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Scientists study bias with association test Yawu Miller

President Obama delivers his State of the Union address last week. The president called for policies to narrow the income gap between the wealthy and the poor. (White House photo)

Obama puts spotlight on growing income inequality Martin Desmarais President Obama called on the country’s leaders to make 2014 “a year of action” to address the growing wage gap in the United States during his State of the Union address last week. “Today, after four years of economic growth, corporate profits and stock prices have rarely been higher, and those at the top have never done better,” he said. “But average wages have barely budged. Inequality has deepened. Upward mobility has stalled. The cold, hard fact is that even in the midst of recovery, too many Americans are working more than ever just to get by — let alone get ahead. And too many still aren’t

working at all.” His call to action mirrors moves in Massachusetts and cities and states across the country to apply public policy to the deepening wage divide. Policy makers see local and national initiatives to increase the minimum wage and provide tax credits for low income workers as steps to bridge that divide. Obama’s remarks on the income gap are the latest of several instances where he has called on policy makers to address the issue. “Our job is to reverse these trends,” he said. “It won’t happen right away, and we won’t agree on everything. But what I offer tonight is a set of concrete, practical proposals to speed up growth,

strengthen the middle class, and build new ladders of opportunity into the middle class.” Massachusetts state Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz has been involved with several pieces of state legislation that are addressing issues critical to income inequality, including raising the minimum wage and making Massachusetts taxes more progressive. Her Act to Invest in Our Communities calls for an increase in the income tax from the current 5.2 percent to 5.95 percent and sets the tax rate on investment income to 8.95 percent; at the same time improving significant tax exemptions to protect low- and middle-income taxpayers and seniors. The inequality, continued to page 9

people with positive or negative words. It is designed to measure It may not be surprising to subconscious attitudes. Since learn that most people in the 1997, different versions of the test United States — 80 percent of measuring attitudes toward skin whites — harbor a pro-white bias. tone, gender, homosexuality and Perhaps more surprising is that a other categories have been added. large minority of blacks — 40 per- In all, the test has been adminiscent — hold a pro-white bias. tered 15 million times. These biases, uncovered The test has granted behavthrough more than 15 years of re- ioral scientists unprecedented search, are not the sort test sub- access into the recesses of the jects would commonly admit to. human mind. Not even to themselves. They “It’s really been a game changer are unexamined attitudes being in a lot of ways,” says Jessie Danuncovered by cognitive scientists iels, a professor at City Univerworking in the growing field of sity of New York who writes exstudy on imtensively about plicit biases, r a c i s m . “ I t ’s using tests that kind of become measure attia Rorschach tudes that most Test on how people cannot, you view race.” or do not want “The main to, admit to research that harboring. has really ex“ We a l l ploded is how have these cogdifferent kinds nitive shortof implicit atcuts we use to titudes affect make sense of decision-makthe world,” exing,” says — David Harris C a r l e e B e t h plains David Harris, diHawkins, a rerector of the searcher with Charles Hamilton Houston In- Project Implicit, the multi-unistitute at Harvard University. “In versity collaboration that adminmoments of decision, it is more isters the Implicit Association likely than not that these biases Test. will influence our behavior.” One such research project in The project that gave birth 2005 found that the 50 test subto the study of implicit biases jects, all trained police officers, humans harbor is the Implicit As- were more likely to mistake walsociation Test, founded in 1997 by lets or cellphones in the hands of cognitive scientists working out of blacks for guns than they were if Harvard University, the Univer- whites were holding wallets or sity of Virginia and Washington cellphones. State University. In a 2008 study using the ImThe earliest version of the test plicit Association Test, researchmeasured variations in the speed ers at the University of Pennsylwith which subjects can match vania and Stanford University bias, continued to page 6 images of black people or white

“We all have these cognitive shortcuts we use to make sense of the world.”

Diversity lacking in Walsh cabinet picks Yawu Miller When Mayor Marty Walsh meets with cabinet members to plan for a snow storm, the whiteout conditions aren’t just on the city’s streets. Despite campaign trail promises to build an administration that is reflective of the diversity of the city at every level, the highest level of his administration remains overwhelmingly white. So far, only Chief of Staff Daniel Arrigg Koh and Health and Human Ser-

vices Director Felix G. Arroyo add color to the 17-seat cabinet. Walsh’s appointments to date have some of his supporters voicing concern. We’re disappointed at this point,” said Juan Leyton, interim director of the Latino Political group ¿Oiste? “We had the expectation that there would be more people of color in higher positions. We’re a majority people of color city. City Hall should reflect that at every level.” Walsh, continued to page 22

Mayor Marty Walsh meets with reporters to discuss the city’s response to an impending January snow storm. (Mayor’s Office photo by Isabel Leon)

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2 • Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER

Black youth unemployment may restrict future earnings Imara Jones As the White House prepares to launch a major economic opportunity effort, record high unemployment among black and Latino youth underscores how essential it is to create job opportunities for young people of color. The critical issue here is that the ages of 16 to 24 are make or break years for lifelong earning potential. With one out four blacks and 1 out of 6 Latinos under the age of 25 without work, a generation of youth of color risks falling behind. The situation for black and Latino unemployed youths is so alarming that leading think tanks and economists are raising red flags about it at a staggering pace. One report on the topic by Demos, a public policy organization, argues that the “exclusion of young people of color” from job opportunities “weakens the promise of America.”

Why’s that?

With wealth in African-American and Latino communities already the lowest on record, a loss of income on a generational scale would likely harden existing inequities and set back economic progress in the country for decades. That’s simply because there are so many young blacks and Latinos who want work but can’t find it.

The older worker squeeze

The jumpoff for understanding what’s going on is that the youth jobs market as a whole, like the broader labor market, is in shambles. With 1 out 6 young people without work, youth unemployment is higher than at any point since most people under the age of 25 have been alive. Close to half of the 4 million young people without work are African American or Latino. They are joined by another 6 million young people of all racial backgrounds who have given up looking for work out of frustration. The core economic issue here is that younger Americans are being squeezed out of the labor market because there aren’t enough jobs to go around for both existing workers and those just entering the job market. As The Wall Street Journal points out, the economy is down 8 million jobs from where it needs to be in order to make sure that everyone who wants a job has one. With so many jobs destroyed by the Great Recession, and with mostly lower-wage jobs being created, older, better educated workers are being pushed into areas of employment traditionally occupied by younger workers. Analysis by the Center for Economic and Policy Research shows that the proportion of 16to 19-year-olds in low-wage work

fell by 50 percent from 1979 to 2011 while workers aged 35 to 64 increased their share of these jobs. Moreover, the proportion of those in low-wage positions who attended college almost doubled. As Sarah Ayres of the Center for American Progress points out, “With three job seekers for every available job, employers can hire people at an education level above what’s required for the actual position.” This trend benefits older workers.

The school-to-prison pipeline

But there are two additional challenges that magnify black and Latino youth joblessness. The first is that lower college graduation rates for youth of color puts African Americans and Latinos at a severe disadvantage. As more workers with higher education compete for jobs that were once dominated by high school graduates, the hill for people of color becomes steeper. That’s because one-third fewer blacks and half as an many Latinos have college degrees as have whites. But there’s more at work here. Disproportionate school discipline directed at blacks and Latinos is a driving force behind lower education attainment rates for these two groups, further damaging lifelong earning potential. Though students from these communities make up fewer than

4 out of 10 kids in school, they make up seven out of 10 children “involved in school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement.” As the Advancement Project points out, students who’ve been suspended are up to five times more likely to not finish high school. Given the condition of the labor market, the lack of a high school diploma is simply a non-starter. The second challenge is the way that higher incarceration rates damage job prospects for youth of color. With 6 out 10 individuals in prison being black or Latino, over 300,000 people of color are released from incarceration each year. Almost all employers perform a background check on job applicants, even those for low-wage positions. Astoundingly, 90 percent of all African-Americans with criminal records are passed over for employment. That’s a rate three times higher than whites with a similar history. Skewed incarceration is another headwind that youth of color face in the job market. The reason that any of this matters is that youth unemployment means lower incomes and fewer life opportunities for those without work. Since employment between the ages of 16 to 24 is vital to setting the pace for an individual’s future earning power, joblessness experienced by young people has severe consequences. Just six months of unemployment can mean $45,000 in lower wages. It can take up to a decade to make up lost ground. The longer unemployment lasts, the larger the longterm earnings hole grows. Young people aged 20 to 24 will amass $20 billion in lost wages over the next decade. Writ large,

this translates into an amount that will be difficult for black and Latino communities, still reeling from the recession, to absorb.

Turning it around

The good news is that youth unemployment is entirely fixable. The most important thing is to jumpstart overall job growth and get the economy functioning normally again. Consequently raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, lowering the wage gap between men and women, and expanding tax breaks for low-income workers — including those without children — would be great places to start. Together these actions would raise the income of tens of millions and lift millions more out of poverty. A shot in the arm to the economy on such a scale would help push labor to function more normally, allowing older workers to move up the earnings scale, and clearing the way for young people. But an even more targeted effort to end black and Latino youth unemployment is desperately needed. As Tom Allison, policy analyst at the under-34 advocacy group Young Invincibles puts it, “If the goal is to improve the economy, we have to focus on those who are suffering the most.” Breaking the school-to-prison pipeline, structuring a way for more people of color to attend college, lowering incarceration rates, and ending employment discrimination for non-violent offenders are all essential. With an entire generation of black and Latino youth hanging in the balance, the country doesn’t have a second to waste.


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 3

Minority hiring figures vary for hub contractors

A worker last week at the The Quincy Heights project on Quincy Street in Dorchester loading new boards in through a window. The project has found good success in hitting the targeted numbers for using Boston resident, minority and female workers on the project. (Banner photo) Martin Desmarais An examination of the numbers, shows that much of the work done in Boston still falls short of the expectations for using city residents, workers of color and women, but some recent projects have begun to set a strong example of how to find success in adhering to the city’s job policies. Almost three decades ago, the City of Boston established the Boston Residents Jobs Policy to help to increase employment opportunities for Boston residents, workers of color, and women on city-funded construction projects and to monitor for compliance with labor standards and prevailing wages on federally funded projects. Part of these efforts also established an office to track this compliance and a Boston Employment Commission to oversee the work. The Boston Residents Jobs Policy set standards for city work that dictated at least 50 percent of the total employee work hours in each trade shall be by Boston residents; at least 25 percent of the total work done shall be by minorities; and at least 10 percent of the total work done shall be by women. The city continues to track these numbers and the most recently report, covering a period from Sept. 28, 2013 to Jan. 4, shows that overall contractors are being successful in their efforts with minorities, but lag behind in the other categories. During that period, 35.4 percent of the work was done by Boston residents; 36.4 percent was done by minorities; and 5.9 percent was done by women. However, a closer examinations of the numbers shows that, even though

the minority numbers are higher than the targeted 25 percent overall, some projects have high percentages of minority workers and other projects have none at all. The city has long been thorough in tracking the paperwork required around the Boston Residents Jobs Policy and informing developers and contractors of what is required, making them sign a contract agreeing to make a “good faith effort” to meet the numbers. But critics contend the gray area of “good faith effort” is where the trouble comes in. The city does have the ability to withhold payments, sanction suspension of payments, terminate a contract, seek liquated damages on contracts and deny participation in future contractors based on failure to comply with the jobs policy. The city can also call in contractors to meet with them and essentially warn them of the repercussions if they are not in compliance. In practice, the complexities of most construction work — with many contractors, subcontractors and workers coming in and off projects on a daily basis — makes it a constant battle. And the success often comes when developers take the onus. Several current building projects on Quincy Street in Dorchester have had success in exceeding the Boston Residents Jobs Policy numbers. A culmination of work by a number of organizations, including Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corp., Quincy Geneva Development Corp., Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative and Project RIGHT, there are three proj-

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ects along Quincy Street which have showcased that success can be found in putting Boston residents, minorities and women to work on city developments. There is close to $80 million in work involved in the projects, which call for the renovation of an existing housing development into new housing, new housing from the ground up and the development of the Pearl Small Business Food Production Center, which will help startups and small food businesses get off the ground. The Quincy Heights housing will be built in two phases and will result in over 120 affordable housing units. The project is backed in part by a $20.5 million U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Choice Neighborhoods grant, which is targeted to re-develop distressed housing into affordable housing. According to Jeanne DuBois, executive director of Dorchester Bay EDC, they set even higher standards than the Boston Residents Job Policy for the work going on along Quincy Street. The goal for the projects workers is for 51 percent Boston residents, 51 percent minorities and 15 percent women. DuBois said that the aim was to try and be a showcase for success in diversity in the workforce, which is why the target numbers were made even higher than the Boston Residents Job Policy suggests or the minimum suggested from organizations such as the Massachusetts Minority

Contractors Association, which sets the line at 30 percent minorities and 10 percent women. “We are glad for this to be a pilot or test case,” DuBois said. “We want to be held accountable for those goals.” Partners on the projects — at least four different organizations — have been tracking the numbers and coming out with a report every two weeks to make sure the projects hit the target when all the work is done toward the end of 2014, which is the current estimated finish date on the work. The most recent report shows 57 percent Boston residents, 67 percent minorities and 8 percent female workers on the housing renovation project of Quincy Heights; 48 percent Boston residents, 60 percent minorities and 8 percent females on the new housing; and 57 percent Boston residents, 63 percent minorities and 12 percent females on the Pearl center project. While the projects have soared in the amount of minority workers and toed just above the line with Boston residents, they have also shown the challenge of finding female workers to hit the numbers. But DuBois is still very encouraged and says their constant attention has been paying off and will continue to pay off and she is confident that, when all is said and done, the projects will be able to hit the higher standards that have been set out. “They key to the success was the willingness to create a new normal and say we were going to do better,” DuBois said. John Mahony, project manager for Quincy Heights, said he is constantly making an effort to work with contractors and subcontractors to lay out what is expected in employee numbers and making sure, even on a

daily basis, they are hitting them — and being quick to point out when they are not. “It is a lot of work — that is what it boils down to,” Mahony said. “It is a lot of work every single week.” Beth O’Donnell, project director for Quincy Heights, emphasized that the work was definitely worth the effort and the continual attention to the employee numbers sends a message to all involved in the projects. “I think that we have demonstrated that we are serious about it by talking about it at every construction meeting once a week, but being consistent and persistent about it,” O’Donnell said. O’Donnell uses the term vigilant to describe the efforts and says it starts before contractors or subcontractors come on the site to do work. “We are also trying to stay ahead of the game. A subcontractor could come on site and say they are compliant but by the time we figure out they are not they are gone already,” she said. “In our contract we require that the owner has two weeks to approve any subcontractor that the general contractor is going to use, so we have an opportunity to screen them and one of the major factors is their previous record on minority hiring.” Quincy Geneva has also gone as far as helping to train local workers for some of the work available on the projects, and has been providing contractors with lists of local residents who are available for hire. While some might see the extra effort superfluous to the development and construction process — as the history of poor numbers on workforce diversity show — DuBois does not agree with that view. “It took work and time but it is really more — it took commitment,” DuBois said. “If everybody is committed it is not so hard.”


