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inside this week:

Harvard-bound student credits BPS education pg 2

A&E pg 14

business news:

BLACK GIRLS ROCK! AWARDS FOUNDED BY DJ BEVERLY BOND RECOGNIZES ACHIEVEMENTS BY WOMEN OF COLOR

Catering business builds foundation for success pg 11

plus Woman In Gold tells story of portrait stolen by Nazis in 1938 pg 14 Thursday, April 9, 2015 • FREE • GREATER BOSTON’S URBAN NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1965 • CELEBRATING 50 YEARS

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Many ideas, no plan for Franklin Pk.

Olympics seen diverting attention from park’s needs By ELIZA DEWEY BANNER PHOTO

Cassandria Campbell and Jackson Renshaw run Fresh Food Generation, a food truck that aims to make healthy lunches affordable.

Dudley food truck rolls out

Local duo focuses on affordability, sustainability By ELIZA DEWEY

Every day around noon at business districts throughout the city, the perennial question arises: “What will I eat for lunch?” Dudley Square has a new answer to that all-important question with the arrival of the Fresh Food Generation food truck, which will roll into town three times a week. The truck, the brainchild of Cassandria

IF YOU GO The Fresh Food Generation truck will be out five days a week according to the following schedule: nD  udley Square: Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. nB  oston Medical Center (on Harrison Ave): Wednesdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. n City Hall: Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Campbell and Jackson Renshaw, sells fresh food with an eye toward affordability and food sustainability.

Together, the local duo — Campbell is from Roxbury, Renshaw from Somerville — is determined to increase healthy food options for their neighbors while tapping into local food sources.

Journey of an idea

Campbell says she first got the idea for the food truck three years ago after graduating from MIT with a degree in Urban Planning

See FOOD TRUCK, page 9

Franklin Park recently gained a spotlight as a key proposed venue in Boston’s Olympic bid. But long before the games were a topic of conversation, residents and community groups linked to the park were calling for changes that do not seem to overlap much with the proposals of Boston 2024, the private group behind the Olympic push. Boston 2024 designated Franklin Park as its first pick to host equestrian events and a decathalon relying on White Stadium and temporary structures on the golf course for a combined total of 70,000 added seats. Community groups and neighbors with long ties to the park, however, say that their ‘wish list’ for park improvements has always centered on issues of maintenance and management — which are exacerbated by the fact

that the park has not has a unified master plan since 1991.

Maintenance woes

Christine Poff, executive director of the Franklin Park Coalition, says that basic maintenance issues such as cracks and potholes in the park’s walking and biking paths have long gone unrepaired. “The park has suffered from neglect,” she says. FPC board member Corey Allen cites a few more needed improvements: tree-planting to maintain the wild sections (especially in the wake of this winter’s snow damage), better upkeep of historical landmarks and pathways that are more accessible for people with disabilities. He says that after people kept abandoning their broken-down cars there in the 1980s and ‘90s, the city erected a series of blockades to prevent drivers from

See FRANKLIN PARK, page 6

City planners take stock of Washington St. Residents see potential for development, displacement in J.P. By YAWU MILLER

Between Egleston Square and Forest Hills, Washington Street provides a series of vignettes that speak volumes about Jamaica Plain’s cultural and economic diversity: bodegas and Dominican restaurants, hipster bikes parked in front of the Canto 6 bakery, the Egleston Square YMCA, triple-deckers, large brick apartment buildings and bars that

still cater to the area’s dwindling working class. Last week, a team of city planners from across the United States viewed that economic and cultural diversity up close, walking the mile from Egleston to Forest Hills as part of a planning exercise aimed at generating ideas for development along the corridor. The tour group, members of the Urban Land Institute, then spoke in the Boston Redevelopment Authority Board Room to a group of

city officials and neighborhood activists about the area’s potential, calling for large, transit-oriented development projects near Forest Hills and smaller in-fill projects between Williams Street and Egleston Square. They called for a master plan to guide growth in the area. BRA director Brian Golden, who attended the meeting, said his agency will soon develop a master plan for

See WASHINGTON ST., page 19

BANNER PHOTO

Egleston Square Main Street Executive Director Luis Edgardo Cotto says market forces are threatening many long-time residents.


2 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

Harvard-bound student credits BPS education Hyde Park teen tells how teachers and a push from mom helped him aim high By ELIZA DEWEY

To those who know him, it is probably not surprising that local high schooler Ericardo Edwards was accepted to all fourteen colleges he applied to and is headed to Harvard in the fall. Edwards has dedicated his high school years to his studies — especially his favorite subjects, Italian and Latin — and his music as a clarinet- and saxophone-player in four different school bands. But he says Harvard wasn’t always a given for him. Edwards says a key moment in his growth happened while he was a student at Boston Latin School. He says that while in his early years there he “played things safely,” it was the intervention of an observant teacher that pushed him to challenge himself. “He told me I was doing myself a big injustice by not taking advanced math,” Edwards says. “I really respect my teacher for telling me that.” The push was enough to get him to sign up for a slew of advanced placement classes, which proved difficult due to the sudden onslaught but also helped

prepare him for future academic success. The teacher was one of many people Edwards says who helped him become a top-level student. “I didn’t grow up in a vacuum,” he says. “Children are a product of their environment, and I thank my mom a lot that my environment was very positive.” Edwards speaks glowingly of every school he’s attended, reaching back to the William H. Ohrenberger elementary school in Hyde Park. He continues his list of praises with a passionate defense of the William B. Rogers Middle School, which school officials recently decided to close in an effort to reel in ballooning costs. “I was very, very saddened by the Boston Public Schools even thinking about closing the Rogers, because they really set me up for success,” he says adding that he isn’t the only graduate of the school to go on to bigger and better things. “We’re all doing really well,” he says of his cohort. “We owe that to the Rogers, I can’t stop thanking them.”

Mother on a mission

It wasn’t easy getting him

into great schools, however, says Edward’s mother, Michelle Trail-Edwards. “Needless to say, [great schools] came with a price, because we never received any assistance, so I always paid higher rents to live in these better communities just so he could attend better schools,” she says. As a single mother, however, Trail-Edwards decided early on that she would not let anything stop her. “We were not going to yield to stereotypes of a child coming out of a broken home with a mom raising him,” she says. “I was determined to raise him the best that I can. We have a really tight family structure, and I really believe in the relationship between parents and teachers.” Her strong belief in school engagement in particular became a pillar of her son’s journey. She says she was sometimes the only parent at parent-teacher conferences, but that the effort paid off because the more she communicated with teachers, the more interest they showed in her son. And she is firm that she wanted the public school system in particular to get the job done.

BANNER PHOTO

Ericardo Edwards and Michelle Trail-Edwards speak with the Banner in Harvard Square “I was encouraged earlier on to sign him up for the Metco program, or to sign him up for the charter schools,” she says. “But I refused, because I believed that the Boston Public Schools is a great system, and I don’t feel that living in Boston and paying my taxes in Boston, I should have to send my child out to a suburban school to get a good education. I wanted to challenge the Boston Public Schools to give him a good education, and I am pleased to see the job that they have done with my child. I have no complaints, absolutely none.”

Funding a future

However, despite Edwards’ long list of colleges to choose from, there was a point even just recently when his future didn’t seem so clear. Despite the predictions of so many of his teachers, he only applied to Harvard after he had finished all his other applications because his mother pushed him to apply — he didn’t think he had a shot at the school. He initially had his heart set on another local university, but his hopes were dashed when it became clear that the school couldn’t offer him nearly enough financial aid. Just two weeks ago, he and his mother returned home from a meeting at that school in tears because the financial aid

package would have left them $26,000 short of tuition costs. It felt like he had gotten so close, only to fall short. Just a few days later, however, he got the notice from Harvard that he was accepted — with enough financial aid to make his dream a reality. So where will Edwards’ future lead? Unlike many rising freshmen, he has a clear answer of what he wants to do. He hopes to pursue global public health, which he finds fascinating for its interdisciplinary approach that he says provides “the most powerful way to tackle the spread of infectious diseases.” And he’s not headed off on his journey alone. He is excited to be going with a number of good friends, some of whom he has known since seventh grade. He describes his peers’ accomplishments, speaking excitedly of one girl who has worked on early-detection technology for cervical cancer and another Boston Latin alum a year older than him who is an award-winning saxophonist. “Are we even on the same wavelength?” he asks incredulously, surprised to find himself in the same cohort as his peers that he holds in such high esteem. He might not think so, but the Harvard admissions office certainly did.

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Do you have 2 hours each week to play with young homeless children (0-6) in one of our statewide shelter-based Playspaces? Are you fun-loving, dependable and looking for a way to make a difference in your neighborhood? Help a homeless child learn, play, and thrive:

horizonschildren.org/playspace | 617.553.5488 Upcoming volunteer training: Saturday, April 25, 2015 9:30am - 3:30pm - Roxbury, MA

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Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 3

Report highlights giving power of Boston blacks By ELIZA DEWEY

When the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston released a study earlier this month showing extremely low levels of wealth among the city’s black and Latino residents, it came as a sobering wake-up call. However, a report on black philanthropy in Boston released last week highlighted a different story about black-led philanthropic efforts to drive social change. The report, released by New England Blacks in Philanthropy and conducted by Dr. Ange-Marie Hancock of the University of Southern California, examined the philanthropic giving habits of blacks in Boston and called for efforts to more effectively coordinate black giving in Boston for better impact. The study was conducted over the course of 18 months and involved 300 participants in a mix of in-depth interviews, an online survey, and three focus groups. While previous research had highlighted the level of philanthropic giving among blacks, this study sought to provide a deeper dive into questions of where blacks are giving their money, how they make decisions about giving, and how their donorship could be better leveraged for greater impact. “We were seeking to understand not only what our community thinks about philanthropy, but also how people engage,” said NEBIP president Bithiah Carter at the report’s launch last Thursday.

A diverse range of interests

The report answered those questions in part by tracing a pattern among survey constituents who explained their motivations for giving. It found respondents generally fell into one of three groups of givers — those who gave to organizations based on subject area (like the arts or cancer research); those who gave to organizations based on their service of the black community in particular; and those who gave primarily to their faith communities. Significantly, the study found that black giving was not as tied to the church as many people assumed. While most respondents said they thought that church giving was the center of black philanthropy, almost half (48 percent) of survey respondents said they did not attend nor give

to religious institutions regularly. The study also found a wide range between the percent of disposable income that was donated to various types of causes: extended family members and friends (31 percent), religious institutions (25 percent), direct service, educational institutions and arts (between 16 and 18 percent each), and political campaigns and advocacy groups (13 percent each).

information from charitable organizations about their effectiveness and real-world impact and (4) more educational resources — such as online videos and webinars — on financial literacy and charitable giving that could help people plan their donations in a more intentional and effective manner. Bruce Bickerstaff, Chairman

of the Roxbury Trust Fund, said he found the report to be a useful launch pad for change, stressing the importance of philanthropy to catalyze social and political change in Boston’s communities of color. “We have to recognize our wealth to leverage it and get interest in our communities in a way that is reciprocal,” he said. He used the example of a sneaker store being built in a community to illustrate the kind of development that does come to neighborhoods like Roxbury but that does not do much to transform the community. “We have to articulate and

demand some reciprocity,” he said. “Other ethnic groups have done it in their own ways.” Both the report and comments at the launch event highlighted a popular desire to have some “tough conversations” on several hot-button topics, including the considerable ethnic diversity within black Boston and divisions along generational, class and education lines. In response to these concerns, the report called for an effort to connect across such divisions to “transition from a diversity game of ‘just faces in the room’ to an equity game of ‘having the power to change policy and make decisions.’”

Missed opportunities

The finding that seemed to resonate most with audience members at the launch centered on organizations’ failure to fully tap into black donorship. The study found a gap between many donors’ desire to be more strategic in their giving and the way that organizations — black and mainstream alike — fail to capitalize on that desire due to lack of research and tracking of outcomes. For instance, one respondent reported giving a large donation to a university, only to receive a solicitation the next year asking for just $25 – a missed opportunity on the university’s part. Chandra Anderson, who was at the report’s launch and is president and CEO of New York-based Anderson Consults, agreed. “Consistently cultivating relationships with major donors is a major challenge for smaller non-profit organizations, particularly community-based organizations for people of color,” she said. “Organization leaders must be equipped with strong donor outreach skills and encouraged to spend more time cultivating donors.” While one panelist, Ms. Benaree Wiley of The Wiley Group, said she felt the opposite — that she was being solicited too much — she noted that the issue might be that the same people are asked for donations over and over. Dr. Hancock said that was precisely the case. “The circle of giving is not being expanded,” she said.

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Dr. Ange-Marie Hancock speaks at the release of Giving Black:Boston, a study on black giving in Boston commissioned by New England Blacks in Philanthropy

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Looking forward, the report identified several key needs within black philanthropic circles: (1) a kind of information clearinghouse of quality organizations in Boston that focus on the needs to black residents; (2) better education among organizations on the collective giving habits of black donors and more intentional relationship-building with donors. (3) more thorough

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4 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

EDITORIAL

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Established 1965

Race: A diversion from America’s real problems For a few days recently the airwaves were abuzz with speculation about the proposal by Howard Schultz, chairman of Starbucks, to have servers initiate a conversation on race with customers through its “Race Together” campaign. While it is unlikely that people will be willing to engage in conversation on such a controversial subject first thing in the morning, there are also other problems with the approach. Of course Schultz is correct to be deeply concerned about the state of race relations in America. The antagonism between black men and the police could lead to a heightened level of violence. Resolution of the conflict should be a major national priority. One advantage that exists now and was unavailable earlier is an expanding interest in genealogy. Scientists have now established that we all belong to the same species — Homo sapiens. Each person has an estimated 20,000 genes. There will be varying structures of chromosomes within the genes, but the genetic pattern establishes our racial homogeneity. There is little scientific basis for identifying racial differences because of variations in the chromosomes. The fundamental truth seems to be that race and racism have no biological basis. Confirmed racists will not likely accept the truth of these conclusions, just like some conservatives deny the reality of global warming. However, thoughtful people will have to wonder how they were deceived for so long into believing that racial superiority is valid. The concept of racial inequality was once an effective salve for the conscience of Christians who found it financially attractive to engage the services of slaves on their plantations. The delusion was that the supposedly inferior slaves were better off to be away from the Dark Continent and be present in a more civilized part of the world. Only the affluent could afford slaves. Even

after overt slavery violated the law, there was still an advantage in continuing the ruse of black inferiority. The oligarchs could placate impoverished whites by assuring them that they are good white brothers and are certainly superior to the blacks. However, this line could be maintained effectively only as long as segregation and racial discrimination were legally permissible. The breech in the theory of white supremacy first came in sports. In the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Jesse Owens defeated the great Aryan hope. After Jackie Robinson entered professional baseball in 1947, the prowess of Robinson and subsequent black players became readily apparent. Unfortunately, the competence of African Americans in those fields requiring intellectual acuity is not always so similarly obvious. The myth of the racial inferiority of blacks seems to be enough to generate white hostility. There is no historical record of a general assault by blacks against whites or the seizure of their property. But the racial conflict enables the oligarchs to take advantage of most whites with impunity. Do the math! n A disproportionate share of the nation’s wealth is held by 1 percent of the population — 62 percent of the U.S. citizens are white. Therefore, almost all whites are 99 percenters. n The number of whites below the poverty line is almost twice the number of blacks who are poor — 19.8 million whites to 10.3 million blacks. n In the past five years, more than 16 million uninsured Americans, many of whom are white, have gained health insurance, from an Obamacare that is despised by so many whites. Schultz is right. Americans should begin to talk diplomatically with one another to discover a way to end this debilitating racial conflict for the good of the country. Now we can start with the knowledge that we all belong to the one human race.

