home at various times to First Nations hunters, trappers, farmers, a wool mill, ranchers, 4 buffalo jumps, and 80 University of Calgary archaeological digs.

In 1883 brothers William and John Roper Hull were driving 1200 head of horses from Kamloops to Calgary under contract with the North West Mounted Police. They liked the looks of the Fish Creek area and decided to purchase the 4,000 acre “Government Supply Farm” for $30,000. The Hulls secured a contract with the Canadian Pacific Railway as the sole source of beef for the British Columbia railway gangs. Eventually the Hulls would build the Calgary Brewing and Malting Company (the precursor to Molsons Breweries), Calgary’s first opera house and the Calgary Grain Exchange.

The earliest known visitor to the area was the explorer and surveyor David Thompson who visited sometime during the period of 1789-1811. Thompson was followed by a number of fur traders and missionaries, but for over one hundred years no one established a permanent residence. This changed in the 1870s when John Glenn, a trapper and farmer, cleared nine acres next to the confluence of Fish Creek and the Bow River. Glenn built a log house and barns, and devised an irrigation system to grow crops (particularly potatoes) in the glacial silt of the riverbanks. By 1879, the farm was thriving and Glenn was enjoying a comfortable lifestyle.

William Roper Hull, a sociable and influential businessman, decided to build “the finest country home in the territories” in a protected area beneath the north escarpment of the Fish Creek valley. He hired Calgary architect James Llewellyn Wilson who designed a Gothic Revival structure featuring a gabled roof, twin brick chimneys, and dormer windows. A

10 | Let us be your guide to the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway


A Walk Through History

View of Bow Valley ranch buildings, Midnapore, Alberta. Courtesy of Glenbow Archive; NA-1511-1

gregarious host, Hull presided over tennis matches and many other gatherings of prominent politicians, business people, ranchers, and farmers in his home. By the early 20th century, land use in southern Alberta was shifting from farming to ranching, and in 1902 the Hull land was purchased by Calgary meat packer and rancher Patrick Burns. Burns acquired some 20,000 acres of land in the area, bordered on the north by what is now Stampede Park. His holdings extended south to 146 Avenue, and stretched west to Macleod Trail. This parcel was only a small part of Burns’ total ranching operation of 450,000 acres! Pat Burns was a selfless innovator, helping other ranchers improve cattle bloodlines. He also introduced better winterfeeding methods and modern feedlot techniques. Burns was also a conservationist and he instructed his foreman to protect the ranch’s groves of aspen and poplar from cattle. He also had his workers plant 2,000 poplar trees along Macleod Trail adjacent to the Bow Valley Ranche. Pat Burns was one of the “Big Four” who helped finance the first Calgary Stampede. In the early 1970s, the Alberta Government purchased some 1,400 acres of land in the Bow River and Fish Creek Valleys, including the Bow Valley Ranche site. On June 29, 1975, the Honorable Peter Lougheed dedicated Fish Creek Provincial Park as “a park for all people.”

Pat Burns. Courtesy of Glenbow Archive; NB-16-150

For a period of time the Ranche House became the Fish Creek Park warden’s residence time, but was eventually boarded up and sat empty for many years. By 1994, the building was slated for demolition. Local residents Mitzie and Larry Wasyliw, who frequently walked in Fish Creek park, decided to save the house by establishing the Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society. Through donations, the Ranche House was saved and restored to its former glory. In addition, the foreman’s house was refurbished and a native species garden was established. In 2000, the Ranche House Restaurant and Annie’s Bakery opened to the public, and remain popular destinations today. The Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society also created the Artisan Gardens and Branded Patio, which opened to the public in September 2013. This one-of-a-kind “art gallery in nature” offers visitors a glimpse of the richness of the valley. Be sure to see some of Pat Burns’ original brands crafted in mosaic stepping stones. Annie’s Bakery has been renovated and it’s operation extended to include the Meadow Mews Pavilion, an event tent accommodating outdoor celebrations. Although we no longer hunt, trap, or live in the Fish Creek valley, the park and its historic buildings serve to honour the past and preserve our heritage. The multitude of park paths, the native gardens, Annie’s Bakery, and the Ranche House restaurant all offer visitors the unique opportunity to step out of the city and sample a way of life from long ago.

11 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com


Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park Did you know Fish Creek Provincial Park spans over 16 km across the southwest and southeast sections of the city of Calgary and over 9 km along the Bow River? The west end of the park includes areas like Shannon Terrace, Bebo Grove, and Marshall Springs, where steep valley walls and dense forest provide some of the most breathtaking natural views this side of the Rockies. A little further east, you will discover the Shaw’s Meadow and Votier’s Flats areas where the forest becomes less dense and the valley walls become less steep. Near Glennfield, on the east side of Macleod Trail, the park landscape opens up into vast grasslands. The forested areas near Lafarge Meadows and Hull’s Wood, close to where the creek flows into the Bow River, provide essential habitat for wildlife. Fish Creek Provincial Park is a natural area that enhances the quality of life for all who visit. Who are the Friends of Fish Creek? The Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park Society is a small non-profit organization based at the Bow Valley Ranch. We work closely with Fish Creek Provincial Park staff, Society members, our 200 volunteers, and hundreds of community partners to help realize our vision of a sustainable park. Our mission is to engage the community through education and awareness to conserve a truly unique naturalized urban park. Park Watch is one of our flagship programs and stewards help by answering visitor questions, providing first aid, and reporting safety issues to park management. 128 volunteers participated in the long-running Weed Whackers program between May

and August last year. Weed Whackers help manage unwanted invasive plant species in the park, including common burdock, common tansy, black henbane, and others. Through the Trail Care program, volunteers work to maintain and expand on the park’s single track trail network. In 2015, the Calgary Mountain Bike Alliance (CMBA) Fish Creek Mountain Bike Skills Park will open near Burnsmead, providing cyclists a safe, enjoyable, and sustainable area for off-trail riding. Getting the most out of the park The Fish Creek Speaker Series presentations take place 9 times/ year. Each talk attracts 50-100 individuals of all ages. Presenters are experts in their field and generously share their knowledge and experience with members of the Fish Creek community. The birding courses are led by knowledgeable and experienced volunteer instructors. These courses not only bring community members in contact with the variety of bird species found in Fish Creek and other natural areas, but also teach the importance of environmental stewardship, encourage an active lifestyle, and provide a wonderfully enriching social experience. In 2013, the Friends of Fish Creek launched a suite of wellness programs featuring running clinics, guided meditation, and yoga, hosted by professional instructors. In 2014, the frequency of these wellness programs increased and more people were able to enjoy the park in a new way. Participants leave feeling relaxed and rejuvenated, with their sense of wonder and appreciation for this park gently rekindled.

12 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park


Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park Also in 2013, the Friends acquired an 11-seat open-air electric minibus. It helps exemplify our mission of engaging community members by providing a way for more people to see and enjoy the park. The minibus has also been used on history, geology, archaeology, nature, and wetland tours, as well as popular photography outings. This program also provides a meaningful and enjoyable opportunity for volunteer minibus drivers. For the subsequent generation of park users The Friends of Fish Creek also facilitates the Toronto Dominion (TD) Learning Naturally program. Learning Naturally enables students from schools in economically disadvantaged areas of Calgary to experience nature in Fish Creek Provincial Park. These kids between Kindergarten and Grade Six enjoy all of the splendours of the natural world found in the park and are truly thankful for this unforgettable opportunity. For many of these young students, their Learning Naturally field trip is also their first visit to Fish Creek Provincial Park. The title sponsor of the TD Learning Naturally program is The TD Friends of the Environment. Learning Naturally has never received funding through the municipal or provincial government and its continuance is in jeopardy. More funding is needed for this essential program to continue to educate our youth. We invite you to make a tax deductible donation as an individual or through your company to support this very important program. For more information on Learning Naturally and how to donate, contact the Friends of Fish Creek at 403-238-3841 or visit us at friendsoffishcreek.org/td-learning-naturally-program.

On July 19, 2015, the Friends will host the 5th annual Creekfest Water Celebration at the historical Bow Valley Ranch in Fish Creek. This free one day family event is part of our Watershed Stewardship public awareness program, designed to inform the community about the importance of protecting our local waterways and responsible water usage. In recent years, you may have been to Creekfest with your children and/or grandchildren and enjoyed the lively performances, interactive booths, and handson learning activities, all of which were made possible by the countless volunteers and community-based organizations who share our vision of a sustainable park environment. Leave a lasting legacy One of the most significant and meaningful ways to support the Friends and contribute to the long-term sustainability of Fish Creek Provincial Park is to leave a financial contribution in your final wishes. You can provide a philanthropic legacy that will benefit the park and improve the quality of life of your grandchildren’s children and beyond. Please speak to your financial planner or your legal representative about how you can continue to support the Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park Society and this amazing natural resource for many years to come. If you would like to learn more about the Friends of Fish Creek, visit our website at friendsoffishcreek.org, or look for the little yellow house at the Bow Valley Ranch in Fish Creek Provincial Park, come inside, and say hi to your Friends!