4 • Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER

Established 1965

Black history: how we got to where we are Black History Month is the time every year to learn more about the travails of the descendants of the Africans brought to America centuries ago. It is the story of an unrelenting drive for freedom, justice and equality. In addition to honoring the commitment and heroism of African American forbearers and their allies, it is also important for readers to assess that history to determine what errors were made and what other strategies might have been more effective. Enthusiasm in the effort to obtain equal rights was intensified by the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Not only did it end the legitimacy of segregated public schools, but it also ended the doctrine of “separate but equal,” the basis for racial segregation since the case of Plessy v. Ferguson (1896). The Montgomery Bus Boycott began the next year, and the leadership of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. emerged. For a whole year, from Dec. 5, 1955 until the campaign ended victoriously on Dec. 21, 1956, blacks in Montgomery refused to ride the buses. The Civil Rights Act that became law in 1957 was a disappointment to most people. After the glorious success in Montgomery people expected much more. The primary function of the Civil Rights Act of 1957 was merely to establish a Civil Rights Division within the Justice Department. The purpose of the division was to develop legislative proposals to end discrimination and to mobilize a prosecutorial effort to enforce anti-discrimination laws. Such a process was especially needed to assure black voting rights. A federal case in Forrest County, Miss., filed against the election registrar established the strategy for prosecuting violations of voting

rights. The population of the county was 30 percent black but only 12 black citizens had survived the rigors of the registration process. The battle over voting rights came to a head on March 7, 1965, “Bloody Sunday,” on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala. The police viciously attacked a group of peaceful protesters marching to Montgomery. They were attacked with tear gas, dogs and club-wielding police officers. Global publicity was embarrassing to America, the international paragon of democracy. President Lyndon Johnson called for a Voting Rights Act that Congress passed promptly. It became effective on Aug. 6, 1965. Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (July 2) paved the way for the Voting Rights Act the following year. It made racial discrimination in education, employment and places of public accommodation unlawful anywhere in the country. For his effort in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Johnson got 94 percent of the black vote. The Republicans have never recovered from Barry Goldwater’s opposition to civil rights. The strategy of the Civil Rights Movement was brilliant from the Brown decision in 1954 until the Voting Rights Act in 1965. But now, 48 years later in 2014, many African Americans would assert that the economic progress has been deficient. Perhaps after so many decades of struggle, fatigue has set in to diminish commitment to the battles that lay ahead. Unfortunately, many blacks defined the racial problem as defective human relations when it has always been a battle for economic dominance. Black leaders have to understand that the major issue of civil rights has been overcome and the struggle now is to prepare for a highly productive role in society.

“Man, we sure have a lot to learn.”

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There have been calls for the resignation of state Rep. Carlos Henriquez of Dorchester based on his conviction for assaulting a woman. I could not agree more with viewpoints and substantiating actions regarding those who commit crimes against women, but I am worried by the possibility that in our haste to set a zero tolerance policy we have failed to adequately scrutinize the evidence to determine what actually occurred. Given the lack of a police investigation, the fact that the alleged victim changed her story on multiple occasions and that she was deemed not to be a credible witness, we do not have proof beyond a reasonable doubt that an assault took place. While I look forward to the day when poor behavior in a dating scenario is assessed as unconscionable and treated accordingly on all levels of society, it currently is not the legal standard. Nationwide, officials who have been asked to resign or received scathing press coverage have been proven guilty of far greater and more numerous misbehaviors such as multiple assaults, improper advances and acts of conduct unbecoming their office, including abuse of power. By contrast, Henriquez has an absolutely squeaky clean record, is not accused of a single prior offense of any sort and may be guilty only of behaving improperly in a dating scenario by continuing unsolicited

NEWS REPORTING Karen Miller Martin Desmarais

Contributing Writers

Gloria J. Browne-Marshall Kenneth J. Cooper Colette Greenstein Caitlin Yoshiko Kandil

WHAT’S INSIDE

Sandra Larson Shanice Maxwell Anthony W. Neal

advances, although proof here is also shaky. Conviction with inadequate legal proof is not the American way. Further, the first sentencing in settings so much smaller than precedent is likely a misapplication of laws on the books. The fact that a black man is the first thusly convicted under the convergence of these facts smacks of racism and is reminiscent of the era of lynching of black men for sexual crimes against non-black women. Henriquez’s conviction is deeply disturbing for a number of reasons. First and foremost, it presents the possibility that the conviction is a miscarriage vzof justice, and that calls for his resignation, therefore, do not serve the vantage point of protecting women. Second, statements such as the Herald’s “Henriquez also, apparently, is a man possessed of violent tendencies and a gaping deficit in the character department” paints a full picture from one episode with minimal and shaky evidence. Finally, public outcries against his lack of remorse are troubling. If the man asserts his innocence when

he believes himself wrongly convicted, how can he be remorseful? Given the specious grounds for the conviction, one could only expect him to be shocked and horrified. I am proud of the fact that Massachusetts has a tradition of liberal social laws, beliefs and policies. But we also have a dark past which includes the Salem witch hunts and segregated school systems. Are we so proud of our liberal traditions and reputation that we rush to judgment? That would leave us as little more than knee jerk liberals. This hunger and haste to pin blames that has not been demonstrated blindly constitutes mob hysteria. It is a fiasco with frightening overtones of the darker eras in Massachusetts history. We owe it to Henriquez, his family and community, Katherine Gonzalves, our traditions, the law and ourselves as citizens striving to improve society to do better than this. Sue Tamber Houseman Brookline

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Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 5

ROVINGCamera

OPINION History and theory of the minimum wage Dr. Fred McKinney

“All but the hopelessly reactionary will agree that to conserve our primary resources of man power, government must have some control over maximum hours, minimum wages, the evil of child labor and the exploitation of unorganized labor,” said Franklin Delano Roosevelt in an address to Congress in 1937 in support of the minimum wage legislation. It is time to confront the reality that we need to increase the minimum wage significantly to a rate far exceeding those being discussed in Washington, D.C., or in state capitals around the country. The federal minimum wage under the 2013 minimum wage law was scheduled to increase in three steps from $7.25 per hour to $10.10 per hour by 2015. This change would be welcome. However, we really need a minimum wage that is even higher and takes effect sooner. Congress should be encouraged to pass Senate Bill 460 and the president should sign it as soon as possible after the affirmative vote. FDR’s motivation in proposing and enacting the nation’s first minimum wage law was to increase the amount of income in the hands of millions of American workers. The minimum wage law was originally passed during the height of the Great Depression. At that time there was widespread criticism from traditional economists who were quick to point out that in accordance with economic theory, the impact of the minimum wage would be unequivocally negative. Opponents of raising the minimum wage still rely on discredited economic principles. There are basically three schools of thought on the minimum wage. The first, based on economic principles of demand and supply, opposes an increase in the minimum wage. The second accepts the demand and supply economic analysis, but believes the benefits of increasing the minimum wage exceed the costs associated with the increase. And the third school of thought rejects the classical economic analysis and believes Economic theory the cost is exaggerated and the benjustifies paying workers efits are underestimated. According to classic economic low wages as if it is theory, labor markets are like all other markets: demand and supply beneficial to them. determine prices. The price in However, the lowlabor markets is the wage. Equilibrium in a particular labor market wage economy keeps occurs when the demand for communities poor and workers equals the supply of those dependent. workers. The demand for workers occurs when employers must hire employees when consumers want to buy the goods and services that their firms sell. This is why economists call the demand for labor a “derived demand.” That is, the demand for labor results from the demand for goods and services. However, an increase in wages would require an increase in the prices charged for those goods and services. Then sales would decline and cause a loss in jobs. Conversely, a decline in wages leads to greater sales from lower prices and an increased demand for labor services. From the workers’ perspective, higher wages will attract more job applicants. Conversely, when wages are too low, leisure becomes increasingly more attractive and workers will choose to stay home. That economic theory leads to the conclusion that an increase in the minimum wage is counterproductive. A minimum wage set above the equilibrium level will result in more workers willing to work at that wage, but the necessary increase in the cost of goods and services will reduce sales and the need for more workers. That gap is what we call unemployment. The solution to unemployment, they theorize, is to lower wages. That is the traditional economic view. It is logical, analytical and wrong. This analysis is wrong because it focuses on one particular labor market and not the economy as a whole. The problem facing low-wage workers and the low-income community is that incomes are not high enough to support a more vibrant economy. We have large numbers of unemployed workers, particularly in low-income areas and in minority communities precisely because there is not sufficient income to support a vibrant economy. If workers had higher incomes, they could buy more of everything. As the sale of goods and services increased, more workers would be hired. This would close a loop that results in the exact opposite of what the traditional economic analysis suggests. Economic theory justifies paying workers low wages as if it is beneficial to them. However, the low-wage economy keeps communities poor and dependent. Increasing the minimum wage would increase the buying power of the poorest Americans. This would help create an environment that would improve the opportunity for higher standards of living to develop. If anything, we are not thinking big enough. The minimum wage should be increased significantly. President Roosevelt was wise enough to understand this. It is about time we understand it all over again. Fred McKinney is president and CEO of the Greater New England Minority Supplier Development Council. The Banner welcomes your opinion. Email Op-Ed submissions to:

yawu@bannerpub.com ­Letters must be signed. Names may be withheld upon request.

What do you think is the importance of learning black history?

We as a people need to know the struggles it took to get us here. We have to respect the struggles our people went through and uphold our culture.

Our black kids should know what our generation did. Many black kids don’t even know who Martin Luther King was. They don’t know what it meant to grow up in the South.

People have to know their history. For some people, they really want to know their roots and find out where they came from.

Ronald Rowe

Deloris Rodriguez

Robert Lee Jewitt

You have to know your history to know your worth on earth. My kids know my history.

It’s essential. It’s our culture. Our kids still think Christopher Columbus discovered America. It’s not true.

To know where we came from. You have to know where you came from to go further in life.

Virginia Landrum

Frenchman Glover

Renee Rone

Merchant Dorchester

Case Specialist Roxbury

City Clerk Jamaica Plain

Self-employed Roxbury

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INthe news

Mark Kennedy

The Massachusetts Prostate Cancer Coalition has appointed Mark Kennedy as its new executive director. Kennedy, a recognized leader in prostate cancer education and advocacy, has been instrumental in driving effective multidisciplinary prostate cancer programs and interventions at local, state and national levels. The coalition educates, connects, and supports high-risk men, newly diagnosed individuals, survivors, and their families, as well as organizations and professionals in Massachusetts seeking to conquer and cure prostate cancer. Kennedy previously served as manager of men’s health programs for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s Community Benefits Office. Kennedy’s work led to the creation and delivery of an award-winning, evidence-based prostate cancer education protocol. Currently, Kennedy serves as co-chair of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Comprehensive Cancer Program’s

Prostate Cancer Workgroup. “Prostate cancer is one of the most controversial areas of management in modern medicine,” said Kennedy. Kennedy is a native Bostonian,

a graduate of Tufts University, and holds a master’s degree in business administration from Northeastern University’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business Administration Executive MBA Program.


6 • Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER

bias

continued from page 1

found that many whites do not see blacks as fully human and under certain circumstances associate blacks with apes. And multiple studies involving doctors in recent years have linked doctors’ implicit bias to overt biases in medical care, ranging from a lower likelihood that black patients will receive pain medication to a lower likelihood that black patients complaining of chest pain will be treated for a heart attack.

Black physicians in the studies were far less likely to hold an implicit bias against black patients or provide inferior treatment to black patients. But on the whole blacks are not immune to implicit biases against their own race. In Project Implicit’s data from Implicit Association Test takers, 40 percent of blacks showed a preference toward whites, while 36 showed a preference toward blacks and 24 percent showed no preference. Among whites, 80 percent showed a preference toward whites, while 7 percent showed a preference toward blacks and 13 percent showed no

bias. Latinos and Asian test subjects showed a 72 percent pro-white bias. A recent study suggests there can be negative health consequences for blacks who hold negative views of their race. A study published in 2013 found that black men who regularly experience racism and showed strong bias against their own race on the Implicit Association Test tend to show more signs of aging than blacks who have a positive view of their own race. Researchers point to the dominant white culture in the United

States as a major factor in test subjects’ preference toward whites, arguing that the roles blacks play in Hollywood films and negative depictions of blacks in the news media color people’s perceptions of blacks. While blacks have earned greater acceptance in Hollywood in recent years, the popular culture is still dominated by whites. Television shows and movies with blacks in leading roles are still the exception. White actors still play the lead roles in most movies and dominate the Oscars. “We live in a culture that perpetuates white supremacy,” said

anti-racism activist Paul Marcus, director of training and education at the Boston-based nonprofit Community Change. “People think it doesn’t affect them. They think that because they’re liberals it doesn’t affect them. It does.” With 15 years of data to study, researchers at Project Implicit have found little to no change in the biases of test subjects. “People thought that now with Barak Obama getting so much exposure in the media, things might change,” said Project Implicit researcher Calvin Lai, a doctoral student at University of Virginia. “Our sample of 100,000 people did not show a decrease over time. In fact, it’s been quite stable over the last 10 years.” Marcus, who has used the Implicit Association Test on students in classes he’s taught at Simmons College, says people are often surprised to find they have a prowhite bias. “People are blown away by it,” he said. “But how else can you know your implicit biases? You can’t change something you don’t know exists.”

“We live in a culture that perpetuates white supremacy.” — Paul Marcus While there have been many research projects examining whether race biases are hardwired into the human psyche, researchers at Project Implicit say biases can be overcome with conditioning. “There is plenty of evidence that implicit biases are malleable over time,” says Project Implicit researcher Carlee Beth Hawkins, a doctoral student at the Center for Decision Research at the University of Chicago. “Young people have different biases than older people.” Researchers have made some progress in examining how to manage biases in certain situations. “Implicit bias is more likely to occur when you’re dealing with an ambiguous situation, like choosing between two job candidates with identical credentials,” said Project Implicit’s Calvin Lai. “That’s when your racial biases can lead you to weigh some criteria more than others.” Lai says removing ambiguities, time pressure and stress from decision-making processes reduces the likelihood that people will make biased decisions. “The less subjectivity you put into a decision, the less likely you are to make a biased decision,” he said.

BLACK

HISTORY EVENTS

Monday, February 17th

Sunday, February 16

5:30pm – 8:30pm • Boston Convention and Exhibition Center • Admission: $20 per person

4:00 pm • Ebenezer Baptist Church, 157 West Springfield Street, Boston, MA • For more info call (508)528-6326

Black History Month Community Forum “The New Political and Economic Landscape of Boston”

Meet the Faces of Freedom: Miss Velma DuPont & The Toward Victory Company present “Toward Victory”

View more events online at: blackhistory2014.baystatebanner.com/events/


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 7

The PTSD crisis ignored: Americans wounded at home Lois Beckett Chicago’s Cook County Hospital has one of the busiest trauma centers in the nation, treating about 2,000 patients a year for gunshots, stabbings and other violent injuries. So when researchers started screening patients there for post-traumatic stress disorder in 2011, they assumed they would find cases. They just didn’t know how many: Fully 43 percent of the patients they examined — and more than half of gunshot-wound victims — had signs of PTSD. “We knew these people were going to have PTSD symptoms,” said Kimberly Joseph, a trauma sur-

hoods are not getting treatment for PTSD. They’re not even getting diagnosed. Studies show that, overall, about 8 percent of Americans suffer from PTSD at some point in their lives. But the rates appear to be much higher in communities — such as poor, largely African-American pockets of Detroit, Atlanta, Chicago and Philadelphia — where high rates of violent crime have persisted despite a national decline. Researchers in Atlanta interviewed more than 8,000 inner-city residents and found that about twothirds said they had been violently attacked and that half knew someone who had been murdered. At least one

“The rates of PTSD we see are as high or higher than Iraq, Afghanistan or Vietnam veterans.” — Dr. Kerry Ressler geon at the hospital. “We didn’t know it was going to be as extensive.” What the work showed, Joseph said, is, “This is a much more urgent problem than you think.” Joseph proposed spending about $200,000 a year to add staffers to screen all at-risk patients for PTSD and connect them with treatment. The taxpayer-subsidized hospital has an annual budget of roughly $450 million. But Joseph said hospital administrators turned her down and suggested she look for outside funding. “Right now, we don’t have institutional support,” said Joseph, who is now applying for outside grants. A hospital spokeswoman would not comment on why the hospital decided not to pay for regular screening. The hospital is part of a pilot program with other area hospitals to help “pediatrics patients identified with PTSD,” said the spokeswoman, Marisa Kollias.“The Cook County Health and Hospitals System is committed to treating all patients with high quality care.” Right now, social workers try to identify patients with the most severe PTSD symptoms, said Carol Reese, the trauma center’s violence prevention coordinator and an Episcopal priest. “I’m not going to tell you we have everything we need in place right now, because we don’t,” Reese said. “We have a chaplain and a social worker and a couple of social work interns trying to see 5,000 people. We’re not staffed to do it.” A growing body of research shows that Americans with traumatic injuries develop PTSD at rates comparable to veterans of war. Just like veterans, civilians can suffer flashbacks, nightmares, paranoia and social withdrawal. While the United States has been slow to provide adequate treatment to troops affected by post-traumatic stress, the military has made substantial progress in recent years. It now regularly screens for PTSD, works to fight the stigma associated with mental health treatment and educates military families about potential symptoms. Few similar efforts exist for civilian trauma victims. Americans wounded in their own neighbor-

in three of those interviewed experienced symptoms consistent with PTSD at some point in their lives — and that’s a “conservative estimate,” said Dr. Kerry Ressler, the lead investigator on the project. “The rates of PTSD we see are as high or higher than Iraq, Afghanistan or Vietnam veterans,” Ressler said. “We have a whole population who is traumatized.” Post-traumatic stress can be a serious burden: It can take a toll on relationships and parenting, lead to family conflict and interfere with jobs. A national study of patients with traumatic injuries found that those who developed post-traumatic stress were less likely to have returned to work a year after their injuries. For most people, untreated PTSD will not lead to violence. But “there’s a subgroup of people who are at risk, in the wrong place, at the wrong time, of reacting in a violent way or an aggressive way, that they might not have if they had had their PTSD treated,” Ressler said.