With a new Mayor of Boston, a soon-to-be-new CEO of the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and a rebounding economy, the timing is fortuitous for a renewed effort to diversify the mostly white, mostly male leadership ranks at the highest level of Boston’s corporations (“City’s diversity officer lays groundwork for inclusion,” April 2). Mayor Marty Walsh has taken an important step in following through on his pledge to establish an Office of Diversity, which is focusing primarily on the city’s own workforce and

NEWS BRIEFS ……………………………………........................ 7-8 BUSINESS NEWS ………………………………...................... 11-12 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT …………………...................... 14-16 COMMUNITY CALENDAR …………………........................ 18 BOSTON SCENES …………………..................................... 13 CLASSIFIEDS ……………………………………......................20-23

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vendors doing business with the city. Incoming Chamber of Commerce CEO Jim Rooney has been speaking about the need to respond to the changing demographics of our region, specifically mentioning the generation shift from Baby Boomers to Millennials and our increasing racial diversity. I suggest they work with the Commonwealth Compact, a group I was involved with during its first two years, to establish a renewed, vigorous and creative effort to really “move the needle” on leadership. The Compact established a detailed numeric Benchmarks Initiative to measure employers’

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Expanding diversity

“They say my problem is with the blacks, but blacks aren’t the ones foreclosing on my home”

progress in response to a 2007 survey by the McCormack Graduate School at UMass-Boston that reported an overwhelming proportion of white males on boards of directors. As they say, timing is everything. The economy is expanding and companies are hiring. Boston is not a backwater community; we have plenty of talented and educated people of all racial and ethnic backgrounds. Let’s seize this moment in time and make developing a culture of inclusion in the C-suite environment one of our priorities. — Jeff Stone Milton

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Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 5

OPINION THE BANNER WELCOMES YOUR OPINION: EMAIL OP-ED SUBMISSIONS TO YAWU@BANNERPUB.COM • Letters must be signed. Names may be withheld upon request.

OPINION

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Free speech hypocrisy

What do you think should be done to build more wealth in the Roxbury community?

By LEE A. DANIELS

This winter the media’s been ablaze with stories about racist, homophobic and sexist slurs being hurled this way and that by college students and other adults. Revealingly, those that have captured the most attention all involve black Americans as the targets of the racist speech or action: the members of the University of Oklahoma chapter of one prominent white fraternity singing a racist ditty that referenced lynching a black man; the sexist slur hurled against adolescent baseball star Mo’Ne Davis by a college baseball athlete; and the attempt by the Sons of Confederate Veterans, of Texas to force that state to produce a license plate with their symbol, the Confederate Battle Flag, on it. This latest effort by Confederate sympathizers to obscure the racist rebellion’s ineradicable stain of “treason in the defense of slavery,” as one analyst wrote, has reached the U.S. Supreme Court, which heard oral arguments on the case last week. The controversies have provoked a growing volume of commentary and opinion columns. Most declared that, while offensive speech and ideas are despicable, they must be tolerated in the name of freedom of expression: so that society can benefit in the shortand long-term from the free flow of ideas. I’m a free-speech advocate myself. But in recent years, whenever these free-speech controversies have burst into the open, I’ve increasingly noticed some important things missing from the general run of commentary and opinion columns. For one thing, I don’t see them grappling with the question of “why” those who spout the slurs do so. For example, shouldn’t we be examining why a group of white college students, most of whom come from middle-class and uppermiddle-class families, would gleefully traffick in expressions of racism? And why a white college baseball player would feel the need to use a slur of sexual degeneracy against Mo’Ne Davis, the 14-year-old black American girl whose athletic prowess and off-the-field poise has won her well-deserved national attention? Why should any public entity sanction the lies Confederate sympathizers continue to spout? The Confederacy’s own documents — among them, the Confederate Constitution of 1861, and the individual ordinances of secession of each of the Confederate states — make clear its driving force was the maintenance and expansion of its slave empire. If states that have these revenue-generating vanity-plate programs must open them to Confederate sympathizers, must they also accept the requests of drivers who want plates bearing the flags of other systems of extraordinary evil — such as the Nazi flag, or the flag of ISIS — too? Part of what’s bothering me is that when these controversies explode, I don’t see the fierce condemnation of the values of the wrongdoers — and their parents, neighborhoods and entire racial group that’s standard procedure whenever some black youth has done something wrong. Instead, I see many free speech advocates rush right past any consideration of the pain the offensive words cause to loftily order the individual and the group targets of the hate speech to “ignore it” or “be better than” the bigots. In doing so, they deliberately ignore the reality that the old saying ‘sticks and stones may break your bones but words can never hurt you’ has always been only partially true. Black American history is replete with many tragic episodes of racist slurs used to provoke and sustain racist violence. And now, the virulent online expressions of hatred against women whom misogynists feel are too assertive underscore the fact that sometimes offensive speech isn’t just “expression.” Sometimes it’s used as a weapon to intimidate its target into silence. As I said, I’m a free speech advocate. But we ought to recognize that until a half-century ago, whites, North and South, united in using speech and other forms of expression to deprive Americans of color of their right to free speech and other markers of citizenship. That schizophrenic stance that marked most whites’ attitudes toward freedom of expression speech then suggests we today should simultaneously both accept in general terms the value of freedom of expression and yet also be prepared to challenge the claim that all offensive speech automatically deserves protection under its shield. And, in order to shed the taint of hypocrisy, free speech advocates ought to more thoroughly expose the bigots who hide behind that noble idea and discuss the damage their words do.

Lee A. Daniels is the author of Last Chance: The Political Threat to Black America (2008). His new collection of opinion columns, Race Forward: Facing America’s Racial Divide in 2014, is available at www.amazon.com

More cooperative enterprises. I think people are isolated and don’t realize how they can pool resources to build economic power.

Education. Education is the new currency for the world. If you have no education, you’re going nowhere in life.

Carmela Zakon

Donald

We have to create jobs and we have to own our own homes.

Kim Jane

Student Somerville

Business Owner Canton

Community Activist Roxbury

We need more homeownership and more economic development. These things contribute to wealth.

We have to have access to resources — primarily education. We need to own our own homes and remain in this community.

More opportunities and better-paying jobs for the people who live in the community.

Frank Williams

Stephona Stokes

Jerome Walker

Manager Roslindale

Barber Roxbury

ton Travel Basketball and Milton National Little League. The Cooperative Bank has office locations in Roslindale,

West Roxbury and Charlestown and specializes in commercial real estate and business lending throughout Massachusetts.

Administrator Roxbury

IN THE NEWS

MIGUEL ROSADO Miguel Rosado has joined The Cooperative Bank as Senior Vice President and Senior Commercial Lender. Previously, Rosado worked at several large commercial banks including US Trust and Citizens Bank. Most recently, he was a Commercial Lender at East Cambridge Savings Bank. In his new position, he will oversee Cooperative Bank’s Commercial Lending division. “I started in community banking and I’m excited to be back at a community bank,” says Rosado. “Community banks can have a major impact on local businesses and their growth.” “The Cooperative Bank has an outstanding reputation as a resource for local businesses we plan to expand our role in helping businesses thrive,” he said. Rosado and his wife Vanessa live in Milton with their two sons. He has been involved for many years with Milton’s youth sports programs including Mil-


6 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

Franklin Park continued from page 1

entering. Now, however, those blockades present a problem. “Certain parts of the park are not accessible for people with walkers and wheelchairs,” he says. “We need to make sure we are ADA [Americans with Disabilities Act] compliant.” When asked if he thinks the city is being cooperative, Allen answers, “To the credit of the Parks Department, I know that nothing good is ever instant. The folks there have been engaged.” Parks Department spokesperson Ryan Woods emphasized that in recent years the city and private funders have made significant financial investments in Franklin Park. Such projects have included annual renovations to the golf course and overhauls of the park’s three playgrounds (American Legion playground is still under construction). Woods says the city has also begun work on the pathways, starting with a section deemed a priority by community members, and that the city has pledged a new commitment to the woodland areas for future improvements. “We look forward to investing regularly in this park, as it needs improvements,” he concluded.

No unified plan

Despite some investments, however, park advocates say that the main source of problems is a lack of central planning for the

S-L

expansive space. Franklin Park does not have a singular “master plan” to coordinate the various city departments and law enforcement entities that lay claim to it. For instance, an assortment of security entities oversee various parts of Franklin Park: the Boston Park Rangers, three different Boston Police Districts (B-2, B-3 and E-13), the State Police, and the zoo’s security. “Police themselves often don’t know their jurisdiction when it comes to the park,” Poff says. She says the management issue has manifested in programming conflicts that cause the park further damage. For instance, the cross-country races held in the park each fall do not really serve the needs of nearby residents. “They’re not community people,” she says. “And there hasn’t been any arrangement yet where they contribute anything to the park.” Poff notes that the races take a toll on the park as runners erode paths and often leave trash behind. The push for a unified park plan dates back to the FPC’s earliest days. Louis Elisa, one of the organization’s founding members, says the conversations on the matter have been long and fruitless. “They’ve been working on a Master Plan literally for 20 years,” he says, referring to city officials. Elisa says that at least 15 meetings have occurred about the idea, spanning from the 1990s up to just last year, which he attended on behalf of the Garrison Trotter Neighborhood Association.

As a result, he says that while the challenges facing the park have been mitigated in some way since the 1980s and 1990s, he still sees the current FPC board fighting a lot of the same battles of old. “The overall maintenance of the park is pretty shabby,” he concludes. The last master plan for the park was done in 1991 and has not been formally updated since then. A draft management plan was also created in 2005. Parks Department spokesperson Ryan Woods told the Banner by email that the city agrees in the need for better coordination. “Mayor Walsh and the Parks and Recreation Department are interested in working with the community to update that plan,” he says. “We hope to have it funded in a future budget.”

Olympic vision

So what about claims that the Olympic bid can get all the relevant parties to the table and force them to develop a solution on a strict deadline? Not everyone is opposed, but people aren’t ready to give their unconditional support, either. Local residents raised a host of concerns about the games’ longterm legacy at a public meeting at the Franklin Park golf course in early March. Some raised questions about who would maintain the Olympic pool after the games. Laura Oggeri, spokesperson for the Mayor, told the Banner that a permanent pool would only be built if there were plans and

Service-Learning Program Spring 2015

Network Exchange ideas Broaden horizons Over 50 Northeastern Students are partnered with more than 5 organizations in the neighborhoods of JP and Mission Hill America SCORES n BalletRox Ethos HOME Inc. n Hyde Square Task Force Little Brothers n Playworks n YMCA of Greater Boston Come and Learn more! April 23rd 10:00am-11:30am Fenway Center at Northeastern 77 St. Stephen St. Boston, MA F A RT S, MEDIA AND DESIGN | JAMAICA PLAIN | COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANIT IES | ROX BURY |

LLEGE OF ENGINEERING | FENWAY / K ENMORE | BOUV E COLLEGE OF HEALT H SCIENCES | SOUT H END | COLLEGE OF SCIENCE | EAST

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Story time with the mayor

MAYOR’S OFFICE PHOTO BY ISABEL LEON

Mayor Martin Walsh reads to children in the Pre-K section of the Roxbury YMCA.

funding for ongoing future maintenance, and reiterated that specifics on venue locations will be finalized by the ongoing public process. Jaime Rodriguez, who lives in Jamaica Plain, walks in the park every day. “I don’t mind [the bid proposal] as long as the community is involved in the process and all the decision-making,” he says. However, he adds another key demand: “The park has to be open all the time for the community. I don’t see why they have to close the park to prepare.” If Boston wins the bid, Boston 2024 officials have said that the golf course could be closed for a month and White Stadium and the surrounding fields could be closed for up to a year to prep for the game. The FPC has not yet released its official stance on the Olympic proposal, saying key unanswered questions remain about the impact on the park and the games’ long-term legacy. The group mailed out a letter to Boston 2024 earlier this week asking for more concrete answers. Reverend Jeffrey Brown, who does community outreach for Boston 2024, says he thinks the Olympics propose an opportunity for park improvement. “I don’t think the desires of community members are out of sync with Boston 2024,” he says. He says that some of the main takeaways he gathered from the March meeting at Franklin Park were the concerns that neighbors had about the park’s overall condition, the walking paths, and the question of what to do about White Stadium.

White Stadium

One of the pillars of Boston 2024’s proposal for Franklin Park is White Stadium, where they hope to build an additional 10,000 in temporary seating. The group’s bid documents assume that the stadium will be fully upgraded by then, saying “a renovation and

expansion is currently planned to return White Stadium to its former glory.” That assumption is based on a 2013 proposal floated by John Fish, Chairman of Boston2024 and CEO of Suffolk Construction, to upgrade the space for use by his non-profit, Boston Scholar Athletes. The plan was for Suffolk and the city to split the cost of the $45 million project. That proposal did not go over well with everyone. Elisa says he strongly opposed it. “The answer from our side as the Garrison Trotter Neighborhood Association was ‘No thank you,’” he says. “We don’t want any privatization of anything in the park.” The stadium has several public uses, including fall and spring school sports, summer events such as the Caribbean Carnival’s annual Kiddie Carnival, and offices for the Boston Public Schools athletic department. Poff recalls the public discussion on the stadium upgrade proposal as “a tough meeting.” Her group never formed an official stance on the proposal because it was still in the discussion phase when the project stalled last year. The Mayor’s office blames rising costs for the project as the reason for the stall and says that the project will be reviewed before the start of the new fiscal year in July just like all city projects. Poff says an Olympic bid may indeed fast-track upgrades to White Stadium. “If the Olympics goes through, it sounds like that project is an automatic,” Poff says of the stadium renovations. “But that brings us up short because we didn’t get to go through a process. It may be a great thing, but we don’t know that because [the presentation] was all so conceptual.” But she adds as a final caution: “We are concerned about Franklin Park being seen as a piece of real estate, rather than a public park.”