All Photos Courtesy of the Friends of Fish Creek

13 | ExperienceFishCreek.com

By: Chris Lalonde


Nature, Art, and Legacy at the Bow Valley Ranche When we celebrate the past, we also honour the future. This is what Mitzie Wasyliw believed, and as cofounder of the Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society, she said the Artisan Gardens “provides us an opportunity to contribute to the legacy of the land through art.” Mitzie, who passed away in 2014, and her co-founder and husband Larry Wasyliw envisioned what legacy planning could bring to fruition at the Bow Valley Ranche at Fish Creek Provincial Park. The idea of building a living legacy in this part of Fish Creek Provincial Park was both innovative and practical. The entire complex is a tribute to its settlers and to the Fish Creek valley itself. This is expressed in both nature and art, with all of the elements working in concert. Arriving at the Ranche from the east of Fish Creek Provincial Park, just off Bow Bottom Trail, you will see the original ranch house, built by William Roper Hull in 1896. Over 100 years later, in 2000, the Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society completed a renovation of the previously bordered-up property. Since then it has been a fine-dining restaurant called the Bow Valley Ranche. Surrounding it is a historically accurate garden, reflecting what would have been planted by the original owner. Just behind the Bow Valley Ranche restaurant, the Branded Patio contains 87 mosaic stepping stones, inlaid in the shape of a wagon wheel and handcrafted by Bragg Creek artist Pamela Rodger. Seven of these stones preserve the legacy of rancher Pat Burns, and the historical significance of Hull, John Glenn, and the Province of Alberta. The remaining stones reflect the memories of those people who worked with Pamela to design their own visual family history. Images, both literal and symbolic, are seen in antique cars, spirit bears, crosses, and quotations. Just past the Bow Valley Ranche, off a path lined with handcarved stone benches and gas lamps, is the Native Gardens, containing indigenous plants and shrubs of Alberta. This area encompasses the Artisan Gardens, which honours the aboriginal heritage and celebrates both art and the natural surroundings of the Fish Creek valley. It is, indeed, an art gallery in nature. Whether you peruse the restored heritage species of plants and shrubs in the Native Gardens, or view the sculptures and artwork

displayed in the Artisan Gardens, you can’t separate yourself from nature or from the serenity that envelops you as you tour the 175 pieces of art, all on view year round. 72 local artists have created paintings and mosaics encased in special weatherproof cases. These cases are attached to amphitheater benches that are arranged in a semi-circle, providing an ideal setting for cultural and musical events. In addition, there are 3 lifesized bronzes, 2 bronze busts, a wood carving of a wolf and, most recently, an 18foot high sculpture of a rearing horse entitled “Caballo,” which honours Mitzie Wasyliw. “Caballo” was fabricated using 1,000 horseshoes collected by the artist from farmers and ranchers in the area. As Larry says, “The Native Gardens and the Artisan Gardens are healing sanctuaries in nature. It is where nature speaks to you—a spiritual place, a place where you can get lost in your thoughts.” To the west, Annie’s Bakery Café welcomes hikers and cyclists who are drawn by the aromas of freshly baked goods. Visitors can grab a salad, sandwich, or ice cream cone and sit outside at picnic tables. This recreation of the home of the Ranche’s first manager, Bill Bannister and his wife Annie attracts vistors who welcome a respite from the rigours of the surrounding city. Lending their support to this infrastructure are Larry Wasyliw and an army of volunteers who garden, paint, clean benches, and plan events which serve to both fundraise and to celebrate nature, history, and art. The Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society is arranging an event to take place on September 1, 2015, to commemorate their 20th Anniversary as well as the 110th Birthday of the Province of Alberta. This “Birthday Celebration Extravaganza” will feature a reenactment of the September 1, 1905 inauguration, as well as a replica of the cake that Senator Patrick Burns commissioned for that occasion! Passing on a legacy is a relatively new concept for most of us. We may not have million dollar trusts, but we can still pass on our love and enthusiasm for things that we value. The Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society is a registered charity, which issues tax receipts for contributions. How can we leave a legacy? Many have purchased a stepping stone in the Branded Patio. The experience of designing the stone with the artist is one of those palpable thrills not easily

14 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park


Nature, Art, and Legacy at the Bow Valley Ranche

Caballo

Egg Money Hand

Artisan Gardens

Children of Yesterday

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Nature, Art, and Legacy at the Bow Valley Ranche forgotten, especially when you see the entire process from rough drawing to finished piece. The purchase of a Branded Patio stone is eligible for a $1,000 tax receipt. There are still works in the Artisan Gardens and the Branded Patio available for sponsorship. In addition to a tax receipt for $5,000, sponsors of art in the Artisan Gardens receive a giclee print of the work and a polished steel plaque inscribed with their name and the title of the work. Arrowhead crowns top the end of each artisan bench displaying the names of donor families and companies. Crown sponsors earn a tax receipt of $10,000, and a limited edition framed print of the historic Ranche House. There are other ways to pass on a legacy to the Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society. Volunteer Mark Kotris, CFP, CLU, ChFC, says that you can both lend a helping hand and, in turn, have the Canada Revenue Agency give you a helping hand when you garner a tax credit equal to a refund of up to 39% for every dollar contributed. This can be achieved in several ways. Cash is the simplest way to donate, but you can also give “gifts in kind,” such as stocks, mutual funds, real estate, and almost any tangible property. The tax credit you receive is based on that property’s

1 Annual “Alberta’s Birthday Celebration Extravaganza” st

September 1, 2015 | 5:30-8:00

The Historic Ranche at Fish Creek Provincial Park Presented by: The Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society Further Information contact: Rob Lennard at 403-607-5299; info@HappyBirthdayAlberta.com

fair market value. This may be an excellent option as you may receive further preferential tax treatment on any capital gains realized, in addition to the donation credit of up to 39%. There are several ways to leave a legacy using life insurance. You can read the particulars of this on the Restoration Society’s website. Donors can also pass on tangible property to a charity in trust. This gives you an immediate charitable tax receipt for the full value of the property but allows you to retain the right to use and derive benefits from the property during your lifetime. After your death, the property is left directly to the charity. Donor-advised funding allows donors to gift through a public foundation and to make recommendations about where the money goes and for what purpose. Lastly, setting up a private foundation is a complex arrangement and best suited for the very wealthy. The donor sets up a private non-profit organization and assigns assets to it in exchange for a charitable tax receipt. A trustee and a group of directors oversee a foundation. As well, donors can name the Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society in their will, leaving monetary donations, life insurance, or stocks. Please consult with your financial advisor on the most beneficial way to both gift the Society and protect your legacy. Educating others about the history of Fish Creek is another way to share its rich legacy. That is the goal of Rob Lennard, “the History Wrangler,” who seeks to inspire and educate students and the general public with unique presentations, that combine story telling with songs. Education has long been an objective of the Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society and now Rob, the official “Historian at the Ranche”, will develop programming and outreach objectives centered around this special area of Fish Creek Provincial Park in both French and English. Legacy planning is an emotional issue. and requires financial considerations. Discussions with family, friends, and advisors can simplify the task. Your consideration of the Ranche at Fish Creek Restoration Society in your financial planning will ensure that future generations will be able to enjoy this unique place. Become part of the legacy by contacting bowvalleyranche.com or email info@bowvalleyranche.com. You can also phone Larry Wasyliw for more details at 403-460-1374. By: Anne T. Payne

16 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park


Nature, Art, and Legacy at the Bow Valley Ranche

WHERE CITY ELEGANCE MEETS COUNTRY CHARM

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Exquisite Tent Events in the Heart of Fish Creek Park

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17 | ExperienceFishCreek.com

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8 Reasons Why You Should Get Married at

Courtesy of Tara Whittaker

Courtesy of Dani & Chad Thompson

Planning your wedding is a rollercoaster ride, with many ups and downs as you make choices for your big day. One of the most important is choosing a venue. One venue to consider is a park, though not all parks are created equal when hosting an event. Some will allow you to build a tent, put in rows of chairs along a river bank for your ceremony, or use a day-rest area, but the City of Calgary may have strict guidelines, so doing your research is paramount. However, Calgary boasts a beautiful provincial park right within its city limits, and luckily the logistics are relatively easy-going. Fish Creek Provincial Park is one of the largest urban parks in Canada, stretching 19 km from east to west. Though home to a variety of wildlife on natural land, at the eastern end of the park lies an area perfect for events, including the Bow Valley Ranche Restaurant, the Meadow Muse Pavilion event tent, the Fish Creek Visitor Center, and the Artisan Gardens. Imagine your beautiful day in the heart of all this wonder! Here are eight reasons to bring your celebration to Fish Creek: 1. Make your theme one with nature. Hosting your wedding in a park creates a breathtaking natural landscape for any theme. The Meadow Muse is a blank slate with the picnic sites providing natural settings for ceremonies, photo shoots, and receptions. And the Bow Valley Ranche Restaurant is a grand historical location. Adding décor is a breeze. Whether you choose to go glam or au naturel (and anything inbetween), rental deliveries to the park are simple, as roads allow access to the event areas. 2. Your photos will be amazing. From long grass fields, to historical landmarks, to babbling brooks, to the quaint porch of Annie’s Bakery & Café, the backdrop possibilities are endless. Choose utter romance for the theme of your photos or show off your “roughing-it” lifestyle.

Courtesy of Dani & Chad Thompson

You can choose the bright flattering afternoon light or opt for the softness of a fading evening; either way every shot will bring out the best in you and your partner. Add high-end lighting, and the midnight mists will strike an element of mystery and magic in late night outdoor photos. 3. It’s in the city, but somehow escapes the city. It’s not a busy downtown hotel, but your guests will still easily get a cab home after the evening’s festivities. Some of the city’s cab companies will even allow you to pre-book a few cars, but nonetheless, this is an area into which cabs regularly drive, so getting your guests home safely won’t be an issue. The hush of the park paired with the excitement of your special day will bring new meaning to your celebration. With no traffic noise or surrounding hustle-and-bustle, the only sounds outside of your DJ or band will be the night owls and other animal noises throughout the park. 4. Your wedding can look just like in the movies. With just a little attention to detail, the stunning wedding-in-thepark you saw in your favourite romantic comedy movie can be yours. Whether in the historical Bow Valley Ranche mansion, the stunning event tent, or anywhere on the grounds, you too can create your dream park wedding—without the need to hire Jennifer Lopez! 5. It’s a paradise for the rustic bride. All the base elements are already in place. Just add your special touch to make it your own. Here are just a few ideas: • Use centerpieces that incorporate the natural foliage of the provincial park. • Vintage shop for little brass fi gurines of the animals you might see frolicking in the fields, like owls, deer, or birds. • Allow the restaurant or café décor to inspire a genuine, rustic feel to your tables and vignettes. • Use vintage elements like old chalkboards, burlap linens, oak barrels and antler fixtures.