Research on military veterans has found that the symptom of “chronic hyperarousal” — the distorted sense of always being under extreme threat — can lead to increased aggression and violent behavior. “Very minor threats can be experienced, by what the signals in your body tell you, as, ‘You’re in acute danger,’ ” said Sandra Bloom, a psychiatrist and former president of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. Hospital trauma centers, which work on the front lines of neighborhood violence, could help address the lack of treatment. Indeed, the American College of Surgeons, which sets standards for the care of patients with traumatic injuries, is set to recommend that trauma centers “evaluate, support and treat” patients for post-traumatic stress. But it’s not a requirement, and few hospitals appear to be doing it. ProPublica surveyed a top-level trauma center in each of the 22 cities with the nation’s highest homicide rates. Just one, the Spirit of Charity Trauma Center in New Orleans, currently screens all seriously injured patients for PTSD. At another, Detroit Receiving Hospital, psychologists talk with injured crime victims about PTSD. Other hospitals have a patchwork of resources or none at all. At two hospitals, in Birmingham, Ala., and St. Louis, trauma center staff said they hope to institute routine PTSD screening by the end of the year. Doctors in Baltimore, Newark, N.J., Memphis, Tenn., and Jackson, Miss., said they wanted to do more to address PTSD, but they do not have the money. They said adding even small amounts to hospital budgets is a hard sell in a tough economic climate. That’s especially true at often-cashstrapped public hospitals. In order to add a staff member to screen and follow up on PTSD, “Do I lay someone else off in another area?” asked Carnell Cooper, a trauma surgeon at Maryland Shock Trauma in Baltimore. Many public hospitals rely on state Medicaid programs to cover treatment of low-income patients.

But several surgeons across the country said they did not know of any way they could bill Medicaid for screenings. The federal government often provides guidance to state Medicaid programs on best practices for patient care and how to fund them. But a spokeswoman for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said the agency has given states no guidance on whether or how hospitals could be reimbursed for PTSD screenings. Hospitals are often unwilling to foot the bill themselves. Trauma surgeons and their staffs expressed frustration that they know PTSD is having a serious impact on their patients, but they can’t find a way to pay for the help they need. “We don’t recognize that people have PTSD. We don’t recognize that they’re not doing their job as well, that they’re not doing as well in school, that they’re getting irritable at home with their families,” said John Porter, a trauma surgeon in Jackson, Miss., which has a per-capita homicide rate higher than Chicago’s. “When you think about it, if someone gets shot, and I save their life, and they can’t go out and function, did I technically save their life? Probably not,” Porter added. When RAND Corp. researchers began interviewing violently injured young men in Los Angeles in the late 1990s, they faced some skepticism that the men, often connected to gangs, would be susceptible to PTSD. “We had people tell us that we’d see a lot of people who were gangbangers, and they wouldn’t develop PTSD, because they were already hardened to that kind of life,” said Grant Marshall, a behavioral scientist who studied patients at a Los Angeles trauma center. “We didn’t find that to be the case at all. People in gangs were just as likely as anyone else to develop PTSD.” In fact, trauma appears to have a cumulative effect. Young men with violent injuries may be more likely to develop symptoms if they have been attacked before. The Los Angeles study found that 27 percent of the men interviewed three months after they were injured had symptoms consistent with PTSD. “Most people still think that all the people who get shot were doing something they didn’t need to be doing,” said Porter, the trauma surgeon from Jackson, Miss. “I’m not saying it’s the racist thing, but every-

body thinks it’s a young black men’s disease: They get shot, they’re out selling drugs. We’re not going to spend more time on them.” While post-traumatic stress often does not show up until several months after an injury, experts say many trauma centers are missing the chance to evaluate patients early for risk of PTSD and to use clinical follow-ups — when patients come back to have their physical wounds examined — to check if patients are developing symptoms. Doctors say hospitals are unlikely to make significant progress until the American College of Surgeons makes systematic PTSD screening a requirement for all toplevel trauma centers. An ACS requirement would be “a much better hammer to show the administration,” said Michael Foreman, chief of trauma surgery at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. Baylor, one of the few trauma centers to have a fulltime psychologist on staff, surveyed 200 patients and found that roughly a quarter experienced post-traumatic stress. But Foreman said the center would not systematically screen all its patients until the ACS mandates it. It’s not clear when that will happen. The organization’s recognition of PTSD screening as a recommended practice is a first step. Those new guidelines will be released in March 2014, according to Chris Cribari, who chairs the subcommittee that evaluates whether hospitals are meeting ACS standards. Cribari declined to say when PTSD screening might become a requirement. He said the timing will depend on what hurdles hospitals encounter — such as patient privacy — when some of them start screenings. Cribari acknowledged that at some hospitals, “unless it’s a regulation, they’re not going to spend the money on it.” At minimum, experts say, hospitals should provide all trauma patients with basic education about post-traumatic stress. “The number one thing we do [is simply] tell everybody in the trauma center about PTSD,” said John Nanney, a Department of Veterans Affairs researcher who developed a program for violently injured patients at the Spirit of Charity in New Orleans. The city of Philadelphia has begun to focus on trauma as a major public health issue. Philadelphia is PTSD, continued to page 8


8 • Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER

PTSD

continued from page 7

working with local mental health providers to screen for PTSD more systematically — and to focus on post-traumatic stress as part of drug and alcohol treatment. The city has also paid to train local therapists in prolonged exposure, a proven treatment for PTSD — the same kind of training the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has paid for its therapists to receive. For violently injured Philadelphia residents, there’s also Drexel University’s Healing Hurt People, a program that’s become a national model

for addressing trauma and PTSD. Healing Hurt People reaches out to violently injured adults and children at two local hospitals and offers them intensive services. The program accepts a broad range of patients — from high-schoolers to siblings of young men who have been shot to former drug dealers. The program’s social workers screen all clients for PTSD symptoms and host discussions in which clients can share their experiences with one another. It’s a way of fighting stigma around mental-health symptoms. Instead of thinking that they’re going crazy, the conversations help them realize, “OK, this is normal,” as one client put it.

One of the program’s central goals is to discourage victims of crimes from retaliating against their attackers and to help them focus on staying safe and rebuilding their own lives. The program’s therapists and social workers remind clients that the aftereffects of trauma may make them overreact and help them plan how to identify and avoid events that might trigger them. “Our thing is education,” social worker Tony Thompson said. The more clients “understand what’s going on in their body and their mind, the more prepared they are to deal with it.” Intensive casework like this has shown good results, but it’s not cheap.

Healing Hurt People is relatively small: Its programs served 129 new clients in 2013 and offered briefer education or assistance to a few hundred more. Its annual budget in 2013 was roughly $300,000, not including the cost of the office space that Drexel donates to the program. Other researchers have been working to develop quicker, more modest interventions for PTSD, including some that use laptops and smartphones — programs that could easily be extended to more patients and still have some positive effect. Whatever the approach, there “is untapped potential,” said Joseph, the surgeon at Chicago’s Cook County

Hospital. Healing Hurt People is a model for what she wants to create. “These are kids, for the most part. When a 17-year-old kid crashes their parents’ car, and they were drinking, we don’t say, ‘Oh, that kid’s hopeless, let’s just give up on them.’ ” “We’ve certainly had decades of trying to apply political solutions and social solutions to our inner cities’ financial problems and violence problem, and they haven’t been successful,” said Ressler, the Atlanta researcher. “If we could do a better job of identification, intervention and treatment, I think there would be less violence, and people would have an easier time doing well in school, getting a job.”


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 9

inequality continued from page 1

point of this legislation, according to Chang-Diaz, is to correct the flat-rate tax and ensure that people at a higher income level pay more taxes proportionately — and use the increased tax revenue to the state to fund the types of infrastructure that can help low- and middle-income workers improve their economic status. “It would allow us to put more resources behind some of the things all of our communities need, but in particular help those who are faced with income immobility,” Chang-Diaz said. Prof. Barry Bluestone, director of the Kitty and Michael Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, says the concept of income immobility that Chang-Diaz mentions is a compounding factor in income inequality. Income inequality measures the distribution of wealth across households and is generally referred to as the comparison of the growing financial gap in this country between the highest-income brackets and the middleand low-income brackets. As explained by Bluestone, income immobility is what keeps people and families in the income brackets they are in with little or

“The thought is that the U.S. is a land of opportunity, but it is not. It is a land of social stagnation.” — Brian Miller no chance of improving. He emphasized this is the big shadow hanging over the income inequality problem and keeps the income gap so big. “We not only have growing inequality but the cost of being in the bottom has grown dramatically because the gap between the low end and the high end is so far apart,” Bluestone comments. “Being stuck in the bottom is worse than ever.” Bluestone points out that recent studies have shown that only 8 percent of people at the lowest income bracket ever make it to the top — which means 92 percent will not. The most important way to combat income inequality and income immobility is improving on the earned income tax credit at both the state and federal level, according to Bluestone. He singled out EITC, as it is referred to, as the “best program for combating poverty” because it can be an income subsidy for many people. EITC functions when workers file taxes, and if their income is low enough, they will get money back. “For low income families this will raise your income,” Bluestone says. While both Massachusetts and federal taxes both currently have some level of EITC, Bluestone wants to see it made better. Bluestone says another important way government can help break the deepening income in-

equality in the long run is to invest substantial resources in children and in early childhood education, in particular. He calls for a new emphasis on providing all children — no matter what their socioeconomic status — with better development at a young age, and most importantly from birth until age 5, when the most critical development of a child’s brain takes place. The thinking is that this early development will lead to stronger success in education, career and economic success. “We need to invest a huge amount of money in our kids,” he comments. “To break the income immobility cycle we need those investments in our children.” Increased investment in early education could directly lead to less spending on infrastructure such as prisons and programs that support social well-being, such as homelessness and drug addiction, Bluestone says. “I would argue that investment in this kind of human capital will pay off such great dividends in the future that we should not be saying we can’t afford it out of current tax dollars,” Bluestone comments. “I can almost guarantee you that we will make a return on this investment.” Brian Miller, executive director of the Boston-based United for a Fair Economy, which is a national organization that advocates for improving the uneven wealth distribution in the United States, puts a very strong emphasis on raising the minimum wage in the income inequality fight. “A minimum wage increase will make a significant impact. That said, we should make sure it is a substantial minimum wage,” Miller says. “We need to be push-

ing for big bold increases.” While Massachusetts has legislation in the works that would improve the minimum wage and federal discussion is around numbers between $10 and $11, Miller would like to see a higher minimum wage and says his organization supports the fight for a $15 minimum wage. “If the minimum wage had grown at the same rate as at the top of the ladder, we would have $20,” he says. “We need to be talking about a $15 minimum wage, period.” “What we need to avoid is a 50 cent increase in the minimum

or a $1 increase in the minimum wage. We need to bolder than that,” he adds. Like Bluestone, Miller also ties income inequality to the concept of people improving their economic status, which he calls social mobility. He also puts a lot of onus on governmental legislation to have an impact. “We need to recognize that governmental action is critical to create the kind of broadly shared prosperity we all want,” Miller says. Aside from minimum wage, Miller also highlights education and health care as areas that leg-

islation can be used to improve and have an impact on income inequality. “The reality is we know it doesn’t have to be this way because other countries around the world have demonstrated that you can create policy mixes that increase social mobility,” he says. “It is a choice here in the United States. “The thought is that the U.S. is a land of opportunity, but it is not. It is a land of social stagnation. If you are born poor you are likely to stay poor. If you are born wealthy, you are most likely to stay wealthy,” he adds.

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10 • Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER

Over-the-counter drugs: A prescription for confusion

Rochelle Sharpe At Able Care Pharmacy & Medical Supplies in Enfield, Conn., Ashraf Moustafa often tries to avert disasters involving drugs displayed on his store’s shelves. Moustafa, the pharmacy manager, recently spoke to an elderly woman seeking ways to treat dark blue patches on her arms. Instead of suggesting any remedies, he asked the woman what medicines she was taking and discovered that she was dangerously mixing overthe-counter anti-inflammatory drugs with aspirin and the prescription blood thinner, Plavix. He sent the woman to the hospital, fearing that she was suffering

from internal bleeding. “People have the impression that if a drug is approved for overthe-counter use, then it must be much safer than prescription medicine,” Moustafa says. “That’s when trouble happens.” Many consumers mistakenly assume that OTC drugs can do no harm. But when improperly used, these medicines are lethal, killing hundreds of Americans and causing tens of thousands of hospitalizations every year, federal data show.

Greatest risk for elders Possible risks can easily be overlooked, given aggressive drug marketing and limited patient safeguards. With OTC treat-

ments proliferating and multiple products containing the same potentially dangerous ingredients, searching drug store aisles for appropriate medical remedies can be a prescription for confusion. Problems with OTC drugs could get worse, as the United States population ages. While people of all ages have been harmed by these medications, elders are at greater risk, because they take more medicine, experience more adverse reactions and have more difficulty understanding health information. Last year, the Gerontological Society of America and Consumer Healthcare Products Association convened a national summit, call-

ing for research into ways to improve these drug labels and how to better educate patients about these medicines’ potential risks. Also, the federal government is considering lowering the maximum dose of one potentially dangerous ingredient found in hundreds of OTC drugs: acetaminophen. In January, the government mandated that pharmaceutical companies drop the maximum dose of acetaminophen in prescription drugs to 325 milligrams per tablet. There’s also growing interest in figuring out how to track what OTC medicines people actually use. It’s hard to monitor what non-prescription drugs patients buy — let alone take, given that these medications can be purchased in so many stores and online. Many consumers don’t seem to consider these drugs as medicine, pharmacists say. More than half of patients, meanwhile, don’t even tell their doctors what OTC drugs they take, surveys show. “It’s under everybody’s radar,” says Beverly Schaefer, a Seattle pharmacist and leader in the National Community Pharmacists Association.

Acetaminophen poisoning — and deaths Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, can be safe and effective when used as directed. When people take just one or two extra tablets a day, though, they can severely damage their livers. “An elderly person taking large doses of Tylenol for a week can be at risk,” says Dr. Rockman Ferrigno, who chairs Bridgeport Hospital’s emergency medicine department. Acetaminophen poisoning is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States and about half of these liver failures are due to accidental overdoses, medical experts say. About 150 Americans die from accidental acetaminophen poisoning every year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Last year, one was a Niantic, Conn., woman, age 51, who suffered from chronic alcohol abuse and had cirrhosis of the liver, according to state medical examiner’s office records. For acetaminophen, part of the hazard is that it is in so many medications. The most commonly-used drug in America, it is contained in more than 600 OTC and prescription products, including various formulations of Robitussin, Midol, Percocet, Vicodin, Excedrin and Alka-Seltzer Plus. With the maximum recom-

mended acetaminophen dose set at 4,000 grams a day, the equivalent of eight extra-strength Tylenols, patients could put their health in jeopardy by simply combining the daily allotment of an OTC painkiller with just one prescription medicine. “If you’re not sitting there with a calculator, adding this up, you can take too much,” says Joan Baird, the American Society of Consultant Pharmacist’s director of clinical affairs. “It’s really easy to do.” Even some doctors get confused about how much acetaminophen is contained in various prescription drugs, she says.

