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be displayed. Clicking on a video takes the user to a page where the video automatically loads, with buttons to pause, rewind, and control the volume and a drag bar that navigates through the video itself. To share the video, a URL is included, as well as HTML code that can be used to “embed” the video on a Web page. The videos are displayed in HTML5, eliminating any need to have a multitude of plug-ins or players on a machine and are mobile ready for tablets and smart phone viewing. Vimeo is popular with the creative community and has a less commercial interface, while YouTube is more mainstream, with a much larger share of the market. YouTube has a file limit of ten minutes. Vimeo allows videos of longer duration and offers better video quality, two attributes that result in good artistic content for a more discerning and creative audience. It’s the embedding function that has made YouTube and Vimeo such a phenomenon, as it allows videos hosted on these sites to be played on any website. With the embedding feature, a blogger, for example, can simply paste the “embed” code into his website and the video will appear, complete with pause and playback controls. This allows for quick and easy “viral” transmission of videos, as “hot” videos are posted repeatedly on other blogs, websites, message boards, and Facebook pages. Whereas most photo-sharing sites are used to share photos among friends and families, videosharing sites have become video repositories for everything from lost TV shows, current events, curious personal creations, old music videos— all the detritus of pop culture’s history. Pretty much anything that’s ever been captured on film makes it onto YouTube or Vimeo, and the content library is ever growing. 77

Profile for exhibit-E

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

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