18 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park


Fish Creek Provincial Park 6. Keep it real: choose a garden site for your picnic wedding. Romantic gazebos, stunning flowerbeds, meandering pathways, and lush summer foliage welcome you and your entourage if you decide to pick one of these many lovely sites. If your guest list is small, a picnic wedding is an especially great way to make your celebration quaint. (Just make sure you have a back-up plan for inclement weather). 7. Go all out: book the Bow Valley Ranche house. From the Grand Salon and peripheral rooms on the main floor, to the bridal suite above, to the immaculately groomed lawn and wraparound veranda of this stunning mansion, your wedding can have throwback glamour written all over it. The Bow Valley Ranche is rich in local history and many of the existing pieces are from the era in which it was built. Originally erected in 1896, the ranch house was a center for refined social activities in the Calgary region, and its sophistication was unparalleled. The menu is stacked with locally-sourced items for the discerning foodie bride and groom. 8. The ultimate outdoor experience with all the comfort of an indoor wedding, and save money: The Meadow Muse Pavilion. Unfortunately, unless you own suitable land, erecting a tent in a park is often expensive, and after permits, rentals, flooring, and lighting are looked after, your budget may look a little slim. The

TASTING

Meadow Muse Pavilion offers all the amenities at a much lower cost. The tent is permanent with beautiful dark hardwood floors, heaters, and chandelier lighting already built in. Tables, chairs, and dinnerware are already included for a much lower price than your average rental. This stunning blank slate has clear walls that display the natural glory of Fish Creek Provincial Park. Or retract them to let in the fresh summer air. Unlike most permanent tents, The Muse provides flexibility and simplicity. Add a little touch of colour or completely transform the space to make it your style. With all the amenities included, weddings are a breeze at the Meadow Muse. Inclement weather won’t spoil your day. Your guests will be warm and protected. Remember, choosing the location for your wedding will dictate your logistics for the day. Like timing, budget, décor, and guest list, it could even affect some of your vendor choices. It’s a decision you must make early: it’s one of the building blocks of your day. There are so many possibilities for your ceremony, photos, and reception at Fish Creek Provincial Park. Choose your own wedding adventure with all the possibilities the park has to offer! By: Kasia Gorski Great Events Group

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Custom designed Wedding & Business Attire 403.874.5257 | europeancouturestudio@gmx.com www.europeancouturestudio.com 19 | ExperienceFishCreek.com


Experience the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway While the Greenway will not be completed until 2017, much has already been done that Calgarians can enjoy. In the completed Phase One, the Greenway runs from Airport Trail NE to 17 Avenue SE and includes the CN Play Park near Memorial Drive SE, the 13 km Bob Skinner Pathway, numerous rest nodes, two playground parks, a fully fenced off-leash area, and the ARC Resources Interpretive Wetlands. Phase Two travels from the Western Irrigation District (WID) Canal on the eastern border of Calgary to Highway 22X, crosses over the highway at 52 Street SE and traverses the communities of Auburn Bay, Seton, and Cranston before entering Fish Creek Provincial Park. It includes a major spur into the community of Mahogany, where you can find sweeping wetlands, a neighbourhood park with climbing rocks, and the unique TransCanada Outdoor Fitness Park.

Photo by: Kristina Cajipe

There are some very large numbers associated with Calgary’s Rotary/Mattamy Greenway: $60 million to build; 138 km of pathways; 55 communities and 400,000 residents touched directly; and 365 days a year of availability. But while this Parks Foundation Calgary’s world-class project is highlighted by impressive math, its greatest legacy shall be the increased connection between Calgarians and the spectacular outdoor recreation that surrounds them. Once it is completed in 2017, the three-phased network of unique urban parks (including off-leash parks for our fourlegged friends), family fitness areas, extra-wide pathways for biking, running, and walking, and environmental wetlands with sweeping lookout points will encircle the entire city. Completely accessible to residents of all ages, abilities, and income levels, the Greenway (with title sponsors the Rotary Clubs of Calgary & Cochrane, and Mattamy Homes, Canada’s largest homebuilder) is free and open 365 days a year. Led by the 30-year-old, not-for-profit Parks Foundation, the project has been funded to date by all levels of government, corporate partners including city land developers, not-for-profit organizations, and individual Calgarians.

Phase Three is the final 74 kilometres of the Greenway, taking it from Airport Trail through the neighbourhood of Cityscape, then connecting with two new side-by-side communities on the northeastern tip of the city, SkyView Ranch and Redstone. The Greenway then traverses west to 12-Mile Coulee, then south to connect into Baker Park, Bowmont Park, and Edworthy Park. The pathway will travel south along Sarcee Trail and 37 Street SW to the west edge of Fish Creek Park, which completes the 138 kilometres loop. The entire Rotary/Mattamy Greenway project is scheduled to be completed by mid-2017: 80% was already finished at the end of 2014, and by the end of 2015, it will be 90% complete.

KID GLOVES COURIER Furniture Delivery and Disposal Small Domestic Moves Contact Kelly Schultz to inquire Phone: 403-660-7792 Email: kidgloves@shaw.ca Calgary, Alberta

20 | Let us be your guide to the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway


Experience the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway

Detailed quadrant maps of the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway can be found on the following pages: NW Map pg 18 NE Map pg 19 SW Map pg 20 SE Map pg 21

CALGARY GREENWAY

Courtesy of Parks Foundation Calgary

21 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com


Rotary/Mattamy Greenway Map - NW Calgary wetland interpretation

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obstacle course fitness park

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rollerblading skills course

North Location - 403.454.4404 thecyclepath.ca

22 | Let us be your guide to the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway

#4112 - 8650 112 Ave NW


Rotary/Mattamy Greenway Map - NE Calgary wind and sound sculpture park

Stoney Trail pedestrian bridge

wetland

lookouts weather monitoring cloud physics interpretation

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17 Ave SE

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Harvest Lake Bed & Breakfast Minutes away from Calgary’s International Airport | 403-226-3025 | harvestlakebnb.com

23 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com


Rotary/Mattamy Greenway Map - SW Calgary Bo

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south glenmore park themed playground

• Complimentary shuttle service sculpture park

• Free courtesy cars

Anderson Road d Trail

• Offering full mechanical services (Done by Licensed Mechanic)

24 Street SW

True Service.

14 Street SW

Heritage Drive

MacLeo

• Hourly wait appointments • Friendly & knowledgeable staff

Call today for an appointment!!

fish creek park

Deer Valley Kal Tire 403 278 7500 Email: ktire@telusplanet.net 14947 Deer Ridge Drive SE

Marquis of Lorne Trail

Heritage Park Historical Village Check out our Yellow Otter Tipi (see pg 40) | HeritagePark.ca 403-268-8500

24 | Let us be your guide to the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway


Rotary/Mattamy Greenway Map - SE Calgary 17 Ave SE elliston park

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fish creek provincial park

off-leash dog park and agility training

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fitness park and interval running track

auburn bay wetland

cranston overlook

South Location - 403-253-7717 9176 Macleod Trail South

North Location - 403.454.4404 thecyclepath.ca

25 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com

#4112 - 8650 112 Ave NW


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26 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park

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2

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Information

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Rotary Nature Park

2 Lake Chaparral

Boat Launch Calgary Transit

194 Avenue S.E.

27 | ExperienceFishCreek.com

Lafarge Meadows

Cranston

5

10 Km


Fish Creek Single Track Trail Map

Woodpath Road S.W.

24th Street S.W.

Evergreen Street S.W. 37th Street S.W.

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Many trails, pathways and 3 bridges were affected by the 2013 flood and repairs or rerouting may take place. For up-to-date information on affected areas stop by the Visitor Centre, call the main park office at 403-297-5293 or visit fish-creek.org

Pathways and Trails • Stay on designated trails. Check Park map and signage for approved trails. Failure to do so could result in a conviction, pursuant to Section 27(2) of the Provincial Parks Act (General Regulations).

• Some areas have been closed to encourage natural vegetation and reclamation of impacted areas. All reclaimed areas are designated by these signs:

• Follow the directions of posted notices or signs. • The single track trail system is connected with existing paved and granular pathways. Single track trails are designated by this sign:

This trail is closed to allow restoration and regeneration of vegetation. For more information phone 403-297-5293

South Location - 403-253-7717 9176 Macleod Trail South

TRAIL CLOSED

North Location - 403.454.4404 thecyclepath.ca

28 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park

#4112 - 8650 112 Ave NW


Fish Creek Single Track Trail Map

Macleod Trail

ergreen eet S.W. Shawnee Gate S.W.

Bannister Road S.E.

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Park Facilities and Information Park washroom facilities are located near staging areas; consult detailed Park maps for facility locations. For Park information phone 403-297-5293 or visit fish-creek.org

Trail Etiquette

Safety on Single Track Trails

• Be courteous - a cyclist climbing a steep grade will appreciate your stepping aside.

• Single track trails are maintained at a lesser standard than paved or granular trails, and are not graded for difficulty levels; use at your own risk.

• Avoid trail use when it is soft and muddy to help prevent trail widening and the creation of short cuts. • Do not alter the trail in any way. No building jumps or obstacles.

• All riders should wear a helmet. Helmets are mandatory for those under 18 years of age.

EMERGENCY telephone 9-1-1 EMERGENCY Locator numbers are located throughout the Park. Quote this number to emergency staff so they can easily locate you in the Park.

• Be aware that Park maintenance and emergency vehicles may be on Park pathways.