Acetaminophen risk For the general public, there’s surprisingly little awareness of acetaminophen’s potential danger. Only 31 percent of adults surveyed knew that Tylenol contained the drug, according to a Northwestern University medical school study. Almost everyone was surprised that acetaminophen could cause liver damage, it discovered. Shopping for medicine can become bewildering, as pharmaceutical companies extend their most popular brands often by varying an original brand name when creating drugs to treat different health problems. For instance, Alka-Seltzer, best known for treating indigestion, contains no acetaminophen. Alka-Seltzer Plus, however, does. Even consumers who diligently read labels can be misled. Acetaminophen is sometimes abbreviated as “apap” on prescription drug labels. Efforts to stop using the abbreviation are currently underway. The federal government has begun implementing additional safety measures for acetaminophen. Besides lowering the maximum prescription dose last month, it has mandated stronger liver-damage warnings on all medicines containing acetaminophen and required that the ingredient be more prominently identified on over-the-counter labels. McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the unit of Johnson & Johnson that produces Tylenol, has made a series of safety changes. It has reduced the recommended maximum dose of 500-milligram Extra Strength Tylenol from eight to six pills a day and launched an interactive website, getreliefresponsibly.com, which allows consumers to type in a drug’s name to see if it contains acetaminophen. Last fall, it began putting warnings on Extra Strength Tylenol bottle caps in red capital letters OTC, continued to page 28


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 11


12 • Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER

Mass shootings do little to change state gun laws

“castle doctrine,” which is meant to allow property owners to protect their homes against intruders. Alabama changed its law so that a shooter would only be entitled to civil immunity for shooting a trespasser if the property owner reacted “reasonably.”

Joaquin Sapien

Arizona

Following the mass shooting in Connecticut, the Obama administration and lawmakers around the country have promised to re-examine gun control in America. Last year, ProPublica decided to take a look at what’s happened legislatively in states where some of the worst shootings in recent U.S. history have occurred to see what effect, if any, those events had on gun laws. We found that while legislators in Virginia, Alabama, Arizona, New York, Texas and Colorado sometimes contemplated tighten-

ted to mental health facilities to be provided to a federal database called the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, or NICS. Licensed gun dealers are supposed to check the database before they sell anyone a gun. President George W. Bush subsequently signed federal legislation requiring all states to submit their mental health records to NICS, but to gain the support of the NRA, Congress agreed to two concessions. It made changes to the way the government defined who was “mentally defective,” excluding people, for example, who had been “fully

In fact, several states have made it easier to buy more guns and take them to more places. ing rules after rampage shootings, few measures gained passage. In fact, several states have made it easier to buy more guns and take them to more places. Here’s a rundown of what’s happened in each of those states:

Virginia After 23-year-old Virginia Tech student Seung Hui Cho killed 32 students and faculty members at the university in April 2007, then-Gov. Tim Kaine assigned a blue-ribbon task force to examine gun policies in the state. The task force made dozens of recommendations that, among other things, suggested that the state intensify background checks for gun purchasers, and ban firearm possession on college campuses. None of the recommendations became law. The most significant change in Virginia came two weeks after the shooting when Kaine signed an executive order requiring the names of all people involuntarily commit-

released or discharged” from mandatory treatment. The law also gave mentally ill people an avenue for restoring their gun rights if they could prove to a court that they had been rehabilitated. After the law passed, the NRA pushed state lawmakers to limit roadblocks for people applying to regain their rights. Virginia is particularly open to restoring peoples’ gun rights. A 2011 New York Times investigation found that the restoration process in the state allowed some people to regain access to guns simply by writing a letter to the state. Others were permitted to carry guns just weeks or months after being hospitalized for psychiatric treatment. In 2012, the Virginia state legislature repealed a law that had barred people from buying more than one handgun per month — a law put in place because so many guns purchased in Virginia were later used in crimes committed in states with more restrictions.

The legislature also has made several changes to its gun permitting process. The state eliminated municipalities’ ability to require fingerprints as part of a concealed weapon permit application. The state used to require gun owners to undergo training with a certified instructor in order to get permits, but in 2009 it adopted a law allowing people to take an hour-long online test instead. Since Virginia adopted the law, the number of concealed handgun permits the state has issued increased dramatically and many of the permits were issued to people who live in other states where Virginia permits are accepted. In 2010, Virginia became one of five states to allow permit holders to carry concealed and loaded weapons into bars and restaurants.

Alabama In Alabama, gun control advocates have won two small legislative victories since March 2009, when 28-year-old sausage plant worker Michael McLendon went on a three-town shooting spree, killing 10 people. In 2011, the state made it illegal for people to buy weapons for someone else who doesn’t have permission to carry one or to provide false information about their identity to a licensed gun dealer. The law was intended to help crack down on gun trafficking. (According to data compiled by non-profit Mayors Against Illegal Guns, the state had the fifth highest rate of crime gun exports in 2009.) After Florida teen Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in February 2012, the Alabama state legislature made a slight revision to its version of a law known as the

Using this technology, a serial number could be stamped on bullet casings so they could be traced back to a particular gun. The gun industry argued that the technology would be too expensive and was still unproven. Some gun manufacturers were so upset by it that they threatened to leave the state. The bill passed the Assembly in June, but the Senate did not vote on it. In January 2012, the legislature repealed a law that previously required handgun manufacturers and dealers to share information about bullet casings and ballistics with the state. Critics of the law said the database used to maintain the information cost too much and didn’t help police.

After former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., was shot in the head in a hail of bullets that killed six and wounded 13, a bill was introduced in the state legislature to limit gun magazines to 10 bullets, but the bill failed in the face of pressure from the gun lobby. A similar bill was proposed in Connecticut last year; it didn’t pass either. In March 2012, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed a bill with the opposite effect, forbidding the Arizona Game and Fish Commission from limiting magazine capacity for any gun approved for hunting. According to rankings assembled by the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, Arizona is “49th out of 50 — having enacted some of the weakest gun violence prevention laws in the country.” Arizona doesn’t require a license to carry a concealed firearm in public, nor does it limit the number of firearms that someone can buy at once.

There’s been no effort to tighten gun control in Texas since Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, 39, killed 13 and wounded 32 at a military processing center at Fort Hood in 2009. In 2011, legislators passed two bills that gave gun carriers greater freedom to take their weapons to more places. One bill restricted employers from prohibiting guns from vehicles in parking areas and another allowed foster parents to carry handguns while transporting their foster children, as long as they are licensed carriers.

New York

Colorado

After a mass shooting at an immigration services center in Binghamton, N.Y., where 13 people were killed and four were wounded, the state assembly entertained several bills on gun control. None passed. One bill would have given police more control over records related to firearm sales. Another would have banned 50-caliber weapons and allowed people to turn them into the state in exchange for fair market value. Perhaps the most controversial bill in the package would have required the use of a technology called microstamping on all bullets sold in the state.

Colorado’s state legislature has not convened since Aurora graduate student James Eagan Holmes, 24, killed 12 and wounded 58 in a movie theater in July 2012. At the time, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper suggested that families of victims needed time to grieve before a discussion on gun control could begin in the state. After the Connecticut shooting, Hickenlooper said that “the time is right” for the state to consider stronger gun control legislation. He has introduced a measure to strengthen background checks for gun buyers.

Texas

ProPublica

(l-r) U.S. Sen. William Cowan, The Dimock Center President and CEO Dr. Myechia Minter-Jordan and Chairman of The Dimock Center’s Board of Directors Fletcher “Flash” Wiley at the center’s annual meeting on Jan. 30 on its nine-acre campus in Roxbury. Sen. Cowan delivered the keynote address on the politics of health care, his experiences in the United States Senate and the importance of advocacy. (Photo courtesy of The Dimock Center)


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BLACK HISTORY photos from the Banner Archives

CELEBRATING THE IMPORTANT EVENTS AND PEOPLE THAT HAVE HELPED SHAPE AMERICA


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HISTORY BLACK

CELEBRATING THE IMPORTANT EVENTS AND PEOPLE THAT HAVE HELPED SHAPE AMERICA

Georgine Hill, 95, civil rights activist, arts supporter

Georgine Hill (r) with her daughter Dr. June Hill, a Smith College graduate, and her grandson Jay Butler, a graduate of Harvard University and Yale Law School. During Black History Month, the black press traditionally publishes stories about the achievements of African American individuals. Rarely is there the occasion to report on the achievements of multi-generational successes in one family. With her death in Bermuda on Jan. 27, just a few days short of her 96th birthday, Georgine Russell Hill

has joined the annals of black history. Roxbury has lost its most outstanding dowager and her family has lost its loving matriarch. Many of Hill’s friends referred to her as “the Duchess” because of her extraordinary personal dignity and her commitment to propriety. She seemed to be always aware that she had the responsibility to sustain the

reputations of two historically significant families — one in Boston and the other in Bermuda. She was born in Boston and attended public schools and Girls’ Latin. She then went to the Massachusetts College of Arts where she studied painting. She lived with her parents and two sisters on Hazelwood Street in Roxbury. Her father,

Dr. Alfred Russell, was a Harvard-educated dentist. The family’s status was already established when the Duchess’ great grandfather, John Jay Smith, came to Boston in 1848 and became active in the abolitionist movement. After the Civil War he was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1868, 1869 and 1872. He was later appointed to a seat on the Boston Common Council. One of Smith’s daughters married George Franklin Grant, a dentist who established great prominence for the family. The Duchess’ grandfather not only invented the golf tee, but his dental expertise was so great that he was appointed to the Harvard Dental faculty in 1871. Dr. Grant was the first black to become a Harvard professor. While in college, the Duchess met Hilton Gray Hill, a student at Boston University. They married and moved to Bermuda in 1941. Nonetheless, the Duchess remained assertively a Bostonian over the years. She sent her son and daughter to the family home in Roxbury so that they could attend the Latin schools. The young bride found Bermuda to be much more racially discriminatory than what she had become accustomed to in Roxbury. She resolved early on to change things, but she knew that her roots would have to be established a bit more firmly in Bermudan soil. Her talent in the arts laid a clear path to community acceptance. As a concert vocalist her contralto voice was often compared with Marian Anderson’s, and as

a painter she was a respected portraitist. By 1947 she had helped develop a more racially diverse artist community. She became one of the founders of the Bermuda Art Association, the forerunner of the Bermuda Society of Arts. Her major blow against racial discrimination came in 1951 when the Duchess, her husband and her sister-in-law, Carol Hill, organized protests against the Bermudiana Theatre Club that refused to sell tickets for blacks to attend theatrical performances. The protests fashioned after the civil rights campaign in the U.S. were successful, and many racial barriers throughout Bermuda fell. As a result of their political efforts, her husband was elected to the Colonial Parliament from 1953 to 1958. In 1993 the Duchess was granted a Member of the Order of the British Empire. Her husband died in 2000, but she went on to receive numerous other awards from major organizations in Bermuda. Georgine Hill’s life was an exemplar of probity, achievement and the pursuit of racial justice. A commitment to those values, long a part of her family tradition, would benefit all African Americans. There is reason to believe that her family’s historical legacy will continue. Among others, the Duchess leaves behind a grandson, Jay Butler, who graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Harvard and is now practicing law. He has already demonstrated some of the historical commitment of his grandmother. His interest in law concerns human rights.


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HISTORY BLACK

CELEBRATING THE IMPORTANT EVENTS AND PEOPLE THAT HAVE HELPED SHAPE AMERICA

George Lewis Ruffin, Mass. state rep., district judge Joseph H. Nelson Honorable Judge George Lewis Ruffin was born of free parents, George W. and Nancy Lewis Ruffin, in Richmond, Va., on December 16, 1834. Advantages for the education of blacks in Virginia were very limited. His parents, who were very anxious about the moral and intellectual development of their children, moved to Boston in 1853 where their family could have the benefit of the schools. George attended and graduated from the public schools in Boston. He began work in a

barber shop with his books always by his side, and he learned from his daily association with the businessmen of the city who came to the shop. Later, he studied law at the firm of Jewall and Gatson, and then entered Harvard Law School, where he distinguished himself by completing the three year course in one year. He graduated in 1869 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, the second degree ever conferred by Harvard on an African American, and the first from the law school. From the old 6th Ward, now the 9th Ward of Boston, lawyer Ruffin was elected to the Mass.

State Legislature in 1869 and served two terms. In 1875, he was elected to the Boston City Council. This recognition was the expression of confidence in the sterling worth, exalted reputation and legal ability of this truly great citizen. In 1872, he was a delegate to the National Convention held in New Orleans, and part of the time he presided over this body and delivered an eloquent speech on the life and services of Hon. Charles Sumner. Again, in 1876, when he was unable to be present at the Lincoln Memorial Club of Cincinnati where he was invited

George Lewis Ruffin (Portrait by Melvin Robbins courtesy of the Harvard Law Library) to deliver an address, his written thoughts were read for the inspiration of those present. He was a man of charitable, warm-hearted and generous impulses. A distinguished looking man with a rich voice similar to Paul Robeson’s, Ruffin firmly believed in justice, equality and human dignity. For many years he was a member of the 12th Baptist Church of Boston and superintendent of its Sunday School. His desire was to teach young people that political honor and a Christian life are not necessarily separable.

