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program art fairs the way we used to program the gallery ten years ago. And art fairs are so intensive and involve so much work and creativity. And yet they’re so brief—a lot of people don’t see them. So our documenting of the exhibitions and art fairs is a way of using the website as an archive. Now you can have video and great images. Another change is we have started selling large editions on the site. I’m kind of excited about that. Of course, it’s been happening forever in other businesses, with books, et cetera, but the art world is very old-fashioned—that’s the charm of it—but I think things have gotten to the point where people will go online and buy a Tracey Emin edition or a Gilbert & George edition or a Do Ho Suh edition. I didn’t think that five years ago. What has changed? The comfort level. People have gotten used to using their computers and websites to buy things. One of the things that turned me off was how slow things were. Another thing that turned me off was people didn’t keep their websites up to date. But I think people are getting better at both of those things now, and so the climate is changing. It occurs to me that one of the benefits of the upgrade to higher quality images on your site is that you make it easier for clients to feel comfortable buying things without seeing them in person. No, there is no substitute for seeing the work in person. Okay, but I was just thinking that improved image quality might make clients even more comfortable with this process. Aren’t you doing more business that way? 58

Profile for exhibit-E

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

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