Trail Care Program: If you or your group would like to participate in a Trail Care day, please contact the Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park Society, visit friendsoffishcreek.org or phone 403-238-3841. 29 | ExperienceFishCreek.com


Off-Leash Dog Parks The Off-Leash Park Rules! The off-leash park is a great place to go when everyone follows the posted rules: • Your dog must be under your control and able to respond to voice or signals. • You must pick up after your dog. • Parking lots and pathways are on-leash. • Dogs must not harass or chase wildlife. Photo by: Reanne Heuston

There are many different versions of etiquette for off-leash parks. Tension mounts when ideas differ, or when people and their dogs seem to follow no particular rules at all. We all have bad days, dogs included! A favourite technique of mine when something goes wrong is to take a deep breath and say to myself “we are in training.” When my shoe squishes in poo, when a puppy jumps up, or when I have to hold up traffic to wait for a dog to tear around the parking lot, I take a deep breath and think “those people are in training.” I could make a long list of off-leash park etiquette, but I would rather share some things that can easily make everyone’s day a little better: 1. I am going to just come out and say it: poop! Yes, we all hate picking up after our dog. Yes, it is gross, smelly, hot, and squishy. Make poop pick-up better with lavender, vanilla, turquoise, textured, or patterned biodegradable poop bags. If your dog’s poop has magically disappeared, pick up three others that you find at the park. When there is a lot of poop lying around dogs develop the habit of ingesting feces - it’s nature’s yucky way of keeping the park clean. Remember, there is no point in gift wrapping poop in a pretty purple bag if it doesn’t make it to the garbage. 2. Always bring your leash! My leash helps me safely break up dog fights, carry poop bags, keeps my dog safe when we see wildlife, and I can’t even count the number of dogs my leash has returned to its panicked owner. Yes, I love my leash! If a dog is on a leash ask permission before letting your dog approach. If they say “no” but it is too late, grab your dog gently and say “sorry, we’re in training.” When you practice this, your dog will begin to look at you or “ask permission” before visiting other dogs on a leash. Responsible owners will put their dogs on a leash if their dog gets over-aroused, isn’t listening, or simply because they are in training.

3. Move! Walk, jog, crawl...just move. Off-leash parks exist to facilitate exercise for our dogs. When owners stand around it creates conflict with the dogs. The dogs get over-aroused in play, and some even guard owners. Moving helps your dog relax. A relaxed dog is more welcoming to new dogs and people. But keep in mind that although you and your dog may meet wonderful new friends at the park, it should not be your sole reason for going. Why go to the park? For mental and physical exercise. 4. Toys and treats: some use them, some don’t. There is no question that it feels wonderful to give your dog a reward for a job well done. The controversy? Some dogs can be food aggressive, ball possessive, or bother people with treats! Those who get upset about people carrying rewards have yet to run into the man on a park bench eating a sandwich, the toddler in a little red sled with a box of Timbits, or a family playing Frisbee. If your dog can’t behave around food or toys, you have got bigger problems. If you happen to be someone who carries treats or toys with you at the park, only give them to your dog. In Calgary we are so lucky to have off-leash parks. The one thing they all have? Other life! Other life is welcome! Having a dog isn’t a prerequisite for the off-leash park. Don’t get upset at others for your dog’s naughty behaviour. If your dog is being absolutely horrible, catch them and leave the park. Your “horrible” dog may just be sore, frustrated, intimidated, or over-aroused. Take a deep breath, clip on your leash and get out of there. Go grab a coffee and return a little later, or try again tomorrow. We all have days where we are “in training.” And don’t forget to pick up poop! It will make everyone’s day just a little better. By: Reanne Heuston

30 | Let us be your guide to the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway


Trail Etiquette Fish Creek Provincial Park is a great place to picnic, exercise, or explore nature with a canine companion. Activities are more enjoyable when proper park etiquette is observed. Although both humans and canines have evolved, we are still both mammals and have certain conditioned responses to stimuli. If someone makes a unexpected loud noise close to us, we startle. When something runs, dogs (a predatory animal) naturally want to chase. It isn’t necessary to pull someone off the path and make small talk to communicate effectively. Using body language, calling out a quick warning, or simply moving over can help make the park more harmonious. Knowing a little about canine body language can also help to improve nonverbal communication at the park. Animals communicate differently than humans. A pathway is designed so that users travel almost straight towards each other. In dog language moving straight and staring at one another is the opposite of polite, in fact, it’s like calling each other’s mamas bad names. When greeting politely, dogs approach in an arc. Dogs communicate by turning their head, sniffing, licking their lips or simply shifting their weight. There are other subtle signals of their complex nonverbal language. Dogs act aggressively when people ignore their “hints” to slow, calm down or move away. Instead of walking your dog down the path’s centre line you can make people seem less threatening by moving Buster to the right side. By walking on the side adjacent to the grass your dog will realize he doesn’t have to sniff every bum that passes 50 cm from him and the pads on his paws stay scrape free from the asphalt.

When owners tighten up on the leash some dogs feel frustrated or threatened and therefore more protective. Owners can teach their dogs to walk on a loose leash that is 2 metres or less. Try to avoid retractable leashes on a small path. Reasons to be cautious of these tools are stamped on the warning label of the device. When travelling through the park and you notice a dog pulling on it’s leash or staring at you, look away or arc as you approach. This will make the dog feel more comfortable as well as let the owner know you are feeling threatened by their dog. Fox hunters that use hounds have an old saying, “if his nose is on the ground and his mouth is closed...his ears are closed”. You may think a dog would hear a bike coming up behind it, but this old saying carries some truth. Give ample warning when approaching someone from behind. “Howdy!” or “On yer left” are two Calgarian favourites. When feeling unsure of someone, their dog, or their skills on those wheeled demons you can always use the universal cue to ignore someone. Avoid eye contact and arc way around them. You close your eyes to take in the sounds and smells of nature in this Calgary paradise. You hear a bike bell ring. Your dog knows that sound. He sits down and looks up at you, as if he’s smiling. While passing by, the cyclist calls out “Thank You”. All is well, and you and Buster continue to explore the paths. By: Reanne Heuston

Tom Sherry Medorann Boucher Audra Reinhardt

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Maintaining Good Health

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The weather is warming and it’s time for me to plan and gear up for my backcountry mountain trip. I’ll be spending nine days solo and off the grid, likely covering over 150 kilometres and 4,000 feet of elevation with my 65 pound pack. Needless to say, the most important equipment I have will be the legs that will carry me through this reprieve from the busy city. Part of my training regime includes a daily run along the many pathways found in and linking Calgary’s parks, such as Fish Creek Provincial Park. Ironically, in the month before writing this article, I changed up my workout routine and wouldn’t you know it, my right knee hurts. I told myself (perhaps like you would), “it will get better on its own … right? I’ll just continue to work out, and maybe skip a workout or two with a little more stretching then usual, right?” Well, not this time! Oops. So now the task of carrying a full pack over a long distance, up and down mountains, isn’t so certain. It’s time to get back to basic maintenance for the hips, knees, and feet (and everything else!) and allow the body to heal fully before pushing ahead. For active people, maintaining your body is about ensuring your quality of life. What you decide to invest in yourself depends on the level at which you want to play. A couch potato likely needs little reassurance that their body is capable of accomplishing the tasks of locating the remote and securing a spot on the couch. Olympic athletes are at the other extreme end of the spectrum. Hence they devote much of their resources to personal maintenance. Most of us are somewhere in between.

Achy knees are common for people at any activity level, after all we all walk on them daily. This article is geared to helping you stimulate flexibility and strength around the knee and isn’t intended to replace proper care and guidance from your chiropractor or physiotherapist. For flexibility around the knee, imagine that you need to stretch the front, back, and both sides of the knee. Hold the stretches for approximately 30 seconds at least one time per day, but 2-3 times each day would be ideal. To stretch the front of the knee, lie on your left side, bring you right heel up to your butt and grab your right ankle with your right hand. (Image 1) For the back of the knee, sit on the floor with one or both legs straight out in front of you, hinge forward from the hips and flex your toes back up toward your knees. (Image 2) For the inside of the knee, sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you and then fan the legs apart as far as you can before bending forward from the waist. (Image 3) For the outside of the knee, stand and cross the knee you want to stretch behind your other leg and bend your body sideways away from the knee you’re stretching. (Image 4) Strengthening the knee does not require special equipment, although they can help. Simple yet effective exercises can be performed in your living room. These exercises should be done with three sets/groups of 15 reps every second day.

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Stretching and Footwear To strengthen the quadriceps, your basic squat is nice, but help rehabilitate the various knee tendons, eccentric exercises are best. This type of stretching are lengthening exercises, referred to as “negative reps.” There are two that should be done to aid the knee to start. For the quadriceps, or front of the knee, stand on the leg you will exercise first and bend the other knee back so you’re just standing on one leg, then slowly lower yourself down over 3-4 seconds so that you land down slowly on the opposite knee, then switch legs and stand using both legs. Again, with these exercises the idea is to emphasize “the down” motion in the repetition. (Images 5) For the back of the knee, think of it as a golfer retrieving a golf tee, but in slow motion on “the down” or retrieving motion, then standing up normally. This will strengthen the hamstrings and calf where they cross the back of the knee. (Images 6) Along with proper conditioning, protect your knees by wearing proper shoes. There is no recipe for preventing injuries through footwear. However, there are some logical basics. Proper footwear should be selected first for its intended purpose. Activities can include walking, hiking, running, and working. Don’t skimp on proper fit or quality with functional footwear. $100 saved amounts to nothing if your trip or exercise regime is shortened or made uncomfortable by a poor fit.

The second factor is the terrain your footwear is to be used in. Terrain in Canada changes with the season, not just with the geographical location. Ideally, you may need two pairs of footwear for the same activity during differing seasons. Once again fit is paramount, so be sure to try on any new footwear with the supporting gear you will be using with it, such as thicker or extra socks, gaiters, or long underwear where the leg seams may be compressed into your leg. Footwear is the foundation upon which our body stands when running through parks or hiking trails. Proper footgear not only absorbs some of the repeated force generated through use, but also supports our body’s proper movements and biomechanics. Footwear should be replaced periodically to maintain proper shock absorption and the characteristics that allow it to support your feet and knees. With all footwear, but especially running shoes, it is common for the shoe’s sole and supportive integrity to be severely compromised while at first glance it may look as if it is in relatively good shape. At the end of the day it’s about your enjoyment of life and it’s abundant offerings. Maintain your body: you can’t buy a new one! And invest in the proper equipment.