Charlestown. Although three nominees were rejected, attorney Ruffin was unanimously confirmed. General Butler himself administered the oath of office. In 1883, he was made consul resident in Boston for the Dominican Republic and served with honor. Ruffin was the first president of the Wendell Phillips Club of Boston, and was a member and at one time president of the Banneker Club. He married a Boston native and four children blessed their home. November 19, 1886, Ruffin passed away after a long illness. Touching tributes of respect were

He was a man of charitable, warm-hearted and generous impulses. For years, he was a member of the Ward 9 Committee. In 1871, he was a Major General Benjamin Butler delegate at the famous Worcester Convention and made the nomination speech supporting General Butler for Governor of Massachusetts. After becoming governor, General Butler nominated Ruffin as Judge of the District Court of

paid to his memory by many friends and dignitaries. In his short life, Ruffin compiled an illustrious record of which anyone might be proud. Continue to meditate. Through meditation, keep climbing higher. O courageous soul, have no fear. O dear one, complete your sadhana with a brave heart. — Swami Muktananda


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HISTORY BLACK

CELEBRATING THE IMPORTANT EVENTS AND PEOPLE THAT HAVE HELPED SHAPE AMERICA

A lesson in standing up from Col. Hubert “Hooks” Jones

Col. Hubert L. “Hooks” Jones (center) was part of the famous Tuskegee Airman unit that flew for the Air Force in World War II. Later, he served as a professor of air science at the Tuskegee Institute. Fletcher H. Wiley Over the years, people around the nation have asked me what was it like to be a black cadet at the Air Force Academy; and they are right to do so since the experience at the time — forged in the midst of racial segregation and the Civil Rights Movement — was foreign to anything within my experience or culture. The situation certainly spawned a number of “interesting circumstances,” and none was more bizarre and instructive than the “Hooks Jones Story.” The story begins in June just after the graduation of the Class of 1962. The new First Classmen from 1963 (which contained the first three blacks at the academy) were preparing to train the incoming Class of 1966; the Second Classmen from 1964 (which contained one black) were preparing to go to Europe, Asia, and Australia-New Zealand on their overseas field trip; and my Class of 1965 (which had five blacks remaining from the original six) — freshly free from its year-long shackles as doolies — was preparing for the Zone of Interior field trip. The purpose of the six-weeklong field trip was to give our class exposure to the operational U.S. armed forces with a week with the Navy, a week with the Army, and the rest of the time visiting Air Force units. While the trip was designed to be very interesting and motivational, at the time it began, we had already been away from home (including Christmas) for almost a year; and that understandable longing to get back to loved ones sometimes overshadowed the excitement of the adventure. Because we were the largest academy class up to that point, the trip planners divided us into two 350-man contingencies — each of which were further broken down when necessary into smaller and more manageable groups. Group A (made-up of cadets from Squadrons 1 — 12) included two blacks,

Bentley Plummer and Charlie Thomas; and Group B (which included cadets from Squadrons 13 — 24) had three blacks, including Robert Stroud, Arthur Beamon and myself. We had become brothers over the year, and we sought out each other’s company and “hung out” together on a regular basis. The common culture, challenges, and quest of our people that we shared formed an unbreakable bond; and when we had any time off to relax, we generally spent it with each other — listening to R&B music, dissecting relationships with girlfriends, complaining about upper-classmen, and sharing career dreams. We all had mixed feelings as we embraced the first-rate learning conditions at the academy while our black collegiate counterparts were being vilified, spat upon, and worse at student-inspired sit-ins around the country. America was a different place then. The U.S. Civil War had not yet been over for 100 years; and in many places in the country, the social issues over which the states bitterly battled had not yet been put to rest. Indeed, separate facilities for the races were the norm throughout the South, and discrimination and vituperation against the colored folks (as we were called back then when the “caller” was trying to be civil) were freely and openly displayed — biting exclamations to the hypocritically insidious American apartheid governing the nation. Although we black cadets lived, worked, played, and prayed well outside of Dixie, the putrid malaise of racism permeated well beyond the Mason-Dixon Line. Still, while at or associated with the academy, our blackness was generally melded into the all-encompassing blue of the Cadet Wing. Thinking that nothing sinister or dangerous lay before us on our Zone of Interior trip — as long as we stayed on-base (because a

number of key military installations were located in the South) — I was somewhat surprised by the visit I received one afternoon before we departed by one of the Air Force officers who would be

accompanying and supervising us. A major, he was the Air Officer Commanding of 21st Squadron, and apparently, as he and his colleagues meticulously planned our routes and routines, they learned that when the two groups of touring 65ers made their customary, week-long concurrent appearance with the Army at Ft. Benning in Columbus, Ga., the post would host a semi-formal, July 4th weekend dance for the visiting cadets. As per usual, the young women for these affairs were invited from the local community, and the major and his colleagues had blanched at the thought of 700 southern belles attending an integrated dance on-post — not because they thought it was wrong, but because they did not want to offend the local populace. Accordingly, the major and his colleagues approached me with the idea — a request really — that so as to not put the academy, Ft. Benning and my white classmates in an embarrassing position, my black classmates and I would not attend the dance. Somewhat stunned by the request, I nevertheless kept my composure and told the major that I would talk the matter over with my classmates and get back to him. I chuckled to myself as I called a “meeting of the brethren.” I explained the major’s “request” to the group; and we all laughed. The fact was that, just like most cadets, we hated going to those dances anyway! The genre was

not of our black culture, and many whites felt the dances were a bit stodgy and archaic too. First of all, the music they played was straight out of the 1930s and 1940s — and the old music was compatible with the “old dances” that they taught us at USAFA like the foxtrot and the waltz. We, on the other hand, were doing the twist, the cha-cha, the bop, the horse, the watusi, the swim, and the ever-popular slowdrag. Aside from the dances and the music, the “dates” procured for cadets at these dances were obviously not always selected for their grace or beauty. Indeed — and I am ashamed to say this now — but at each dance, awards would be made to the cadet having the ugliest date. One of the more enterprising members of our group suggested that if we’re going to give up going to the dance, then we ought to get something out of it. Again, we laughed, because not going to the dance was reward enough! But we eventually came around to his way of thinking; and then Plummer suggested that we all get the weekend off and go home with him to Tuskegee, Ala., — a mere 50 miles away. Not anxious to get off the military installation and delve any further into the Deep South, I was not at all sanguine about the idea. However, Bentley insisted that we could party hard over the weekend with good soul food and Hooks, continued to page 20


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HISTORY BLACK

CELEBRATING THE IMPORTANT EVENTS AND PEOPLE THAT HAVE HELPED SHAPE AMERICA

Hooks

continued from page 19

music — and, there would be girls — his girlfriend for one. Since we had not yet been home after 12 hard months at the Air Force Academy — and since we had an opportunity to get at least one of us home — we all agreed to the plan; and I was sent back to the major to cut the deal. He carefully listened to my request for an “accommodation,” my leverage argument being that not only would we not go to the dance, but we would also not be on-post during the dance — thereby avoiding an embarrassing situation. He liked the idea, and took the matter up with his superiors. Our proposal was approved; and we were asked to be discreet in discussing the arrangement with our classmates. They didn’t want everyone asking for the special deal of skipping the dance and/or going home early. Off we went on our excursion; and three weeks into the trip, both cohorts of the Class of 1965 arrived at Ft. Benning. After an exciting week “playing war” with the Army, Friday came, and we whisked away to our weekend to Tuskegee. Of course, our supervising Air Force officers knew what the deal was; and necessity required us also to share the facts with some of our classmates, who were answerable for our presence. Indeed, it didn’t take long for the word to get around that “Hey, the black guys are getting the weekend off, and they don’t have to come to the dance!” The reaction of most of my white classmates that I talked to was how rotten it was that we were being made to miss a class function because of racial segregation — even the guys from the South said so, though they understood more than most the turmoil that would be caused by our presence. For the most part, we were envied

for getting away to someone’s home before the rest of the Class could do it; having the weekend off with music, partying and home cooking; and most of all, missing a dance. Before we left the post, we made sure to go to the bathroom so that we wouldn’t have to stop at an unfriendly, segregated facility while on the road. As we headed down the two-lane highway and passed the no-interior-plumbing wooden hovels, the shanty towns, and cotton fields along the road, my misgivings about travelling in the Deep South resurfaced. I thought about the lynchings, the violence, the backwardness and the danger enshrouding Dixieland; and I had second and third thoughts about leaving the safety of the post behind. Luckily, I also thought about Tuskegee as the home of Tuskegee Institute, Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver and the renowned Tuskegee Airmen — heroes to blacks across the nation, and exemplars to black cadets at the service academies. Those thoughts made the ride easier; and after an hour, we pulled into town. It was small, southern and rural — particularly the black side of town where we were headed. I could not imagine having a good time in this place. When we pulled up in front of a friend’s home, there on the front porch, chit-chatting about the events of the day were five of the most beautiful young women I have ever seen in one place at one time. I couldn’t believe such pulchritude was available in this hick town! We bounded out of the car, made ourselves known, and socialized a bit. However, we soon had to resume our trip to Plummer’s house where we were staying. The young ladies said that they would see us later at the party. Plummer said don’t worry about leaving them — there were plenty more where they came from. And man was he right!

The people of Tuskegee could not have been more welcoming and hospitable. Many of them were around when the Tuskegee Airmen were in training there. To them we represented a new generation of accomplished black air cadets. Our uniforms and our military bearing evoked fond memories in the old folks and sparked new flames of adoration and respect in the younger ones. I don’t mind telling you that we enjoyed the notoriety immensely as we went from house to house to meet and pay respect to the town’s black leadership. We all stayed

ing conversation when he asked how we happened to be in Tuskegee. Then, with great satisfaction in our own cleverness, I related the entire story of how the major had requested that we not come to the dance, and we had leveraged that plea into a weekend in Tuskegee with partying, food, music and all of the pretty girls! We could not have been more self-satisfied with our wisdom and good fortune. Suddenly, the smile left Hooks face as he stood-up in our midst and calmly said: “Gentlemen, You have to go back to Fort Benning

And as far as I know, there was never any mention at the Air Force Academy of segregating cadets on a racial basis ever again. with Plummer and his family and we visited with folks, ate and partied that Friday night, and looked forward to our weekend of fun. Saturday morning was reserved for sight-seeing and visiting, and one of the last stops was the home of Col. Hubert L. “Hooks” Jones, the professor of air science at Tuskegee Institute. “Hooks,” a former the Tuskegee Airman who had stayed in the Air Force at the end of World War II, was a local legend in his own right. His warm welcome and beaming smile when we met spoke of the immense pride and respect he felt toward us as we carried forth his legacy. He entertained and mesmerized us with stories of his military career — the planes he flew, the battles he fought, and the men he knew. We were well into the rous-

and attend that dance!” At first, I thought he was kidding; and I laughed at the joke as I replied “Sir, I don’t think you understand. We hate going to those dances, and we were extremely fortunate to get out of this one. Besides, the major was right: Our presence at the dance would not be greeted happily by the City Fathers of Columbus, and we would put the base commanders, the Army, and the Air Force in an embarrassing position.” Hooks then replied, “Son, don’t you see? Our people have been struggling for years for equality in the military and elsewhere; and the academy and the Air Force has to be made to stand up for the principle that all cadets, no matter their color or creed, are integral part of the Cadet Wing — an inseparable part of the whole. If some cadets can’t go to the dance, then none of them can go. We all must stick together!” Feeling my resolve weaken in the face of his infallible logic, I nevertheless countered by saying “Sir, I cut the deal with the major and gave him my word — our word. I don’t want to be in the position of having now accepted the fruits of our bargain, and then later reneging on my part. He would be forever angry at us and make our lives back at the academy miserable.” Hooks, a “bird colonel,” immediately replied “Don’t you guys worry about a thing. I’ll take care of the major; and I’ll tell him that I ordered you to go to the dance — which I do!” Hooks not only agreed to drive us to the dance, but to also help us obtain dates from among the damsels in Tuskegee. Being the pillar of the community that he was — and explaining the point-making situation as he did — it was not long before he had the cadres of beauties needed with semi-formal gowns in tow to provide each and every one of us with a date. We all piled into Hooks’ big station wagon, taking care not to muss the girls’ dresses; and I must admit that the close proximity with these gorgeously clad, perfumed misses made the trip to Ft. Benning less foreboding. Hooks was resplendent as well in his beige, be-medaled, officer’s

uniform with the pilot’s wings on front and the colonel’s eagles on his shoulders. He was a tall, moderately tan, imposing man with straight black hair, and an aquiline nose from which he derived his famous nickname. Although his demeanor was warm and nurturing when he was with us, there was nevertheless the air of confident authority when he wished to emphasize his point. As we drove past the guard post and to the building where the formal was being held, we could hear the music and see a few of our classmates and their dates outside. Hooks stopped the car, got out, and asked us to start unloading. While our classmates seemed unfazed by our presence and genuinely glad to see us, their dates did not appear to be quite so enamored. Someone must have gone to get the major, and he came outside to see what the commotion was all about. As soon as he saw us, he approached me with anger and concern and said, “What are you doing here? I thought we had a deal!” Just then, Hooks interposed himself between me and the major and said, “It’s not his fault, major. I ordered them to come!” It was only then that the red-faced major noticed the tan-faced colonel and apologized to him as he pointed to us: “Sir, I’m sorry, I didn’t see you; and I don’t have any personal objections to their attendance here. But we’re guests of the Army; and we’re trying to get along with the customs of the local host population here in Columbus.” Hooks then pulled the major aside and firmly said, “Major, these men are part of the Air Force Academy Cadet Wing; and we — the Air Force — have taught them that the Wing and their fellow comrades-in-arms work, play and fight together. If some members of USAFA 1965 can’t come to the party, then none of them can come! Now, let’s go in.” In we walked — tall, straight, and proud — just like Hooks, who led the way. People gawked at us — especially a few Georgia belles and some of the Army officers in attendance. We were warmly greeted by our classmates; and they graciously introduced us to their dates for the evening. Their ladies were equally gracious; and I don’t remember any type of incident ensuing from our presence. Later on that weekend, as our classmates congratulated us for coming and suffering through the dance with the rest of the class, they said something that we all knew was true: We had the classiest and best-looking girls there! And as far as I know, there was never any mention at the Air Force Academy of segregating cadets on a racial basis ever again. Thank you, Hooks, for the lesson — the logistical support — the love — and the legacy! Fletcher H. Wiley is a lawyer, entrepreneur, activist, and political commentator. Each day, contemplate the glory of Guru’s grace. Prostrate from the heart and offer him your salutations. Revere his teachings; love them more than your body and prana. — Swami Muktananda


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 21

BLACK HISTORY MONTH Visit the Banner’s Black History Month online platform during the month of February. We cover a wide range of topics about the African American experience and our impact on American society. Share with us in celebrating the important events and people that have helped shape America. Our history is history to all Americans. We are America.

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Walsh

continued from page 1

Mayor Marty Walsh and Health and Human Services Chief Felix G. Arroyo (r) at a Violence Intervention and Advocacy Round Table held at Boston Medical Center. (Mayor’s Office photo by Isabel Leon)

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Walsh administration spokeswoman Katherine Norton said the mayor could not be reached for comment by the Banner’s press deadline, but gave the following statement: “The diversity of the City of Boston is one of the things that makes our city strong, and the citizens of the city deserve an administration that reflects that strength. Mayor Walsh remains committed to leading an administration that is filled with diverse, well-qualified professionals. That commitment has been reflected not only with the appointment of a diverse transition committee, but also by the fact that today, with the guidance of Commissioner Evans, the Boston Police Department has the most diverse command staff in its history.” Walsh did receive high marks from many in the black community for his promotions of black, Latino and Asian officers to command positions. Currently more than 50 percent of command staff positions are occupied by people of color and women. And among mid-level managers, Walsh appears to have injected some level of diversity. Of 60 appointments made to date — including 27 Police Department promotions — 61 percent have been whites, 22 percent blacks, 10 percent Latinos and 6 percent Asians, according to a list of appointees provided by the Walsh administration. While 39 percent of Walsh’s appointments have been people of color, 53 percent of the city’s population is non-white, according to the 2010 Census. Walsh’s top level appointments have left some who supported him in the last year’s race for mayor concerned. “This doesn’t look like the new Boston,” said Alex Oliver-Davila, executive director of Sociedad Latina and a member of the Latino Network, a group of nonprofit leaders. “I’m disappointed and obviously concerned that there are only two people of color in his cabinet.” In January, Walsh made key appointments to his cabinet: Koh as his chief of staff, Joseph Rull to head Operations and Administration, Joyce Linehan as chief of Policy, Lisa Pollack as chief of Communications, former state Rep. Eugene O’Flaherty as corporation counsel and former Department of Neighborhood Development Director Sheila Dillon as Housing chief. Police Commissioner William Evans rounds out the cabinet.

With his appointments, Walsh has filled many of the top positions in city government with key campaign advisors, including Rull and Linehan. Inside and outside his cabinet, he has kept many holdovers from the Menino administration, including Pollack and Dillon. Cabinet positions yet to be filled include Fire Commissioner, the Education chief, Streets Transportation & Sanitation, Arts & Culture, Information Technology, Finance & Budget and the Economic Development post, which includes the Boston Redevelopment Authority. “We still have a long way to go with the Walsh administration,” said City Councilor Charles Yancey. “He still has a lot of opportunities to make appointments, but not as many as he had in January.” Yancey, who has tracked hiring and promotion in city government for the last 30 years, says

“I’m disappointed and obviously concerned that there are only two people of color in his cabinet.” — Alex Oliver-Davila blacks, Latinos and Asians have consistently been underrepresented at the higher pay grades. “One of the persistent patterns is that higher-paid positions tend to be monopolized by white males,” he said. “That pattern remains constant up till Dec. 31, 2013.” Yancey says that having diversity at the highest levels of city government would ensure that the city would be more responsive to the needs of its residents. “If the chief decision-makers don’t reflect the city, it’s unlikely that the middle managers will either,” he said. “My experience is that the lack of diversity in decision makers does impact how people are treated in this city.” The Latino Network’s Oliver-Davila says her group has tried to meet with Walsh since he took office with no success. “We wanted to let him know who we were and that we can be a resource to him,” she said. “We still have not met with him. We also wanted to push him on hiring people of color.”

