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Demolition set to begin on Bartlett Yard site Martin Desmarais For residents in Roxbury the long-empty Bartlett Yard has been an ongoing topic of conversation. Plans to develop and revitalize the property have come and gone. But now the ball is rolling and the all-but-abandoned site is set to be cleared with demolition work scheduled to begin this fall. A former MBTA bus yard, Bartlett Yard is now owned by Nuestra Comunidad Development Corp. and that company is working with Windale Developers on a project called Bartlett Place with the ultimate aim of developing 323 units of housing and 54,000 square feet of commercial property on 8.5 acres of land. Also included will be a grocery store, shops, offices, a public market and plaza and new roads. The project has a total price tag of about $140 million. According to Mark Matel, the Nuestra Comunidad Development Corp. project manager for Bartlett Place, the plan is for the housing to be 60 percent affordable and 40 percent moderate priced or market rate. The housing will be a mixture of home ownership and rental. While Matel knows that the issue of urban housing development is always controversial, he asserts that Nuestra Comunidad Development is dedicated to a plan that will be agreeable to the community. “It is our mission to support affordable housing,” Matel said.

He also says the company wants to quell any fears about issues such as gentrification that opponents of development in the city often raise. “We have to make sure that people who do live here stay here,” Matel said. “And part of that is providing affordable housing. We are encouraging people to come but we are also encouraging people to stay.” The Bartlett Place project has four proposed phases. The first phase will be about 100 units of housing and a grocery store. The second phase is targeting senior housing. The third phase is being considered to develop artist housing and work space. The fourth phase would be the development of homes for sale. Matel said that the later phases of the project are still being developed, but that phase one is mostly finalized in regards to what will be presented to the zoning board. If approved, the plan would be to break ground next summer or next fall. According to him, phase one would specifically develop two buildings. The first building would be 60 units of housing and a grocery store and the other building would be 40 more units of housing. The first building is projected to cost about $28 million and the cost for the second building is still being finalized. “We are not building them at the same time,” Matel said. “One is going up first and then

“We have to make sure that people who do live here stay here,” Matel said. “And part of that is providing affordable housing.” — Mark Matel

Bartlett, continued to page 20

Mayor Thomas Menino enters the 2nd annual “Summer Swing” hosted by Central Boston Elder Services. More than 500 Boston seniors attended the event at the BCYF Shelburne Community Center in Roxbury. Mayor Menino thanked the crowd for their contributions and support, and highlighted the wide array of city resources available to seniors. (Photo courtesy of the Mayor’s Office)

Minority developers file suit against Northeastern Univ. Suit charges school for reneging on development Howard Manly A group of minority businessmen have sued Northeastern University for what they charge is not only a breach of contract involving the development of parcels of land in Roxbury but also an apparent violation of the city’s Linkage Program designed to encourage minority businesses. According to the suit filed last month in Suffolk Superior Court by Columbia Plaza Associates (CPA), Northeastern signed a contract on June 29, 1999 that named CPA as its partner in a joint venture called Renaissance Park Garage LLC that would

develop Parcel 18-2, adjacent to Northeastern. At the time, that parcel was owned by the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) but the development rights were owned by CPA. In addition, the agreement called for Northeastern to form a second joint venture with CPA to develop parcel 18-3A as a hotel or other commercial use in which CPA would receive 30 percent of the net profits. Northeastern agreed in the contract to pay CPA a total of $800,000. According to the suit, Northeastern did pay $700,000 but still owes CPA $100,000. In

the meantime, Northeastern built a parking garage on one of the parcels and constructed a high rise dormitory at Tremont and Ruggles streets. But since the opening of the parking garage on Jan. 28, 2008 and the completion of the $127 million International Village dormitory on July 8, 2009, the suit alleges that Northeastern has reneged on its promises set forth in its contract with CPA. The suit claims that the university has “failed” to provide an accounting for net receipts generated by the $16 million Renaissance Parking Garage and has “reSuit, continued to page 8

Obama’s criminal justice reform lauded for historic proposals Caitlin Yoshiko Kandil

National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice briefs President Barack Obama during his Presidential Daily Briefing in Chilmark, Mass., on August 12. (Photo courtesy of the White House)

The Barack Obama administration has announced a set of proposals aimed at stemming the growth of the U.S. prison population and racial disparities in the criminal justice system — chief among them, the elimination of mandatory minimum sentencing for low-level drug offenses. “With an outsized, unnecessarily large prison population, we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, deter, and rehabilitate — not

merely to warehouse and forget,” U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said Monday in a speech unveiling the administration’s plans. According to Holder, the Justice Department will change its policies such that some low-level drug offenders who are not affiliated with gangs or drug cartels will no longer be punished with what he called “draconian” mandatory minimum sentences. Instead, these offenders will receive sentences that “are better Prison, continued to page 10

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2 • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

Mayoral Election Campaign Calendar Below is the calendar for upcoming mayoral forums. This list gives you a great opportunity to get out and meet the candidates in person. We will update the calendar as it changes. If you have any questions email news@bannerpub.com 8/15

Boston Park Advocates’ Parks and Open Space Forum William Devine Golf Course at Franklin Park, 1 Circuit Rd, Dorchester 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boston Architectural College President Ted Landsmark to moderate.

8/16 “EcoForum” City Hall Plaza, 1 City Hall Sq., Boston 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. 8/19

8/22

8/27

8/29

9/5

9/10

Main Street Coalition Forum Strand Theatre, 543 Columbia Rd. Dorchester 6:30 p.m. to 8:30pm WGBH’s Callie Crossley will moderate. More information: http://www.mymainstreetmyboston.org/#!forum/c21kz Youth Group Forum First Parish Church, Meetinghouse Hill, Dorchester 6 p.m. Teens from the Cape Verdean Community (CVC) UNIDO’s Youth Leadership Academy are planning the event. Ward 10 Mayoral Candidates’ Night Parks Community Building, 2 New Whitney St, Mission Hill 6 p.m. South End Business Alliance Forum Calderwood Pavilion, 527 Tremont St., South End 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Boston Courant is sponsoring the forum. Ward 19 and Ward 5 Democratic Committees First Baptist Church, 633 Centre St., Jamaica Plain 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

9/10

Coalition for Community Forum Roxbury Community College, Media Arts Center, 1234 Columbus Ave., Roxbury Crossing 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sponsored by NAACP, Urban League of Massachusetts, Commonwealth Compact and KROC

9/11

Action for Boston Community Development forum Action for Boston Community Development, Inc., Melnea Cass Room, 178 Tremont St., South End 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

9/11

Boston Teachers Union Forum Boston Teacher’s Union Local 66, 180 Mt. Vernon St., Dorchester 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

9/12

Boston University School of Education Forum Boston University, Tsai Performance Center, 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

9/16

9/18

9/19

NAACP Forum Salvation Army KROC Community Center, 650 Dudley St., Dorchester 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Back Bay Association Forum Liberty Mutual Conference Center, 175 Berkeley St., Back Bay 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Dorchester Board of Trade Freeport Tavern, 780 Morrissey Blvd., Dorchester 6:30 p.m. UMass Boston’s Professor Paul Watanabe to moderate. UMass Boston’s McCormack School, The Boston Foundation and WBUR UMass Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Dorchester 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

City Council Candidates and Forums MassVote will be hosting three forums for the City Council races. For more details go to massvote.org

District 4

District 5

Wednesday, September 11 6-7:30 p.m.

Preliminary At-Large

Monday, September 16 Wednesday, September 18 Roslindale Community Center Roxbury Community College (located at 6 Cummins Highway 6-8 p.m. in Roslindale Square) Candidates: 6-7:30 p.m. Candidates: Charles Calvin Yancey Martin J. Keogh Divo Rodrigues Monteiro Candidates: Ayanna S. Pressley Steven Godfrey Michael E Wells III Catherine M. O’Neill Terrance J Williams Jean-Claude Sanon Francisco L. White Margherita Ciampa-Coyne Michael F. Flaherty Ava D Callender Frank John Addivinola Jr. Andrew Norman Cousino Jeffrey Michael Ross Mimi E Turchinetz Douglas D. Wohn Timothy P McCarthy Keith B. Kenyon Patrice Gattozzi Stephen J. Murphy Ramon Soto Jack F. Kelly III Christopher Conroy For Information on voter registration, where Michelle Wu to vote, absentee voting, or any other voting Gareth R. Saunders rights or procedure questions visit Seamus M. Whelan Phillip Arthur Frattaroli Althea Garrison Annissa Essaibi George

www.massvote.org

Snapshots from the

campaign trail

John Barros stopped by the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative’s 25th Multicultural Festival on Saturday. Barros spoke with residents about the need to ensure we have safe and clean open space throughout the city to host events like the festival. (Travis Watson photo)

Mayoral Candidates Here’s the list of mayoral candidates and their websites. Find out where they stand on key issues and how they plan on achieving their goals.

City Councilor Felix Arroyo www.forwardwithfelix.com

John Barros

www.barrosforboston.com

Charles Clemons

www.charlesforboston.com

District Attorney Dan Conley

www.danconleyformayor.com

City Councilor John Connolly www.Connollyforboston.com

City Councilor Rob Consalvo www.robconsalvo.com

Charlotte Golar Ritchie

www.charlotteformayor.com

City Councilor Mike Ross www.mikeforboston.com

Bill Walczak

www.billforboston.com

State Rep. Marty Walsh www.martywalsh.org

David James Wyatt www.davidjameswyatt.org

City Councilor Charles Yancey www.charlesyancey.org

Look for more updates on our facebook page facebook.com/baystatebanner and on twitter page @baystatebanner

The Bay State Banner’s weekly campaign update (also available at baystatebanner.com)


Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 3

One Hen hatches in Boston with program at Kroc Center

(L-R) Adrianna Hunt, Keith White, Leslie Benoit, Desaray Pryor and Cecillia Teixeira at the Salvation Army Kroc Center in Dorchester. The summer camp students took part in One Hen Academy, which included starting their own small businesses to make and sell bracelets and key chains. (Photos courtesy of the Salvation Army Kroc Center) Martin Desmarais A dozen eight- and nine-year olds spent most of the summer learning what it means to get into business at Dorchester’s Salvation Army Kroc Center. Last week, the budding entrepreneurs took their self-made key chains and bracelets to market as an end to their One Hen Academy summer experience. They sold over $100 worth of products and plan to donate some of the money. “Through the program the kids learn how to start their own small business … and it also teaches them to look at community needs,” said Helen Rosenfeld, executive director of One Hen Inc. “This empowers kids to become social entrepreneurs to make a difference for themselves and the world.” Based in Boston, One Hen is a program that teaches children basic financial literacy, money management and business skills. Started in 2009, One Hen has produced an education curriculum for teaching elementary and middle school students about microfinance, social entrepreneurship and personal finance. Over 32,000 students have participated in its programs and more than 1,200 educators have been trained in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and Ghana. According to Rosenfeld, One Hen got its start based on a children’s book One Hen: How One Small Loan Made a Big Difference, by Katie Smith Milway. One Hen is the story of a West African boy, Kojo, who receives a small loan to buy a hen and from that one hen develops a successful business as

an entrepreneur. He moves from poverty to being a provider and employer of others. The book is called “a story of how the world undergoes change, one person, one family and one community at a time.” It is based on the real experience of Kwabena Darko of Ghana. The One Hen program held this summer at the Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center of Boston — like all One Hen programs — starts with the kids reading the book. The story shows them how starting a small business with something as simple as selling eggs can turn into something much bigger. “I think the kids really connect with the story of Kojo. … They got it,” said Rosenfeld. “They also really enjoyed making the product and they really enjoyed selling it. The idea of standing up and convincing somebody to buy their product, they really enjoyed it. They really thrived.” The kids from Dorchester took part in the One Hen program every Tuesday and Thursday for two hours as part of the Kroc Center’s summer camp for youth. The kids received micro-loans to start their simple businesses making key chains and bracelets. On Aug. 6, they got a chance to practice their sales skills and sell their products at a community market at the Kroc Center. Rosenfeld said that the kids were able to quickly relate to the concept of being an entrepreneur and it helped them recognize businessmen and businesswomen from their community. “These

Kroc Center summer camp students sell products they made to a Salvation Army employee at the Dorchester center last week.

are people they know and they can relate to and it shows them that they can do it too,” she said. Having the kids also plan to donate some of the profits exposes them to the concept of social entrepreneurship, according to Rosenfeld. “Kids have a connection to money already,” saiud Rosenfeld. “They are bombarded with advertising. … This was a really neat way to get them to think about community causes. They totally embraced the idea of how it was a business and how they could make money and actually do good with it.” As part of the program, the kids got a chance to choose the different part of a business they wanted to focus on as business managers, marketers, makers of the products and sellers. Rosenfeld said that it was great to see the program end with a market at the Kroc Center. “What was so fun was to see these little kids running after anyone who entered the center and persuading them to buy a bracelet and doing it with confidence,” she added. Ida Cooper, a group leader at Kroc Center summer camp, said the feedback from the kids and some parents about One Hen was excellent. “The kids were excited about it because it is something new to them,” she said. “Some of the things that they thought they knew about buying stuff they got to know better. “When the parents found out,

they were excited about it and they thought it was a beautiful idea,” she added. Marisol Ayala, director of summer camps and education manager at the Kroc Center, said that the strength of One Hen was how it connected the kids to other countries through the story of Kojo. It also connected them to donating money to an organization that helps out all over the globe. Ayala said that the aim in bringing in the One Hen program to the Kroc Center summer camp was to provide some new and different programming. She said they would very much like to bring it back again. In fact, she said they would love to make the One Hen program a year-long after-school program. “What stood out with One Hen was the fact that we were teaching about entrepreneurs and teaching them how to start their own business and teaching them the responsibility they need to start their own business,” she said. “We are happy that it turned out just how we wanted it to turn out,

which is showing the kids that when you grow up this is what you have to do.” While One Hen is based in Boston and has worked with teachers in Everett for a couple of years, Rosenfeld said this past year was the organization’s first real expansion into Boston with a program at The Dever-McCormack Middle School in Dorchester during the school year and the summer program at the Kroc Center. The summer program at the Kroc Center also gave One Hen the chance to work with younger students. Typically the program works with middle school students. She labels the program a great success in showing it can work with younger students. “We realized there was an opportunity,” she said. “We wanted to make sure it would work before doing it in a broader way. “It is applicable across the grades,” she added. “The earlier we are able to infuse the ideas about saving and the basic economic ideas … the more impact it is going to have.”

Jordan Wallace shows off the key chains and bracelets being sold at the Kroc Center in Dorchester as part of the One Hen Academy.


4 • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

Established 1965

The ongoing battle between national security and privacy After 9/11 and the Boston Marathon bombings, Americans are aware that they are targets for terrorists. Recently, the U.S. State Department closed 21 embassies and consulates in the Middle East and Africa and issued travelers warnings in response to uncovered threats of attack. Now the government is concerned with the establishment of surveillance programs that do not violate the constitutional rights of American citizens. The National Security Agency (NSA) spy program collects data on everyone’s telephone calls, including the date, time and duration, together with the numbers involved. The sheer magnitude of the unauthorized telephone surveillance program of the NSA stunned Washington insiders who thought they were knowledgeable about the nation’s secrets. According to official assurances, the lines are not tapped without a warrant. Nonetheless, this enormous surveillance program is considered by civil libertarians to be a violation of the Fourth Amendment right in the U.S. Constitution, which protects “against unreasonable searches and seizures.” Surprisingly, public reaction to the publicity about the NSA project was relatively mild. Perhaps that is because so many Americans have already surrendered their right of privacy to the Internet. Consequently, a breach of Fourth Amendment protections is no longer such a serious violation. People know that when they conduct a search on Google there is an analysis of the search to evaluate the best prospects for ads. No specific consent is given for that. Even more invasively, people voluntarily divulge information on Facebook that would be considered indiscreet even if it was whispered only to a close confidant. And some people re-

lease quasi-erotic photos of themselves to roam in cyberspace. The possibility that the government might one day listen in on a phone call is trivial by comparison. Also, African Americans and other minorities often suffer from invasions of their Fourth Amendment protections that are far more grievous than recording the time, duration and date of a telephone call. In New York and other major cities the police summarily stop and search youthful male pedestrians on the basis of fancied suspicions. Those who are riding in a car can be pulled over under the “driving while black” policy. Those who refuse to allow a search for drugs are often required to wait for an extended time until trained drug sniffing dogs arrive. Nonetheless, it would be presumptuous to presume that all African Americans share the same attitude toward the NSA surveillance program. Undoubtedly there is a common concern about the heightened risk to the nation created by the terrorists’ aggression. A bill in Congress to curtail the NSA surveillance program was defeated 217-205. Ideally, all operations in a democratic government should be public and transparent. For obvious reasons that principal cannot apply to military secrets. In the United States a court established by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act is supposed to protect the constitutional rights of individuals. The conflict is between the maintenance of the secrecy necessary to defeat the terrorists and maintaining the protection of constitutional rights. Since African Americans have been denied many civil rights protections, it is logical that their primary concern should be the danger of terrorist attacks.

Lettersto the Editor

Turning the tide on childhood obesity

As the Department of Agriculture’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services, I am on a mission to make sure all of our nation’s children have the best possible chance at a healthy life and a bright future. So, I’m very encouraged by Some recent news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) should have us all encouraged: the rate of obesity among low-income pre-school children appears to be declining for the first time in decades. The declining rates show that our collective efforts — at the Federal, State and community level — are helping to gain ground on childhood obesity. School-aged children are now getting healthier and more nutritious school meals and snacks, thanks to the support of First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! initiative and historic changes implemented under the historic Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. We’re supporting healthy, local foods in schools through our Farm to School grant program, and we’re improving access to fresh produce

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and healthy foods for children and families that receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. So what can you do to make a change in your home and community? Parents and caregivers can use educational materials like Healthy Eating for Preschoolers and Nutrition and Wellness Tips for Young Children to help teach young children healthy habits from the start. Teachers, principals and school food service professionals can use nutrition education materials like the Great Garden Detective curriculum Nutrition to motivate older children to eat healthy and try new foods. We still have a long way to go before America’s childhood obesity epidemic is a thing of the past. Far too many — one

out of every eight — preschoolers are still obese. But we know that, we are beginning to see real results in the fight against early childhood obesity. Dr. Janey Thornton Deputy Under Secretary, USDA Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services

Erratum Correction: Due to an editing error, The Bay State Banner incorrectly reported that Aundrea Kelley, the new vice president of academic affairs at Quincy College, earned a doctorate in public policy. She has completed doctoral-level study.

Ernesto Arroyo John Brewer Tony Irving Don West

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The Boston Banner is published every Thursday. Offices are located at 23 Drydock Ave., Boston, MA 02210. Telephone: 617-261-4600, Fax 617-261-2346 Subscriptions: $48 for one year ($55 out-of-state) Web site: www.baystatebanner.com Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA. All rights reserved. Copyright 2010.

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“ I don’t care who is listening to my phone calls as long as the terrorist stay away. ”

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Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 5

RovingCamera

Opinion Obama: No ‘abuse’ of surveillance technologies Editor’s note: The following is an excerpt from President Barack Obama’s conference with reporters in the East Room of the White House on Aug. 9. In meeting the threats to our nation, we have to strike the right balance between protecting our security and preserving our freedoms. Unfortunately, rather than an orderly and lawful process to debate these issues and come up with appropriate reforms, repeated leaks of classified information have initiated the debate in a very passionate, but not always fully informed way. But given the history of abuse by governments, it’s right to ask questions about surveillance — particularly as technology is reshaping every aspect of our lives. I’m also mindful of how these issues are viewed overseas, because American leadership around the world depends upon the example of American democracy and American openness. In other words, it’s not enough for me, as president, to have confidence in these programs. The American people need to have confidence in them as well. And so, today, I’d like to discuss four specific steps that we’re going take very shortly to move the debate forward. First, I will work with Congress to pursue appropriate reforms to Section 215 of the Patriot Act — the program that collects telephone records. As I’ve said, this program is an important tool in our effort to disrupt terrorist plots. And it does not allow the government to listen to any phone calls without a warrant. But given the scale of this program, I understand the concerns of those who would worry that it could be subject to abuse. I believe there are steps we can take to give the American people additional confidence that there are additional safeguards against abuse. Second, I’ll work with Congress to improve the public’s confidence in the oversight conducted by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, known as the FISC. The FISC was created by Congress to provide judicial review of certain intelligence activities so that a federal judge must find that our actions So all these steps are are consistent with the Constitution. One of the concerns is that a judge designed to ensure reviewing a request only hears one that the American side of the story. While I’ve got confidence in the court and I think they’ve people can trust done a fine job, I think we can provide that our efforts are greater assurances that the court is looking at these issues from both per- in line with our spectives — security and privacy. interests and our So, specifically, we can take steps to values. make sure civil liberties concerns have an independent voice in appropriate cases by ensuring that the government’s position is challenged by an adversary. Number three, we can, and must, be more transparent. So I’ve directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. We’ve already declassified unprecedented information about the NSA, but we can go further. So at my direction, the Department of Justice will make public the legal rationale for the government’s collection activities under Section 215 of the Patriot Act. The NSA is taking steps to put in place a full-time civil liberties and privacy officer, and released information that details its mission, authorities, and oversight. And finally, the intelligence community is creating a website that will serve as a hub for further transparency, and this will give Americans and the world the ability to learn more about what our intelligence community does and what it doesn’t do, how it carries out its mission, and why it does so. Fourth, we’re forming a high-level group of outside experts to review our entire intelligence and communications technologies. We need new thinking for a new era. We now have to unravel terrorist plots by finding a needle in the haystack of global telecommunications. And meanwhile, technology has given governments — including our own — unprecedented capability to monitor communications. So I am tasking this independent group to step back and review our capabilities — particularly our surveillance technologies. And they’ll consider how we can maintain the trust of the people, how we can make sure that there absolutely is no abuse in terms of how these surveillance technologies are used, ask how surveillance impacts our foreign policy — particularly in an age when more and more information is becoming public. And they will provide an interim report in 60 days and a final report by the end of this year, so that we can move forward with a better understanding of how these programs impact our security, our privacy and our foreign policy. So all these steps are designed to ensure that the American people can trust that our efforts are in line with our interests and our values. And to others around the world, I want to make clear once again that America is not interested in spying on ordinary people. Our intelligence is focused, above all, on finding the information that’s necessary to protect our people, and — in many cases — protect our allies. So this is how we’re going to resolve our differences in the United States — through vigorous public debate, guided by our Constitution, with reverence for our history as a nation of laws, and with respect for the facts. The Banner welcomes your opinion. Email Op-Ed submissions to:

hmanly@bannerpub.com ­Letters must be signed. Names may be withheld upon request.

What’s the importance of having black and Latino officers on the Boston Police Department?

It’s very important to have minorities on the police force. It makes you more comfortable to speak with them. There’s less racism. They grew up the same way you did. They know what you’ve been through.

They have a different point of view. People are more willing to cooperate with officers from their own race. It’s also good for young people to see officers who look like them.

Charice

Natarsha Fisher Patient Coordinator Malden

Personal Care Attendant Jamaica Plain

They bring cultural sensitivity in their approach to young people. Rather then looking at them as felons, they understand them.

We all grew up together. We’ve had the same experiences. We understand each other.

Nowadays, it ain’t important. The police aren’t police anymore. On the side of a police car, it says “protect and serve.” They don’t do either.

Sadiki Kambon

Angel

Provider Services Representative Dorchester

Volunteer Director Roxbury

Mother Mattapan

They should be more sensitive to the people in our community with more understanding and compassion. Instead, they’re often more violent and less compassionate.

Katherine Jones

Drew

Self Employed Boston

INthe news

David Keene

MassHousing’s David Keene has been elected to serve a oneyear term as vice president on the National Leased Housing Association Board of Directors. Keene, the agency’s chief preservation officer, will assist the NLHA in its mission of providing its members with information and advocacy concerning low and moderate-income rental housing. Keene has been at MassHousing for 27 years. During that time, he has overseen more than $1 billion in refinancing for rental housing, tax credit recapitalizations and other loan transactions, as well as more than $500 million in annual Section 8 subsidies. Prior to joining MassHousing, Keene worked in New York, Washington and Texas in the area of affordable housing and received a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in city planning from the Univer-

sity of Pennsylvania. “David Keene is a nationally recognized expert in state and federal programs involving subsidized rental housing,” said MassHousing Executive Director Thomas R. Gleason. “His expertise will benefit thousands

of people who rely on low and moderate-income housing.” The NLHA has helped obtain necessary legislative and regulatory changes affecting federally related housing and tax policy for more than 40 years, according to the organization.


6 • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

CommunityVoices

Study: Student loan debt reduces lifetime wealth For students, $1 trillion debt causes $4 trillion of wealth loss Charlene Crowell A new research report on America’s still-growing student loan debt found that its financial effects can last a lifetime. According to Demos, a national nonpartisan public policy organization, 39 million Americans have used student loans to fund college education. An educa-

tion debt of $53,000 will lead to a $208,000 lifetime loss of wealth.  If current student borrowing trends continue, student debt will reach $2 trillion by 2025. Additionally, a $1 trillion in outstanding student debt will lead to a total lifetime loss of $4 trillion for affected households. “Though a college education remains the surest path to a mid-

dle-class life, evidence has begun to mount that student debt may be far more detrimental to financial futures than once thought, particularly for those with the highest levels of debt: students of color and students from low-income families,” states the report, At What Cost: How Student Debt Reduces Lifetime Wealth. Lost lifetime wealth, accord-

ing to the report, will reduce two-thirds of retirement savings by $134,000, with the remaining third being lost from lower accumulations in home equity. Demos attributes these wealth losses to loan repayments and the amount of time required for repaying them in full have on savings and delays in buying a first home.  Further, the report warns of the risks that spiraling student loan debt has on the nation’s economy. “Student debt’s financial impact won’t just be felt by the nearly 39 million Americans who currently have student loans,” states the report, “the drag of student loans on indebted households’ purchasing power and ability to save will slow an already-sluggish growth for the entire U.S. economy. If we wish to avoid this fate, we need to take immediate action to both reduce the burden of existing student debt and prevent future debt from piling up even higher.”

Other key findings show:

(L-R) Northeastern University’s Robert Gittens, Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley, State Senator Linda Dorcena-Ferry and Boston businessman Darryl Settles at Pressley’s campaign kickoff at Tavaro’s Restaurant in Dorchester. Among the many supporters in the crowed were mayoral candidate Charlotte Golar Richie, State Rep. Russell Holmes and State Rep. Carlos Henriquez. (Don West photo)

• Nearly 80 percent of black students in the class of 2008 graduated with student debt averaging $28,692, while student debt for white graduates occurred with 65.6 percent and at a reduced debt load of $24,692; • Approximately 75 percent of students earning bachelor’s degrees from families earning less than $60,000 incurred debt; by comparison, students earning the same degree from families earning more than $100,000 incurred debt at a rate of 45 percent; 

• Students enrolled in private for-profit schools incurred the greatest average debt at $33,050; followed by private, non-profit schools with an average of $27,650 in debt; • The lowest student debt was incurred at public universities with an average of $20,200.   Commenting on the Demos research, Debbie Goldstein, executive vice president with the Center for Responsible Lending said, “This rising burden on American young people impairs their ability to build wealth through savings, homeownership or other investments in their financial future. The problem is particularly serious for students of color and also for those who attend for-profit colleges, which leave students with much larger debts and a higher risk of default.” Similar observations were voiced by Max Richtman, president and CEO at the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. “A secure retirement has long been premised on three solid legs of the stool — that is Social Security, employer-sponsored pensions and personal retirement savings,” said Richtman. “This report shows that the ability of families to save for retirement is reduced by the burden of high student loan debt, leading to diminished lifetime savings and a lesser standard of living in retirement.”   Charlene Crowell is a communications manager with the Center for Responsible Lending. She can be reached at: Charlene.crowell@responsiblelending.org


Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 7

Voting Rights and the personal politics of U.S. Rep. John Lewis Catherine Paden I have been thinking a lot about Georgia Rep. John Lewis, a leader of the civil rights movement, since the Supreme Court essentially gutted the Voting Rights Act last month. His presence in our government is an important reminder for sometimes seemingly unconcerned poli-

sistently outspoken leader on the myriad of civil rights issues facing the United States. Rep. Lewis reminds us that political leadership exists, and that it is often informed by personal history. I got a firsthand glimpse of that history about five years ago, on June 11, 2008, when I sat down with Lewis in his office in the Cannon

Rep. Lewis reminds us that laws have consequences — unjust and draconian Jim Crow laws led to life-threatening injuries as he mobilized for the right to vote. cymakers that this country’s recent history involved state-sanctioned violence used to disenfranchise voters. Immediately after the court’s decision, Rep. Lewis took to the airways to express his fierce disappointment and dismay at the ruling, saying it put a “dagger in the heart of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.” The very next day, the congressman publically praised the Court for its decision in support of same-sex marriage. His responses to both decisions are unsurprising: he has been a con-

House Office Building on Capitol Hill. I was finishing up research about anti-poverty efforts during the Civil Rights Movement, and had requested an interview with him based on his leadership role in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. I had no expectation of a response to my request; I was a young, untenured scholar in racial politics sending an interview request to a congressman and former leader within the movement. Much to my surprise and delight, I received a

response from his office. The congressman would meet with me. Prior to my outreach, I had spent months in the archives of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and SNCC, reading his memos, understanding his commitment to the strategic pursuit of constitutional change and learning about the implications of the hatred and violence he and others encountered. I had come to admire the congressman’s ongoing moral commitment to civil rights; his leadership was unwavering and reflected an understanding of the importance of his particular voice as a former movement leader. Speaking in opposition to the Defense of Marriage Act on the House floor in 1996, Lewis explained to his colleagues that “I think that as politicians, as elected officials, we must not only follow, but we must lead. Lead our districts.” So on a very hot day in late spring of 2008, Rep. Lewis spoke to me for more than 45 minutes. We did not sit across the table from each other; instead, he pulled up a chair next to me. He told me stories of the movement, of the tensions between organizations, of the movement’s commitment to economic equality. He patiently corrected the distinction I was drawing between civil rights and

CommunityVoices

economic rights for African Americans during the 1950s and 1960s. At the end of the interview, he walked me to the elevators. Concerned that I would get lost on the way to the cafeteria, he gave me detailed directions and waited with me until the elevator arrived. As the often-gridlocked Congress considers new voting rights legislation, which Rep. Nancy Pelosi has suggested calling, “The John Lewis Voting Rights Act,” perhaps Rep. Lewis’ model of political leadership, rooted in his personal history, will facilitate civil rights progress. Rep. Lewis reminds us that laws have consequences — unjust and draconian Jim Crow laws led to life-threatening injuries as he mobilized for the right to vote. When describing the events of Bloody Sunday on March 7, 1965, the day demonstrators were attacked

in Selma, Ala., for their attempts to gain the right to vote, Lewis reported to a federal judge: “I was hit with a billy club. … I was hit twice, once when I was lying down and attempting to get up. … When we were forced back, most of the people in line knelt in a prayerful manner. … [The troopers] started throwing gas and people became sick and started vomiting, and some of us were forced off the highway and behind some buildings in the woods.”  Those personal injuries shaped a powerful political leader. Rep. Lewis reminds us that the political is, in fact, personal. Catherine Paden, Ph.D., is an associate professor and the chair of the Department of Political Science and International Relations at Simmons College. She is also the author of the book Civil Rights Advocacy on Behalf of the Poor.