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‘Till next time … Dr. Don Findlay

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33 | ExperienceFishCreek.com


Hiking 101: How to Tie Your Boots For hikers who consistently tackle aggressive hiking missions, there are finer details to boot tying which should improve the experience for any hiker. Putting on a boot is synonymous with “carefully packing up a foot.” For an aggressive hike, wear 2 pairs of socks in a quality hiking boot - a thin liner and a thicker outer sock. Carefully massage both to remove any wrinkles. The theory is the thin synthetic liner sock tracks the foot and wicks moisture away from the skin. The outer, thicker, wool sock tracks with the motion of the boot while providing moisture absorption, and cushioning. Friction between the skin and the boot is reduced by the socks capturing some of that motion. It works well for me but I also carry a set of eZeefit ankle booties to further reduce friction and prevent blisters. The eZeefit shims are an alternative to moleskin. Hiking boots have two very distinct parts. My foot is in a shoe while the upper portion of the boot is an ankle support. The two sections can and should be tied independently. These photographs will illustrate the steps I am describing to tie laces. 1. Unlace the boot down to where the ankle joins the top of the foot. (See photo #1) 2. Carefully check the socks for any wrinkles. Redo until perfect. Loosen the tongue and carefully slide the foot into the boot. Knock the heel firmly to the back of the boot. The heel must

be snug to reduce the heel rubbing on the inside of the boot. (See photo #2) 3. Place the tongue in position and tuck flaps smooth. Snug the laces at the bottom. I recommend laces with “stick.” Spend the money for a pair of high-end, quality boot laces. Keep the original laces as spares in the bottom of your backpack. Bring the laces over the top of the middle hooks and under the bottom. Do a simple crosstie and pull firm. Notice this will place the tie over the laces below, providing friction which substantially increases the hold and security of my foot in the “shoe.” It also increases the resistance for a more loosely tied ankle support section to creep down into the shoe component. If the shoe gets loose, the foot can move forward and the heel will no longer be held securely in the back of the boot. If the heel gets loose, it can move up and down and dramatically increase the potential for blistering. (See photo #3) 4. Initially, lace up the top, ankle part of the boot from around the bottom of hooks. (See photo #4) 5. At the top hooks, lace around the top of the hook and out the bottom, then make the tie over the laces underneath. (See photo #5) 6. Finish the final tie in a double knot and you are ready for the trail. (See photo #6)

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For Safety and Comfort #1

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Photos Courtesy of Justin Howse

By reversing the pattern at mid-point and at the top, the tie will occur over the top of the lace to better secure the position. This may seem trivial but, in my experience, this small alteration in the pattern can make a big difference. By separating the bottom of the boot from the top, you can adjust them independently. The objective is to keep a carefully packed foot stable at the heel of the boot and to keep the ankle protected on uneven terrain. This reduces the risk of rub and subsequent blistering on heels, toe stress during descent, and ankle fatigue or injury. You could be far from immediate assistance in time and distance. If I am hiking a long, sustained descent, my feet are angled predominantly downward and my foot wants to slide to the front of the boot. I can reduce the risk of toe rub and improve heel stability by tightening the ties at the top of both the shoe and ankle portion. Conversely, if I am on a sustained incline, my feet are angled predominantly upward so the heel wants to stay at the back of the boot where it belongs. If the top of the ankle support begins to bite into the shin, I can loosen the top tie. You will keep tension in a middle range with the occasional adjustment for lace stretch and will be fine for the whole day. At the midpoint of a hike, normally at maximum elevation, I will remove my boots and socks so they can dry out a bit. As you gain experience, the tension of the laces for those “sweet spots” will become practiced and intuitive. In the beginning, you may

need to adjust more often to get it right. Patience and attention to detail will help in the long term on more aggressive hikes. As an example, your boots will be tied much differently if you are desceding into Paradise Valley from Sentinel Pass for a visit to the Giant Steps and other incredible valley features before the return ascent above Lake Louise in Banff National Park. There are some boot lacing systems which prevent this approach so you may need to be inventive to create a similar result. At day’s end, I experience a major benefit by changing into fresh, dry socks and different, comfortable footwear. Trust me! It is a good idea to carry an extra boot lace in your backpack. In addition to replacing a broken lace, there are a large variety of applications where a thin, tough rope may come in handy. For shoulder season hiking or for rugged terrain, supplement your hiking kit with gaiters and hiking crampons to increase comfort and safety. I use a pair of Kahtoola K-10 hiking crampons and I am very happy with them. This lacing approach, one of many methods of lacing boots for improved comfort and safety, has worked well for me for many years. After learning it more than 30 years ago, I could feel the difference right away. By: Barry Taylor

35 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com


Family-Friendly Rambles in Calgary’s Natural Areas I’ve lived in Calgary for over ten years now and it wasn’t until I became a parent that I began to explore the nature on my own doorstep. We escaped to the mountains to go hiking every weekend, but I never knew that I could go for a hike without ever leaving the city limits. Nobody had ever told me how vast the City of Calgary’s natural areas were and that from any community in Calgary you could quickly find nature by just stepping out your front door. The city maintains over 5,600 park sites and nearly 800 kilometres of pathways spread out over 10,000 hectares of parkland. Explore the city’s natural areas and you’ll discover something new around every corner - from natural springs and waterfalls to wooden boardwalks, oxbow wetlands, forests with towering Douglas fir trees, and a pond with a bridge made out of stepping stones. I challenge you to take the children out this summer to explore some of our favourite family-friendly rambles.

Nose Hill Park and the Old Quarry Nose Hill Park is surrounded by 12 communities and covers an area of 11 km2 in northwest Calgary. I love this park because in many places you honestly can’t tell you are in the city anymore, all you see when you look around is prairie, grass, and a big blue sky. Nose Hill parking lots can be accessed from Shaganappi Trail, 14th Street, and John Laurie Boulevard. We usually start from the parking lot at John Laurie Boulevard and Brisebois Drive and head straight for the quarry. To find the quarry, follow the paved trail up to the top of the hill and then proceed straight north on an old gravel and dirt road - you really can’t miss it. If you look carefully, you might find a porcupine hiding in a tree, see the stones from an old tipi ring, or even see a deer hiding in a thicket. If you’re going to visit the quarry, be prepared with rubber boots, a change of clothes, and some wet wipes to clean muddy children and pets before getting in the vehicle afterwards: the quarry usually fills with water creating a pond for children to play in. A rock bridge across the middle guarantees at least one child will fall in and come home wet.

Edworthy Park and the Douglas Fir Trail The Douglas Fir Trail is one of the most well-known hikes in Calgary and is located in Edworthy Park on the southern bank of the Bow River. If you access the park off Spruce Drive in the southwest, you’ll be parked right beside the Bow River Pathway on the south side of the train tracks that run through the park. Follow the paved regional trail heading east until you come to the official sign for the Douglas Fir Trail. Truly a gem in our city, the trail will have you walking over wooden boardwalks and climbing flights of stairs as you make your way to the top of an escarpment looking down over the park and the river. The trail winds its way through a beautiful forest that is scenic even on an overcast or rainy day. Note that if it’s raining however, the boardwalks get very slippery and extreme caution is required. The trail is also closed in winter and early spring due to ice caused from natural springs found along the path. The trail is 2.5 kilometres long from Edworthy Park to Cedar Crescent SW. From there, return the same way you came or make your way down to the regional pathway and return on the paved trail. Many people also hike to the high point at the top of the stairs and go back down again for a shorter hike with small children.

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Family-Friendly Rambles in Calgary’s Natural Areas Bowmont Natural Environment Park and Waterfall Valley I was never so impressed with our natural areas as when I discovered the incredible Waterfall Valley in the Bowmont Natural Environment Park. The Bowmont area stretches all the way from Bowness Park in the northwest to the community of Varsity further east as it follows the northern bank of the Bow River. It passes by the Silver Springs Golf and Country Club and eventually ends at Home Road a few blocks away from Market Mall. While the park offers a myriad of trails to explore, our favourite is the little known Waterfall Valley Trail. It is located just off the paved trail that winds through the park and is accessed from the bottom of Silver Springs Blvd at the intersection with 54th Ave NW. Park on the street beside the large sign for Bowmont Natural Environment Park and follow the paved pathway heading west. You’ll see the sign for Waterfall Valley within a few hundred metres and you’ll descend down into the valley towards the river. You’ll be following wooden boardwalks and stairs as you make your way to a set of natural springs near the Bow River. The river is not currently accessible from this trail but there are plenty of natural trails you can take from further up the trail heading west if you want to make your hike longer.

North Glenmore Park and the Weaselhead Natural Area There’s nothing quite like the Weaselhead Natural Area in all of Calgary. This city treasure truly takes you far away from it all as you follow the meandering Elbow River past Oxbow Wetlands, over wooden boardwalks, and through Calgary’s only delta. To access the area, look for the signed Weaselhead parking lot at North Glenmore Park at the bottom of 37th Street SW. You’ll be right beside the paved regional pathway that descends a large hill towards South Glenmore Park. From your starting point looking down on the west end of the Glenmore reservoir, head southwest on the regional pathway and make your way down to a bridge that crosses the reservoir. You’ll see the sign for the Weaselhead Area shortly after you cross the bridge. A trail map can be found at the trailhead so plot out your route and make note of intersections you’ll want to remember later. The orange loop is the most scenic and offers you a complete tour of the area. Families with young children can double back on the green trail which features a short boardwalk.