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Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 23

Alice Walker

reflects on a life of writing

Kam Williams Alice Walker has been defined as one of the key international writers of the 20th century. She made history as the first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction as well as the National Book Award in 1983 for her novel “The Color Purple.” The award-winning novel served as the inspiration for Steven Spielberg’s 1985 film and was adapted for the stage, opening at New York City’s Broadway Theatre in 2005, and capturing a Tony Award for Best Leading Ac-

tress in a Musical in 2006. An internationally celebrated author, poet and activist, Walker’s books include seven novels, four collections of short stories, four children’s books, and volumes of essays and poetry. She has written many other best sellers, too, among them, “Possessing the Secret of Joy” in 1992, which detailed the devastating effects of female genital mutilation and led to the 1993 documentary “Warrior Marks,” a collaboration with the British-Indian filmmaker Pratibha Parmar, with Walker as executive producer.

In 2001, Walker was inducted into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame and, in 2006, she was honored as one of the inaugural inductees into the California Hall of Fame. In 2007, her archives were opened to the public at Emory University. In 2010, she presented the keynote address at the 11th Annual Steve Biko Lecture at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, and was awarded the Lennon/ Ono Grant for Peace, in Reykjavik, Iceland. She donated the financial award to an orphanage for the children of AIDS victims in Kenya. She has served as a jurist

for two sessions of the Russell Tribunal on Palestine. She recently talked to the Banner about her career and about the documentary “Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth,” which premieres on PBS’ American Masters series on Feb. 7 at 9 p.m.

How do you feel about having the biopic coming out about you?

Well, it’s very interesting because I almost never do anything for Black History Month, because I feel it’s just another way to separate us. It’s amusing to me that it

would be coming out as a Black History presentation on PBS. But on the level of the film, I like it. And I love the producer [Shaheen Haq] and the filmmaker [Pratibha Parmar]. I think they were incredibly devoted. They did it on a hope and a prayer, and at one point had to rely on crowd-sourcing because of the huge expenses.

The film left me with an appreciation of your deep connection to nature.

The forest is the first catheWalker, continued to page 24


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Alice Walker, shown above today (l) and as a young author (r) is considered one of the key writers of the 20th century. She is the first African-American women to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award, which she collected for her novel “The Color Purple” in 1983. A new documentary about her, “Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth,” premieres this month on PBS. (Photos courtesy of “Beauty in Truth”)

Walker

never left.

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dral. I felt that from the time I was a child. I credit my mother with that. I used to think it came from her Native-American side. Whichever it was, she instinctively connected with nature, and taught me that. Church just could not hold my spirit. It was a beautiful little church, too. As sweet as could be. It was at a bend in the road, with a big, oak tree sheltering it. Still, I wandered right out the window, mentally and emotionally, got into the trees, and

How did you feel about the screen adaptation of “The Color Purple?”

I was worried about the film at first, because I’d never had a movie made of any of my work on a big scale like that. There had only been a couple of small, student efforts before that. “The Color Purple” was so overwhelming that I actually brought a magic wand to New York City for the premiere, and pointed it at the screen in the hope that movie didn’t embarrass all of us. Lo and behold, it turned out to

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be a beautiful picture. The audience was so into it, gracious and emotional, laughing when they should be laughing, crying when they should be crying. I got to feel it as a living work of art, as something useful. My interest in creating anything is that it be useful. People can love the beauty of it, but they should also use it to grow, to deepen.

What did you think of the stage version of “The Color Purple?”

I so loved working with the musicians. It was just wonderful! It was great and I felt like it was

such a tonic for people to see it.

You have written several essays about Barack Obama. How do you feel about his presidency thus far?

I’m very disappointed in Obama. I was very much in support of him in the beginning, but I cannot support war. I cannot support droning. I cannot support capitulating to the banks. I cannot support his caving in to Netanyahu [Israeli Prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu]. There’s a long list of this administration’s initiatives that I find unsupportable. I think many black people

support him because they’re so happy to have a handsome black man in the White House. But it doesn’t make me happy if that handsome black man in the White House is betraying all of our traditional values of peace, peoplehood, caring about strangers, feeding the hungry, and not bombing children. I’m very disappointed. More than disappointed, I think I’ve actually returned to a kind of realism about how the world works. That’s helpful. Because, in a way, no matter who’s in charge of the corporation that the United States is, the direction in which it is taken seems to be inexorable. So, you just get the job of being the front man for four or eight years. Now, most people realize that’s what you are.

I think the black community sort of got checkmated in terms of its own agenda. And very vocal folks who try to hold Obama accountable are having their blackness questioned or their blackness revoked, like Tavis Smiley.

That’s okay. It’s better to have your blackness taken away than to stand there and lie about who you actually are. That’s the trap. In fact, Cynthia McKinney just sent me a piece by somebody about how, for the first time in history, black people are supporting the wars, the military strikes on Syria, and other awful things, as if they woke up and became entirely different people. It’s totally distressing! Look at the NDAA [The National Defense Authorization Act], look at the Patriot Act, look at the NSA, and the ruthless droning of civilians. I pretty much lost it when they droned the grandmother who was teaching her grandchildren how to pick okra. It seems to me the ones who are the real threat are the ones who are in power.

Are you interested in writing your own screenplay?

At this point, no, because I have gone back to writing poetry, which I absolutely love. And I write on my blog, which I enjoy. And life being what it is, every once in a while I’ll have a book which will have developed without my actually having paid that much attention to that part of it. I’m really only interested in each day’s gift.


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 25

intheMix with Colette Greenstein

with Colette

Calif. artist brings her mixed heritage themed works to Hub

Sculptor Alison Saar’s work “Weight,” shown above, is an example about how her mixed heritage and interest in American and African traditions influences her work. Saar’s newest work is on display in the exhibit “STILL …” at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. (Photo courtesy of Alison Saar) “The beauty of art is the ambiguity,” says sculptor Alison Saar discussing her current exhibit “STILL…” showing at the Sandra and David Bakalar Gallery at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. Using such mediums as wood, bronze, paper and glass in her installations, Saar’s work often explores and challenges the themes of race and identity, the female form, and spiritually and stereotypes. Saar’s own personal struggle with her mixed heritage and her interest in American and African artistic and spiritual traditions often informs her work. Examples of these themes are explored in her recent installations such as “50 Proof,” “Black Lightning,” “Rouse” and “Weight.” In “Weight,” we see a young black girl on a swing dangling from a cotton scale opposite a coal scuttle with objects such as an iron, ladle, horseshoe, shackle, shovel, hot comb, boxing gloves and skillet. Of the piece, Saar states: “I started thinking of it as a kind of cornucopia, about [the girl’s] opportunities, and what her value is … as a slave or as a domestic. She can be a hairdresser. She can work in the field. She can be a seamstress, a cook.” Of the tattered pair of boxing gloves that are part of the piece, Saar explains that the young girl “has to fight her way out.” Born into a prominent art family in Los Angeles in 1956 and the middle of three daughters, Saar followed in the pathway of her artist mother Betye Saar, whose work is widely known for challenging African American myths and stereotypes through assembling images of Aunt Jemima, Uncle Tom, Little Black Sambo, and other stereotyped African-American figures from folk culture. Her father Richard Saar is an art conservationist and

her older sister Lezley became reknowned as an artist for transforming old books into assemblages. Her younger sister Tracye

is a writer and author of “Family Legacies: The Art of Betye, Lezley and Alison Saar.” Saar graduated from Scripps

College in 1978 in Claremont, Calif., and received a master’s degree in fine arts from Otis College of Art and Design in 1981. Her work is held in many collections around the country including the Museum of Modern Art and Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. She has received numerous prestigious awards and grants from the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and Anonymous Was a Woman. Saar’s exhibit “STILL…” gathers together for the first time four never-exhibited works made during a residency at the Pilchuck Glass School in Seattle with a selection of new bronze and mixed-media sculptures. The exhibit was organized by Otis College of Art and Design’s Ben Maltz Gallery and funded in part by Contemporary Collectors Orange County. Saar spoke to the Banner from her home in Laurel Canyon, Calif., about her influences and her “STILL…” exhibit

How did having a mixed racial upbringing inform your work?

My dad is German Scottish and my mother is African American and Irish. LA is divided by

colors of people. It was hard for me to find a place where I belonged. I felt I was living two very different lives. It’s a real concern of mine — how we’re categorized by the color of our skin.

When you’re creating your sculptures do you find that it’s more of a conscious effort or is it subliminal?

I always have a specific work in mind. I’m very conscious of what I’m creating. In the process of making the art there are subliminal images that manifest that are not always conscious.

In the introduction of “STILL…,” Meg Linton writes that she has been working with you the last two years on this exhibition. Did she commission your work for Otis College of Art’s Ben Maltz Gallery? How does it work between the artist and the gallery?

There’s a difference between a commercial space and a gallery like Otis. Meg Linton really gives the artist full reign. The Otis gallery has very high ceilings and it’s Saar, continued to page 27


26 • Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER

Community Calendar Thursday February 6

Sacre Rouge Simmons College presents Sacre Rouge, an exhibit of mixed media by Susan Montgomery and paintings by Richard Whitten from February 3 – March 6 at the Trustman Art Gallery, located on the fourth floor, Main College Building, 300 The Fenway in Boston. A reception from 5-7pm will be held on Thursday, February 6. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public (closed February 18). Entwining the sacred with the profane, the art of Susan Montgomery and Richard Whitten astounds with their virtuosity in service to the imagination. Red — the color of passion, power, and blood has been an art historical touchstone. These artists employ all of these red visions and more as they manipulate our expectations of space, time, and convention. Susan Montgomery and Richard Whitten both controvert and make use of images we associate with the sacred. Their secularization and alteration of iconography asks questions about order, chaos, and societal choices, beauty, and memory. Trustman Gallery hours are 10am - 4:30pm, Monday through Friday. The gallery is free, open to the public, and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Marcia Lomedico at 617-521-2268, or visit the Trustman Art Gallery website at www.simmons.edu/trustman. Dead Men Still Walking: A First-Hand Account of Death Row & Wrongful Executions What’s it like to be sentenced to death — for a crime you did not commit? Sister Helen Prejean — perhaps the most famous Roman Catholic nun in the U.S. — knows better than most. A spiritual advisor to death-row inmates for more than 25 years, she’s also America’s most famous advocate for ending the death penalty. Sister Helen says that 80 percent of those on death row live in the 10 Southern states that practiced slavery, and that 80 percent of those executed are poor people who kill white people. “When people of color get killed in this country, it doesn’t even hit the radar screen in district attorneys’ offices,” she says. Sister Helen is an electrifying speaker, whose paired sense of humor and sense of moral urgency make it clear why her work has helped transform American attitudes and laws. Her gripping talk at Brandeis’s Spingold Theater in 2006 was standing room only. The rare opportunity to hear her, live and in person, is not to be missed. 7-9pm, Levin Ballroom, Usdan Student Center, Brandeis University, 415 South St., Waltham. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served following the lecture. Sponsored by the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism and cosponsored by the following Brandeis University departments and programs: the Brandeis National Committee, the Department of African and Afro-American Studies, the Department of Sociology, the Education Program, the

Journalism Program, the Legal Studies Program, the Office of the Dean of Students, the Peace, Conflict and Coexistence Studies Program, the Social Justice and Social Policy Program, the Interfaith Chaplaincy, the Kraft-Hiatt Fund, and the Women’s Studies Research Center.

Monday February 10

Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities Talk by Prof. Craig Steven Wilder, MIT, 7pm at First Parish Church, 3 Church St., Harvard Sq. Sponsored by Revolution Books. A 2006 report commissioned by Brown University revealed that institution’s complex and contested involvement in slavery — setting off a controversy that leapt from the ivory tower to make headlines across the country. But Brown’s troubling past was far from unique. In Ebony and Ivy, Craig Steven Wilder, a rising star in the profession of history, lays bare uncomfortable truths about race, slavery, and the American academy. Many of America’s revered colleges and universities — from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to Rutgers, Williams College, and UNC — were soaked in the sweat, the tears, and sometimes the blood of people of color. The earliest academies proclaimed their mission to Christianize the savages of North America, and played a key role in white conquest. Later, the slave economy and higher education grew up together, each nurturing the other. Slavery funded colleges, built campuses, and paid the wages of professors. Enslaved Americans waited on faculty and students; academic leaders aggressively courted the support of slave owners and slave traders. Significantly, as Wilder shows, our leading universities, dependent on human bondage, became breeding grounds for the racist ideas that sustained them. Ebony and Ivy is a powerful and propulsive study and the first of its kind, revealing a history of oppression behind the institutions usually considered the cradle of liberal politics. $5 donation requested. For more information or to reserve tickets contact: Revolution Books, 1158 Mass. Ave., 2nd fl. Cambridge, info@rev olutionbookscamb.org, http://rev olutionbookscamb.org.

Tuesday February 11

After Exodus After Exodus will screen at the Somerville Theatre, 55 Davis Square, in Somerville at 5pm. This event at the 39th Boston Sci-Fi Film Festival is the film’s World Premiere. In the distant future a refugee lives in peace on an uninhabited island. A surprise arrival by those he left behind and a simple mistake compromise his situation, sending him into a nightmarish struggle to survive and keep his freedom. The film stars Caleb Usry in a wordless performance as the lone outlier.

Set against stunning landscapes of desert, forest, and ocean After Exodus takes the viewer on a visceral journey as we confront the darkest sides of humanity and mortality. The film was shot on a micro budget on an uninhabited barrier island off the coast of South Carolina. Arriving by boat, the crew built camp on the beach and lived on the island for over a week, all the while battling mosquitoes, lightning storms and exhaustion. The experience added to the coarse nature of the film itself and realistically portrays this island for what it is: Another character. For information about After Exodus, including the trailer, visit: www.YANfilmgroup.com/ afterexodus. Free and open to the public; for more information visit www.bostonsci-fi.com.

Open Mic Opera Starting at 7 pm, at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 838 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, the weekly “Tuesday Nights” concert series presents Open Mic Opera. Local opera singers, younger and older, amateur and professional, are invited to sing their hearts out. Suggested donation of $10 at the door. For more information about the weekly “Tuesday Nights” concert series please visit www.saintpeterscambridge.org/ news-events/announcements/ tuesdaynightconcertseries.

Wednesday February 12

Lunchtime Lecture Simmons College’s Lunchtime Lecture series continues at 12:30pm in the Gallery with Simmons College Professor of Spanish Delores Peláez. The title of her talk is “Red: A Colorful Connection to Power and Phantasy.” The lecture is free and open to the public. Trustman Gallery hours are 10am - 4:30pm, Monday through Friday. The gallery is free, open to the public, and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Marcia Lomedico at 617-521-2268, or visit the Trustman Art Gallery website at www.simmons.edu/ trustman.

