Page 44

Do you think of your site as a work of art? If not, have you ever considered making any Web pieces? I think of my site as one-stop window-shopping for Laurie Simmons. I’ve done so many disparate kinds of projects throughout my life and my website is the only place that brings them all together. Not only my pictures, but my writing, products, fashion collaborations. No one person or entity has ever been motivated to bring all these things together, besides me. How has the website affected the way people relate to your art— or rather, how they relate to you about your art? Do you get fan mail? Better-informed questions? I do get more fan mail. I assume people think they have easier access and of course there is general studio contact info on the website. Better-informed questions? Not really—still pretty crazy. Do you think there’s any effect—positive, negative, or other—in having people (including yourself) be able to take in your whole career at a glance? As much as I love the romantic idea of the mysterious and withholding artist, I’m way too excited about having so much of what I’ve done in one place. I don’t assume that every person that goes to my site reads every word and looks at every picture, but if anyone is interested, it’s there. What differences between your gallery site and your artist site do you consider to be most important? Obviously, the galleries I work with are presenting the works that are the most relevant to them at the moment—meaning 42

Profile for exhibit-E

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

Advertisement