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the digital world by storm—Facebook now has over 1 billion members—and represents an important networking opportunity that galleries cannot afford to overlook. Every gallery should have a Facebook page and its website should link to it. The two portals are inextricably intertwined and should be managed together. With Facebook, you have an Internet user who has reached out and literally befriended the gallery, brought it into his own social network, and publicly announced the relationship to all his friends—free advertising with the potential to grow gallery website visits exponentially. The gallery needs to feed and nurture these friendships by participating in Facebook frequently through announcements, discussions, postings of images and videos, and so on. The content of these Facebook postings should be managed in coordination with the website; the two portals have a symbiotic relationship, with the gallery’s website containing rich, broad content and the Facebook page being more interactive and headline-oriented. Microblogging sites like Twitter are the third leg of the social-media stool and should be used by galleries in concert with their Facebook pages and websites. The more channels of influence a gallery can enter, the more successful its business will become. While it’s easy to see the benefits from a business perspective, it’s also easy to downplay the amount of commitment required for a gallery to truly harness the potential of social media. Real success requires a deep and ongoing commitment to managing and refreshing the website content, managing the gallery’s Facebook presence, and integrating Tweets into the communications mix.

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Profile for exhibit-E

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

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