Upcoming Black Heritage Event Meet the “faces of freedom”! Be transported by MLK’s prophetic words! Be uplifted through songs of trials & triumph! Miss Velma DuPont & The Toward Victory Company present “Toward Victory,” (the African-American historical saga in drama, dance, poetry & music). Performances will be Sunday, February 16 at 4pm at Ebenezer Baptist Church, 157 West Springfield St., Boston (South End) and on Sunday, February 23 at 4pm at Charles Street AME Church, 551 Warren St., Roxbury. Free parking! Reception! Free-will offering. For more information, contact Ms. Scott: 508528-6326 / lcgmed@msn.com. Fun and Games in the 1700s Wednesday, February 19 and Friday, February 21, 10:30am – 12pm. For middling sorts of

families, like the Reveres, it did not matter that Colonial Boston contained few toy stores, for they could rarely afford such luxuries. Instead, children ingeniously turned to common household items for toys, games, and entertainment. Discover many adaptive uses for objects found in both historic and modern homes as you play games known and loved by generations of children. During a tour of the Revere House, children (and adults) search for beans, a thimble, straw, pieces of cloth and then try their hands at Snail, Jackstraws, and Beast-FishFowl and other popular colonial amusements. Participants will leave with directions for playing these and other games at home. Each presentation is limited to 20 people. Reservations are required and may be made by calling the Revere House at 617-523-2338. Fee: $4.50 for children ages 5-10, and accompanying adults. Price includes admission to the Revere House. On the Freedom Trail, in Boston’s historic North End, the Revere House was home to patriot and silversmith Paul Revere from 1770 to 1800. Revere left from the house in 1775 to begin the ride that Henry Wadsworth Longfellow immortalized in the poem, Paul Revere’s Ride. Built c. 1680, the Revere House is the oldest house in downtown Boston. For further information about the Revere House, please visit www.paureverehouse.org ParkSCIENCE Children’s Festival Thursday, F e b r u a r y 2 0 , 10am - 2pm. William Devine Golf Course Clubhouse, 1 Circuit Dr., Dorchester. Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the Boston Parks and Recreation Department invite families to the Franklin Park Golf Course Clubhouse for the ParkSCIENCE Children’s Festival. The free Festival will provide fun during February school vacation week with indoor and outdoor activities including science experiments and activities, sledding and snow shoeing, arts, crafts, games, and more. For further information, please call 617-635-4505. Petticoats at the Revolution Thursday, F e b r u a r y 2 0 , 12:15pm. Join us to hear a remarkable story of tea and Revolution from the woman who rode through life with Paul Revere. Actor and storyteller Joan Gatturna as Rachel Revere tells of the

Boston Tea Party, the Midnight Ride and the Siege of Boston through the eyes of a woman who kept the home fires burning while her husband fanned the flames of rebellion. The character of Rachel Revere was developed with assistance from the staff of the Paul Revere House. Included with admission: $6 for adults, $5 for seniors & college students, $1 for children (6-18); free for Old South Meeting House and Paul Revere House members. Old South Meeting House, Museum & Historic Site, 310 Washington St., Boston.

Ongoing Solidarity Works: Politics of Cultural Memory Solidarity Works explores how art and architecture can act as vehicles for community making, both real and imagined, and generate a sense of solidarity in contexts of conflict and crisis. Critical reflections on Islamic architecture and the politics of cultural memory are presented through multiple thematic clusters. Bridging art, architecture and history, Solidarity Works presents work in a variety of media, including textile, furniture, architectural sculpture, video, audio and networked productions. Featured is Aksamija’s prayer space design at the Islamic cemetery in Altach, Austria, winner of a 2013 Aga Khan Award. Wolk Gallery, MIT School of Architecture + Planning. Through March 21. For more information visit http://sap.mit.edu/resources/ galleries/wolk_gallery/. South Shore Chess Club 100% free and open to everyone, the SSCC meets Mondays 7-10pm at the Hough’s Neck Community Center, 1193 Sea St. Quincy. Play chess, learn chess, and make new friends. www. southshorechess. com, 857-888-1531, or southshore chess@gmail.com for more info. Toddler Drum Circle Toddler Drum Circle series with Cornell Coley will run every Saturday during the school year. 9:30-10:30am. Songs, stories, puppets, drumming and cultural info! Ages 1 – 4 yrs old! Spontaneous Celebrations, 45 Danforth St., Jamaica Plain. Contact: Cornell Coley www.afro latin.net 617-298-1790 cc@afrola tin.net. Cost: $8, $5 for sibling.

SEE MORE UPCOMING EVENTS ONLINE BayStateBanner.com/events

The Community Calendar has been established to list community events at no cost. The admission cost of events must not exceed $10. Church services and recruitment requests will not be published. THERE IS NO GUARANTEE OF PUBLICATION. To guarantee publication with a paid advertisement please call advertising at (617) 261-4600 ext. 7797 or email sandra@bannerpub.com. NO LISTINGS ARE ACCEPTED BY TELEPHONE, FAX OR MAIL. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Deadline for all listings is Friday at noon for publication the following week. E-MAIL your information to: calendar@bannerpub.com. To list your event online please go to www.baystatebanner.com/events and list your event directly. Events listed in print are not added to the online events page by Banner staff members. There are no ticket cost restrictions for the online postings.

B


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 27

Saar

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an exciting space to come up with ideas. It’s an opportunity for the artist to explore the work. You can make big, unwieldy things. It’s an opportunity to take some risks and you’re encouraged by the gallery to do so.

How do you name your sculptures?

I’m a huge fan of the thesaurus and I’m interested in punning, wordplay. Part of it is the African American tradition of slangs, playing with words. Word plays as in the blues traditions. All the work is a little dark and heavy and I try to add some levity to it.

Who or what has been an influence on your work?

Of course my parents and my mentor Dr. Samella Lewis. She was an instructor at Smith and she broadened my horizons.

In what way did she help to broaden your art and the way that you think about your work?

I studied African Art history as well as the art of the African diaspora with Dr. Lewis. She was also my advisor for my thesis on selftaught African American artists. Although I didn’t pursue a career in art, I feel these studies have a huge influence on my work as an artist.

Was there a moment growing when you knew that you wanted to be an artist?

It was something I always did growing up; being dragged around to installations. My mother was widely known. It was daunting. Initially, I was interested in being an art historian but

when I was getting my B.A. I realized that I wanted to make art instead of reading about art.

Taking kids when they’re really young and very often.

In the ‘80s I was invited to be part of an exhibit called “Art & Politics.” I never considered my work as political. It’s always been very personal. Sometimes, it’s a direct response to what’s going on in the media and in the world.

Film has always been important to me. My husband is a filmmaker. Reading. When you’re reading you’re present. The mind allows you to be fully there.

Is your work influenced Do you consider your work by film, television or pop political? culture in any way?

You talked about working with glass and the idea of “distilling down to an essence.” Can you describe in more detail your experience working with glass during your residency at Pilchuck Glass School?

Pilchuck invites artists without prior knowledge of glassmaking to come and explore the material with the help of skilled glass artists to create works in a variety of techniques. I was working with two gaffers in the hot shop. For some pieces I would draw an image of what I wanted and we would work together to get the right shape. For others I made molds of pieces, into which the glass was blown.

What do you hope that people take away from the exhibit, if anything?

Hopefully, calling people to arms and having their voices heard. The Massachusetts College of Art and Design’s Bakalar & Paine Galleries presents Alison Saar’s exhibit “STILL…” now through March 8. The galleries are free and open to the public Monday through Saturday, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Wednesdays 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. The galleries are closed on Sundays. For more information, please email galleryinfo@ massart.edu or call 617-879-7333.

Alison Saar comes from a prominent art family in California. Her father, mother and two sisters are all involved in the arts. Her father is German Scottish and her mother is African American and Irish. (Photo courtesy of Alison Saar)

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Does being a mother influence your work, and if so in what way?

I feel the work shifted when I had children in that I began to make the work more personal. I was also more interested in how motherhood has affected our lives as women and women of color, both historically and in the present.

Do you have any thoughts on how to expose kids to art, to make it more understandable?

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OTC

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that said: “CONTAINS ACETAMINOPHEN. ALWAYS READ THE LABEL.” The changes come against the backdrop more than 125 lawsuits against the company, with many plaintiffs claiming they suffered liver failure from taking Tylenol.

Sleep aids Despite the focus on acetaminophen, public health experts see safety problems with other OTC

medicines as well. Sleep aids are a big concern, especially among elders. Many of these drugs, like Nytol, Sominex and Unisom SleepGels contain diphenhydramine, a sedating antihistamine that can cause confusion, dizziness, and increase the risk of falls. Diphenhydramine is on the widely respected list developed by the late Dr. Mark Beers of 53 medications that medical experts contend seniors should not use. There’s little evidence showing these OTC pills actually improve sleep, the Gerontological Society of America says. At its National

Summit on Sleep Aids and Sleep Health in Older Adults last year, experts pointed out that neither diphenhydramine nor doxylamine, another key ingredient in these pills, has been put through the rigorous clinical trials that the government now requires. That’s because these drugs started being marketed before 1972, when the Food and Drug Administration launched its current regulations of over-the-counter medicines. Many believe that OTC medications are safe simply because they don’t require a prescription. The illusion of safety is hard to

(l-r) Chef Ming Tsai with NESN’s Dining Playbook producer and host Jenny Johnson and Boston Celtics forward Brandon Bass at a special community eveent about nutrition and fitness. (Matt West photo)

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13D2666DR

Divorce Summons by Publication and Mailing Juana Morris

vs.

Timothy Morris

To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for irretrievable breakdown of the marriage. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon: Juana Morris, 394 Harvard St, Dorchester, MA 02122-1223, your answer, if any, on or before 03/06/2014. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. Witness, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: December 19, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU14D0028DR

Divorce Summons by Publication and Mailing Nichole E Klemyk

vs.

Juanita Bruno

To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for irretrievable breakdown of the marriage pursuant to G.L. c. 208, Section 1 B. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon: Nichole E Klemyk, 39 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116, your answer, if any, on or before 03/27/2014. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. Witness, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 9, 2014 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU14P0114EA

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication Estate of Patrick Blair Cooke Date of Death: 12/20/2013 To all interested persons: A Petition has been filed by Ian T. Cooke of Acton, MA requesting that the

change, given the marketplace and government regulation. Advertising rules for prescription and OTC drugs, for instance, are completely different. Over-the-counter ads, which are regulated by the Federal Trade Commission, cannot include fraudulent or deceptive statements. That’s a far lower hurdle than the FDA’s rules for prescription drugs, which require company ads to have a fair balance of risks and benefits. As a result, death must be mentioned as a risk in ads for prescription drugs with acetaminophen, but not in ads for OTC acetaminophen products. There are about 300,000 OTC drugs currently on the market, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association says, and more than 700 prescription drugs have become OTC products since 1976, such as Benadryl, Prilosec and Zantac. There’s also a move underway to consider making some drugs available without a prescription. The FDA convened a meeting in 2012 to examine the possibility of selling prescription drugs OTC under certain so-called “conditions of safe use.” The prospect of opening the floodgates to even more OTC drugs makes some consumer advocates queasy. Michael Carome, director of Public Citizen’s Health Research

Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that Ian T. Cooke of Acton, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 02/20/2014. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 17, 2014 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU14P0034GD

Citation Giving Notice of Petition for Appointment of Guardian for Incapacitated Person Pursuant to G.L. c. 190B, §5-304 In the matter of Lyncott Price Of Mattapan, MA RESPONDENT Alleged Incapacitated Person To the named Respondent and all other interested persons, a petition has been filed by Peter Murfitt of Hyde Park, MA, Barbara Price of Roxbury, MA, in the above captioned matter alleging that Lyncott Price is in need of a Guardian and requesting that Austin Price of Mattapan, MA, Barbara Price of Roxbury, MA, (or some other suitable person) be appointed as Guardian to serve on the bond. The petition asks the court to determine that the Respondant is incapacitated, that the appointment of a Guardian is necessary, that the proposed Guardian is appropriate. The petition is on file with this court and may contain a request for certain specific authority. You have the right to object to this proceeding. If you wish to do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance at this court on or before 10:00 A.M. on the return date of 02/13/2014. This day is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline date by which you have to file the written appearance if you object to the petition. If you fail to file the written appearance by the return date, action may be taken in this matter without further notice to you. In addition to filing the written appearance, you or your attorney must file a written affidavit stating the specific facts and grounds of your objection within 30 days after the return date.

Group in Washington, D.C., worries that some patients are substituting OTC pills for needed medical exams. His group, as well as an FDA medical advisory panel, opposed the FDA’s decision last year to let Oxytrol for Women be sold over-the-counter to treat overactive bladder, which can be a symptom of bladder cancer or diabetes, he says. Some pharmacists are also warning the public of potential dangers. “You see a lot of strange things,” says Able Care’s Moustafa, who also visits senior centers, where residents bring all their drugs in a bag for him to examine. For instance, Moustafa has found people who incorrectly assume it is okay to take prescription Nexium along with OTC omeprazole – both designed to treat acid reflux. And he’s discovered many consumers mistakenly taking too many blood thinners simultaneously. Over and over, consumer advocates offer the same advice to keep patients safe: More is not better, always read drug labels, and don’t self-medicate for too long. “If you’re taking an over-thecounter medication and things are not improving after a few days, you should have a discussion with your doctor,” Bridgeport Hospital’s Ferrigno says. New America Media

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU14P0070EA

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication Estate of Boyzell Washington Date of Death: 08/08/2013 To all interested persons: A petition has been filed by Michael Washington of Waltham, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that Michael Washington of Waltham, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 02/13/2014. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 14, 2014 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU99P2590EA

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication Estate of Ebenezer Sealy, Sr. Date of Death: 10/06/1999 To all interested persons: A petition has been filed by Ebenezer Sealy, Jr. of Conyers, GA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of Adjuction of Intestacy & Determination of Heirs and for such other relief requested in the Petition.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 02/27/2014. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you.

The outcome of this proceeding may limit or completely take away the above-named person’s right to make decisions about personal affairs or financial affairs or both. The above-named person has the right to ask for a lawyer. Anyone may make this request on behalf of the above-named person. If the above-named person cannot afford a lawyer, one may be appointed at State expense.

The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration.

WITNESS, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 08, 2014 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 24, 2014 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 29

INVITATION FOR BIDS The Brookline Housing Authority, the Awarding Authority, invites sealed bids from general contractors for Col. Floyd Apartments – Community Space Accessibility Renovations, in Brookline, Massachusetts, in accordance with documents prepared by Kang Associates. The project includes renovations to a community kitchen, restrooms and laundry room. Construction costs are estimated to be $68,000.00. General Bids will be received until 2:00 PM, on Thursday, February 20, 2014, and publicly opened forthwith. All Bids shall be delivered to Brookline Housing Authority, 90 Longwood Avenue, Brookline, MA 02446 and received no later than the dates and times specified above. General Bids shall be accompanied by a bid deposit that is not less than five percent (5%) of the greatest possible bid amount (considering all alternates) and made payable to the Brookline Housing Authority. Bid Forms and Contract Documents are available by email as PDF files, free of charge, by sending a request to ccorrenti@brooklinehousing.org. The successful general bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and also a Payment Bond; each bond executed in the full amount of the contract price. Bids and the Contract are subject to the following requirements: M.G.L. Chapter 149, Sections 44A through J, Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, Equal Opportunity provisions of Executive Order 11246, NonDiscrimination provision of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Labor Standards provisions of the Davis-Bacon Act and related acts and Contract Work Hours Standards Act, and prevailing wage determinations as issued by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. The work performed under this contract is funded, through the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 and is subject to all provisions and regulations issued pursuant to this act. A briefing for Contractors bidding this work will be conducted at 28 Foster Street Extension, Brookline, MA at 11:00 AM on Wednesday, February 12, 2014. Attendance is strongly recommended but not required. The job site will be available for inspection immediately following the briefing. For information contact Carolyn Correnti at ccorrenti@brooklinehousing.org or 617-731-9551. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA CONTRACT NO. L1320-C1, SATELLITE FIRE STATION SANITARY TANK REPLACEMENT, LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2014 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10.00 AM LOCAL TIME ON WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2014. The work includes REPLACE EXISTING 10,000-GALLON UNDERGROUND SANITARY SEWER STORAGE TANK, RELATED PIPING, MONITORING SYSTEM, AND SURFACE PAD WITH NEW 10,000-GALLON DOUBLE-WALL FIBERGLASS UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK AND ANCHOR IT TO EXISTING CONCRETE ANCHOR PAD, INSTALL NEW INLET PIPING AND TANK MONITORING SYSTEM. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. The estimated contract cost is One Hundred Thirty Thousand Dollars ($130,000.00). A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $10,000,000.00. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. W188-C3, WORCESTER ARFF STATION, WORCESTER REGIONAL AIRPORT, WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS,

will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S - Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014 immediately after which, in a designated room, the proposal will be opened and read publicly.

A Contractor having fifty (50) or more employees and his subcontractors having fifty (50) or more employees who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will, within one hundred twenty (120) days from the contract commencement, be required to develop a written affirmative action compliance program for each of its establishments.

Sealed filed sub bids for the same contract will be received at the same office until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014, immediately after which, in a designated room, the filed sub bids will be opened and read publicly.