Mayor Thomas Menino attends the United for Seniors Summer Swing at the Shelburne Community Center in Roxbury on August 8. (Photo courtesy of The Mayor’s office)


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Suit

continued from page 1

Northeastern University has been sued by Columbia Plaza Associates for breach of contract involving the development of parcels of land in Roxbury, including construction of the schools International Village dormitory. The suit also alleges Northeastern violated the city’s Linkage Program, which is designed to encourage minority businesses. (Photo courtesy of Northeastern University)

fused” to pay 50 percent of those receipts to CPA as promised. The suit further alleges that Northeastern constructed the dormitory “in violation of public policy as to minority investment and that Northeastern “has failed to pay any fair value for such institutional use to Columbia Plaza Associates or make any accounting to CPA as to such institutional receipts.” Plans for a hotel are on hold. “The project was delayed due to a downturn in the economy, and there are ongoing discussions with the community partner on proceeding with this project,” Northeastern stated in its Institutional Master Plan submitted to the Boston Redevelopment Authority in 2012. Aside from the alleged violation of its contractual obligations with CPA, the suit brings attention to the city’s Linkage Program – and Northeastern’s alleged violations of the city’s public policy. “For over a decade,” said John Cruz, the CPA president, “We have worked and negotiated in good faith with our partner Northeastern University to successfully complete the Linkage Program to bring real and substantial economic benefits to our community. Their actions ignore the intent and the spirit of the Linkage Program and further encroach on our community.” The Linkage program was created in the 1980s by then City Council President Bruce Bolling and BRA Director Steve Coyle. The idea was to link downtown development with development in residential areas. The Linkage

Program was also designed to encourage minority employment and business development. “The BRA created the program because it determined that minority access to development opportunities and its attendant economic benefits ‘will most likely be denied’ without their intervention,” the CPA stated. “The BRA proactively responded by creating the Linkage Program to make the benefits of Boston’s economic de-

prevent Northeastern University from unjustly enriching itself by manipulating the BRA’s Linkage Program to its exclusive benefit, at the expense of Boston’s communities of color.” CPA knows how much communities of color can benefit from economic development. After One Lincoln was sold, CPA was able to distribute more than $1 million to several non-profit agencies serving Boston’s communities of color.

“Their actions ignore the intent and the spirit of the Linkage Program and further encroach on our community.” — John Cruz velopment more inclusive.” As part of the development of One Lincoln, now called the State Street Financial Center, the city mandated a minimum 30 percent ownership stake be awarded to a minority group and that 30 percent of construction and technical contracts go to minority-owned companies. The BRA named Columbia Plaza Associates as the project’s equity principal. Shortly thereafter, CPA began developing the site that was linked with the One Lincoln development—Parcel 18. But after years of negotiations, the partnership of CPA and Northeastern has ended up in court. “By breaching its contractual obligations to CPA, Northeastern has effectively taken over the Parcel 18 development,” CPA stated. “CPA is determined to

“The Parcel 18 development was similarly positioned to generate significant economic benefits for Boston’s Roxbury community,” CPA stated.

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Prison

continued from page 1

suited to their individual conduct,” while the harshest penalties will be reserved for “serious, high-level, or violent drug traffickers.” U.S. prisons are now filled with 2.2 million people — a 500 percent increase over the last 30 years, when the drug war commenced. Nearly half of the inmates in federal prisons have been convicted of drug crimes, and people of color are largely overrepresented at every stage of drug enforcement. A report released earlier this year by the ACLU found that African Americans are nearly four times as likely to be arrested for marijuana possession than whites, despite similar usage rates between the two groups. Once convicted, the U.S.

Sentencing Commission has shown that black men receive prison sentences nearly 20 percent longer than those given to white men for the same crime — a disparity Holder called “shameful.” It is no surprise, then, that people of color make up two-thirds of all people behind bars for drug arrests, as the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit The Sentencing Project reports. “Right now, unwarranted disparities are far too common,” Holder said. “It’s time to ask tough questions about how we can strengthen our communities, support young people, and address the fact that young black and Latino men are disproportionately likely to become involved in our criminal justice system — as victims as well as perpetrators. On top of reforming mandatory minimum sentences, Holder also

announced that the Justice Department will update the way it considers compassionate release for aging and ill inmates who did not commit vio-

“We need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, deter, and rehabilitate — not merely to warehouse and forget.” — U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder lent crimes, and that it will increase its use of drug treatment and other programs that are aimed at keeping people out of prisons in the first place. Holder explained that states have already started this process by diverting money away from prison con-

struction and toward community and treatment programs — and that such efforts have led to a reduced prison population in several states, such as Kentucky, Texas and Arkansas. Holder was sure to add that these strategies to shrink the prison population “have not compromised safety,” but have helped states by reducing the financial burden of a bloated prison system. In 2010 alone, the United States spent $80 billion on incarceration.  Civil rights groups are already hailing the administration’s reforms. Barbara Arnwine, executive director for the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, called Holder’s announcement “historic and game-changing,” adding, “mandatory minimum sentences are not only unfair in stature and consequence, they represent a serious threat to the civil rights gains and progress of the

1960s and ‘70s.” Wade Henderson, president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, also called Holder’s speech “the most significant proposal ever put forth by the Justice Department to reform our nation’s disastrous criminal justice system.” This week’s announcement was not the first time that Holder and the Obama administration have advocated for criminal justice reform. In 2010, Congress passed the Fair Sentencing Act, which reduced the sentencing discrepancies for crack and powder cocaine, and a year later, the U.S. Sentencing Commission retroactively applied these new guidelines to people sentenced before the law was passed. As Holder said: “We cannot simply prosecute or incarcerate our way to becoming a safer nation.”


Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 11

Two-Time Oscar-Nominee Talks about His Latest Offering

Lee Daniels discusses his new film, The Butler, a civil rights epic recounting the story of an African American who served in the White House. Kam Williams Lee Daniels is best known for directing and producing the Academy Award-winning film Precious which was nominated for a half-dozen Oscars in 2010, including his two for Best Picture and Best Director. Mo’Nique won for Best Supporting Actress while scriptwriter Geoffrey Fletcher landed another for Best Adapted Screenplay. Lee’s production company, Lee Daniels Entertainment, made its feature film debut in 2001 with Monster’s Ball, the dysfunctional family drama for which Halle Berry would earn her historic, Best Actress Oscar. Last year, he wrote, produced and directed The Paperboy, an adaptation of the Pete Dexter novel starring

Matthew McConaughey, Zac Efron, John Cusack and Nicole Kidman.

So, what inspired you to make the movie?

What attracted me to the project was the father-son story which I looked at as a love story with the Civil Rights Movement as a backdrop. That was intriguing to me both because I’d had issues with my own dad, and because I have issues with my teenage son. I think the father-son love story is a universal one which transcends color. That’s what was sort of there on the page, but it wasn’t until I started shooting that we began getting into the Woolworth’s sit-ins and the Freedom Riders with the Molotov cocktails that I asked myself, “What have

I stumbled upon?” It was then that I realized the film was much bigger than just the father-son story.

Did you decide to tackle the civil rights material because of the Trayvon Martin shooting?

No, it hadn’t happened when Danny Strong wrote the script, including the line “Any white man can kill any of us at any time and get away with it.”

You got Oscar-winners in Forest Whitaker, Cuba Gooding, Jr., Jane Fonda, Vanessa Redgrave, Robin Williams and Melissa

Leo, and Oscar-nominees in Terrence Howard and Oprah Winfrey to come aboard. How were you able to assemble such an outstanding cast?

My usual way … throwing out a net and fishing. This one was easy because the material was so good. The actors I approached took the bait because they wanted to serve the material. We really didn’t have any money to pay them, so most of them lost money in relation to what their normal acting fee would be.

How has the tempest over re-using the title The Butler affected you?

When I’m working on a movie, it’s like being in a cocoon. I consider it like giving birth, and I don’t leave the bubble, because if I do, then it’s bad and affects the child. But I was pulled out for a minute when my kids told me about something they saw online. I didn’t even hear about it from the studio. It disturbed me, but I didn’t have time to think about it.

Well, it’s now called Lee Daniels’ The Butler.

The MPAA [Motion Pictures Association of America] gave me that title and I still don’t know how to feel about it. I just finished giving birth to the movie. “Lee Daniels’ Daniels, continued to page 12


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Daniels

continued from page 11

The Butler!” It sounds like “The Greatest Show on Earth!”

Well Tyler Perry, Dino De Laurentis and others are famous for placing their names before the title?

I’m not Tyler Perry. I’m not Dino De Laurentis. I think it’s a bit much to put one’s name in front of the film. It makes me uncomfortable. Here’s the thing. Insiders like you know the whole story and about the legal issues, but not the average person. I worry that young kids in Oklahoma or Ala-

bama might end up asking, “Who is this filmmaker to be so full of himself?” That bothers me. The MPAA handed down this edict. So, I don’t know how I feel about it right now. Ask me tomorrow. [Chuckles]

My eyes must have welled up at least a half-dozen times while watching the film. As the director, you must be too close to the film for it to have that sort of emotional effect on you.

No, when I actually sat down all alone to watch the final cut just for pleasure, I broke down in tears.

portraying the tensions and differences between the Civil Rights and Black Power generations.

There was no right and wrong. Cecil [played by Forest Whitaker] was right and so was his son [played by David Oyelowo]. You’ve got a problem when neither is wrong, yet you have a conflict.

I also appreciated the evenhanded way in which you approached each of the presidents Cecil

served under, like how Reagan could give his African American help a raise to make their pay equal to that of whites, while hypocritically still supporting Apartheid in South Africa.

I did. I think it was a great movie for its time, but I wanted to avoid the episodic feeling of that film.

What message do you want the public to take away from The Butler?

Ain’t that interesting? We don’t make Kennedy out to be a “goody two-shoes” either.

I hate that question because it forces me to be philosophical … I think the message is that we have got a long way to go. I hope that this film rips a scab off the sore that is racism in America today.

Have you seen the TV miniseries Backstairs at the White House?

To see a trailer for Lee Daniels’ The Butler, visit: http://www.twcpublicity.com/video_popup.php?id=108

You did a masterful job of

Forest Whitaker stars in Lee Daniels’ The Butler. Daniels was also able to get other award-winning stars such as Cuba Gooding Jr., Jane Fonda, Vanessa Redgrave, Robin Williams, Melissa Leo and Terrance Howard.


Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 13

Save Our Streets revived with with Urban Art Festival Kassmin Williams Tony Diaz worked alongside three other street artists to fill blank white boards with graffiti in the far center of the Francis D. Martini Memorial Shell Park in Hyde Park as

spectators observed. This was one source of entertainment that last month’s Urban Art Festival, hosted by Save Our Streets, offered to attendees at the daylong family-friendly event. To the street artists’ right a small

crowd hovered around a stage and watched live performances. In the center of the park some kids played a game of Frisbee while others created artwork of their own on the upper half of the field. The event attracted about 100

people and served as a kick-off for the organization that is looking to re-establish itself after a two-year hiatus. Fitzgerald David, who started SOS in 2008, funds the organization out of pocket and had to put his vision for SOS on pause when he lost his job. “I think the greatest thing about the event is it [created] some momentum for our organization and hopefully we can keep it going,” David said. The purpose of the festival was to bring together local performers, artists and poets to provide a community platform to promote the arts as a positive diversion and alternative to violence in urban communities in the city.

The message was heard loud and clear by attendees who said they appreciated the organization providing entertainment for the youth and local artists who were grateful for the opportunity to perform in their hometowns and for a cause. A spoken-word poet who performed at the festival and goes by the name London Bridgez grew up in Roxbury, but has often traveled outside of the state to find performance opportunities. “There seems like there’s this movement over the last year to revitalize the art scene here so this event is a part of that revitalization and this is an urban arts festival that is SOS, continued to page 14

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Tony Diaz creates a piece of street artwork live at the urban art festival. (Photo courtesy of Save Our Streets Boston)

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J. Hoard and The Greenhouse People was one of many performers at This street artwork created by Merk Those during the Urban Arts Festival takes a stand against gun vio- Kids participated in a number of activities the Save Our Street’s First Annual Urban Arts Festival. lence. (Photos courtesy of Save Our Streets Boston) at the festival, such as face painting.

SOS

continued from page 13

specifically for … Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan,” Bridgez said. “It’s great to have entertainment in our neighborhoods.”

Boston R&B singer April Stanford said she appreciated the opportunity to promote peace in the community and sing for a “great cause.” “I think the more we try to raise awareness and promote peace, that’s great,” Stanford said. Sirae Richardson, who attended

the event with her nephews with the intention of supporting Stanford, said she realized how important the event was to the community after arriving. For Richardson, the event provided a rare opportunity for Boston youth to interact with each other. “Having something where

they can meet kids their age, especially for my nephews, it’s a blessing,” Richardson said. For Boston resident Teila Gray, the event was about more than the entertainment. It was about creating positive moments for Boston communities that

are most often associated with negativity, Gray said. “[The festival is] really important for our community because it’s something positive,” Gray said. “I think it’s really good for their kids to see role models and positive things in the community.”


Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 15


16 • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

healthNews

Poll: Blacks, Latinos worry over long-term care crises Bruce Chernof It is no secret that Americans are aging, but what is too often lost is that most people will need help as they grow older. Unfortunately, America does not have a strategy to deal with

this growing demand. For some, this help comes in the form of needing just a little bit of assistance in the home with such tasks as cooking meals or getting groceries. For others, it is more comprehensive daily help in an assisted living community or nurs-

ing home care. As chair of the newly created federal Commission on LongTerm Care, I believe it is imperative for Americans to understand that 70 percent of us who live beyond the age of 65 will need some form of long-term care, on average for three years. This is a particularly significant statistic given the reality that our nation’s system of care is outdated and lacks the tools to meet the needs of our growing senior population. To better understand Americans’ attitudes and perceptions around aging and long-term care, as well as levels of preparedness for future care, the Associated Press’s NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national poll of adults aged 40 and older with funding from The SCAN Foundation, which I head. The implications of these findings are profound considering the population of adults over 65 will double to nearly 72 million people — 19 percent of the U.S. population — by 2030.

Counting on Family Members

Mayor Thomas Menino attends a lunch at The Food Project’s West Cottage Street Farm in Dorchester on August 7. (Photo courtesy of the Mayor’s office)

For starters, most Americans today are operating under the assumption that they can count on family members to help care for

them in a time of need. About two-thirds believe they can look to their families for significant support and even more people think they will get at least some support from their families in a time of need. However, in spite of these assumptions, nearly six in 10 are not even having conversations with family about their future desires and preferences for care. This is not about having the death conversation — what you want to happen to you when you die. This is about having the life conversation — defining how you want to live in light of changing health needs and daily physical struggles that may emerge as you age. Perhaps, even more remarkably, 30 percent of Americans would rather not even think about getting older at all. This denial about aging and future care needs can be of serious detriment to individuals who are suddenly thrust into a situation in which they need care and do not know where to turn for help.

Misunderstanding Medicare

Americans also have major misconceptions about the costs of long-term care and about who — or what — will pay for these needs when the time comes. While more than half (57 percent) of Americans 40 or older report having some experience with long-term care, most are not aware of how expensive it is. Almost half (44 percent) mistakenly believe that Medicare pays for ongoing care at home by a licensed home health care aide. And more than one in three Americans (37 percent) in-

Public Meeting Notice for proposal on Smith Leadership Academy Charter Public School Expansion and Relocation Notice is hereby given that the Smith Leadership Academy Charter Public School 23 Leonard Street, Dorchester, Mass 02122 Board of Trustees will hold a public meeting on a proposal school expansion and school relocation as required by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education on Thursday August 29, 2013 at the Grove Hall Branch Public Library, 41 Geneva Ave. Dorchester, Ma 02121 from 6:00pm -7:45pm. This will be the second of three meetings; The purpose of this public meeting is to allow input into the planning of this relocation and development project on the part of the local citizens and any other interested parties, governmental agencies or groups. All persons interested in the design, location and construction of the Smith Leadership Academy facilities and the potential impact to the existing school and students are invited to appear and express their views. The public meeting shall take place August 29, 2013 at the Grove Hall Branch Public Library, 41 Geneva Ave. Dorchester, MA. 02121, starting at 6 pm and ending promptly at 7:45 pm (limited space available) in the Jazz Room of the facility. The final public meeting shall take place at Smith Leadership Academy 23 Leonard St. Dorchester, Mass. 02122 October 8, 2013 starting at 6 pm and ending at 8 pm. Those having special needs (wheel chairs, hearing impaired and interpreter) shall contact Ms. Marshall at Smith Leadership Academy Charter Public School at 617 474-7950.

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correctly believe it pays for ongoing care in a nursing home. A mere 27 percent of older adults surveyed are confident that they will have the resources to pay for the care they need as they age. This confusion about how services are paid for leads to a lack of knowledge on how to plan and, again, individuals find themselves in situations of need with no idea of where to turn for help. African Americans and Latinos were especially worried. Well over half of blacks (57 percent) expressed concern about being able to pay for needed care, compared

Americans also have major misconceptions about the costs of long-term care and about who — or what — will pay for these needs when the time comes. to 45 percent of Hispanics and 41 percent of whites. Also, half or more of African Americans and Latinos said they worry about becoming a burden on their families, in contrast to just over one in three whites. And almost half of blacks surveyed were concerned that they may leave debts to family related to longterm care, compared to just over one in four Hispanics and whites. The prospect of ending up in a nursing home proved somewhat more troubling for African Americans (57 percent) than for Hispanics (44 percent) and whites (40 percent).

Promising Solutions

However, there is promise for innovative approaches to solving these issues: Americans across the political spectrum show majority support for public policy solutions to transform the nation’s system of long-term care. More than three-quarters of Americans support tax breaks to encourage saving for long-term care expenses; just over half support a government-administered longterm care insurance program similar to Medicare. Solutions on how to effectively plan for future care are not partisan concerns but universal ones, with affordable and accessible services for older adults a priority for all. The new poll reflects a serious gap in knowledge and awareness that leaves individuals and their families struggling to fend for themselves when it comes to paying for these services. However, what this poll also shows is that people support a better model, a toolbox that offers a suite of services with viable options for individuals to stay in their homes and communities whenever possible. The timing for this poll is critical as our window for action is short. Americans are clearly asking for solutions and mechanisms to begin to prepare for their future care needs so that we all can age with dignity, choice and independence. Bruce Chernof, M.D., FACP, is the president and CEO of The SCAN Foundation, as well as the chair of the Commission on Long-Term Care.


Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 17

Mayoral candidates grilled on housing issues at forum

Candidates at a mayoral forum sponsored by the Right to the City Boston and the Boston Tenants Coalition sit in alphabetical order: Felix G. Arroyo, John Barros, Charlotte Golar Richie, Mike Ross, Marty Walsh, Bill Walczak and Charles Yancey. (Carlos Solis photo) Carlos Solis housing units and housing for the homeless. The affordable housing acWhere they demonstrated tivists gathered at the Quincy their differences was in the expeSchool last week at a mayoral rience each said they would bring candidates forum were asked to bear in tackling these issues as some of the most vexing ques- mayor. tions facing policy makers inCity Councilor Arroyo talked volving residential development. about his family coming to The candidates were asked Boston from Puerto Rico and how they would stop the dis- living in public housing in the placement of low-income res- Villa Victoria public housing deidents in newly fashionable velopment and cited his work on neighborhoods; how they would the City Council on behalf of afprevent foreclosures and no-fault fordable housing initiatives. evictions; and how they would Richie, a former state reprebalance luxury developments sentative, talked about her parwith affordable housing. ents work in public housing in The forum was sponsored by New York City, where she grew the umbrella groups Right to up, and touted her experience as the City Boston and the Boston head of Boston’s Department of Tenant Coalition. Neighborhood Development. The mayoral candidates who Barros touted his work as exmet with the groups — John ecutive director of the Dudley Barros, Felix Arroyo, Charlotte Street Neighborhood Initiative, Golar Richie, Michael Ross, Bill which has taken land by eminent Walczak, Charles Yancey and domain and held it in trust for Marty Walsh — expressed strong the development of affordable support for public housing, housing. tenant protections, the preservaWalsh spoke about the distion and construction of public placement of long-time residents

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in the Savin Hill neighborhood where he grew up and lives and how it informed his support for affordable housing. The candidates offered no positions at odds with those espoused by the groups that organized the forum, which included City Life/Vida Urbana, the Chinese Progressive Association, the Mass Alliance of HUD Tenants and the Mass Senior Action Council. When asked what they would do to end homelessness in Boston, the candidates’ answers varied greatly. Ross suggested shifting some resources from shelters to actual housing units for homeless people, regardless of whether or not they’re sober, arguing it’s easier for people to receive services when they have a place to stay. “When you’re homeless, what you need is a home,” he said. Yancey said he would float a special bond issue to build more housing units for homeless people. “When I was born there were 800,000 people living in Boston,” he said. “Now we have a little more than 600,000. There’s still room in Boston.” Arroyo said a third of all housing should be affordable and one third should be moderately affordable. When asked what they would do to stop banks from evicting

tenants after foreclosure, virtually all of the candidates agreed with the coalition’s suggested measure, which include fining banks that don’t mediate, taking city deposits out of Wall Street banks, and using eminent domain to take mortgages and renegotiate them. Richie cited her eight years as head of the city’s Department of Neighborhood Development, which launched a “Don’t Borrow Trouble” public awareness campaign to help steer homeowners away from predatory loans.