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Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 7

Committee adopts living wage standards, rejects union rule By YAWU MILLER

The Roxbury Strategic Master Plan Oversight Committee voted Monday to adopt a plan that would require developers building on publicly-owned land in Roxbury to commit to so-called living-wage standards for construction workers and for permanent jobs created by new construction projects. The body rejected by a narrow vote a proposal to require new businesses on publicly-owned parcels to commit to card-check neutrality — a provision requiring employers to commit to not blocking employees’ right to unionize. The committee’s refusal to back the card-check provision appeared to be aimed at protecting the Parcel 9 development team, which seeks to develop a hotel and retail space at the corner of Melnea Cass Boulevard and Washington Street. At past meetings, members of the development team said the provision would kill their deal. The committee’s rejection of the card check provision sparked an

uproar among the audience, which was packed with labor activists from across the city, and opposition from elected officials, who are non-voting members of the body. At times the meeting descended into shouting matches, with one audience member threatening to fight committee chairman Norman Stembridge. Union activists and community members in support of the “good jobs provision” frequently shouted down committee and audience members who questioned the ordinance. Many good jobs provision supporters said they feared a lack of well-paying jobs would accelerate displacement of Roxbury low-income residents. “What’s happening here is ethnic cleansing of people of color,” said Stephona Stokes, a Roxbury native who lives in Roslindale. “What’s happening here is no different from what’s happening in Chinatown and East Boston.” Roxbury resident Rodney Singleton, however, said paying higher wages to construction workers would not necessarily help low-income people remain in Roxbury,

noting that buyers need an income of at least $100,000 to buy a home in Roxbury. “We’re fighting over the wrong thing,” he said. “A housing unit in Roxbury costs $400,000 to build. That’s a fact. Anyone making $14 to $18 can’t buy housing in Roxbury.” Roxbury developer Fred Fairfield, a longtime union member, said unions should be required to “open their doors to Roxbury residents” before the committee adopts language on card-check neutrality. The living wage guidelines the committee adopted, drafted by

a coalition called the Roxbury/ Dorchester Campaign for Good Jobs, require developers to commit to a construction workforce that is 51 percent people of color, 51 percent Boston residents and 15 percent women. The ordinance also calls for what organizers say is a living wage for all permanent jobs created on publicly-owned parcels of land. Those wages would start at $13.89 an hour in 2015 and rise to $16.89 an hour by 2017. The guidelines would apply to the eight parcels of publicly-owned land overseen by the Roxbury Strategic Master Plan Oversight Committee. The Oversight Committee was established after the completion of the Roxbury Master Plan, a years-long process through which neighborhood residents, elected and city officials and representatives of major

institutions in and around Roxbury agreed on development guidelines for vacant parcels of publicly-owned land. The master plan that community members ultimately signed off on calls for the development projects that spur job growth, housing and economic growth in Roxbury. Under the living wage standards adopted by the Oversight Committee, businesses would be required to maintain a permanent jobs workforce that is 51 percent people of color, 51 percent Boston residents and 51 percent women. Businesses would be required to maintain at least 75 percent of all jobs at fulltime levels with benefits. Committee members expressed support for the measures, and voted to forward them to the Walsh administration with a request that they be implemented city-wide.

NEWSBRIEFS Walsh announces appointments to boards and commissions Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced he has made 39 appointments to 12 City of Boston and Massachusetts boards and commissions in the first quarter of 2015. The appointees bring diverse expertise and backgrounds to their positions. The Mayor has appointing authority to more than 60 boards and commissions, which advise on policy and the administration of funding and services across a number of areas. “We rely on boards and commissions to review policy and guide decision making on initiatives that move the City of Boston forward,” said Mayor Walsh. “I have the utmost confidence in all of these appointees, and want to thank them for their service.” Appointments from January 1, 2015 - March 31, 2015: Animal Control Commission: Agnes Chang, Brighton; Alexandra Lopez-Cuadra, Brighton; Carrie Marie Marsh, Roxbury; Chayla White, South End; Gino Provenzano, South Boston; Jean Weber, Roslindale; Jennifer Evans, South End; Kit Lilly, Cambridge; Maryann Regan, Kingston; Ryan Hawkins, Dorchester; Skott Wade, Dorchester; Laura Gretch, Back Bay; Felix Arroyo, Jamaica Plain Boston Cultural Council, Daniel McCole, South Boston; Matt McArthur, Roxbury Boston School Committee, Miren Uriarte, Jamaica Plain Boston Water and Sewer, Michael Woodall, West Roxbury City of Boston Scholarship Fund Committee, Craig Galvin, Dorchester Commission for Persons with Disabilities Advisory Board, Moses Mallard, Allston Community Ombudsman Oversight Panel, Larry Mayes, Hyde Park; The Honorable Regina Quinlan, Charlestown

Living Wage Advisory Committee, Darlene Lombos, Jamaica Plain; Father James A. Flavin Jr., South Boston; Katherine Belgard, Dorchester Massachusetts Port Authority Community Advisory Committee, Darryl Pomicter, Beacon Hill; David Manning, South Boston; Erica Mattison, Dorchester; Karen Buttiglieri, East Boston; Mary Berninger, East Boston; Maura Zlody, Fenway Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, Austin Blackmon, West End Neighborhood Jobs Trust, C o u n c i l o r Ma r k C i o m m o , Brighton Residency Policy Commission, Anise Vance, Jamaica Plain; Denise Williams-Harris, Dorchester; Eileen Boyle, Dorchester; Councilor Michael Flaherty, South Boston; Councilor Tito Jackson, Roxbury; Molly Maloney, Beacon Hill; Vivian Leonard, Hyde Park. In February 2015 Mayor Walsh announced that Boston would begin taking applications from the general public for open seats on Boards and Commissions, to give everyone in Boston an opportunity to serve, or at least, inquire to serve the City in this capacity. Those in search of more information will be able to find vacancies at http://www.cityofboston.gov/ boardsandcommissions/. Most of these are volunteer positions, and most require monthly meetings.

United Housing Management, LLC sponsors education program United Housing Management’s Neighborhood Network Center in Dorchester has been selected to host the first Children’s Defense Fund Freedom Schools® program in Boston — one of three in Massachusetts. As a site

See NEWS BRIEFS, page 8

BANNER PHOTO

Members of the Roxbury Strategic Master Plan Oversight Committee deliberate over a policy that calls for living wage standards on projects developed on city-owned land.

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8 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

Come Brunch with Brother Kinney Saturday, April 11, 2015 12:00 noon – 3:00 p.m. Roxbury YMCA Martin Luther King Blvd., Roxbury, MA $35.00 per person All proceeds to benefit Bro. Kinney’s kidney transplant aftercare. Cannot attend, please make your donation to www.helphopelive.org

Hosted by: Brother Kinney Fundraising Committee “If everyone does a little, no one has to do a whole lot!”

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NEWSBRIEFS

News briefs continued from page 7

sponsor, the Neighborhood Network Center becomes a member of the network of organizations across the country utilizing Children’s Defense Fund’s innovative youth summer learning model. The framework is built around the theme: I can and must make a difference in myself, my family, my community, my country and my world. From July 6 – August 14, 2015, the program will serve fifty families living in and around United Housing Management properties. The Neighborhood Network Center CDF Freedom Schools site will be located at Christian Science Church 33 Elm Hill Ave. Dorchester, MA. Since 1995, over 125,000 children and families have been touched by the CDF Freedom Schools program experience. In summer 2014, CDF Freedom Schools sponsor partners served over 12,700 children in 107 cities, 28 states and Washington, D.C. The program, modeled closely after the Freedom Schools of the 1960’s , focuses on promoting the love of reading, cultural enrichment, and community engagement through an integrated reading curriculum. The model has garnered accolades from the likes of Dr. Cornel West, Tavis Smiley, and current US Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan. Applications are available at the Neighborhood Network Center, 402 B Blue Hill Avenue, until April 10, 2015. For additional information, contact Cathy Draine, UHM Resident Services Coordinator/Neighborhood Network Center CDF Freedom Schools Executive Director: cdraine@uhmgt.com. United Housing Management, LLC provides professional property management services. Founded in 2003, the Dorchester based company currently manages a portfolio of over 1700 units throughout greater Boston.

National Park Service announces spring tours schedule at Brookline’s Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, located at 99 Warren Street in Brookline, begins its spring public hours on Friday, April 10. The site is offering regular tours of the historic Olmsted design office and Olmsted-designed grounds on Fridays and Saturdays at 10:00, 11:00, 1;00, 2:00, and 3:00. The tours take roughly 45 minutes, and admission is free. In addition, visitors are welcome to view self-guided exhibits on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm and Fridays and Saturdays from 9:30 am to 4:00 pm. For further information on Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, on-site tours, and other programs, please visit www.nps.gov/ frla or call 617-566-1689 Monday through Saturday. The site is a 15-minute walk from the Brookline Hills Green Line MBTA station and also walkable from the MBTA’s #60 bus that runs between Kenmore Station and Chestnut Hill. Limited parking is available on-site for those coming by car. Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site was the Brookline, Massachusetts home and office of America’s premier parkmaker and the designer of the Emerald Necklace park system. Now administered by the National Park Service as one of its 407 sites around the United States, Olmsted NHS was for nearly a century the headquarters of the first full-scale professional landscape architecture office in the United States. The site maintains the Olmsted Archives, a collection of the Olmsted firm’s plans, drawings, photographs, and other work product for thousands of landscapes around the continent.

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Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 9

food truck continued from page 1

“I had just finished grad school and come back to Roxbury and I found I was traveling to other communities to get healthy food,” she says. Although her background was in city planning, she felt passionate enough about the idea that she decided to pursue it. She contacted Renshaw, whom she knew from when she was a staffer and he was a teen leader at the Food Project, an urban farming initiative that has worked for the past 25 years to develop youth leadership while increasing the supply of locally-grown vegetables in low-income neighborhoods. The two developed the idea and soon took part in a six-month business accelerator program run by the Future Boston Alliance. The program provided them with training, tailored guidance, and connection to a network of mentors and potential partners. At the end of the six months, they won the program’s pitch competition, which came with a $5,000 prize funded by the Boston Impact Initiative. They used the money to underwrite their marketing and

host an online Kickstarter fundraiser, which in turn brought them $54,000 to launch their business. The launch was an intense process that involved purchasing a truck, conducting various pilots of their recipes, researching suppliers and market prices, and learning how to use industrial cooking equipment. While neither one of them has formal culinary training, they bring their personal experience to the table. Campbell says she is particularly influenced by her parents’ Caribbean cooking, and her personal knowledge of the kinds of food that people in Roxbury and neighboring areas want to buy. Renshaw loves to cook and first landed in the food truck business as a manager for Bon Me, the Vietnamese restaurant that runs a number of food trucks across Boston and Cambridge. They note that the Bon Me owners were gracious enough to let them develop their skills with the truck’s industrial equipment as they prepared to enter the food truck game.

Affordability and sustainability

Campbell says they are committed to keeping prices affordable, or at a level “that people are

used to paying in Roxbury, Mattapan and Dorchester.” They are able to do so in part by supplementing their food truck earnings with the catering services they provide for a number of downtown businesses. In addition, they plan on partnering with local suppliers who emphasize food sustainability. Renshaw, who studied agriculture at the University of Vermont, spends a lot of time building relationships with local farmer networks. A partnership with a network called Farm Fresh Rhode Island, for instance, allows them to compare prices from various farms the way one might compare flight prices on Expedia. The networking also has a human aspect to it. “Farmers want to feed people, that’s why they grow food,” Renshaw says, adding that he studied agriculture because of a similar personal commitment. And connections with growers helps the duo find a use for products that otherwise would go to waste. If the farmers have too much of something, or a perfectly good product is not aesthetically pleasing enough for a supermarket — say, a vegetable is oddly shaped — Renshaw and

Campbell can purchase it at reduced cost and work it into their menu. They also source from Boston-area farms like their “alma mater,” the Food Project, as well as Allendale farm in Brookline and Dorchester-based City Growers, which trains urban farmers to grow produce in vacant Boston lots. Initiatives like the Food Project and City Growers are part of a larger wave of urban farming projects nationwide that aim to increase access to locally grown, healthy food in neighborhoods where such offerings can be scarce or too expensive. While there are some skeptics who question whether urban farming can truly meet city dwellers’ food needs on a large scale, its proponents see such initiatives as an innovative way to begin fixing a broken food system. Campbell and Renshaw are looking to build even more partnerships with local food sources. They currently are planning with Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative to develop a network for purchasing food from local growers who want to grow produce on their private property.

Renshaw says the process should be easier now due to the 2013 passage of Article 89, a change to the city’s zoning code that lay out the guidelines for people who want to grow food for commercial sale in their homes — a first in the city’s history.

Healthy foods

The cooks are dedicated to keeping their food homemade as a commitment to health. “When we say ‘healthy,’ we mean real food — an alternative to fast food and over-processed corner store food,” Campbell says. To that end, they make all of their sauces — chipotle, jerk, and more — from scratch, thereby cutting out the high fructose corn syrup that is found in many storebought sauces. Campbell says that they will also make some small changes to traditional recipes — for instance, baking their empanadas instead of frying them — while striving to keep the food choices “culturally relevant” to local consumers. For instance, when the Banner dropped by last Friday, the offerings were jerk chicken, chipotle chicken or bean stew with a choice of herbed potatoes, greens or cole slaw.

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10 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

Gala GNEMSDC 40 TH ANNIVERSARY AWARDS

SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 2015

Join the GNEMSDC as we celebrate 40 years of Minority Business Development and Supplier Diversity.

2015 Awards Gala Keynote Speaker:

Governor Charlie Baker Commonwealth of Massachusetts Honoring 2015 President ’s Award Recipient:

Joset Wright-Lacy NMSDC President

Throughout the past 40 years, the GNEMSDC has connected thousands of MBE’s with our Corporate Partners and each other. On this special evening, we will be honoring some of the best business achievements in Supplier Diversity. Don’t miss your opportunity to connect with business leaders from across New England and to be a part of a great event.

