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Food | 81

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Nonetheless, sometimes you will want to use a knife with your dish. It might be to eat a whole fish or cut up large pieces of pork. That?s when the fork comes handy and it also functions as a knife. These may not be the typical tools you are used to, but they work. In the Philippines, you realize quickly that a knife is not always necessary. EVERYTHING AT ONCE, NO COURSE MENUS

Be it at a restaurant or a local eatery, dishes are presented a la carte or in pots in front of you to choose from. Rarely will you see the food separated by appetizers or starters and main meals. On our quest, we noticed Filipinos tend to eat their food in one course. When you order, your dishes are brought out at the same time or as soon as they are ready. The soups come at the same time as the main dishes and everything is laid out on the table.

Don?t expect to take your time eating in between courses. Everything is brought out at once and you had better eat fast while everything is still hot. One great thing about this approach, is that everybody shares together.

"FILIPINO'S DON'T USE KNIVES TO EAT. INSTEAD, THEY PUSH THE FOOD USING THE FORK ONTO THE SPOON AND "SHOVEL" IT INTO THEIR MOUTHS."

DINNING TAKES PLACE IN THE MALLS

Malls in the Philippines do not only provide retail therapy, they are also centers for socializing, entertainment and dining. When we first arrived in the Philippines and wanted to try local Filipino food, everybody kept sending us to the malls. Not used to going to the malls to try local and authentic foods, we were very perplexed. Only after talking to locals and observing the local culture, did we realize that malls provide safe, air conditioned environments. Imagine our surprise when we saw a Catholic Mass taking place at the high-end Greenbelt Mall in Manila. WWW.EXPATSWORLD.COM

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Expats World Magazine - Issue 4 - Oktober 2017  

Expats World Magazine - Issue 4 - Oktober 2017