banks on behalf of homeowners and gone to housing court with homeowners seeking to halt foreclosures. “I’ve been there with you at the court house,” he said. Arroyo also noted that he wrote legislation that would require the city to deposit the more than $1 billion in cash it holds in banks that invest in local communities, rather than in Wall Street banks. Barros agreed with the group’s suggestions and said he’s had experience using eminent domain

“The federal government shouldn’t have given [banks] money to keep their doors open so they could shut your doors.” — Marty Walsh She also said she would use the mayor’s office as a bully pulpit to force banks to do right by homeowners. Walsh agreed with the group’s measures. “The federal government shouldn’t have given [banks] money to keep their doors open so they could shut your doors,” he said. Ya n c e y a g r e e d w i t h t h e group’s ideas and noted that he’s attended City Life’s eviction blockades, actions designed to disrupt foreclosure auctions and force banks to negotiate with homeowners in default. Arroyo also cited his attendance at the blockades, noted that he’s intervened by phoning

to renegotiate mortgages. The Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative was given the power of eminent domain by the city in the 1980s to take vacant land from speculators and hold it in a community land trust. The seven mayoral candidates present at the forum were among the most progressive in the race. Most of them, with the exception of Ross, have not received significant contributions from real estate developers and large financial institutions. Unable to attend were Suffolk District Attorney Dan Conley, Boston City Councilors John Connelly and Rob Consalvo, radio host Charles Clemmons and David James Wyatt.


18 • Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

Prepare for hurricane season: Being ready is the best plan

of a storm, fill your vehicle’s gas tank and make arrangements with family, friends and neighbors to help one another with transportation during an emergency. Also be sure to prepare an emergency kit for your car that includes food, road flares, jumper cables, maps, tools, a first aid kit, a fire extinguisher and sleeping bags.

Be Safe

Look out for updated information about potential storms on TV, radio and social media. During a hurricane, most injuries are caused by flying glass and other debris. Stay safe indoors by avoid-

elderly, before, during and after a hurricane. You can avoid cabin fever by having games and other entertainment in your home, but remember that you might not be able to rely on electricity. With the peak of this year’s Atlantic hurricane season on the horizon, keep these tips in mind as you prepare, and start the conversation about preparedness with your neighbors. Taking small steps to prepare year-round for emergencies will help you feel calmer and more in control when one happens. Together, we can build healthier, stronger and more resilient communities.

If we prepare before a hurricane and take steps to be safe when one strikes, we will be healthier and stronger as a community. 

The Boston Public Health Commission had developed the Get Ready, Be Safe, Stay Healthy campaign to help people prepare for emergencies, including hurricanes. (Lolita Parker photo) While we’re still soaking in the summer sun most people would rather not think about the freezing temperatures and snow that are sure to come once November and December roll around. But between now and then, there’s a season that many of us in Boston tend to overlook.  It’s the Atlantic hurricane season, which occurs from June through November and peaks from late August through September. Thankfully, we were spared the devastation experienced in New York and New Jersey, but the de-

struction caused by Hurricane Sandy last October should be a reminder that preparing for the worstcase scenario is the best decision. At the Boston Public Health Commission, we’ve developed the Get Ready, Be Safe, Stay Healthy campaign to take some of the stress out of preparing for emergencies. It’s hard to anticipate an emergency before it happens, but it’s easy to prepare. For hurricane season, follow these simple steps to create a plan that works for you and your loved ones.

Get Ready

Start by checking your emergency supplies. Make sure you have food, drinking water, batteries, a battery-powered radio, flashlights, a fire extinguisher, a first aid kit, important paperwork, medications, a phone charger and other daily necessities on hand. Store a 3-5 day supply of non-perishable food and water (about 5 gallons per person) in an area that is not at risk of flood damage.  You can freeze perishable food items to keep them fresh for longer periods of time. Ahead

ing windows and seeking shelter in a bathroom or basement, if necessary. To keep food safe during a power outage, open your refrigerator and freezer as little as possible. Food in an unopened fridge will stay cold for about four hours, and a full freezer can keep food at a safe temperature for up to 48 hours. If you have to evacuate your home, take only the essential items with you, turn off your utilities and appliances and follow designated evacuation routes.

Stay Healthy

If we prepare before a hurricane and take steps to be safe when one strikes, we will be healthier and stronger as a community. Check in on your neighbors, especially the

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The Boston Medical Reserve Corps will be hosting a free lecture called “Hurricanes: The Public Health and Medical Services Response” on Sept. 26 at 6 p.m. For more details on the event and to register for free through the DelValle Institute for Emergency Preparedness, visit https://delvalle.bphc.org/. Learn more about the Boston Public Health Commission’s Get Ready, Be Safe, Stay Healthy campaign by visiting www.readysafehealthy.org, and sign up to receive emergency alerts from the City of Boston at www.cityofboston.gov/ alertboston. S. Atyia Martin is the director of the Office of Public Health Preparedness, a division of the Boston Public Health Commission.

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Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 19

Obituary

Simeon Golar, N.Y. judge, father of mayoral candidate

Simeon Golar, a former New York Family Court judge, and onetime chairman of both New York City’s Commission on Human Rights and the New York City Housing Authority, has died, his family says. He was 84. Golar died Sunday of natural causes at Calvary Hospital in the Bronx, N.Y., according to the campaign of his daughter, Boston mayoral candidate Charlotte Golar Richie. Judge Golar was born in 1928 during the Great Depression, in segregated South Carolina. He was born to Lottie Jackson, a single teenage mother, and then adopted by the Golar family with whom he migrated to New York City when

he was a small boy. He attended public schools, and later the City College of New York. He worked his way through New York University School of Law as a subway toll clerk; and at NYU he was a classmate of former New York City Mayor David Dinkins. In 1956, he married Pauline Wellington, a young teacher and daughter of Barbadian immigrants, and they settled in Brooklyn. They had two children, Charlotte and her sister, Katherine. Though Simeon and Pauline divorced in 1965, they maintained a close relationship with each other and with their two daughters, family members said. In 1966, Golar ran unsuccessfully for the office of Attorney General of New York on the Liberal Party ticket, running at a time when it was extremely uncommon for African American candidates to campaign for statewide office. He subsequently became the chairman of New York City’s Commission on Human Rights, and later, chairman of the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) in the administration of New York City Mayor John Lindsay; he was reportedly the first NYCHA chairman to have lived in public housing. Golar later served as a judge in

the New York State Family Court system; he had a stint as a television talk show host on WNBC’s “Open Circuit,” and worked for several years as a housing developer, a law professor and as an attorney in private practice.

He served on many boards, including the Supreme Court Justices’ Association of NYC, the Community Service Society of NY, the New York Urban League, and NYU Law School. He was also a life member of the NAACP. “He had great courage and a brilliant mind,” said Charlotte Golar Richie. “He overcame great odds to succeed in public life, rising from humble beginnings in Chester, South Carolina, to become a dynamic leader and public servant. I will miss him very much.” In keeping with one of her

father’s favorite quotes, “A life well-lived is a life of service,” Golar Richie followed in her father’s public service footsteps. She was a Peace Corps volunteer and later became a state representative from 1994 to 1999. She later worked as Boston’s Chief of Housing and Director of Neighborhood Development and as a senior aide to Governor Deval Patrick. She recently took time off from her latest job as senior vice president for YouthBuild USA to campaign for Boston mayor. Funeral services will be held in New York this week.

Mayor Thomas M. Menino administers the ceremonial swearing in for U.S. Senator Edward Markey at Faneuil Hall last week. (Photo courtesy of the Mayor’s office)

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Check out our online Events page – updated daily, and submit your own event.

Contact sandra@bannerpub.com or call 617-261-4600 for more information and to advertise with the Banner www.baystatebanner.com • facebook.com/baystatebanner • twitter.com/baystatebanner


20 20 •• Thursday, Thursday, August August 15, 15, 2013 2013 •• BAY BAY STATE STATE BANNER BANNER

Plans for Bartlett Place, which will be developed on the former MBTA Bartlett bus yard in Roxbury, include 323 units of housing and 54,000 square feet of commercial property. Nuestra Comunidad Development Corp. will lead the project, which has an estimated total cost of about $140 million. (Photos courtesy of Nuestra Comunidad Development Corp.)

Bartlett

continued from page 1

the other one is going up. We are really starting to pick up speed here and we are really close to securing funding.” He also pointed out that all the commercial development is being done in phase one. The Bartlett Yard has been part of many development proposals in the last decade, many of

said that Nuestra Comunidad Development now is in discussion with a local grocery store to come into the development. In the past, many of the development plans have had a tough road because the site was owned by the MBTA. City involvement delayed approvals and the process in general, Matel said. But in 2010, Nuestra Comunidad Development bought the Bartlett Yard property and the company is committed to making development happen.

“We are making sure the buildings are sustainable and making sure we give cultural community benefits back to the community.” — Mark Matel which have been highly criticized by both the public and city officials. The result has been an essentially empty site. One proposal that drew a large outcry would have brought a Walmart store to the site. This plan was eventually shot down when Mayor Thomas M. Menino stepped in and spoke against the project due to worries about the impact on local retailers. Matel

No matter how things turn out on the final development plans, the company will put up $9 million, the estimated cost for acquisition of the land, design work and cleaning up the site. At least one government organization is fully behind Nuestra Comunidad Development’s efforts to clean up the Bartlett Yard site. The Environmental Protection Agency has already given the

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU04P0636GM1 In the interests of Chaniya Hendricks of Roxbury, MA Minor

4.

company $1 million in grants to demolish the old buildings and clean up the old site. In 2011, Nuestra Comunidad Development got a $600,000 EPA remediation grant and they got another $400,000 grant this year. Demolition work on Bartlett Yard could begin as early as November. “The site will be potentially cleaned up by spring of next year, so we will have 8.5 acres of cleaned up land — no buildings,” Matel said. From the start, Nuestra Comunidad Development has dubbed the Bartlett Place project a “creative village.” “The housing and the commercial property is wrapped around a public plaza — an open market that will have arts and events venues and walkability,” Matel said. “We look at parts of the programing as a public plaza and making sure the artists are actually here so they can activate the place.” However, until this spring when Bartlett Events started to hold events on the property and created a large mural of painting and graffiti art, locals didn’t have much sense of what a “creative village” might actually mean to the area. But many of the weekends have now seen well-attended events showcasing art and culture and community gatherings from different organizations. Matel said Nuestra Comuni-

1.