BOSTON CONVENTION AND EXHIBITION CENTER 415 Summer Street, Boston, MA 02210 5:00 PM Cocktail Reception 6:30 PM Dinner and Awards Presentation Black Tie Preferred

For more information and to register for the event, please visit gala.gnemsdc.org or call 888-874-7114 GNEMSDC.org Ce r tify | D evelop | Con nec t | Advo c ate


Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 11

BUSINESSNEWS CHECK OUT MORE BUSINESS NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/NEWS/BUSINESS

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Down Home builds foundation for success Family business cooks up Southern specialties from Dot to Downtown By MARTIN DESMARAIS

Down Home Delivery & Catering in Dorchester is not your typical food business. Started by a former government department official and an ex-Wall Street managing director, the business goals go beyond just building a loyal local following — the target is widespread catering business throughout Boston. Specializing in southern cooking, Down Home has grown since its start in 2009 so that the vision its co-owners, the husband and wife pair of Gary Webster and Gale Scott, started with is now coming to fruition. “We didn’t try to do this to be a little soul food place on the corner that was not what we were interested in doing. We understood that there was a void in the city of Boston for Southern cuisine. We had the talent, the ability, the will to do it, so we wanted to take on the challenge,” said Webster, who prior to starting Down Home worked as director of public affairs for the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. With few other options for Southern cuisine in the city, Down Home has been able to cement itself firmly in a market that has showcased strong demand. “We are the biggest operation around, at this point,”

Webster added. “We have done a tremendous amount as far as catering and becoming the known entity for purveyors of Southern cuisine.” The daily and catering menus vary, but the gist of what Down Home does is offer a variety of popular dishes from different Southern regions, everything from fried chicken to macaroni and cheese to gumbo to barbeque brisket. Daily popular entrees include jumbo chicken wings, country pot roast, savory bbq baby back ribs, with traditional sides such as candied yams and collard greens. For the catering business, the Southern theme prevails but anything from Creole to Cajun to Texas BBQ is a go. “We will make anything you ask,” said Scott, who spent most of her prior career on Wall Street, most recently working as a managing director at Standard & Poor’s.

Model for success

Down Home’s headquarters in Four Corners is in a building that Webster and Scott bought and now own. The company has a small fleet of trucks and drivers for delivery and catering and a handful of employees that operate the kitchen and a small storefront takeout operation. In addition to the owners, the family business extends to Webster’s brothers Willie, a principal

MARTIN DESMARAIS

(l-r) Gary Webster, Michael Webster, Daren Payne and Willie Webster of Down Home Delivery & Catering. chef, and Michael, head of delivery operations, as well as sonin-law Daren Payne, a head chef. Several other family members also pitch in. With the profit margins higher in catering than in small delivery and takeout orders, Down Home has succeeded by finding catering work with community organizations such as nonprofit groups and churches, as well some of the anchor institutions in the city including Boston Public Schools, University of Massachusetts Boston and MIT. Currently, Down Home’s business is about 30 percent catering,

30 percent delivery and the rest is storefront takeout. But the next big move is more corporate-based business. Both Webster and Scott say Down Home can tap into the market for catered corporate events to fuel further growth. They have some corporate clients now, but they want more. And they’re ready. “To cater to corporate clients to satisfy their demands and their needs we have to have enough staff and reliable vehicles,” Scott said. “That is the thing about corporate clients — they want what they want when they want it, so you have to be able to make it for them

and deliver it to them, and it could be on a day’s notice. We had to actually have the capacity to be able to deliver to that type of client, so we wanted to make sure we built up to that.” Plans are also on tap to expand the Dorchester store front to include sit-down eating space in the range of 50 seats. Taking advantage of assistance such as certification as a disadvantaged business enterprise — that can lead to city, state and federal contracts — a recent loan from the Massachusetts Snow

See DOWN HOME, page 12


12 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

BUSINESSNEWS CHECK OUT MORE BUSINESS NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/NEWS/BUSINESS

PHOTOS BY MARTIN DESMARAIS

Above, Down Home Delivery & Catering owners Gary Webster and Gale Scott. Right, Down Home Delivery & Catering Head Chef Daren Payne works in the company’s Four Corners main kitchen facility.

Down Home continued from page 11

Storm Fund and impending financing for expansion from the Massachusetts Growth Capital Corporation, Webster and Scott are leaving no stone unturned to expand business on all fronts.

In many ways, the couple showcases a new breed of entrepreneur that has emerged in this country. For one, they are entrepreneurs of necessity since they were both laid off during the recession in 2008 and needed another job option, which got them thinking about the business opportunity that became Down Home Delivery &

Catering. For another, they are Dorchester residents looking to be part of the economic growth of their community. “This isn’t about surviving. We don’t want to survive — we want to thrive,” Webster said. “To often small businesses, particularly local, small minority businesses get into business to survive, just

to have enough to pay their bills, but that is not what we got into this for and we wouldn’t stay in it if we didn’t see the projected path to growth.” It’s a mindset and model they hope their business can help set for the local business community and other Dorchester entrepreneurs.

“As long as there is an opportunity for success there, I can continue to lend myself to being one of those who are blazing the trail for establishing solid businesses within the minority community. That is what I want to be committed to,” Webster added. “It is about establishing a base of wealth.”

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Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 13

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The Boston Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. celebrated seventy years of community service by honoring six exemplary community leaders. The event was held on March 28, 2015. Honorees included: Sandra Cotterell, CEO, Codman Square Health Center for her service in the area of physical and mental health; Charla Jones, Founder and CEO, Eu2Be Products for her service in the area of economic development; Jean McGuire, Executive Director, METCO, Inc. for her service in the area of educational development Sarah-Ann Shaw, Community and Political Advocate for her service in the area of political awareness; Andrea Swain, Executive Director, Boys and Girls Club of Boston-Yawkey Club of Roxbury, for her service in the area of international awareness. The president’s life time achievement award was given to Jackie Jenkins Scott, President of Wheelock college. The speaker for the event was the 24th National President of the organization, Cynthia Butler McIntyre.


14 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

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Q&A

Beverly rocks!

Awards recognize achievements by women of color, feature First Lady By KAM WILLIAMS

COURTESY OF THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

A scene from Woman In Gold

‘REMEMBER US’ British director Simon Curtis’ film Woman In Gold tells the story of Gustav Klimt’s famous portrait stolen by the Nazis By COLETTE GREENSTEIN

C

onsidered the “Mona Lisa of Austria,” Gustav Klimt’s famous painting Woman In Gold has become a national treasure. But for one woman, it was simply a portrait of her beloved aunt Adele.

Directed by Simon Curtis, Woman In Gold is the remarkable true story of Jewish immigrant Maria Altmann, starring Helen Mirren as a young woman who was forced to flee her home with her husband Fritz during World War II under the Nazi occupation of Vienna. Now 60 years later, after creating a whole new life in California, she begins a journey to recover her family possessions that were looted by the Nazis, including Klimt’s famous painting of her aunt, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, which had hung prominently in her childhood home.

IF YOU GO

Woman In Gold opens in theaters nationwide this

Friday, April 10. Aiding Altmann in her quest to right the wrongs of the past is lawyer Randy Schoenberg, portrayed by Ryan Reynolds. Together, they sue the Austrian government for the return of artwork stolen from her family by the Nazis. Their journey and subsequent battle with the Austrian government takes them from Austria all the way to the hallowed halls of the U.S. Supreme Court. And along the way, Altmann is forced to confront the painful truths about her past. Curtis, who first heard about Maria Altmann and her family’s history after seeing the 2007 documentary Stealing Klimt, was inspired to bring the story to a wider audience for many reasons, including “the fact that it takes the events of 1938 and links them to contemporary suburban Los Angeles,” says the director in a recent

See CURTIS, page 16

A dynamo in true form, Beverly Bond has blazed trails in the music, entertainment and social entrepreneurship industries. Her body of work has made her one of the most celebrated DJs and social innovators of our time. A true music connoisseur, Bond’s passion for music and her uncanny ability to read the crowd has solidified her as a force to be reckoned with in the DJ world. Over the last decade, the former Wilhelmina model has brought her versatile talents to myriad celebrity clients including Prince, Alicia Keys, Sarah Jessica Parker, Erykah Badu, Sean “Diddy” Combs, Derrick Jeter, Jessica and Jerry Seinfeld, Jay Z, Martha Stewart and others. In 2006, she founded BLACK GIRLS ROCK!, a youth empowerment mentoring organization. Bond simultaneously created the annual BLACK GIRLS ROCK! Awards to celebrate the accomplishments of exceptional women of color who have made outstanding contributions in their careers and stand as inspirational and positive role models in the community. In 2010, Bond first partnered with BET to air BLACK GIRLS ROCK! on network television. The Awards show went on to receive an NAACP Image Award for outstanding Variety Series or Special. Bond’s work as a businesswoman, mentor, philanthropist and community leader has earned her a number of prestigious recognitions. EBONY magazine listed Bond on its Power 100 list for five consecutive years. She was also recognized by Ebony as one of the “Most Influential Blacks in America” and one of ESSENCE magazine’s “40 Fierce and Fabulous Women Who are Changing the World.” Bond spoke with the Banner about this year’s BLACK GIRLS ROCK! Awards, which is set to aired on BET on Sunday, April 5th. Among the many luminaries who appeared on the show was First Lady Michelle Obama.

See BOND, page 15

ON THE WEB To see a TV spot for Black Girls Rock!, visit:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJ_idJp9V2U


Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 15

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT CHECK OUT MORE ENTERTAINMENT NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/ENTERTAINMENT

Bond

based on the time period you’re looking at. So, yes, there’s a process, but the truth is there are so many amazing black women who have contributed to society who don’t always get a chance to shine. Our mission is to make sure we acknowledge them on our stages.

continued from page 14 Kam Williams: I’ll be mixing my questions in with some sent in by readers. You just taped the BLACK GIRLS ROCK! awards show last night. Are you still on a high from the event?

KW: How difficult was the process to create BLACK GIRLS ROCK! and make it into a social force?

Beverly Bond: Oh my gosh! I’m still taking it in and trying to process it all.

BB: I founded it in 2006, and it was an instant success. I was so driven and so passionate about the necessity of this message that I worked 24 hours a day to make it happen. But it doesn’t feel difficult when it’s your mission and your vision. It’s been a lot of work, but I knew that many people would be into it. Honestly, by 2007, we had the media’s attention already, BET, VH-1 and others, so I knew it was going to be televised. If you believe in something enough, you’re going to make it work. And to me, this was so important because it was about the message to the girls, especially the young girls.

KW: What was your strongest or most surprising impression of First Lady Michelle Obama? BB: I think I always knew this about her, although I’d never met her in person until now, but she’s so authentic and genuine. And she’s so sincere and committed to making a difference in the lives of others. She’s a real humanitarian.

KW: How did you come to pick this year’s honorees: director Ava DuVernay, actresses Jada Pinkett Smith and Cicely Tyson, singer Erykah Badu, CARE CEO Dr. Helene D. Gayle and middle school principal Nadia Lopez? BB: Well, there’s never a shortage of incredible black women who have made major contributions each year. So, we’re constantly monitoring what’s happening in “black girls’ world,” so to speak, and we’re aware that there’s always an abundance of worthy individuals to choose from. It’s a matter of each person’s accomplishments and how current they are. Part of the process has to do with production, and part of it just comes down to who is available and how things fall in place

E AT

+

DRINK

KW: How were you able to sell the idea to BET, given its history of often appealing to the lowest common denominator, as reflected in reality-TV shows and misogynistic music videos? BB: It wasn’t difficult, because BET obviously needed something like this. It was almost a perfect storm, because we came along at a time when BET was trying to change that image and that message.

KW: How do you respond to the Twitter trend #WhiteGirlsRock which claimed

+

C E L E B R AT E

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that BLACK GIRLS ROCK! is racist? BB: I think that when you tune into Black Entertainment Television and you are complaining about black people lifting up black women and celebrating their wonderful accomplishments, your racism is showing all over your face. Did they call in when the images were less than stellar? It is fascinating to me how there’s an uproar whenever it comes to black people celebrating themselves. So, I pay them no attention, although I did respond once by writing a little article making the point that just because we say that black girls rock doesn’t mean that you don’t rock, too. But I wonder whether this was really just an attempt to punish us for having the audacity to celebrate ourselves. Everyone’s so used to putting us at the bottom of the barrel that they feel entitled to find our simply saying “We rock!” offensive. I don’t give it too much attention, because it’s really silly, but it does show the privilege and the racism that exists in some circles.

KW: What do you want viewers to take away from BLACK GIRLS ROCK!? BB: BLACK GIRLS ROCK! really focuses on helping to raise the bar for our kids, because we’ve got to change our culture and make black excellence important again. Literacy should not be a problem for us in 2015. The education gap continues to widen for black kids, and that’s telling. So, we have to figure out how to help COURTESY BET

See BOND, page 16

Beverly Bond


16 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

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Curtis

Losing everything

Under the guidance of Curtis, the film subtly and masterfully shows the devastation and destruction the Nazis imposed upon Austria’s Jewish community. After Austria was annexed by Hitler’s Germany into the Third Reich in 1938, Vienna’s Jewish community, which was rich in art and culture, abruptly came to an end. Jewish businesses and residences were invaded and taken over, and Altmann’s family lost everything. “I was terribly moved by the idea of this community in Vienna, which is a flourishing, loving, cultural community. It was destroyed and shattered

continued from page 14 interview with the Banner. “There’s a theme. [The character] Maria says, ‘People forget, especially the young’ and the father at the end says ‘Remember us.’ I think … that’s the main theme of the film … it’s a tiny reminder of the perils of anti-Semitism and much more than we would have even known and, not just the perils of picking on the Jewish community but picking on anybody because of their race or religion. It’s so distressing that we have to keep saying that.”

overnight,” says the director. “This family and painting were emblematic of that whole world that was destroyed and Maria was the last one living from that community. I think there’s a lot of nuance in the conversation about the right of art. In this case, her uncle paid Gustav Klimt to paint her aunt and that painting ended on the wall of their family home.” Curtis, who has long directed television in London, made his directorial film debut in 2011 with My Week with Marilyn starring Michelle Williams as Marilyn, Monroe for BBC Films and The Weinstein Company. The film also starred

Roxbury HomeComing Committee, Inc. Presents It’s

Annual Fundraiser Dance featuring The Witness Matlou Quartet & DJ Jazzmaster Saturday, April 25, 2015 8:00pm to 1:00am At Mosley’s on the Charles 50 Bridge St. (route 109) Dedham, MA Free Parking, Cash Bar $30.00 pp / $35.00 at door No Food Allowed For tickets call 617-858-6755

Judi Dench, Eddie Redmayne, Kenneth Branagh and Emma Watson.