Discovery Ridge and Griffith Woods Griffith Woods is another natural area located along the banks of the Elbow River in the southwest community of Discovery Ridge. There are several entrances into the park from the south side of Discovery Ridge Boulevard, but the official parking lot is found off Discovery Ridge Cove and Discovery Ridge Link. The paved pathway through the park is great for biking, and the natural gravel paths are also fun to bike or hike as a family. Hiking in Griffith Woods feels like you’ve discovered a secret forest in the middle of the city with a meandering creek and bridges throughout. What you’re really looking for though is the pond with a bridge made out of stepping stones. While it’s a bit of a scavenger hunt to find, the natural path is on the northwest side of the park, north of the power lines. Once you find it, you’ll remember where it is. Story and Photos by: Tanya Koob 37 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com


Experience Cycling

Unless you’ve spent the past 30 years under a pile of jackets, you will have noticed a dramatic change in consumer products. Exponential growth in computer power combined with endless new fabrication techniques and vast overseas labour markets has affected the production of almost everything, including bicycles. The basic shape of modern bicycles solidified towards the end of the 18th century when the development of chain drives made the massive front wheels of tall, accident prone penny farthings obsolete. And in time, bicycles became the primary mode of transportation for millions of people worldwide. Soon enough, a single gear was insufficient for many riders, and several styles of brakes have come and gone, actuated by levers, rods, cables, and fluid. Bike frames have been made of everything from wood, steel, and aluminum, to titanium and carbon fiber. By the early 1980s, bicycle frames were made of various forms of steel. Some alloys were more marketable than others, but only people willing to pay big dollars could buy a frame that was based on an element other than iron. There were generally road bikes and mountain bikes, both of which tended to be available with 10 speeds (five cogs on the rear hub and two multiplier rings on the crank). Road bikes had shifting levers on the frame, and mountain bikes had shorter ones next to the brake levers. Front shock absorbers were just hitting the market world wide and the only way to slow down and stop were caliper brakes, drum brakes, or a foot held against the tire. Japanese ingenuity and robotic manufacturing led to the mass production of more complicated bike designs. Suddenly there were rapid-fire gear selectors, some of which were considerate

enough to tell the rider which cog he or she was using. Derailers became more precise and reliable thanks to elegant ratcheting mechanisms that combined form and function. Road bike brake levers and gear selectors were happily merged into a single input device that freed riders from taking their hands away from a firm position of control and stability. Control of the bike has also been increased by the use of disc brakes. The stopping power produced by rubber pads squeezed by calipers against the preferably light material of the wheel rim was the best that was available for decades. Finally, a disc of hard metal mounted at the centre of the wheel was available which could be squeezed by pads that were much harder than rubber (either metal or ceramic). Lighter materials were also on the way. Throughout history, most machines have been made of steel. It has been available for centuries and much was already known about its properties when rubber tires suddenly softened the ride of the so called “boneshakers” that were used on some of the first high-profile bike races. Steel is strong, easy to work with and available on a massive and economically attractive scale. However, steel is significantly heavier than aluminum and when humans are the prime mover of a machine, weight adds up quickly. Aluminum, which is plentiful throughout the Earth’s crust, is relatively light, but is it brittle and more complicated to work with. Thicker tubes and specialized welding were required to overcome the disadvantages, but once the bugs were worked out, significant weight reductions were realized. A decade later, carbon fiber frames continued this trend by abandoning metal altogether in a manner that was affordable for casual enthusiasts.

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The Evolution of Cycling The great leaps of the 20th century can be seen in more than the mechanical wonders of the frame and components of the bicycle itself. Electronic accessories have made their way into a market where size, weight, and durability are very important design considerations. Electronics are, in fact, one of the most powerful changes to have taken place in the past few decades. They have brought light into our lives like never before. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are simple electronic components that produce light efficiently. Until recently they have only been available in red, yellow, and green. They were used as number indicators in VCRs and gave products a futuristic feel. However, as manufacturers were able to make LCDs brighter, they were eventually packed with a pair of batteries and a microchip in a weather resistant shell that was easily mounted on a bike seat post or a backpack. The streets at night were then brightly punctuated by clear, sharp red flashing that alerted motorists to the presence of a cyclist. The developments that led to the corresponding white LEDs won the Nobel Prize and made bulkier halogen handlebar lights obsolete. Electronics also ride with us in the form of computers that are far more powerful than the ones that were brought to the surface of the moon. GPS receivers can tell us our distance travelled, speed, and can keep a record of our route. And after our ride, these devices can connect to remote servers in order to create a detailed report of our performance. Digital power controllers, advanced lithium batteries, and rare earth elements have allowed the manufacture of electric motors that can be built into a wheel and operated with precision and ease to provide a welcome boost. They are often more powerful

than the rider. Fancy new bike locks such as BITLOCK can be electronically actuated from a cell phone, doing away with the keys and combinations of days gone by. New belt drives do away with the chains that did away with the penny farthing. They are quieter, cleaner, and low maintenance. They will never rust, and while they do have some significant hurdles that might keep them from becoming mainstream, people are using rubber to replace metal for the crucial task of transmitting their efforts towards the pavement. Research and development will continue to improve upon the functionality of the belts and the internally geared hub shifters that are required for chainless bikes to run. Internal hub shifters contain the clockwork that can provide up to 13 speeds (so far). This keeps the complicated cogs and shafts sheltered from the dirt and salt of winter urban riding, and while belt drives require hub shifters, they work just fine with chains. The awesome global industrial capacity of this age has made us rich in material, information, and recreational opportunities. Manufacturing plants at home and abroad have produced huge quantities of almost everything that anyone would want to buy, and mass production has made many of the fine things in life much more affordable. Most working people can now purchase a bicycle that is far superior to anything that was available 100 years ago. We can exercise using brilliant, reliable machines that quietly allow us to cover many more kilometers than we could with our feet alone, and they require much less energy and pavement than automobiles. There’s never been a better time to crawl out from under your pile of jackets! By: Cameron Melin

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Experience Golf

Heritage Pointe by Andrew Penner

With its beautiful river valleys, arid coulees, rolling parkland, and wonderful mountain views—it’s no surprise that Calgary is home to some of the best golf courses in the country. Golf, it seems, was made for places like this! And, with over thirty championship golf courses to choose from, there are over 500 golf holes for Calgary’s passionate posse of players to swing at. From knee knocking par 3s with island greens to super sweet par 5s that parade through pristine pine-lined corridors, there are numerous holes in the region that easily fall into the “awesome” category. And narrowing them down to a top-10 is a difficult proposition. While the following holes (listed in no particular order) are high in wow factor, your list of favourites could easily contain 10 completely different holes. And that’s good! It’s just another reason why the golf scene in Calgary is so strong. 1. Heritage Pointe Golf Course, Hole 4 (Heritage Nine), Par 4, 479 yards Tucked away in beautiful Pine Creek Valley near De Winton, Heritage Pointe has remained a “must play” in Calgary ever since it burst onto the scene. With three distinct nines, an outstanding practice facility, and a sprawling hilltop clubhouse, it’s certainly the full meal deal. And the tough-as-nails 4th on the Heritage Nine, a 479 -yard par 4 that bends along the bluff and crosses the creek, is one of many to feast on at Heritage Pointe. heritagepointe.com/Calgary-golf-course 2. Valley Ridge Golf Club, Hole 17, Par 3, 225 yards Hugging the banks of the Bow River in NW Calgary, Valley Ridge is another upscale facility with all the ingredients for a memorable day of golf. And the 7,100-yard Ken Dye designed golf course is certainly the star of the show. One of the stand-

out holes is the par 3 17th. It plunges down the hill (so club selection is always a crap shoot!) and features a massive green surrounded by sand pits and poplars. valleyridgegolf.com 3. McKenzie Meadows Golf Club, Hole 12, Par 4, 440 yards Heavily damaged in the 2013 “flood of floods,” McKenzie Meadows has made an impressive comeback. Hats off to superintendant Wade Bishop and his entire crew, as well as the many volunteers, for restoring this player-friendly course. The back nine starts with a solid run of holes along the bluff, including the toughest hole on the course, the 440-yard 12th. It requires a strong fade off the tee and a long iron approach into a small green guarded by the busiest bunker on the course. mckenziemeadows.com 4. Canyon Meadows Golf & Country Club, Hole 18, Par 5, 550 yards Thrust into the spotlight thanks to the Shaw Charity Classic— now a major success story on the Champions Tour—Canyon Meadows is one of Calgary’s premier private clubs. If you get an invite it would be unwise to turn it down! Overlooking Fish Creek Provincial Park and boasting 18 holes that will test every facet of your game, it’s no wonder the best senior golfers in the world love the layout. It’s likely that 2014 champion Fred Couples, who chipped in for a closing eagle on the dynamite par 5 finisher, would say the 18th is his favourite. And you will too! canyonmeadowsgolf.com 5. Springbank Links, Hole 5, Par 3, 174 yards With two distinct nines (the back has an open “links” feel while the front has a rolling parkland setting) Springbank Links appeals to a wide variety of tastes. The western overtones here

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Calgary’s Best Golf Holes also add to the ambiance. Regardless of your skill level, it’s always a “wild west” showdown when you play their famous Devil’s Triad stretch of holes. The 5th, a do-or-die par 3 over the ravine and the first hole of this difficult run, is about as good a place as any for a dust up. springbanklinks.com 6. Wintergreen Golf & Country Club, Hole 1, Par 5, 520 yards Located 30 minutes west of Calgary in Bragg Creek, Wintergreen serves up an awesome mountain golf experience right on Calgary’s doorstep. The huge elevation drops always make for an exciting round. And the action starts fast and furious with the starting hole, a plunging par 5 that is both beauty and beast. Unquestionably, this is one of the most thrilling starts in Alberta. wintergreengolf.com 7. Sirocco Golf Club, Hole 18, Par 4, 440 yards With absolutely perfect scoring conditions all week, the top players on the Canadian Tour binged on birdies in the 2014 ATB Financial Classic (the winner finished 27 under par), which was contested at Sirocco. However, for the rest of us, the course, which meanders through a beautiful valley south of Calgary, is tricky and tough. The 18th, for example, is a super-strong par 4 with two creek crossings. It is a hole that epitomizes both the beauty and challenge of this excellent championship course. sirocco.ca 8. Calgary Elks Lodge & Golf Club, Hole 17, Par 3, 225 yards Located in the heart of Calgary and routed through mature pines and poplars, the Elks features one of the best finishing stretches in Alberta. The 17th, a long downhill par 3 with a green surrounded by water, is an outstanding, late-round challenge. A good swat here and you could be singing a birdie ballad; a bad swing and you’ll have the double-bogey blues! calgaryelks.com/Golf.aspx 9. Calgary Golf & Country Club, Hole 18, Par 4, 460 yards The Calgary Golf & Country Club, which is located along the banks of the Elbow River near downtown, is a hushed and heavenly spot. Unfortunately, due to its private status, scoring a tee time can be a difficult proposition. However, for those that do, the final hole—a stellar par 4 with a perched tee and a velvet fairway that hugs the river—is one of the best you’ll ever play. cgandcc.com/Home.aspx

McKenzie Meadows

Escape the city for a round! Check out Golfing the Cowboy Trail at experiencethecowboytrail.com/stories.