2.

Response to Petition: You may respond by filing a written response to the Petition or by appearing in person at the hearing. If you choose to file a written response, you need to: File the original with the Court; and Mail a copy to all interested parties at least five (5) business days before the hearing.

3.

Counsel for the Minor: The minor (or an adult on behalf of the minor) has the right to request that counsel be appointed for the minor.

The Bartlett Place project has four phases of development for the 8.5 acre former MBTA bus yard in Roxbury. The first phase consists of 100 units of housing and a grocery store. Proposed plans for later phases including senior housing, artist housing and homes.

Presence of the Minor at Hearing: A minor over age 14 has the right to be present at any hearing, unless the Court finds that it is not in the minor’s best interests.

THIS IS A LEGAL NOTICE: An important court proceeding that may affect your rights has been scheduled. If you do not understand this notice or other court papers, please contact an attorney for legal advice. Date: August 1, 2013

NOTICE AND ORDER: Petition for Resignation or Petition for Removal of Guardianship of a Minor NOTICE TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES Hearing Date/Time: A hearing on a Petition to Resign as Guardian of a Minor or Petition for Removal of Guardian of a minor filed by Goldie A. Perry of Brockton, MA on 07/31/2013 will be held 08/23/2013 09:00 AM Guardianship of Minor Hearing Located at 24 New Chardon Street, 3rd floor, Boston, MA 02114 ~ Family Service Office.

dad Development is thrilled with the success of Bartlett Events so far and hopes that it shows the company wants to partner with community events. Bartlett Events will continue to host events on the property into the fall. “We didn’t think it would

Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

reach this kind of success.” Matel said. “For us it is serving as a community development tool. “In this scenario we are testing things and we are actually seeing it is working,” he added. “It has panned out to work very well.” In fact, the community reaction to Bartlett Events and the art and murals in particular has led to Nuestra Comunidad Development including plans to keep a 20foot L-shaped wall, which is covered with a mural, in the final development of Bartlett Place. The wall will be used as a backdrop for public events. “That is the only part of the development that is staying,” Matel said. The Bartlett Place project is now going through the zoning process and will go before the zoning board in September. “The development isn’t going to start until next year potentially, but we are demo-ing the buildings this fall,” said Matel. Bartlett Place is taking a cue from other recent development in the region, such as the revitalization of Dudley Square. “We are trying to bring the same kind of positive energy that the city is bringing to that development,” Matel said. “We are making sure the buildings are sustainable and making sure we give cultural community benefits back to the community. … We are putting culture up front at the forefront of our development so that the community can enjoy it.”

Docket No. SU13P1701GD

Citation Giving Notice of Petition for Appointment of Guardian for Incapacitated Person Pursuant to G.L. c. 190B, §5-304 åIn the matter of Jamal Tyrone Brodie Of Mattapan, MA RESPONDENT Alleged Incapacitated Person To the named Respondent and all other interested persons, a petition has been filed by Renita L. Brodie of Mattapan, MA in the above captioned matter alleging that Jamal Tyrone Brodie is in need of a Guardian and requesting that Renita L. Brodie of Mattapan, MA (or some other suitable person) be appointed as Guardian to serve on the bond.

The petition asks the court to determine that the Respondant is incapacitated, that the appointment of a Guardian is necessary, that the proposed Guardian is appropriate. The petition is on file with this court and may contain a request for certain specific authority. You have the right to object to this proceeding. If you wish to do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance at this court on or before 10:00 A.M. on the return date of 08/29/2013. This day is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline date by which you have to file the written appearance if you object to the petition. If you fail to file the written appearance by the return date, action may be taken in this matter without further notice to you. In addition to filing the written appearance, you or your attorney must file a written affidavit stating the specific facts and grounds of your objection within 30 days after the return date. IMPORTANT NOTICE The outcome of this proceeding may limit or completely take away the above-named person’s right to make decisions about personal affairs or financial affairs or both. The above-named person has the right to ask for a lawyer. Anyone may make this request on behalf of the above-named person. If the above-named person cannot afford a lawyer, one may be appointed at State expense. WITNESS, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: July 23, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate


Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 21

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13P1418GD

In the interests of Quentin Michael Stewart of Dorchester, MA Minor NOTICE AND ORDER: Petition for Appointment of Guardian of a Minor 1.

NOTICE TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES Hearing Date/Time: A hearing on a Petition for Appointment of Guardian of a Minor filed on 06/18/2013 by D’Lontai C. Blake of Arlington, MA and Peggy C. Louis of Arlington, MA will be held 10/28/2013 09:00 AM Guardianship of Minor Hearing Located at 24 New Chardon Street, 3rd floor, Boston, MA 02114 ~ Family Service Office.

2.

Response to Petition: You may respond by filing a written response to the Petition or by appearing in person at the hearing. If you choose to file a written response, you need to:

File the original with the Court; and Mail a copy to all interested parties at least five (5) business days before the hearing.

3.

Counsel for the Minor: The minor (or an adult on behalf of the minor) has the right to request that counsel be appointed for the minor.

4.

Presence of the Minor at Hearing: A minor over age 14 has the right to be present at any hearing, unless the Court finds that it is not in the minor’s best interests.

THIS IS A LEGAL NOTICE: An important court proceeding that may affect your rights has been scheduled. If you do not understand this notice or other court papers, please contact an attorney for legal advice. Date: July 9, 2013

Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU09P1336GD In the interests of Javonte L. Thomas of Boston, MA Minor

NOTICE AND ORDER: Petition for Resignation or Petition for Removal of Guardianship of a Minor 1.

2.

3. 4.

NOTICE TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES Hearing Date/Time: A hearing on a Petition to Resign as Guardian of a Minor or Petition for Removal of Guardian of a minor filed by Lionel Jacks of Hudson, MA on 07/30/2013 will be held 09/04/2013 09:00 AM Guardianship of Minor Hearing Located at 24 New Chardon Street, 3rd floor, Boston, MA 02114 ~ Family Service Office. Response to Petition: You may respond by filing a written response to the Petition or by appearing in person at the hearing. If you choose to file a written response, you need to:

to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 09/05/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: August 05, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

Presence of the Minor at Hearing: A minor over age 14 has the right to be present at any hearing, unless the Court finds that it is not in the minor’s best interests.

THIS IS A LEGAL NOTICE: An important court proceeding that may affect your rights has been scheduled. If you do not understand this notice or other court papers, please contact an attorney for legal advice. Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

Date: July 30, 2013

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13P1772EA

SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13P0793EA

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication Estate of Sharon Louise Billings Also known as: Sharon L. Billings-Addington Date of Death: 09/21/2012 To all interested persons: A petition has been filed by Estate Recovery Unit of Worcester, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that Bethany White of Chesapeake, VA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 08/29/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: July 30, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13P1733PM

In the matter of: Marie Gemene Casimir Respondent (Person to be Protected/Minor) Of: Mattapan, MA CITATION GIVING NOTICE OF PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF CONSERVATOR OR OTHER PROTECTIVE ORDER PURSUANT TO G.L c. 190B, §5-304 & §5-405 To the named Respondent and all other interested persons, a petition has been filed by Marie G. Lespinasse of Mattapan, MA in the above captioned matter alleging that Marie Gemene Casimir is in need of a Conservator or other protective order and requesting that Marie G. Lespinasse of Mattapan, MA (or some other suitable person) be appointed as Conservator to serve Without Surety on the bond. The petition asks the court to determine that the Respondent is disabled, that a protective order or appointment of a Conservator is necessary, and that the proposed conservator is appropriate. The petition is on file with this court.

INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE

Bonnie L. Jefferson of Eastham, MA Diana Welsh of Rockport, MA has been informally appointed as the Personal Representative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restricting the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13P1490EA

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication Estate of Fred Hayse Dixon Date of Death: 08/18/2007 To all interested persons: A petition has been filed by Michelle Y. White of Dorchester, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that Michelle Y. White of Dorchester, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate

Witness, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: July 24, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13D1490DR

Divorce Summons by Publication and Mailing Bernice Taylor

SOUTH YARMOUTH

Simpkins School Residences Brand New Affordable Studios, 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts for adults 55+. 65 apts. Available by Lottery. Applications Available through 9/16/13 at 134 Old Main Street S. Yarmouth MA,02664/ 1146 Rt 28 S. Yarmouth MA, 02664 & 528 Forest Rd. West Yarmouth MA, 02673. Call 508.394.7111 or visit www.SimpkinsSchool.com for more information. Income restrictions apply.

CHELSEA APARTMENT

4+ bdrms Newly renovated, 2000+ sq ft apt in 3 fam, no smkng/pets, hrdwd flrs, eat-in kit, pantry, lg master bedroom, din and lv rm, laundry rm, enclosed frnt/bck prchs, off street prkng, T access, min to Bost. Sec 8 OK

617-283-2081

vs.

Mark N Taylor

To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for irretrievable breakdown of the marriage pursuant to G.L. c. 208, Section 1 B. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon: Bernice Taylor, 47 Waverly St, Roxbury, MA 02119-1176 your answer, if any, on or before 09/26/2013. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. Witness, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: July 23, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13D1476DR

Divorce Summons by Publication and Mailing Olawunmi Guerrier

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department

Estate of Adrienne Welsh Date of Death April 17, 2013

To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Bonnie L. Jefferson of Eastham, MA Petitoner Diana Welsh of Rockport, MA a will has been admitted to informal probate.

IMPORTANT NOTICE The outcome of this proceeding may limit or completely take away the above-named person’s right to make decisions about personal affairs or financial affairs or both. The above-named person has the right to ask for a lawyer. Anyone may make this request on behalf of the above-named person. If the above-named person cannot afford a lawyer, one may be appointed at State expense.

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department

File the original with the Court; and Mail a copy to all interested parties at least five (5) business days before the hearing. Counsel for the Minor: The minor (or an adult on behalf of the minor) has the right to request that counsel be appointed for the minor.

You have the right to object to this proceeding. If you wish to do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance at this court on or before 10:00 A.M. on the return date of 09/05/2013. This day is not a hearing date, but a deadline date by which you have to file the written appearance if you object to the petition. If you fail to file the written appearance by the return date, action may be taken in this matter without further notice to you. In addition to filing the written appearance, you or your attorney must file a written affidavit stating the specific facts and grounds of your objection within 30 days after the return date.

vs.