Accolades

Williams won a Golden Globe for Best Actress for her portrayal of Monroe and also earned two Best Actress nominations: one from the Academy Awards and the second from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. Curtis remarks how the film was scary “an actress being brave enough to take on Marilyn is a huge thing and I was lucky that Michelle was brave enough to do it.” For the role of Altmann, Helen Mirren was at the top of

Bond

modeling. When I became a DJ, that career took over. I just evolved.

continued from page 15 our kids to survive and thrive and become trailblazers themselves.

KW: What types of programs do you have at the BLACK GIRLS ROCK! summer camp? BB: We have a very strong arts education program, plus media literacy, coding, robotics, college prep, empowerment circles, financial literacy and cultural immersion. They start every morning with African dance or yoga, and end their day with Brazilian capoeira, with all that other material in between. It’s a very wellrounded and intensive, two-week experience.

KW: What motivated you to make the move from modeling to music DJ? BB: I never really left

T O ICK N ET LY S $5

the list for Curtis. “She is a brilliant actress and it was brilliant to work with her,” says the director of his leading lady. In taking on the role of director for Woman In Gold, Curtis was interested because the film had substance. “A lot of movies out at the moment are about nothing. A lot of films are comic book movies and all that,” he said. “Then there’s a film like 12 Years A Slave or the Stephen Hawking film that’s about something. I’m much more interested in that. And, I think this film is about something and that’s what draws me to it.”

KW: African-Americans were able to gain victories 50 to 60 years ago during the Civil Rights Movement, such as the marches in Selma and the successful bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama. Do you think that this type of activism is still possible today? BB: Yes, but we have to do it in many different ways. I think Black Girls Rock is revolutionary. And there are other ways to achieve changes in this technological age. For instance, without Twitter, there probably wouldn’t have been such an outcry about Trayvon Martin, Mike Brown and so many others. But it’s important to use our voices to speak out and make a difference since, if we don’t do it, no one’s going to do it for us.

Bill Blumenreich Presents

BILL BLUMENREICH PRESENTS

TOWER OF POWER APRIL 15

HANNIBAL BURESS APRIL 16 - 18

LUPE FIASCO APRIL 27

WENDY WILLIAMS MAY 2

FOR TICKETS AND INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT WWW.THEWILBUR.COM

Fri, Apr 10, 7 pm Tickets: 617.695.6955

www.bostonballet.org/strandtheatre

Mayor Martin J. Walsh City of Boston Aidos Zakan; Yury Yanowsky and Kathleen Breen Combes. Photography by Liza Voll.

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Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 17

FOOD

www.baystatebanner.com

CHECK OUT NUTRITION AND HEALTH NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/HEALTH

TIP OF THE WEEK

Go gluten-free for brunch Gathering friends and family for a brunch is a delicious alternative to the typical dinner party. A more casual setting and lighter fare make for a refreshing change. However, many of the foods commonly served at the brunch hour contain gluten, which can make it hard to accommodate the needs of anyone following a gluten-free diet. One simple solution is sorghum, which can be substituted in a variety of baked goods and other dishes. Whole grain sorghum is a wholesome, hearty grain that possesses a mild flavor that won’t compete with the flavors of other food ingredients. Sorghum can improve the texture of recipes and digests more slowly with a lower glycemic index, so it sticks with you a bit longer. This makes it a great healthy substitution in desserts. You can also add a hearty, nutty flavor to your favorite recipes with whole grain sorghum, for example, using it in salads and in place of pasta and rice. The Greek salad below combines sorghum with fresh veggies and a light, tangy dressing for the perfect addition to a brunch menu. For more recipes and tips for cooking with sorghum, visit healthy sorghum.com.

Strawberry ladyfinger desserts

BY THE EDITORS OF

RELISH MAGAZINE

T

he combination of biscuits, berries and whipped cream, called strawberry shortcake, is one of America’s favorite desserts. Strawberries have been around for thousands of years, but serving them with cake was the invention of one smart 19th-century cook, who included the recipe in Miss Leslie’s New Receipt Book. As the idea caught on, the dessert turned into mashed berries between layers of piecrust, a sort of strawberry sandwich. Because strawberry shortcake is an easy recipe to customize, the tinkering continues. For starters, the biscuit can be replaced with sponge cake, pound cake or even splitin-half cupcakes. The mounds of whipped cream, which may give the dessert a deliciously lopsided look, can be partnered with ice cream. If strawberries are not available, other fruits will do. For a spur-of-the-moment variation, ladyfingers, berries and ice cream make an attractive and simple take on the real thing.

Strawberry dessert n 1 pint strawberries, hulled n 2 tablespoons sugar, or to taste n 1 tablespoon water n 8 ladyfingers, split n 4 scoops vanilla ice cream

— Family Features

EASY RECIPE

Greek Sorghum Salad

Cut about half the berries into thin slices. In a bowl, combine the slices, sugar and water. Let stand for 2 hours, tossing occasionally, or until juicy. Puree in a food processor and return to bowl. Cut remaining berries into thin slices and stir into puree. To serve, in each of 4 stemmed glasses or individual trifle dishes, stand 4 ladyfinger halves, rounded sides out. Place scoop of ice cream in the middle and top with strawberry sauce. Serves 4.

n 2 cups water n 1 cup sorghum n 2 cups spinach, sliced into ¼-inch strips n 1 large lemon, juice only n ¼ cup olive oil n ¼ teaspoon salt n 1 cup grape tomatoes, halved n 1 avocado n ½ cup feta cheese In medium saucepan, bring water to boil. Add sorghum and reduce heat. Simmer for 50 minutes or until water is absorbed. Turn off heat. Stir spinach into sorghum until lightly wilted. Whisk lemon juice, olive oil and salt together. Add dressing to salad and toss lightly. Just before serving, stir in tomatoes, avocado and feta cheese.

— Recipe by Jean Kressy

Join us for an Artist’s Reception Thu Apr 9 at 5:30pm Hakim Raquib - Time Eternal Coming to Art is Life itself! Thu Apr 9 - Hakim Raquib + “How to Blog” with Maurice Wilkey + Open Mic Thu Apr 16 - Deconstructing the Prison Industrial Complex w CFROP + Patti LaRosa (singer/songwriter) and Mel King + Open Mic

— Family Features

Program starts at 7pm. Come early for dinner! Coming Events at HHBC:

WORD TO THE WISE Ajowan seeds: Ajowan (or ajwain) seeds are a spice related to cumin and caraway that originates from the Middle East and is now mostly found in southern India. Ajowan seeds look like purplish-red celery seeds and taste like astringent thyme. — Cookthink

Be sure to check out our website and mobile site www.baystatebanner.com

Fri Apr 10, 6:30pm -The House Slam - Team Semi-Finals Sun Apr 12, 4pm - The Haitian Experience at Guantanamo: A Neighborhood Event For more information, go to: www.facebook.com/haleyhousebakerycafe/events This program is supported in part by a grant from the Boston Cultural Council, a local agency which is funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, administrated by the Mayor’s Office of Arts, Tourism, and Special Events.

Haley House Bakery Cafe - 12 Dade Street - Roxbury 617 445 0900 - www.haleyhouse.org/cafe


18 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

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THURSDAY ENTERING ROXBURY Premiere Screening: Entering Roxbury, a video collage by Tessil Collins with Lolita Parker, Jr, Maureen McNamara, René Dongo, Darius Morant. Music by Rollins Ross. Entering Roxbury will give residents and visitors the opportunity to visually realize the evolution the neighborhood has endured. The videographers will participate in an audience Q&A folling the screening. Thursday, April 9, 6-7:45pm, Dudley Branch Auditorium, 65 Warren St., 617442-6186. Sponsored by the Fellowes Athenaeum Fund. Free. www.bpl.org.

FRIDAY IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE: THE WEST END HOUSE From March 31 through August 22, The West End Museum will host a new exhibit in its Main Exhibit Hall. In Pursuit of Excellence: The West End House features artifacts, photographs, oral history video and memorabilia representing over 100 years. Among the club’s most distinguished alumni are Leonard Nimoy and crooner Buddy Clark. The show reception takes place on Friday, April 10 at 6pm. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. The West End Museum is dedicated to the collection, preservation and interpretation of the history and culture of the West End neighborhood. The Museum’s permanent exhibit, “The Last Tenement,” highlights the immigrant history of the neighborhood through its decimation under Urban Renewal in 1959; two additional galleries feature rotating exhibits. The Museum is located near North Station at 150 Staniford St., Suite 7. Hours: Tuesday - Friday 12-5pm; Saturday 11am - 4pm. Admission is free.

SATURDAY AARDVARK JAZZ ORCHESTRA: NEW MUSIC FOR JAZZ ORCHESTRA

www.morningsidemusicstudio.com/a-townjazz-festival.html, 617-909-7776, danfox1@ verizon.net.

SUNDAY MEET ELIZABETH MURRAY: FROM COLONIAL BOSTON TO FARMSTEAD OWNER The Shirley-Eustis House, 33 Shirley St., Boston, Massachusetts, a National Historic Landmark house museum and carriage house in Roxbury will host a lecture on Sunday, April 12 at 2pm. Una McMahon will discuss the life of Elizabeth Murray, a Scottish immigrant, who developed a successful retail business in Colonial Boston. By mentoring younger women and insisting upon pre-nuptial agreements in two of her three marriages, this amazing woman achieved economic independence and helped change the way society viewed women. Throughout the upheavals of the American Revolution, Mrs. Elizabeth Murray Campbell Smith Inman faced the challenge of separating from Tory family members while declaring loyalty to the local Patriot cause. Una will share how this outstanding woman led an adventurous and challenging life journey from Scotland to London to North Carolina and eventually Boston, which she made her home. Una McMahon, Founder-Owner of Acorn Tours of Boston, is a Governor/Board Member and the Chair of the Events Committee for the Shirley Eustis House Association. Una has taught French Language, led student tours to France and Canada and established organizations such the Irish Business Network Small Business Forum. Admission will be $10 per person. Please give us a call or email to RSVP your attendance. Refreshments will be served following the presentation. Visit www.shir leyeustishouse.org for more information, call Patricia Violette at 617-442-2275 or email governorshirley@gmail.com.

PICS IN THE PARKS

The Aardvark Jazz Orchestra continues its 42nd season with premieres of new works by Mark Harvey, including Sisyphus of the Snow Banks, inspired by the recent record-setting snowfall in the Boston area; a free-form romp titled Out and Out; and the big band premiere of FiLmprov Cha Cha Cha. The band marks the Billy Strayhorn Centennial with his lovely ballad Almost Cried, from the movie Anatomy of a Murder. Aardvark audience favorites No Walls and De-Evolution Blues are also on tap. The band will honor the Boston Marathon survivors and victims, including MIT police officer Sean Collier, with Mark Harvey’s piece Commemoration (Boston 2013), given its premiere in 2014. Saturday, April 11 at 8pm, MIT Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge. Free Admission. Information: 617-452-3205. This concert is sponsored by MIT Music & Theater Arts as part of its Faculty Concert Series.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the Boston Parks and Recreation Department invite Boston residents to participate in the free Pics in the Parks photography sessions taking place on select Sundays in March and April from 2-3pm. Individuals of all ages and skill levels are welcome to bring their cameras and participate in these informal sessions led by a photography instructor. Participants will learn techniques for taking impressive photographs of Boston’s scenic parks as well as be given a theme to focus on each Sunday. Select photos may be chosen for an exhibit at Boston City Hall. Dates and locations are as follows: April 12 — Lagoon Bridge, Boston Public Garden, 4 Charles St., Boston. For more information please visit the Boston Parks and Recreation Department at www. facebook.com/bostonparksdepartment or www.cityofboston.gov/parks. Participants must bring their own equipment and can register via email by contacting mavrick. alfonso@boston.gov.

MEETING OF GENERATIONS

UPCOMING

Saturday, April 11, 7:30-9pm: “Meeting of Generations” featuring Arlington’s best high school age students performing swing music. With special guest, veteran reedman Tom Ferrante. Supported by a grant from the Arlington Cultural Council. Free and open to all. Arlington Senior Center, 27 Maple St., Arlington 02476. For more information, visit

A CONVERSATION WITH GEORGE COLEMAN AND HAROLD MABERN Tenor saxophonist George Coleman and pianist Harold Mabern are the 2015 Jazz Masters in Residence at Harvard University, sponsored by the Office for the Arts at Harvard and Harvard Jazz Bands (Mark

SUNDAY, APRIL 12

HUB THEATRE COMPANY OF BOSTON PRESENTS LOOT Hub Theatre Company of Boston will kick off its third season this spring with Joe Orton’s irreverent and amoral dark farce, Loot, at the First Church in Boston Friday, March 27 - April 12. Poor Mr. McLeavy! It’s the day of the funeral and his late wife won’t stay in her coffin. The nurse — a seven-time widow — fancies him as her latest “late” husband. His ne’er-do-well son and his “friend” are pursuing new careers as bank robbers and a nosy representative from the water board (or so he claims) is asking some very probing questions and making everyone quite nervous indeed. In this tour de force of bad taste, taboos, and high farce, nothing and no one is safe from Orton’s wicked wit! Inspired by the trial of the infamous police detective Harold “Tanky” Challenor, notorious for his brutality and planting of evidence, Loot satires the Roman Catholic Church, social attitudes toward death, police brutality and everything in between. This show will make you laugh but its message will stay with you long after you leave the theatre. The Hub Theater Company of Boston was founded in 2012 to foster creativity among Boston’s emerging theatre artists and as a means to help break down barriers between audience and art. As such, all tickets to all performances are Pay-What-You-Can! First Church in Boston, 66 Marlborough St. All tickets are Pay-What-You-Can and may be purchased via www.hubtheatreboston.ticketleap.com. For more information please visit www.hub theatreboston.org. Olson and Don Braden ’85, conductors). Friday, April 17, 4pm: A Conversation with George Coleman and Harold Mabern moderated by Ingrid Monson, Quincy Jones Professor of African American Music. Barker Center for the Humanities, 20 Quincy St., Cambridge. Admission free (tickets or RSVPs not required); seating first-come, first served, subject to venue capacity. For more information, call 617-495-8676 or visit http://ofa.fas. harvard.edu/music/memphisgiants.php]ofa. fas.harvard.edu/music/memphisgiants.php.