Heading to the mountains? We’ve run 5 great golf stories within past editions of Experience the Mountain Parks.You’ll find them all at experiencemountainparks.com/stories

10. Inglewood Golf & Curling Club, Hole 18, Par 5, 489 yards Completely submerged during the 2013 flood, the recovery at the Inglewood Golf & Curling Club is a testament to determination and community spirit that ruled the day during that difficult time. In fact, not only did the staff, members, and volunteers at Inglewood save the course, they brought it back better than ever! The closing hole on Inglewood’s classic, tree-lined course—a terrific risk/reward par 5 with water guarding the green—is an excellent summation of one of Calgary’s most popular facilities. inglewoodgolfclub.ca If you’ve played any golf at all in the area, you know just how good the terrain here is for golf. You also know that many holes that could have been on this list did not appear. And that, in golf-rich Calgary, is just the way it has to be! By: Andrew Penner 41 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com

Sirocco by Andrew Penner


Experience Fly Fishing on the Bow boat rental with Country Pleasures, I was oozing with confidence and fully expecting to bag a school of trophy-size trout. Joining me on this “epic” one-trout day was my father-in-law, Gordon, who had last picked up a fly-rod when Jimmy Carter was president. As for me, I was probably looking at the Ronald Reagan days. But, as seasoned veterans will tell you, even the rookies can score big on the Bow. Shortly after our put-in under the Glenmore overpass, I turned to our capable guide, Jason Eggleton, who has bagged hundreds of days guiding float trips down the Bow, and sheepishly asked, “so how many fish did you catch on your best day on the river?” “People measure their best days differently,” he said with a wry grin. “But, if you’re strictly after quantity, sixty or seventy, I guess. I’ve had days where it’s virtually non-stop action. The Bow can be that good.” Of course, there were reasons - well, let’s just say “legitimate excuses” - for our meager take. In spring, during run-off or spring storms, the water levels on the Bow can change quickly. And this fluctuation, as well the poor visibility that accompanies rapidly changing water, can be a major hindrance to fly-fishing. Mike Gifford, owner of Country Pleasures says “Think of it this way, when your living space is drastically being altered, are you really going to be thinking about food? It’s probably the last thing on your mind. For good fishing we need stable conditions.” For most competent anglers drifting down the Bow - especially during the peak summer months when the water is clear and stable – trying to find excuses is seldom necessary. The Bow, which is the only premier trout stream in North America to flow through a major city, gets bigger and slower as it moves east. And, for most of the summer, it serves up stable conditions that are ideal for driftboat fly-fishing. Unfortunately, to put it mildly, we just hit the river on a challenging day.

Ten minutes before our take-out at Policeman’s Flats, in one of the weirdest five minutes of fishing I’ve ever experienced, the sky unleashed its fury and our luck suddenly changed. During the chaotic hailstorm we, miraculously, bagged our only brown trout of the day. And, when it was all said and done, my respect for severe Alberta thunderstorms - and one of our province’s most revered trout streams - reached new heights. A favourite among Alberta’s tight-knit fly-fishing community, the Bow River regularly gives up rainbow and brown trout worth writing home about. Thanks to our professional guide and a drift-

Shortly after lunch, the clouds gathered and our cool, blustery day made a turn for the worse. By the time we reached Hwy 22x a legendary hot spot - a steady rain was falling. And still no luck with the fishing. Jason was dismayed. Just past 22x, the wind started whipping violently through the trees and hail started hammering down on us. Everything went white and chaotic. We were caught. I could hardly see my fatherin-law, Gordon, at the front of the boat. But above the pelting madness I heard him yell. “Hey, I’ve got something!” Jason quickly put down anchor as Gordon battled one of the meanest, maddest, most miniscule brown trout that’s ever been snagged on the Bow. But, unlike me, at least he got one.

42 | Let us be your guide to Fish Creek Provincial Park

Story and Photo by: Andrew Penner


The Bow Habitat Station Four things you’ll discover at Bow Habitat Station: Located just off Calgary’s cycle route in Pearce Estate Park, Bow Habitat Station is home to a frenzy of family fun. With attractions both inside and out, your experience can be as unique as you are! 1. 65 different fish species make their home in Alberta! From small to large, you’ll get a glimpse into the rarely seen underwater world in the Discovery Centre’s aquariums—including a fish that’s related to the dinosaurs! 2. Fish really do create a frenzy when they eat! You can tour the indoor fish hatchery for an opportunity to experience what happens when you drop a handful of fish food into a pond filled with thousands of hungry trout. Careful, the front row has been known to get wet! 3. Trout sure can be hard to trick! No luck reeling in the big one? That fish you’re trying to catch has probably learned the hard way that your bright, shiny lure isn’t a bug. Do your best to make your lure dance in the water and you may just get lucky! 4. There may be more than you think living beneath your feet! All sorts of critters (known as invertebrates) make their homes in the marshes. Discover what lies beneath the water’s surface! So what are you waiting for? Wade on in to make a splash!

The Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society What if you were hit by a car and nobody stopped to help you? This is the reality for countless wild animals that are injured every day by their contact with humans; with no one to help them recover or end their suffering. We believe that every life has value. We provide a chance for these animals to live the wild life they were meant to live. In 1993, The Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (CWRS) was founded to provide professional care for injured wildlife.

Our mandate is to rescue, rehabilitate and release—the 3 Rs of responsible wildlife management. Every year, we receive over 2000 patients, and respond to thousands of wildlife-related calls. We are the only place in Calgary with the necessary permits and skills to rehabilitate wildlife. Yet we receive no direct government funding and rely on donations to pay for food, housing, medical supplies, and staffing. With a budget of $315,000, we spend only $150/patient. The need for wildlife rehabilitation is growing as the city expands and wildlife-human conflict increases. Calgary is home to over 300 species of wild animals. This biodiversity enriches the lives of every Calgarian and should be protected. This is why CWRS is an active member of the community providing hundreds of wildlife education programs every year to schools, senior’s residences, and community groups. We can continue their care but only with your help. Please consider donating to this established grassroots charity. Every dollar you contribute helps local wildlife in need. For more information on our programs and our services please visit our website: calgarywildlife.org or call our wildlife hotline 403-239-2488. Story and Photos by Andrea S. H. Hunt, Executive Director

43 | ExperienceFishCreek.com


Experience Heritage Park Friends of Fish Creek Survey Recently the Friends of Fish Creek surveyed their members with 10 questions. Here are some of the responses they received. Where is the best place in Fish Creek to watch a sunrise and/or a sunset? Brian: Sunrise from the Parkland ridge / Sunset from the Mount McKenzie ridge above bridge 14 Jennifer Solem: Sunrise: ridge at Sun Valley Blvd. Sunset: on Bridges 12 or 13 between The Ranche and Sikome Rick: Cranston Ridge Jacqueline Deegan: Standing on the MacKenzie Hill at Sunset overlooking the Bow River and the Rockies in the distance. Lynda: On the ridge in Midnapore, sitting on a bench overlooking the park

What are your 3 favourite activities that you like to do in the park? Stewart Scott: Running, Hiking, Snowshoeing Sara Dahlman: Walking my dogs, Biking from one end to the other, Exploring with my son Dan Edwards: Walking, Birding, Fishing Susan Gallup: Running, Running oh, and Running Liz: Cycling, Walking, Bird Watching, Coffee at Annie’s Neil Barker: Hiking, Wildlife Photography, Cycling

Please complete our survey on pg 3 for a chance to win!

Heritage Park’s Yellow Otter Tipi Heritage Park Historical Village connects visitors to the settlement of Western Canada, from the fur traders of the 1860s to the suburban families of the 1950s. History is brought to life through the many exhibits, artifacts, hands-on activities, and costumed interpreters. For the past eight years, Heritage Park has been growing its Aboriginal programming, including the First Nations Encampment that shares the history and culture of the Blackfoot people. Each year, the park works to develop new programming, acquire additional artifacts, and hire knowledgeable and engaging interpreters, all to help paint a broader picture of the past. A painted tipi was on the park’s wish list for a number of years, and in fall 2014, that wish came true. In October 2014, the Park received a gift of a Yellow Otter tipi design, in transfer from Louis Soop, Piipiakihtsipiimi, a respected elder of the Kainai Nation, along with his wife, Abby Soop, Matoiyohkomiaakii. A tipi design must come from a dream, or be transferred from two people to a man and a woman, in a sacred, and spiritual ceremony. The Yellow Otter tipi is traditional in design and has been in Louis Soop’s family for generations. The design was painted onto a tipi, which was then presented during a transfer ceremony performed by Kainai elder Ray Black Plume. Heritage Park’s Public Programming Coordinator, Ellen Gasser, and Heritage Park Society Vice President, Joe Anderson, accepted the design, and responsibility for it. The Yellow Otter tipi is a colourful and welcome addition to the park, rich in tradition and history, with a new set of stories to share. The tipi opens to visitors on May 16, 2015. By Barb Munro 44 | Let us be your guide to the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway


Calgary Rotary Challenger Park Update

The campaign for The Centre for All Abilities is in full gear with great volunteers stepping up to help bring Phase 4 into reality. On Apr 8th, a group of distinguished CRCP volunteers and ambassadors, gathered to share ideas on how to successfully assemble vital community support. Great to have the advice of Jack Thompson, Gerry Darichuk, Walter Haessel, Murray Young and Don Ross assisting the staff - Bill Locke, Derek Fraser, Phil Levson and Jim Zackowski. Thank you gentlemen!