Emmanuel Guerrier

To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for irretrievable breakdown of the marriage pursuant to G.L. c. 208, Section 1 B. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon: Olawunmi Guerrier, 32 Old Morton St, Mattapan, MA 02126 your answer, if any, on or before 09/26/2013. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. Witness, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: July 23, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate


amount of $25.00 to cover handling and mailing fees. The selected contractor shall furnish a performance bond and payment bond in amount at least equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price as stipulated in Section 00700 GENERAL CONDITIONS of these specifications. Anticipated funding project will be from BANNER the Unite States 22 • Thursday, Augustfor 15,this2013 • BAY STATE

Statement and Weekly Utilization Report. Each Contractor must complete, sign and file with his bid the Bidder’s Certification Statement. Failure to do so will result in rejection of the bid. The Weekly Utilization Reports shall be submitted in accordance with section 8.2 (ii) and (iii) of the Contract. Failure to comply with the Minority Employee Utilization Requirement may result in imposition of the sanctions set forth in section 8.2 (f) and (g) of the Contract.

For Rent:

For Rent:

ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT

THREE BEDROOM

Please contact: Sharif Khallaq, SAAK Realty 2821 Washington St. Roxbury, MA 617.427.1327

Please contact: Sharif Khallaq, SAAK Realty 2821 Washington St. Roxbury, MA 617.427.1327

Available in quiet Roxbury neighborhood. Building is well maintained with only three apartments. Renter responsible for heat, hot water and electricity.

Attractive and Affordable This beautiful privately owned apartment complex with subsidized units for elderly and disabled individuals is just minutes from downtown Melrose.

DUPLEX

Working fireplace, 2 baths. All GE appliances. Master bath has marble tile floor and whirlpool bath. Building opposite beautiful quiet park.

Close to Public Transportation • Elevator Access to All Floors • On Site Laundry Facilities Heat Included • 24 Hour Closed Circuit Television • On Site Parking Excellent Closet and Storage Space • 24 Hour Maintenance Availability On site Management Office • Monthly Newsletter • Weekly Videos on Big Screen T.V. Resident Computer Room • Bus Trips • Resident Garden Plots

Call for current income guidelines Joseph T. Cefalo Memorial Complex

Rudy Crichlow, CRS 617-524-3500

245 West Wyoming Avenue, Melrose, MA 02176

Buying • Selling • Relocation • 1st time home buyer assistance • Free home value estimate

Call our Office at (781) 662-0223 or TDD: (800) 545-1833, ext. 131 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Friday for an application

“I’m here to help you” www.rudycrichlow.com

visit us on the web at www.cefalomemorial.com

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Parker Hill Apartments The Style, Comfort and Convenience you Deserve!

YWCA Market Street Apartments Now accepting applications for efficiencies, one and two bedroom apartments at YWCA Market Street Apartments in Newburyport, MA. Applicants must be homeless or qualify as disabled through Massachusetts Department of Rehabilitation. One unit prioritized for applicants with a sensory disability. Monthly rents from $513, all utilities included. Income restrictions apply. family size

30% income limit

50% income limit

4 person household 2 bedroom only

$28,300 / year $2,358 / month

$47,200 / year $3,933

3 person household 2 bedroom only

$25,500 / year $2,125 / month

$42,500 / year $3,542 / month

2 person household 1 or 2 bedroom

$22,650 / year $1,888 / month

$37,800 / year $3,150 / month

1 person household efficiency & 1 bedroom

$19,850 / year $1,654 / month

$33,050 / year $2,754 / month

Requests for reasonable accommodations will be accepted. Applications are available from YWCA Greater Newburyport, 13 Market Street, Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 465-9922 x 27. Units will be assigned to eligible tenants by lottery. Applications must be received by 5:00 PM on Aug 27, 2013 to participate.

HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY

8 AFFORDABLE TOWNHOUSE CONDOMINIUM UNITS

The Orchards at Holliston 353-377 Highland St, Holliston

Heat and Hot Water Always Included Modern Laundry Facilities Private Balconies / Some with City Views Plush wall to wall carpet Adjacent to New England Baptist Hospital Secured Entry, Elevator Convenience Private Parking Near Public Transportation and much more ...

2 bed - $1264-$1900; 1 bed $1058-$1500 Call Today for more details and to schedule a visit...

888-842-7945

Max Income One Person - $47,150 Three Persons - $60,650 Two Persons - $53,900 Four Persons - $67,350 Other Restrictions Apply

Elderly Housing Low- to moderateincome housing applications being accepted for the waiting list. Studios, one- and two-bedroom apartments.

(781) 335-2667 Equal Housing Opportunity

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INFO MTG: Holliston Town Hall, Room 105, July 29th, 6-8pm Applications available at: Holliston Town Hall, Town Clerk’s Office & Holliston Public Library Or Write To: JTE Realty Associates, P. O. Box 955, No. Andover, Ma. 01845 Or e-mail: orchards@jterealtyassociates.com MAILING ADDRESS MUST BE PROVIDED 978-258-3492 APP. DEADLINE REC’D BY August 28, 2013

Wollaston Manor 91 Clay Street Quincy, MA 02170

Senior Living At It’s Best

A senior/disabled/ handicapped community 0 BR units = $1,027/mo 1 BR units = $1,101/mo All utilities included.

Call Sandy Miller, Property Manager

#888-691-4301

Program Restrictions Apply.

Union Towers 210 Washington Street Weymouth. MA 02188

TO BE SOLD BY LOTTERY TO ELIGIBLE HOMEBUYERS

(8) 2-Bed, 2.5 Bath Townhouse units $166,500, 1580 (approx)

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

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Reward...

YOURSELF WITH TWO CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AS AN ADMINISTRATIVE AND BOOKKEEPING PROFESSIONAL

Do you need to upgrade your skills? Ready for a new career?

ADMINSTRATIVE AND BOOKKEEPING PROFESSIONALS PROGRAM ONE PROGRAM…TWO CAREER CHOICES… MORE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The Administrative and Bookkeeping Professionals Program uses a combination of hands on classroom instruction and online learning experiences designed to give you employer ready skills, and the self confidence from achieving new, professional level skills for today’s economy.

The Administrative and Bookkeeping Professionals Program offers: • Introductory and advance levels of computer skills training using Microsoft Office 2010 (MS Word, Excel, Outlook) • Bookkeeping essentials and procedures for office professionals • Opportunities to create professional business documents using digital, social media and internet technologies • Computerized bookkeeping using QuickBooks • Procedures for recording, managing and securing client/ customer financial and non-financial data

Training Grants available to qualifying applicants. Contact: Mr. Royal Bolling, Computer Learning Resources Phone: 617-506-1505 Email: clr2paths@gmail.com

Licensed by the Massachusetts Division Professional Licensure Office of Private Occupational School Education


Thursday, August 15, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 23

Sociedad Latina is currently seeking individuals to fill the following positions:

• Family Engagement Coordinator • Mission Possible College Access & Career Coordinator • Civic Engagement Coordinator • Workforce Development Coordinator • Video Production Instruction (Part-time) • Grants Manager • Music Clubhouse Coordinator (Part-time)

ADVERTISE your classifieds with the Bay State Banner

(617) 261-4600 x 7799 • ads@bannerpub.com Rate information at www.baystatebanner.com/advertise

For full job descriptions visit us at www.sociedadlatina.org.

Executive Director or Management Agent

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OR MANAGEMENT AGENT

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The Board of Commissioners of the Wareham Housing Authority seeks an Executive Director or Management Agent to begin employment on or before September 15, 2013 A minimum of 2 years’ experience at a supervisory or management level in housing, community development, public administration and accounting or a closely related field, interaction with/ over all areas of operation including maintenance is desirable. Responsibilities include management of 104 State-Aided elderly/disabled housing, and 40 units of MRVP vouchers. A required PHM certification may be obtained within the first year. Written and verbal skills required and must be bondable. Two-year full time post-secondary education in a related field may be substituted for up to one year of experience. Hours, compensation, duties and benefits will be determined according to Chapter 121B Section 7 by the Board considering DHCD guidelines, a part-time arrangement is anticipated.

call (617) 261-4600

SUBMIT COVER LETTER, RESUME AND TWO REFERENCES TO

baystatebanner.com

Benefit from on-the-job internships

Tuition funding may be available Operation A.B.L.E. of Greater Boston

Engage with and assess homeless elders in the areas of housing barriers, mental health, substance abuse, cognitive skills, and physical health problems. Provide case management and housing advocacy; assist in making the transition to appropriate community residences and resources. Assist with connection to mainstream benefits, services, and intervention. Provide counseling and stabilization services to those obtaining housing and those at risk of homelessness, including home visits. Provide outreach in Boston area shelters weekly. Collaborate regularly with a network of homeless services providers. Weekly clinical individual and team supervision provided. Bachelor’s degree preferred. Prior social service experience working with the homeless, elders, and/ or underserved populations. Fluency in Spanish and English required. Competitive salary and benefits

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Learn MS Office and on-line job search techniques

617-542-4180

(Full Time)

Hearth is an equal opportunity employer.

Operation ABLE has helped over 30,000 unemployed workers update their skills and learn the techniques needed to attract employers and have successful interviews.

Register today for a briefing that will outline all of Operation ABLE’s training programs, and to answer all of your questions.

Bilingual Outreach Case Manager

Respond: Hearth, Inc. 1640 Washington Street Boston, MA 02118 Fax: 617/369-1566 or Email: pjones@hearth-home.org

Need Skills & Experience?

Rudolph Santos Sr., Chairperson, Human Resource Committee, Wareham Housing Authority, Agawam Village, and 57 Sandwich Rd, Wareham, MA 02571 on or before 9/15/2013

The Wareham Housing Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

The Brewster Housing Authority seeks qualified applicants or local housing authorities (LHAs) to provide management and operating functions beginning November 1, 2013. The Director or Agent is responsible for the administration of 56 units of stateaided housing (32 elderly/disabled and 24 family) and 2 MRVP vouchers. Minimum qualifications are two years’ experience in housing, community development, public administration, or a closely related field. Must have knowledge of the principles and practices of housing management, finances and maintenance systems in public or private housing. Good written and verbal communication skills are required as is a willingness to work with people from various socio-economic backgrounds. Must be bondable. Professional certification as a PHM from a HUD approved organization is desired. Certification as a property manager or similar classification by a nationally recognized housing or real estate organization, or certification as an MPHA may be substituted. Experience with federal housing programs and affordable housing development is a plus. Two years of postsecondary education in a related field may be substituted for one year of experience. Minimum of 20 hours per week. Salary or fee is commensurate with experience and Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development guidelines with a starting range of $29,562 to $30,609. Applicants should submit cover letter, resume or organizational profile and references to Executive Director Search Committee, Brewster Housing Authority, 11 Frederick Ct., Brewster, MA 02631 on or before August 30, 2013. Equal Opportunity Employer.



Bay State Banner 08/15/2013