PAINTING EXHIBITION Simmons College Trustman Art Gallery presents Verdant, an exhibit of paintings by Elizabeth Awalt, Ken Beck and Aaron Fink, and prints by Catherine Kernan from April 21-May 29. The artists get lush with nature themes at the Trustman Art Gallery, located on the fourth floor, of the Main College Building, 300 The Fenway in Boston. A reception from 5-7 p.m. will be held on Wednesday, April 22. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. Verdant is a salute to uncontrolled nature, fecund, beautiful, rank and alive. It also honors art collector Sinclair Hitchings and his long commitment to Boston artists, who are all part of Hitchings’ Art in Boston project. Although the show is visually rooted in the natural world, it is also a metaphorical statement about the luxuriant art scene in Boston. The Gallery is closed for the Simmons College Commencement, May 15, and Memorial Day, May 25. Trustman Gallery hours are 10am - 4:30pm, Monday through Friday. The gallery is free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Marcia Lomedico at 617-521-2268, or visit the Trustman Art Gallery website at www.simmons.edu/trustman.

ALL GIRLS SPORTS FESTIVAL Mayor Martin J. Walsh joins the Boston Parks & Recreation Department and Boston Centers for Youth & Families in inviting girls from throughout the city to spend their April school vacation at the All Girls Sports Festival. The four-day event will take place in Roxbury April 21-24 from 8:30am - 3:30pm daily. Activities will be held at the Reggie Lewis Track & Athletic Center at Roxbury Community College, 1350 Columbus Ave., and the nearby BCYF Madison Park Community Center, Building 4, 55 Malcolm X Blvd. The All Girls Sports Festival features a variety of sport clinics and health and wellness workshops supported by local colleges, non-profits, and City of Boston agencies. Participants will find a variety of fun ways to exercise mind, body, and spirit and try out a variety of sports with expert instructors including basketball, tennis, Double Dutch, step dancing, track, swimming, bicycling, rugby, soccer, and an intro to rock climbing.

Participants must be Boston residents ages 11-14 and should wear activity-appropriate clothing. Applications are available online at www.boston.gov/parks/recreation.asp. For more information, please contact Barbara Hamilton at 617-961-3093 or by emailing barbara.hamilton@boston.gov. Free.

EMANCIPATION TRAIL: CIVIL RIGHTS FOR ALL In this interactive presentation, Vincent Licenziato celebrates the women and men who advocated for the freedom and civil rights of African Americans and explores how they led the fight for “liberty and justice for all” by encouraging civil rights for other groups including women, Native Americans, people with disabilities, and the LGBTQ community. Wednesday, April 22, 4pm, Uphams Corner Branch of the Boston Public Library, 500 Columbia Rd, 617-265-0139. www. bpl.org.

JOLLEY FUN, LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB Thursday, April 23, Dudley Library community room, time: 6:30-7:30pm. Please bring water. Every one welcome. Laughter yoga (Hasyayoga) is a practice involving prolonged voluntary laughter. Laughter yoga is based on the belief that voluntary laughter provides the same physiological and psychological benefits as spontaneous laughter. Laughter yoga is done in groups, with eye contact and playfulness between participants. Forced laughter soon turns into real and contagious laughter (Wikipedia). 65 Warren St., Roxbury.

INCREASING EQUITY IN THE FIELD OF NUTRITION BOND of Color presents: Increasing Equity in the Field of Nutrition — A meeting with the President-Elect of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dr. Evelyn Crayton EdD, RDN, LDN, FAND, Professor Emerita, Auburn University, Director, Living Well Associates. Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, Boston, Main College Building, Room C103. Friday, April 24, 3-6pm. To RSVP, visit: IncreasingEquityInNutrition.Eventbrite.com. For more information, contact bondofcolor@ gmail.com or 617-858-6492. Boston Organization of Nutritionists and Dietitians of Color.

ONGOING WOMEN AND WEAVING AT SIMMONS COLLEGE Simmons College presents Skirting Identity: Women and Weaving in Laos, Thailand and Myanmar, an exhibition curated by Simmons Professor Margaret Hanni, Ph.D. through April 17, at the Trustman Art Gallery, located on the fourth floor, Main

College Building, 300 the Fenway in Boston. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. Skirting Identity: Women and Weaving in Laos, Thailand and Myanmar is the fruit of two sabbaticals Professor Hanni spent visiting Southeast Asia. This exhibit is a scholarly and visually rich examination of how traditional textiles create a narrative of gender roles, status and wealth. Trustman Gallery hours are 10am - 4:30pm, Monday through Friday. The gallery is free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Marcia Lomedico at 617-521-2268, or visit the Trustman Art Gallery website at www.simmons.edu/ trustman.

MUJERES: POETIC REVELATIONS OF OUR LIVES – EXHIBITION Celebrating women’s achievements and the International Women’s Day, La Galería is presenting the exhibit MUJERES: POETIC REVELATIONS OF OUR LIVES. Comprising the work of two Latina artists — Silvia Lopez Chavez, a painter, and Nora Valdez, a sculptor — they share the interest of creating art inspired by the inter-connection between people’s physical spaces, emotions and life experiences through their daily life. López Chavez’s explores the intellectual and emotional narratives of joy, struggle, acceptance and assimilation with the uses of traditional methods of drawing and painting with experimental techniques in printmaking and collage. Valdez’s explores the conditions of travel, transition, and displacement represented by sculptures and sketches. Through April 22, La Galería, 85 West Newton St., Boston. Gallery hours: Tuesday thru Friday 3pm-6pm | Saturday: 1-4pm | by appointment. Contact: Julio Cesar Román, 617-927-1737. Free.

BCNC QUINCY SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMS LEAP (Leadership, Enrichment, Arts Program) is a six-week program for rising 9th grade youth. Youth will have fun and meet new friends. The program is FREE at no cost and will provide enrichment activities, fieldtrips, project-based and educational workshops on leadership and transition to high school. Youlead Summer is a six-week program for high school youth (9th-12th grade). This program is FREE at no cost and youth can gain community service hours, learn about leadership, public speaking, meet new friends, and work on community projects. July 6 - August 14, 12-5pm, BCNC Quincy (Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center Quincy), 275 Hancock St., Suite 200, Quincy (Across from North Quincy High School — next to McDonalds in North Quincy). RSVP: E-mail Catalina Tang at catalina.tang@bcnc. net or call 617-770-0091.

The Community Calendar has been established to list community events at no cost. The admission cost of events must not exceed $10. Church services and recruitment requests will not be published. THERE IS NO GUARANTEE OF PUBLICATION. To guarantee publication with a paid advertisement please call advertising at (617) 261-4600 ext. 7799 or email ads@bannerpub.com. NO LISTINGS ARE ACCEPTED BY TELEPHONE, FAX OR MAIL. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Deadline for all listings is Friday at noon for publication the following week. E-MAIL your information to: calendar@bannerpub.com. To list your event online please go to www.baystatebanner.com/ events and list your event directly. Events listed in print are not added to the online events page by Banner staff members. There are no ticket cost restrictions for the online postings.


Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 19

Washington St. continued from page 1

that corridor, as well as other areas of the city. Those master plans, Golden said, would be incorporated in a larger master plan for the entire city, providing a unified vision for housing, economic development and transportation in Boston. “We haven’t done a city-wide master plan in 50 years,” Golden told the gathering in the BRA board room. Mayor Martin Walsh, who attended the meeting, said the Urban Land Institute’s study of the area would inform master plans for Egleston Square and the city. “What you are doing here today is giving us ideas on how we can move forward,” he told the planners. Walsh has called for the construction of 53,000 new housing units in Boston, an ambitious plan he says will ease pressure on Boston’s real estate market — one of the most expensive in the country. The BRA’s city wide master plan, and the smaller plans it will encompass, will help the city prioritize areas for construction of new housing.

Recommendations

The Urban Land Institute is a nonprofit association of urban planners, city officials and real estate developers who share information, best practices and ideas on urban land use. As part of ULI’s Daniel Rose Fellows program, a team of urban planning professionals spent four days in Boston studying the corridor and presented their recommendations last Thursday. While many of the ULI recommendations were specific to Egleston Square, some recommendations were directed at lack of uniformity and predictability in the process of obtaining approval for new projects. Calvin Gladney, a Washington, D.C. real estate developer, said the city’s Article 80 process, through which developers are required to obtain community support for their projects, is too cumbersome. Gladney suggested that many of the specifics developers and neighborhood residents typically fight over — building height, density and parking — should be governed by a plan that would prevent what

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he called “parcel-by-parcel fights.” “What we’re proposing is a more efficient development process,” he said. “If you want to build 53,000 new units in this city, the development process has to support development activity. Since we’re outsiders and we’re going to run and get on a plane, we can say that.” Many of the ULI team’s specific recommendations for the corridor were centered on the vacant, city- and state-owned parcels near Forest Hills. “While a lot of people might not appreciate density or high-rise development, this is a place where you can do it,” said Rick Dishnica, a San Francisco-based real estate consultant, speaking about the vast swaths of vacant land near Forest Hills. Dishnica and others from the Urban Land Institute said the vacant parcels would be a good site for affordable housing, large retail projects and office space. Beyond Williams Street, growth potential is limited by the density

of the street scape, which features both residential and commercial uses. Along that stretch of Washington Street, developers have proposed the construction of a sixstory, 76 unit apartment building on the site of a former electrical supply store. Yet the ULI presenters said commercial uses would have the greatest impact on the area’s revitalization. “Housing may not be the primary driver,” Dishnica said. “Commercial activity should be what you’re focused on.” Among the recommendations the group offered were increased funding for storefront improvements and the redevelopment of the site currently occupied by the Greater Egleston YMCA to accommodate retail space. The panel of housing planners also recommended establishing design standards for development along Washington Street, façade improvements for storefronts, improved lighting along the street, better landscaping and trees,

enhanced code enforcement, better pedestrian crossings and stricter regulation of billboards.

Displacement

Among the hot-button issues the panel did not investigate was displacement of moderate- and low-income residents in the area, many of whom are leaving in the face of precipitous rent increases. When City Life/Vida Urbana organizer Maria Cristina Blanco asked members of the panel about their ideas, the panelists offered none. “So no recommendations for people who are being displaced now?” she asked. “We really haven’t drilled down to that level,” a panelist responded. Department of Neighborhood Development Director Sheila Dillon, who is a fellow with ULI, said her agency is considering ways to maintain affordability in the area. “We looking at the existing housing stock and how it could be

acquired by nonprofits and benevolent for-profits,” she said. Washington Street between Egleston Square and Forest Hills has traditionally been a working class community. Up until 1987, the elevated Orange Line, which had stops at Egleston Square and Green Street, cast a shadow over the street and was thought to have depressed real estate values on Washington and nearby streets. In recent years, as Jamaica Plain has gentrified, rents and home prices along Washington Streets have been on the rise. In an interview following the meeting, Egleston Square Main Street Executive Director Luis Edgardo Cotto said a wave of new buyers and renters is sweeping toward Washington Street from the more affluent side of Jamaica Plain closer to Jamaica Pond. “Jamaica Plain is now one of the hottest real estate markets in the country,” he said. “Properties consistently sell for 60 percent higher than the asking price. Displacement is very real.”


20 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

LEGAL MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed General Bids for MPA CONTRACT NO. L1281-C1, AIRFIELD WIDE SNOWMELTER SYSTEM UPGRADES – PHASE I, AT LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02128-2909, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2015 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE:

PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OFFICE, SUITE 209S, LOGAN OFFICE CENTER, ONE HARBORSIDE DRIVE, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02128-2909 AT 10:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 2015.

The work includes DEMOLITION AND DISPOSAL OF EXISTING DIESEL FIRED SNOWMELTER AND INSTALLATION OF NEW OWNER SUPPLIED GAS FIRED SNOWMELTER. SPECIFIC ITEMS OF WORK INCLUDE REMOVAL AND DISPOSAL OF EXISTING SNOWMELTER AND INFRASTUCTURE INCLUDING FUEL TANK AND MELTING PIT; CONSTRUCTION OF NEW SNOWMELTER INFRASTRUCTURE; UTILITY CONNECTIONS; SNOWMELTER INSTALLATION AND COMMISSIONING. Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 2015. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. The estimated contract cost is SEVEN HUNDRED TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($720,000). A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $1,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. This contract is subject to a Minority/Women Owned Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than FIVE AND SIX TENTHS PERCENT (5.6%) of the Contract be performed by minority and women owned business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

LEGAL SIGNS, PAVEMENT MARKINGS, LOAMING AND SEEDING AND OTHER INCIDENTAL WORK. Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8, 2015. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. The estimated contract cost is ONE MILLION, THREE HUNDRED FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($1,350,000). A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $10,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. This contract is subject to a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than EIGHT AND TWO TENTHS PERCENT (8.2%) of the Contract be performed by disadvantaged business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. A Contractor having fifty (50) or more employees and his subcontractors having fifty (50) or more employees who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will, within one hundred twenty (120) days from the contract commencement, be required to develop a written affirmative action compliance program for each of its establishments. Compliance Reports - Within thirty (30) days of the award of this Contract the Contractor shall file a compliance report (Standard Form [SF 100]) if: (a)

The Contractor has not submitted a complete compliance report within twelve (12) months preceding the date of award, and

(b)

The Contractor is within the definition of “employer” in Paragraph 2c(3) of the instructions included in SF100.

The contractor shall require the subcontractor on any first tier subcontracts, irrespective of the dollar amount, to file SF 100 within thirty (30) days after the award of the subcontracts, if the above two conditions apply. SF 100 will be furnished upon request. SF 100 is normally furnished Contractors annually, based on a mailing list currently maintained by the Joint Reporting Committee. In the event a contractor has not received the form, he may obtain it by writing to the following address: Joint Reporting Committee 1800 G Street Washington, DC 20506 Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA CONTRACT NO. H216-C1 TAXIWAY G RUNUP AREA AND RUNWAY 23 SAFETY AREA IMPROVEMENTS, L. G. HANSCOM FIELD, BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2015, immediately after which, in a designated room, the proposal will be opened and read publicly. NOTE:

PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE 3RD FLOOR CONFERENCE ROOM, CIVIL AIR TERMINAL, L. G. HANSCOM FIELD, BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS AT 1:00 PM (LOCAL TIME) ON THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015.

The work includes: RECLAMATION OF THE EXISTING RUNWAY 23 END SAFETY AREA BITUMINOUS CONCRETE, RE-USE OF THE RECLAIMED BASE MATERIAL FOR THE RUNWAY 23 END BLAST PAD AND TAXIWAY G RUNUP AREA, STRIPPING OF THE TOPSOIL IN THE RUNUP AREA FOR RE-USE, ACCESS ROAD FOR ARFF EQUIPMENT BY MAINTENANCE BUILDING, REGRADING, WARM MIX ASPHALT, TAXIWAY EDGE LIGHTS AND GUIDANCE

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. L930-C5 TERMINAL C - E ROOF REPLACEMENT, LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2015, 2015 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly.

Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of ROOFING. The estimated contract cost is ONE MILLION, NINE HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS ($1,900,000.00). Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44J inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of TEN MILLION DOLLARS ($10,000,000.00) Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. No filed sub bids will be required for this contract. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MASSACHUSETTS BAY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY TRANSPORTATION BUILDING 100 SUMMER STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02116-3975 NOTICE TO BIDDERS Electronic proposals for the following project will be received through the internet using Bid Express until the date and time stated below, and will be posted on www.bidx.com forthwith after the bid submission deadline. No paper copies of bids will be accepted. Bidders must have a valid digital ID issued by the Authority in order to bid on projects. Bidders need to apply for a digital ID with Bid Express at least 14 days prior to a scheduled bid opening date. Electronic bids for MBTA Contract No. C72CN03, WORCESTER COMMUTER RAIL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, RAIL REPLACEMENT, FRAMINGHAM TO WORCESTER, MA, (CLASS 1, GENERAL TRANSIT CONSTRUCTION, and CLASS 3, TRACK WORK, PROJECT VALUE - $5,500,000, can be submitted at www.bidx.com until two o’clock (2:00 p.m.) on April 23, 2015. Immediately thereafter, in a designated room, the Bids will be opened and read publicly. Work along the Worcester Line will consist of rail de-stressing operations at various locations on both Tracks 1 between Boston and Worcester. Work shall be performed during weekdays and weekends and shall be done segmentally within signal block limits as shown on the Contract drawings. Rail de-stressing shall include but not limited to cutting welded rail at selected intervals, removing rail anchors and/or clips, heating rail to desired neutral temperature, providing means for the rail to expand, re-anchoring or clipping the rail at the desired temperature, and re-welding the rail. Bidders attention is directed to Appendix 1, Notice of Requirement for Affirmative Action to Insure Equal Employment Opportunity; and to Appendix 2, Supplemental Equal Employment Opportunity, Anti-Discrimination, and Affirmative Action Program in the specifications. While there is no DBE goal associated with this contract, the Authority strongly encourages the use of Minority, Women and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises as prime contractors, subcontractors and suppliers in all of its contracting opportunities. Additional information and instructions on how to submit a bid are available at http://www.mbta.com/business_center/bidding_solicitations/cur rent_solicitations/

PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL NOTE: PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10:00 a.m. LOCAL TIME ON FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2015.

On behalf of the MBTA, thank you for your time and interest in responding to this Notice to Bidders Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority

The work includes REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT OF THE EXISTING ROOFING, FLASHINGS, INSULATIONS, AND ASSOCIATED WORK.

Francis A. DePaola, P.E. Interim General Manager of the MBTA April 2, 2015

Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2015.

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Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 21

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

LEGAL

LEGAL

INVITATION TO BID The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority is seeking bids for the following: BID NO.

DESCRIPTION

DATE

TIME

WRA-4015

Purchase of 400 and 350 Motors for Nut Island Odor Control

04/20/15

11:00 a.m

WRA-4011

Purchase of Plumbing Supplies for Cottage Farm Wash Down (or Equal)

04/22/15

11:00 a.m.

WRA-4022

Purchase of Thirty (3) 6” Plug 04/22/15 Valves, NBR, EPDM, NT Grooved Ends (or Equal)

11:00 a.m.

WRA-4020

Websense Upgrade

04/22/15

11:30 a.m.

WRA-4016

Vibration Analysis Training and Support Services Deer Island Treatment Plant

04/22/15

2:00 p.m.

will be issued in the second phase of the procurement process. The project delivery method for construction will be public CM at Risk with a Guaranteed Maximum Price (“GMP”) under M.G.L. 149A. In addition, firms interested in being prequalified must demonstrate that they have had prior experience as a Construction Manager on at least three CM-at-Risk projects and have completed at least one project of a similar cost, complexity, type and size as this project as it is described further below and in the RFQ. Firms must also demonstrate prior experience working on an active campus. The prior CM-at-Risk projects must have been completed within the last ten (10) years. At the time a CM firm submits the Qualifications Statement, it must have a DCAMM Certification in the Contractor Category, “General Building Construction”, with a single limit greater than the Estimated Total Project cost of $31,531,000. See www.mass.gov/dcam/certification for certification forms and the required Update Form.

To access and bid on Events please go to the MWRA Supplier Portal at www. mwra.com.

The project involves four occupied buildings and is divided into four phases. The first phase involves a major replacement of centralized infrastructure in buildings 1 through 4, along with accessibility and envelope work for building 2. The scope in subsequent phases is grouped largely by building and scheduled in such a manner to minimize disruption to the operation of the college. The Request for Qualifications may be downloaded from http://www.commbuys.com or copies may be obtained by contacting the DCAMM Bid Room, One Ashburton Place, Boston, MA 02108, 617-727-4003, bidroom.dcamm@ state.ma.us on or after Wednesday, April 8, 2015

CLASSIFIED LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE DIVISION OF CAPITAL ASSET MANGEMENT & MAINTENANCE (DCAMM)

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance Carol W. Gladstone, Commissioner

Request for Qualifications for Construction Management at Risk Services Massachusetts State Project No. RCC1201 DC1 Major Campus Renovation, Roxbury Community College, Roxbury, Massachusetts The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, through its Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance (DCAMM), requests that qualified and experienced firms submit a Statement of Qualifications and required information to the DCAMM Bid Room no later than 2:00 PM, Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Firms interested in providing Public Construction Manager at Risk Services (“CM” or “CM at Risk”) for the Roxbury Community College – Major Campus Renovation (“Project”) are invited to submit a Statement of Qualifications (“SOQ”) to the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance (“DCAMM”). This CM at Risk procurement is conducted pursuant to M.G.L. 149A, contained in Chapter 193 of the Acts of 2004. This Request for Qualifications (“RFQ”) is the first phase of a two-phase procurement process as set forth in M.G.L. 149A. DCAMM is prequalifying firms interested in providing public CM at Risk services for the project through the RFQ process. DCAMM will evaluate submitted SOQs based upon the identified evaluation criteria as set forth in the RFQ and will select those respondents it deems qualified. Only those respondents deemed qualified will be invited to submit a proposal in response to a detailed Request for Proposals (“RFP”), which

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU10P0465EA Citation on Petition for Removal Estate of Elizabeth H. Sheppard Date of Death: 12/14/2009

To all interested persons: A petition has been filed by Everette Sheppard, Jr. of Dorchester, MA and Yvonne Wynn of Mattapan, MA requesting that Jerome Sheppard of Dorchester, MA be removed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

OFFICE SPACE

Wollaston Manor

DORCHESTER/ MILTON

Senior Living At It’s Best

CHELSEA APARTMENT

91 Clay Street Quincy, MA 02170

1st Class Office Space Corner of Gallivan Blvd and Washington St ample parking.

4+ bdrms Newly renovated, 2000+ sq ft apt in 3 fam, no smkng/pets, hrdwd flrs, eat-in kit, pantry, lg master bedroom, din and lv rm, laundry rm, enclosed frnt/bck prchs, off street prkng, T access, min to Bost.

A senior/disabled/ handicapped community

$650/mo. $695/mo. $1500/mo.

0 BR units = $1,027/mo 1 BR units = $1,101/mo All utilities included.

OWNER

Call Sandy Miller,

617-835-6373

#888-691-4301

Sec 8 OK

Docket No. SU92P1174

Citation on Petition for Formal Appointment of Successor Personal Representative Estate of Lelia, M. Clark Date of Death: 10/18/1991 To all interested persons: A petition has been filed by Arcelia M. Pereira of Philadelphia, PA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order that Arcelia M. Pereira of Philadelphia, PA be appointed as Successor Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve With Personal Surety on the bond and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 04/23/2015. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: March 23, 2015 Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate

REAL ESTATE

AFFORDABLE HOUSE Franklin, MA FRANKLIN MUNICIPAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST Household Income Limits: 1 Person - $ 48,800 2 Person - $ 55,800 3 Person - $ 62,750 4 Person - $ 69,700 5 Person - $ 75,300 6 Person - $ 80,900 Assets are capped at $75,000.

Application Deadline is May 15, 2015 @ 1:00 pm in the Town Administrator’s Office, 355 East Central Street, Franklin, MA 02038.

Program Restrictions Apply.

call (617) 261-4600  • baystatebanner.com

Applications and Information available at the Municipal Building and at www.franklin.ma.us Town Administrator’s Page, Affordable Housing. Contact Maxine (508) 520-4949.

1

2

3

4

Parker Hill Apartments Brand New Renovated Apartment Homes

Rental Amounts and Minimum and Maximum Income Limits as of 1/1/2015

1BD Min Max

SUFFOLK Division

SUBSCRIBE TO THE BANNER

Waitlist remains open for 1&2 bedroom units. 3 BEDROOM WAITLIST IS CLOSED AND HAS A 1.5 YEAR WAIT AT THIS TIME. 2 Bedroom 80% units available for immediate occupancy.

50% $782

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department

Property Manager

311 Lowell Street Andover, Massachusetts 01810

Household Size

WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: March 30, 2015 Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate

For Sale: 4 Bedrooms, 2 ½ Bathrooms, 2 Car Garage Selling @ $242,240 93 Brandywine Road

HAMILTON GREEN APARTMENTS

Rent

10:00 a.m. on 04/30/2015. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you.

617-283-2081

heated

Brokers Welcome

LEGAL

5

6

Stainless Steel Appliances New Kitchen Cabinets Hardwood Floors Updated Bathroom Custom Accent Wall Painting Free Parking Free Wi-Fi in lobby Modern Laundry Facilities

Two Bedrooms Starting at $2200

Affordable Rental Housing Concord, MA Brookside Square at 50 Beherrell Street Eight Affordable Rental Units, 2 ADA units

$25,170 $31,350

$25,170 $35,800

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$931

2BD Min Max

N/A

$30,210 $35,800

$30,210 $40,300

$30,210 $44,750

N/A

N/A

80% $1,161

1BD Min Max

$31,351 $46,100

$35,801 $52,650

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Concord Town House, Monument Square, Concord MA 01742

$1,386

2BD Min Max

N/A

$35,801 $52,650

$40,301 $59,250

$44,751 $65,800

N/A

N/A

Applications accepted through: May 5, 2015 1:00PM

Tenants pay for Electricity only – Utility Allowances are as follows: 1BR - $49; 2BR - $65; 3BR - $80 *Minimum income requirements do not apply to Section 8 Voucher holders. All utilities, except electricity are included in rent. Voucher holders are eligible. Applications are available at the property daily between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday – Friday or call Lisa Perez @ 978-623-8155, TTY:711 or 800-439-0183.

888-842-7945

ADVERTISE

your classifieds with THE BAY STATE BANNER

Four 1BR Units: $1,236 per month Four 2BR Units: $1,374 per month Information Session: March 30, 2015, 7:00 pm,

Maximum Income: 80% of area median income Minimum Income: No more than 35% of an applicant’s gross income can be spent on rent Application and Information: Housing@Sudbury.Ma.US

(617) 261- 4600 x 7799

ads@bannerpub.com

278 Old Sudbury Road, Sudbury, MA 01776, 978-639-3373


22 • Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY 3 AFFORDABLE Single Family Homes TO BE SOLD TO ELIGIBLE HOMEBUYERS BY LOTTERY PROCESS Holly Glen, 7 Azalea Drive, Unit #25, Burlington (1) New Construction 3-Bed, 2-1/2- Bath Single Family (Detached Condominium) Home $195,000; 1882 Apprx SF 2 LeRoy Drive, Burlington (1) Existing 3 Bed, 1-1/2 Bath Single Family Home $213,800, 1564 Apprx SF 34 Harriet Avenue, Burlington (1) Existing 4 Bed, 2 Baths, Single Family Home $231,000, 1592 Apprx SF

Maximum Income Limit: 1 Person - $48,800 3 Persons – $62,750 5 Persons – $75,300 7 Persons $86,450 2 Persons - $55,800 4 Persons -$69,700 6 Persons - $80,900 8 Persons $92,050 Maximum Asset Limit: $75,000, as defined in application packet Other Restrictions Apply INFORMATION MEETING 5/11/15; 6-8 PM Burlington Public Library OPEN HOUSES – 5/16/15, 1-3PM AT SEPARATE PROPERTY ADDRESSES ABOVE Application Packet w/ additional details at: Burlington Public Library or Burlington Town Hall, Town Administrator’s Office Or Write To: JTE Realty, P. O. Box 955, North Andover, Ma. 01845 Or e-mail: hollyglen@jterealtyassociates.com MAILING ADDRESS MUST BE PROVIDED 978-258-3492 Application Deadline Received by 6/5/2015

REAL ESTATE Bedford Affordable Housing The Crossing at Bedford www.TheCrossingAtBedford.com 1BR condominium for $156,500 2BR condominium for $177,000 This is a lottery for the 2 affordable homes available at The Crossing at Bedford. These 2 homes will be sold at affordable prices to households with incomes at or below 80% of the area median income. It is anticipated that the first affordable homes will be ready in Summer 2015. For details on the development, go to www.TheCrossingAtBedford.com For details on the lottery, go to www.s-e-b.com

HELP WANTED

Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R), a nonprofit based in Boston’s Back Bay and dedicated to advancing the highest ethical standards in the conduct of research, is recruiting for a full-time Operations Assistant. The Operations Assistant supports PRIM&R’s core activities by providing topnotch customer service and by coordinating event registrations, membership applications, and internal operations. The position requires an intelligent and responsible individual with attention to detail and exemplary customer service. Additional qualifications include: a BA/BS and 1 to 2 years of relevant work experience. Dedication, enthusiasm, and a committed work ethic are also a must. Experience with Microsoft Office is required. Experience with CRM databases and/or accounting packages preferred. The salary range is in the low $30Ks, commensurate with experience, and includes a robust benefits package. Interested applicants should send their resume and a writing sample to jobs@primr.org. No phone calls, please.