Compliance Reports - Within thirty (30) days of the award of this Contract the Contractor shall file a compliance report (Standard Form [SF 100]) if:

NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT WORCESTER REGIONAL AIRPORT, MAIN TERMINAL BUILDING, 2ND FLOOR CONFERENCE ROOM AT 9:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2014. The work includes:

(a)

The Contractor has not submitted a complete compliance report within twelve (12) months preceding the date of award, and

(b)

The Contractor is within the definition of “employer” in Paragraph 2c(3) of the instructions included in SF100.

The contractor shall require the subcontractor on any first tier subcontracts, irrespective of the dollar amount, to file SF 100 within thirty (30) days after the award of the subcontracts, if the above two conditions apply. SF 100 will be furnished upon request. SF 100 is normally furnished Contractors annually, based on a mailing list currently maintained by the Joint Reporting Committee. In the event a contractor has not received the form, he may obtain it by writing to the following address:

a.

Full abatement of all hazardous materials;

b.

Demolition of existing Control Tower and other demolition as shown on the Contract Documents;

c.

Expansion of building to accommodate new vehicle bays including all structural upgrades to accommodate fire fighting vehicles and equipment;

d.

Upgrade of all life/safety systems to code compliance;

e.

New shell space areas for future expansion;

f.

New windows and roofing system;

g.

Plumbing, Storm and sanitary upgrades as indicated;

h.

New interior layout and finishes for occupied areas.

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

i.

Exterior civil improvements as indicated for relocated vehicle bays and systems upgrades;

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY

j.

Upgrade tel/data and electrical systems for new interior layout and space use.

Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2014 Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of GENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. The estimated contract cost is $3,404,000. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract, filed Sub-bidders must submit with their bid a current Sub-bidder Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The filed Sub-bidder must be certified in the sub-bid category of work for which the Sub-bidder is submitting a bid proposal. Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44H inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $1,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. Filed sub bids will be required and taken on the following classes of work: ROOFING AND FLASHING

$140,000

METAL WINDOWS

$63,000

PAINTING $61,000 FIRE PROTECTION SPRINKLER SYSTEM

$117,000

PLUMBING $170,000 HEATING, VENTILATING, AND AIR CONDITIONING

$224,000

ELECTRICAL $355,000 The Authority reserves the right to reject any sub bid of any sub trade where permitted by Section 44E of the above referenced General Laws. The right is also reserved to waive any informality in or to reject any or all proposals and General Bids. This contract is subject to a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than 5.4 % of the Contract be performed by disadvantaged business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000.

Joint Reporting Committee 1800 G Street Washington, DC 20506

Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA CONTRACT NO. L1255-C1, TERMINAL C EXTERIOR PANEL REPLACEMENT, LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 021282909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: A PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 11:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2014. The work includes REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT OF EXISTING EXTERIOR PRECAST WALL PANELS WITH NEW EXTERIOR ALUMINUM COMPOSITE MATERIAL (ACM) PANELS ON A NEW COLD FORMED METAL FRAMING (CFMF) BACKUP WALL SYSTEM. THE WORK IS BEING UNDERTAKEN DUE TO DISPLACEMENT OF SOME OF THE EXISTING PRECAST PANELS NEAR THE NORTH CURBSIDE ENTRY TO TERMINAL C. THE PANELS RUN APPROXIMATELY 55’ WEST FROM THE FACE OF THE WINDOW WALL SYSTEM AT TERMINAL C, AND TERMINATE APPROXIMATELY 10’ NORTH AROUND THE CORNER OF THE ROOF TO PIER A. THE PANELS ARE APPROXIMATELY 16’ IN HEIGHT. ROOFING REPAIRS AND JOINT CAULKING WILL BE REQUIRED TO ACCOMPLISH THE WORK. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of GENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. The estimated contract cost is $260,000. Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44J inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $1,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. No filed sub bids will be required for this contract. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


30 • Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. A259-C2, CHP FUEL CONVERSION #6 TO #2, LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, BOSTON, MA, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE AND A SITE VISIT WILL BE HELD AT THE FACILITIES 1- CENTRAL HEATING PLANT, 550 TERMINAL ROAD, BOSTON, MA 02128 AT 10:30 AM LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014. The work includes CONVERSION OF CENTRAL HEATING PLANT BOILERS FROM #6 FUEL TO #2 FUEL; CLEANING AND DISPOSAL OF RESIDUE #6 FUEL IN EXISITNG SYSTEM; CLEANING OF EXISTING FUEL TANK INTERIOR; DEMOLITION OF THREE (3) EXISTING STEAM FUEL HEATERS AND ASSOCIATED OIL AND STEAM PIPING; REPLACING BURNER COMPONENTS ON (9) BURNERS, STARTUP AND TUNING OF BURNERS; PARTICIPATION IN COMMISSIONING ACTIVITIES. Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2014. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Assessment Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of MECHANICAL SYSTEMS. The estimated contract cost is TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS ($200,000). Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44J inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages

to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater.

The proposed work includes all nature of general building construction in Airport buildings. The estimated value of work to be performed by the Elevator and Escalator trade contractor is listed below:

The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $1,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details.

The Authority is implementing this project in accordance with MGL Chapter 149A, Sections 1 thru 13. This selection of trade contractors conforms to MGL Chapter 149A, Section 8, subsections (b) to (k) inclusive. This Request for Qualifications (RFQ) will be utilized to prequalify trade contractors capable and experienced in the building construction. The Authority shall utilize a two-step process including the prequalification of trade contractors based on an evaluation of the Statement of Qualifications received in response to this solicitation, followed by an Invitation to Bidders that will only be issued to the prequalified trade contractors. A Prequalification Committee consisting of four representatives, one each from the Designer and the CM at Risk and two Massport staff. This Prequalification Committee will be conducting a qualifications-based evaluation of submittals received from interested trade contractors in order to identify prequalified trade contractors who will be invited to respond to a written Invitation to Bidders.

No filed sub bids will be required for this contract. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NOTICE TO TRADE CONTRACTORS REQUEST FOR TRADE CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS The MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY is soliciting Statements of Qualifications from TRADE CONTRACTORS interested in performing work for MPA PROJECT NO. L1177-C2-4, CBIS RECAPITALIZATION/OPTIMIZATION, LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, EAST BOSTON, MA. The Authority is seeking Qualification Statements from Trade Contractors who have a demonstrated experience in the construction and implementation of similar work in terms of scale and complexity as required for this project at Logan Airport in East Boston. In accordance with Massachusetts construction manager at-risk requirements, MGL Chapter 149A, Section 44F, Qualification Statements are being requested at this time from Elevator / Escalator and Terrazzo trade contractors. The scope of work on the Project involves construction activities in all of the Terminals at Logan International Airport. Extensive interaction and coordination with the TSA and the airlines will be required. Construction of the Project commenced in July of 2012. The work on the Project will be completed prior to March of 2016.

Parker Hill Apartments The Style, Comfort and Convenience you Deserve!

Elevator and Escalator

$

750,000

Terrazzo

$

300,000

Please note that the Authority is not utilizing this process to prequalify subcontractors who are not trade contractors which shall be done separately in accordance with MGL C. 149A, Section 8, subsection (j). Qualification Statements shall be evaluated in accordance with the following criteria; (1) Management Experience; (2) Project References including a Public Project Record and (3) Capacity to Complete including a demonstration that the contractor has the financial stability and long-term viability to successfully implement the Project. A Supplemental Information Package that discusses these Evaluation Criteria and the Prequalification Process in more detail as well as any other requirements for the Qualification Statements will be available to interested parties beginning Wednesday, February 5, 2014, by contacting Michelle Arnold at 617-568-5978 or via email at marnold@massport.com. Seven (7) copies of a bound document each limited to 20 sheets (40 pages), exclusive of covers and dividers and resumes, which shall be limited to one page, shall be printed on both sides of the sheet (8 ½” x 11”) and shall be addressed to Mr. Houssam H. Sleiman, P.E., CCM, Director of Capital Programs and Environmental Affairs, and received no later than 12 Noon, Thursday, February 20, 2014, at the Massachusetts Port Authority, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, Suite 209S, Logan International Airport, East Boston, MA 02128-2909. Any submittal that exceeds the page limit set here or that is not received in the Capital Programs Department by the above deadline shall be rejected as non-responsive. Questions may be sent via email to CPBidQuestions@massport.com. In the subject lines of your email, please reference the MPA Project Name and Number. Questions and their responses will be posted on Capital Bid Opportunities webpage of Massport http://www.massport.com/doing-business/_layouts/CapitalPrograms/default.aspx as an attachment to the original Legal Notice and on Comm-PASS (www.comm-pass.com) in the listings for this project. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

OFFICE SPACE

Wollaston Manor

DORCHESTER/ MILTON

Senior Living At It’s Best

Heat and Hot Water Always Included Modern Laundry Facilities Private Balconies / Some with City Views Plush wall to wall carpet Adjacent to New England Baptist Hospital Secured Entry, Elevator Convenience Private Parking Near Public Transportation and much more ...

1st Class Office Space Corner of Gallivan Blvd and Washington St ample parking.

Available 1 bedroom $1600 Call Today for more details and to schedule a visit...

888-842-7945

91 Clay Street Quincy, MA 02170

A senior/disabled/ handicapped community

$375/mo. $695/mo. $1000/mo. $1395/mo.

0 BR units = $1,027/mo 1 BR units = $1,101/mo All utilities included.

heated

Call Sandy Miller,

OWNER

Property Manager

#888-691-4301

617-835-6373 Brokers Welcome

Program Restrictions Apply.

PUDDING HILL DEVELOPMENT

AFFORDABLE UNIT FOR AGE RESTRICTED ADULT HOMEBUYERS 1300 Square Feet Living Space 2 Bedrooms - 2 Baths First Floor Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Dishwasher

92% Efficient Radiant Gas Heat One Level Living Design Outside Private Deck Or Patio One Car Garage “Green” Building Standards

Applicants must meet income guidelines of $47,450/one person: $54,200/two persons and an asset limit of $75,000. (There is a $200,000 waiver if you own your own home now) All residents must be 55 years or older to qualify. Eligible applicants will be entered into a lottery. 70% preference will be given to people living or working in Marshfield. Applications are available at the Council on Aging, Marshfield Town Hall or the Marshfield Housing Authority, 12 Tea Rock Gardens, Marshfield, MA 02050. Tel. # 1-781-834-4333. An informational session will be held at the Council on Aging, Senior Center WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2014 AT 7:00 P.M. at 230 Webster Street, Marshfield. A Deed Restriction will be applied to all of these units, as these units must be maintained in perpetuity for applicants who are income & asset qualified. Applicants should be pre-approved for a mortgage. All applications are due before noon FEBRUARY 19, 2014 at the MARSHFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY, 12 TEA ROCK GARDENS MARSHFIELD, MA 02050, TEL. 781-834-4333

Selling price will be $173,300.

For more information, please call the Marshfield Housing Authority at 781-834-4333.

The Lottery for this development will be held at the Council On Aging Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. on FEBRUARY 26, 2014.


Thursday, February 6, 2014 • BAY STATE BANNER • 31

CHELSEA APARTMENT

4+ bdrms Newly renovated, 2000+ sq ft apt in 3 fam, no smkng/pets, hrdwd flrs, eat-in kit, pantry, lg master bedroom, din and lv rm, laundry rm, enclosed frnt/bck prchs, off street prkng, T access, min to Bost.

The United States Postal Service is currently hiring

Sec 8 OK

617-283-2081 HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY 13 AFFORDABLE CONDOMINIUMS

City Carrier Assistants

Johnson Woods (Phase II) 30 & 39 Taylor Drive, Reading

TO BE SOLD BY LOTTERY TO ELIGIBLE HOMEBUYERS

Salary: $15.30/hr Limited Benefits Available

(8) 2-Bed, 1-1/2- Bath Garden Style Condos $171,100; 1150 Apprx SF

Apply at: www.usps.com/employment

(5) 1 Bed, 1 Bath Garden Style Condo $153,100, , 1000 Apprx SF

The USPS is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Max income: 1 Person -$47,450 3 Persons - $61,000 2 Persons -$54,200 4 Persons - $67,750 Other Restrictions Apply

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

INFO MTG: Tues: 2/11/2014 6PM – 8PM (Walter S.) Parker Middle School, 45 Temple St., Reading Open House: Sat. 2/15/2014 12- 2PM 39 Taylor Drive, Apt. 1001

RECERTIFICATION SPECIALIST

Applications at: Reading Public Library | Reading Town Hall Or Write To: JTE Realty, P. O. Box 955, No. Andover, Ma. 01845 Or e-mail: johnson@jterealtyassociates.com

Tenants’ Development Corp., a South End tenant housing organization, seeks candidates for the position of Recertification Specialist. Candidates must have minimum 3 years HUD Section 8 and LIHTC certification experience; person must demonstrate strong resident relations and interpersonal skills must be detail oriented and organized, strong math skills, computer proficiency, Real Page/ One Site or similar software experience required. Pay range $15$20/hour. TDC offers an excellent benefits package. Email resumes to ahuggins@tenantsdevelopment.com. No phone calls please.

MAILING ADDRESS MUST BE PROVIDED 978-258-3492 Application Deadline Received by 3/21/2014

Equal Opportunity Employer

AFFORDABLE HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

For Elders 62 & Older

Dalrymple School 46 Grovers Ave Winthrop, MA 02152

Type

Rent

Application Deadline: February 24, 2014 Mail to: Jon Sills, Superintendent of Schools 97 McMahon Road, Bedford, MA 01730

% of Income

23

1 BR

Contract Rent

30%

4

0 BR

Contract Rent

30%

We’re on the Web: www.bedford.k12.ma.us Bedford is proud to be an Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer and a member of Empowering Multicultural Initiatives.

Maximum Income Limits per Household Size Household Size

30 %

50%

1

$19,800

$32,950

2

$22,600

$37,650

Applications may be picked up in person at: Winthrop Senior Center 35 Harvard Street Winthrop MA, 02152 Wednesday March 5th to Friday March 7th 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Or picked up in person or by telephone at: Metro Management Company 201 Sumner Street, East Boston, MA 02128 (617) 567-7755 Located just across from the Maverick T stop on the Blue Line. Weekdays, March 3rd to March 7th, 9:00 am to 4:30 pm. Evening hours, Thursday March 6th 6pm-8pm Saturday, March 8th, 9:00 am-12:00 pm Deadline for completed applications at the Metro Management address above: In person by 4 pm Friday March 28, 2014 or mailed and postmarked by that date SELECTION BY LOTTERY Use and Occupancy Restrictions apply. 5 units have a preference for households needing wheelchair accessible units. 3 units have a preference for households whose income meets 30% Income limits or less Projected Occupancy Summer 2014 For more information or reasonable accommodations call Jeff Buono, Metro Management 617-567-7755 Equal Housing Opportunity

Qualifications: • Master’s Degree (minimum) Advanced Degree (preferred) • Licensure as an Assistant Superintendent in Massachusetts • Minimum of 10 years of teaching and school administrative experience. Primary Responsibilities • Curriculum and Instruction, Coordination of District Data, Professional Development, and Grants Coordination Application packet must include: Letter of Application, Resume, 3 Letters of Professional Reference, College Transcripts, Proof of Massachusetts Licensure or eligibility.

*conversion of historical elementary school into 27 units of affordable housing for elderly residents* Developer: EBCDC, Inc. d/b/a Metro Management # of Units

Bedford is seeking an experienced, dynamic educational leader to serve as its Assistant Superintendent of Schools. The Assistant Superintendent will work with a staff and community committed to academic excellence in an environment that nurtures and respects individual differences. Qualified candidates will possess excellent communication, interpersonal and organizational skills. Bedford is a suburban community located 15 mines north of Boston. The district is comprised of four schools K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12 with a total enrollment of 2,507 students and a professional staff of 263. Highly competitive salary and benefits package effective July 1, 2014.

ADVERTISE YOUR CLASSIFIEDS WITH THE BAY STATE BANNER

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Bay State Banner 02-06-2014  

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