Rotary To Fuel The Campaign...Again! The Rotary Clubs of Southern Alberta are invited to consider making a legacy commitment in the Centre for All Abilities. Rotarians drove the first 3 phases of the program to a successful conclusion and it was natural to return to the Clubs to ask for their support again, 10 later to realize the ultimate dream, The Centre for All Abiltiies! Thanks to the many Rotarians who have sat on the Board of Directors, the many volunteers and now Campaign Cabinet members. This final phase would not happen without you!

rewarding process to learn how the new centre can serve the community in an innovative way and assist these organizations with a stable and affordable new home - opening in fall 2018. The following groups have indicated that they would be very interested in being our founding tenants: Accessible Housing Society of Calgary Autism Aspergers Friendship Society Calgary Bridge Foundation for Youth Calgary Quest School Calgary Seniors Resource Society Children’s Link Society Community Kitchen Program of Calgary Duke of Edinburgh’s Award – AB/NT/NU Federation Of Calgary Communities (FCC) Impact Society Social Venture Partners Urban Society for Aboriginal Youth

Where are we Today

Wonderful Community Partners – Potential Tenants Over the last 11 months, the campaign team have been inviting great organizations out to the park to chat about the prospect of moving into the Centre for All Abilities. It has been a very

Received the gift of the land from the Calgary Airport Authority valued at $3.5 million. CRCP has invested over $570,000 in this legacy project

www.allabilitiescentre.com

THE CENTRE FOR ALL ABILITIES 45 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com


Follow the Mead Trail It is a beautiful spring morning in the Alberta foothills and I am rolling down Hwy 22 south on my way to visit the first of three meaderies. The white-capped mountains are glistening in the crisp morning sun. There is magic that comes with warmer days. The rolling hills are tender green and the first birds have arrived. Beethoven’s pastoral is playing on the radio. I feel bliss. Alberta produces 1/3 of Canada’s honey and has no grape wine industry. As mead is being rediscovered by connoisseurs and consumers alike, the production of mead is rapidly becoming a cottage industry with incredible potential. Its history is in the making by local mead producers who are the embodiment of the western spirit: bold, creative, and passionate about what they do. Mead, a.k.a. hydromel or ambrosia, may be the world’s oldest alcoholic beverage. The Greeks celebrated mead as a god-sent elixir with magical and sacred properties as reported by Virgil’s Georgics. Mead could prolong lives, increase fertility, build strength, and impart wit and poetry. Quite a noble calling! However, I also picture another kind of mead: that of the Vikings … rather hairy and “rustic” figures drinking mead from horns and brawling their way along the European coast in search of young virgins to steal and carry back on their shoulders. Either way, mead has permeated western cultures and carries with it a rich folklore that we are slowly rediscovering. At its most basic, mead is a yeast-fermented mixture of honey and water yielding a degree of alcohol. Today, this basic recipe

Chinook Arch Meadery

has been elevated to an art form by our local mead producers, expanding the range of styles, aromas, and tastes to new heights. Aproaching Spirit Hills, a family owned winery, I am welcomed by friendly dogs and an expansive view of the undulating Alberta foothills. Ilse de Wit invites me into her winery designed and built by local craftsmen. For Ilse and her husband Hugo, Spirit Hills is all about celebrating mead for what it is: a high quality beverage that lends itself to innovation. Using methods similar to wine making, Ilse and Hugo control all aspects of the production. Honey is harvested from their beehives once a year, integrating the flavors of wild and pasture flowers that grow throughout the warm season and ensuring consistency from batch to batch. Next, the honey is warmed up to beehive temperature and mixed with water and various fruits or herbs depending on the style of mead. Champagne yeast is added as it favours rapid fermentation and imparts unique flavours. The fermented mead is then filtered, sometimes aged in wood, and finally bottled. Spirit Hills’ total mead production is about 2000 cases and growing rapidly. Spirit Hills is located close to the Millarville Farmer’s Market. Appointments must be scheduled to make sure the owners are on hand to give you a guided tour complete with a taste of their meads. This is a perfect activity to follow a visit of the market. Also close to Millarville, and just west of Okotoks, Chinook Arch Meadery is located in what can best be described as big sky country. Art Andrews has been producing honey for over 20 years and mead for eight years, making him the first to produce mead commercially in the province. Today Chinook Arch offers a full complement of services including an educational centre that teaches young and old about bees and honey, and a wellappointed boutique and mead tasting bar. Art’s style of mead is more traditional, meaning sweeter, in style but is no less creative.

Spirit Hills Honey Winery

46 | Let us be your guide to the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway


Follow the Mead Trail

Fallentimber Meadery

In fact Art, like Hugo from Spirit Hills and Colin Ryan from the Fallentimber meadery, is somewhere between a mad chemist and an artist mead vintner. Self taught, they revel in exploring new styles of meads, new flavours, and new production methods. This is what keeps their passion going—the realization that they are pioneers in their field as they help to develop the Alberta mead industry one bottle at a time. Fallentimber is located near Water Valley, a 30 minute leisurely drive north of Cochrane. Tucked in the woods of the foothills, it is a family business that started 46 years ago as a honey farm. Five years ago, Colin Ryan started “experimenting”. Today he cannot meet demand and the business is growing quickly. Perhaps the largest of the 3 meaderies in terms of production, Fallentimber wishes to provide their customers with a full country experience. Open year round, their farm offers lovely picnic areas and the possibility to explore the forest in their midst. Their tasting room is warm and inviting with multiple honey and mead products

made solely of wild flowers. You can visit their mead-making room and perhaps have a taste of Colin’s latest concoction. Add to your visit a stop in the quaint hamlet of Water Valley, and you have yourself a beautiful Sunday outing. This summer set aside three beautiful days, one for each meadery. Visit, taste, compare, and learn the differences between these three highly creative and exceedingly good mead houses. You will treat your palate and undoubtedly discover gems to pair with any of your favorite dishes. Once you set your heart on your favorite meads, visit the Liquor Connect’s website (liquorconnect.com) to locate your chosen bottles in a store near you. In doing so, you will help Hugo, Art, and Colin add another exciting chapter to the history of mead making. By: Renée Delorme A local sommelier who offers private tastings. For more information visit her website at tastingpleasures.ca

Spirit Hills Honey Winery

Fallentimber Meadery

Chinook Arch Meadery

240183, 2380 Drive West, Millarville 403-933-3913 ilse@spirithillswinery.com spirithillswinery.com

Water Valley 403-637-2667 info@fallentimbermeadery.ca fallentimbermeadery.ca

386087 Range Road 11, Okotoks 403-995­‐0830 info@chinookhoney.com chinookhoney.com

Open: Call to schedule a tour

Open: Sat & Sun: 11:00 to 17:00. Email to book a tour outside regular hours.

Open: Wed - Sat: 10:00 to 17:00, Sund & Mon: 12:00 to 17:00

Ilse de Wit and Hugo Bonjean

Try: Dande, winner at the Alberta Beverage Awards.; Wild Rose Passion; and new for summer 2015, a sangria mead.

Nathan Ryan and Colin Ryan

Try: Beer-like meads Ginger Mead, Hopped Mead, Braggot, Smokey Rye, and Honey Kölsch

47 | ExperienceCalgaryGreenway.com

Cherie and Art Andrews

Try: Melomels (fermented honey and fruit juice) Summer Sassation and Cherry Mi Amor, and decadently rich iced mead Forsted Blissss


Experience Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park is one of Canada’s newest provincial parks. Located along the north shore of the Bow River between Calgary and Cochrane, it protects more than 1,300 hectares of foothills fescue parkland. The park is located 34 km from downtown Calgary, and 4 km from the Town of Cochrane. Access to this park is from Glenbow Road, off of Hwy #1A. The Glenbow Ranch is a day-use park; there is no overnight camping, no camp fires, and the park is open only during daylight hours. Please note that this is a dry park, bring plenty of water. Don’t forget your snacks and layered clothing, including a hat and sturdy walking shoes. With over 26 km of paved and granular pathways, Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park is perfect for many activities, such as walking, and cycling, participating in guided programs and volunteer activities and enjoying wildlife. Be sure to drop

into the Visitor Centre. The exhibits provide insight into the natural and cultural history offered by these protected lands. The friendly staff and volunteers can help answer any questions that you may have. Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park preserves significant natural and cultural features, including examples of endangered ecosystems & rare species. It provides a unique opportunity to showcase First Nations and early ranching history and the Glenbow townsite. It is managed through a formal partnership with the Glenbow Ranch Park Foundation. For general park inquiries, phone (403) 851-9053. For upcoming events, go to www.grpf.ca/events.

Many trail s and day use areas were affected b y the 2013 fl ood and re p airs or reroutin g may tak e place. Be sure to vis it the Visitor Centre for up-to-date informatio n

EMERGENCY

If you require Fire, Ambulance, Police, or Mountain Rescue assistance, call 9-1-1. Tell the operator you have an emergency in Kananaskis Country.

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