The 1BR home is 788 sqft and has 1 full bathroom. The 2BR home is 1,144 sqft and has two full bathrooms. Both homes include one surface parking spot. Households cannot have more than $75,000 in assets. The Maximum Household Income Limits are: $48,800 (1 person), $55,800 (2 people), $62,750 (3 people), $69,700 (4 people) For more information on the Development, the Units or the Lottery and Application Process, please visit: www.s-e-b.com/lottery or call 617.782.6900 (press 2 for homeownership and then press 6 for The Crossing at Bedford). Applications and Required Income Documentation must be delivered, not postmarked, by 2 pm on June 9th, 2015. A Public Information Session will be held on April 28th, 2015 at 6 pm in Bedford Town Hall (10 Mudge Way) The lottery will be on June 23rd, 2015 in Bedford Town Hall. Applications and Info Packets also available at: Bedford Public Library located at 7 Mudge Way (Hours: M- Th, 9-9, F 9-6, Sa 9-5, Su 1-5)

GET READY FOR

A Great Office Job! Restoration Housing 747 Huntington Ave Boston, MA 02115 T: 617-232-5910 F: 617-734-5853 TDD: 1-800-439-2370

Train for Administrative, Financial

Services, Health Insurance Customer Service & Medical Office jobs.

Work in hospitals, colleges, insurance agencies, banks, businesses, government offices, health insurance call centers, and more! YMCA Training, Inc. is recruiting training candidates now! We will help you apply for free training. Job placement assistance provided. No prior experience necessary, but must have HS diploma or GED. Free YMCA membership for you and your family while enrolled in YMCA Training, Inc.

Call today to schedule an Information Session: 617-542-1800

Please take notice that the Waiting List(s) for Restoration Housing will be closed as of April 24, 2015 for the one, two, and three bedroom apartments. We are closing the wait lists as the average waiting time for an apartment exceeds more than five years. An advertisement will be placed in the newspaper when the list re-opens. Thank you for your interests in joining our community. Managed by: Wingate Management Company

RESIDENTIAL SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT PROGRAM Substance abuse facility seeking 1 Part-Time Counselor. (30 hrs per week/4 days a week). Experience with substance abuse and/or mental health clients is required. Duties include individual and group counseling, client supervision, case management. Minority candidates are strongly encouraged to apply. LADC, CADAC, experience preferred; B.A. required. AA/EOE Employer Non-smoking incentives Please send resume to:

North Cottage Program Inc. 69 East Main Street Norton, MA 02766

E-mail resume to: Fax resume to:

lisajo@northcottage.com 508-285-4771

Procurement Specialist:

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED Are you interested in a

Healthcare CAREER?

SUBSCRIBE TO THE BANNER

call (617) 261-4600  •  baystatebanner.com

Project Hope, in partnership with Partners HealthCare is currently accepting applications for a FREE entry level healthcare employment training program. Program eligibility includes: • • • • •

Have a high school diploma or equivalent Have a verifiable reference of 1 year from a former employer Pass assessments in reading, language, and computer skills Have CORI clearance Be legally authorized to work in the United States

For more information and to register for the next Open House please visit our website at www.prohope.org/openhouse.htm or call 617-442-1880 ext. 218.

The Procurement Specialist at the Massachusetts Port Authority is responsible for processing contracts and the related purchase order transactions. The Procurement Specialist coordinates the required documentation for the procurement files. He or she works with departments to facilitate the processing of the necessary information for the contracts. EDUCATION LEVEL: High School diploma or equivalent required. Associate’s degree in business or equivalent related work experience preferred. EXPERIENCE IN RELATED FIELD: 1 - 3 years’ relevant administrative experience required. Familiarity with procurement rules and procedures strongly preferred. Familiarity with PeopleSoft financials strongly preferred. MASSPORT IS AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER COMMITTED TO WORKFORCE DIVERSITY You can now apply online by clicking on the job title you are interested in and clicking on the “Apply” link! http://agency.governmentjobs.com/massport/default.cfm


Thursday, April 9, 2015 • BAY STATE BANNER • 23

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Property Manager

Transportation Services Assistant:

United Housing Management LLC is seeking an experienced professional to manage a Section 8 Development. The successful candidate will have a minimum of five years of experience in managing at least 150 units with Project Based Section 8 and Tax Credit layering; ability to interpret and analyze financial projections, experience and skills in team building and motivation, including organizational skills with strong verbal and written communication ; ability to relate effectively with people of various backgrounds. Bilingual English/Spanish is a plus. Professional Certification as a Property Manager and Tax Credit Specialist are required. Transportation is a must. Submit resume and cover letter to: United Housing Management LLC, 530 Warren Street, Dorchester, Ma 02121. Fax: 617-4427231 no later than April 10, 2015. United Housing Management LLC is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

The Transportation Services Assistant at the Massachusetts Port Authority provides administrative support for the Transportation Services Unit, maintains and updates the private carrier database and provides administrative assistance with the unit’s customer service programs. EDUCATION LEVEL: High School Diploma or equivalent required. Associate’s degree preferred. EXPERIENCE IN RELATED FIELD: 1 - 3 years in account and contract coordination, administration, and billing. MASSPORT IS AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER COMMITTED TO WORKFORCE DIVERSITY You can now apply online by clicking on the job title you are interested in and clicking on the “Apply” link! http://agency.governmentjobs.com/massport/default.cfm

ADVERTISE

YOUR CLASSIFIEDS

Delivery Driver’s Assistant

(617) 261- 4600 x 7799

Property Manager United Housing Management LLC is seeking an experienced professional to manage a Market Rent Development. The successful candidate will have a minimum of 5 years of experience in managing at least 150 units of Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) with the ability to interpret and analyze financial projections, experience and skills in team building and motivation, including organizational skills with strong verbal and written communication; ability to relate effectively with people of various backgrounds. Proficiency in a second language is a plus. Professional Certification as a Property Manager and Tax Credit Specialist are required. Transportation is a must. Submit resume and cover letter to: United Housing Management LLC, 530 Warren Street, Dorchester, Ma 02121. Fax: 617-442-7231 no later than April 10, 2015. United Housing Management LLC is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

The job will require working on the road as a helper or delivery driver when necessary. n Must have experience driving vans n Must know Boston and surrounding areas n Have a valid driver license and provide copy of current clean driving record n Must be willing to take drug test n Ensuring all paperwork related to delivery of rugs or pick up of rugs is signed for and completed n Must be able to do heavy lifting at times. 60+ pounds Please call LaNette between 11-1 to make appointment for interview Adams & Swett 617-268-8000

HELP WANTED

HOUSING PLANNER SEARCH REOPENED

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), the regional planning agency for Metro Boston, seeks a Housing Planner as part of the Land Use Department team. The planner will help achieve the goals of MAPC’s long-range smart growth regional plan, MetroFuture. In large part, the planner will assist with drafting housing production plans, reviewing and drafting zoning to address housing affordability, and assisting with state housing policy activities. Duties include: Designing new policies and programs to preserve and create affordable and mixed-income housing in Metro Boston; Researching and advocating for greater equity throughout Metro Boston in regard to housing and other land use issues; Helping cities and towns to develop new plans, zoning, permitting, programs, and other implementation strategies to achieve affordable housing, fair housing, and sustainable development goals; Desired qualifications: Demonstrated experience, particularly in housing, with creation and implementation of local housing or master plans, public policy analysis, political decision-making, and/or project evaluation; Knowledge of real estate development, ability to evaluate residential or commercial sites and projects, or hands-on experience with housing production; Education: MA in planning, policy, or related field, or at least 3 years professional experience in housing or land use; Demonstrated history of entrepreneurial work ethic and ability to manage projects to completion; Excellent interpersonal, verbal, and written communication skills. Compensation and benefits: Full-time, one year position with excellent state employee benefits package. Salary contingent upon qualifications; range is $55,000-$65,000. All candidates must have a valid driver’s license and/or the ability to arrange transportation to meetings in different parts of the region and legal authorization (citizenship or visa) to work in the USA. Position open until filled. See complete job ad at www.mapc.org (Jobs at MAPC) AND APPLY AT LINK SHOWN THERE, and please attach cover letter and resume. MAPC is an EOE/ AA employer. We are committed to creating a diverse workforce and encourage applications from minority group members, women, persons with disabilities, veterans, and others who may contribute to the agency’s diversity. Posted 4/3/15. Thomas E. Hauenstein, Operations Manager.

Employment Opportunities: Early Care and Education Center: Roxbury n Teacher* n Substitute Teachers *Must be in a degree program or have already obtained a degree in Early Childhood Education. CSA: Community Service Agency (Specialized in Black Families): This program provides support to families with young people with Severe Emotional Disturbances: Roxbury

Behavioral Health Services – Roxbury Community Support Program Worker: Provides outreach, care management monitoring, follow-up, and general assistance for clients in dealing with day-to-day activities or problems that may impede access to treatment or the progress of recovery *Must have a Bachelor’s degree in human services field from an accredited university and one (1) year of experience working with the target population. n In Home Therapist: Providing strength-based therapeutic relationship between a Master level clinician and the youth and family for the purpose of treating the youth’s behavioral health needs, including improving the family’s ability to provide effective support for the youth to promote his/her healthy functioning within the family. * Must be a master’s level (or above) with at least 3 years experience in providing outpatient Behavioral health services to youth and families. Experience managing a home-based or Wraparound program models is preferred. Must be certified in the Massachusetts CBHI CANS. n Outpatient Mental Health Therapist: Performing assessments; formulating clinical diagnoses; providing individual, family and group counseling; collaborating with other agencies, family members and other relevant parties

Intensive Foster Care Program: Roxbury & Tewksbury n Family Visitation Program & Intensive Foster Care/ Family Support and Stabilization Program Manager (Roxbury): Overall responsibility for compliance with contract regarding utilization, policy and procedures and Licensing. High energy level needed in fast-paced environment with skills necessary in trouble-shooting and crises management in Intensive Foster Care, Family Support & Stabilization and Family Visitation Programs. Must demonstrate the ability and experience in supervision, program administration, program development. Must have thorough knowledge of Early Education & Care (EEC) and Department of Children and Families (DCF) policies and procedures. * Must hold a Master’s Degree in Social Worker or related field. Preference LICSW, LCSW. Must have a minimum of three (3) years experience working in an Administrative Capacity. Must have a valid Driver’s License.

n Family Partners: Individuals who are experienced caregivers of youth with emotional challenges and are able to support and coach other families. n Intensive Care Coordinator: An individual that facilitates the Wraparound care planning process and coordinates services and natural supports for youth experiencing emotional and behavioral challenges. n Senior Family Partners: Ensures that all Intensive Care Coordinators complete all required trainings, including CANS and CANS certification (Training is completed upon initial employment and annually.); ensure that all ICC’s provide intensive care coordination to youth/families; facilitates the development of Care Plan Teams; involved in the client’s care; providing consultation to CSR non clinical and home-based clinical staff; and participating in research/evaluation activities to ensure the delivery of evidence-based trauma informed care and best clinical practices.. * Master’s level degree is required in Social Work, Counseling, Psychology, or a related field with 2 years experience in providing Behavioral health services to youth, adults and families. Experience in home-based or wraparound program models is preferred. Must be certified in the Massachusetts CBHI CANS n In Home Therapist- Therapeutic Training and Support: A service provided by a qualified paraprofessional working in collaboration with a Master level clinician, using the co-clinician model, to support implementation of the therapeutic objectives of the treatment plan designed to address the youth’s mental health, behavioral and emotional needs. This service includes teaching the youth to understand, direct, interpret, manage, and control feelings and emotional responses to situations and to assist the family to address the youth’s emotional and mental health needs. *Must have a valid driver license without restrictions and have reliable transportation. Bachelor’s degree in human services field from an accredited university and one (1) year of experience working with the target population, or Associate’s degree in a Human Service field from an accredited school and one (1) year of experience working with children/adolescents/transition n Child Specific Worker (Spanish Speaking- Tewksbury Office): CSR’s Intensive Foster Care Program works to place children in stable, loving, nurturing foster homes. Our goal is to find both short-term and long-term placements for at-risk children and youth with a broad range of emotional, physical and developmental special needs. Reunification with the child’s biological family is our goal. When that is not feasible, care providers and staff work together to formulate an alternate plan for permanency such as kinship care, guardianship, or adoption. * Bachelor’s level; and/ or 2-5 years of experience. Must be LCSW, LSW, LSWA, or LICSW eligible. Must have a valid driver’s license without restrictions and have reliable transportation

conducts CANS and risk assessments; convenes CPT meetings; coordinates and communicates with the members of the CPT to ensure the implementation of the ICP; works directly with the youth and family to implement elements of the ICP; coordinates the delivery of available services; monitors and reviews progress toward ICP goals and updates the ICP in concert with CPT. * Must be a master’s level (or above) clinician with at least 3 years experience in providing outpatient behavioral health services to youth and families. Experience managing a home-based or wraparound program is preferred. Must be licensed at the Independent practice level to support programs requirements. Must be certified in the Massachusetts CBHI CANS.

age youth, and a minimum of two (2) years experience working with children/ adolescents/transition age youth n Clinical Supervisor: Provide weekly supervision to Clinicians and Therapeutic Training & Support Staff. Offer guidance to direct care staff in addressing client management, crisis intervention, and emergencies. Ensure adherence to professional standards and policies. Provide quality assurance through chart review. Facilitate peer review and related activities to ensure quality of services. Oversee charting and documentation to ensure that clients meet medical necessity criteria for the services. Provide Clinical Supervision for license eligible interns. *Must be Massachusetts CANS certified. Must be a Master’s level (or above) clinician with at least three (3) years supervisory and/or management experience. Experience managing a home-based or wraparound program is preferred. Must be Independently Licensed to meet programs requirements. Must have at least five (5) years post graduate experience providing behavioral health services to youth and families. Experience in navigating any of the child/family serving systems and experience in advocating for family members who are involved with behavioral health systems is preferred. Must have a valid driver license without restrictions and reliable transportation with valid state minimum insurance coverage.

Quality Assurance Team: Roxbury n Quality Assurance Auditor: Responsible for auditing and evaluating the work product of other departments within the agency, in accordance with articulated standards. Accuracy, thoroughness, and attention to detail are key requirements of this position, as is a service-focused, team-oriented attitude. Strong proficiency in the Microsoft Office Suite ETO software, Therasoft, and similar software for case management and electronic health records. Bachelor’s required, Master’s preferred, particularly MSW or M.Ed. with licensure as either LMHC (Mental Health Counseling) or LMFT (Marriage and Family Therapy). Bilingual in Spanish, Cape Verdean Creole, or Haitian Creole a plus.

For more information regarding these listings and/or other employment opportunities, please visit our website at www.csrox.org and send your resume to:

Children’s Services of Roxbury, Inc., 520 Dudley St., Roxbury, MA 02119, Attn: Human Resource Department or email to cshropshire@csrox.org NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Subscribe to the Banner call: 617-261-4600


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