Page 1

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

John Thomas of Brockton, two-time Olympian, dies ..pg. 11

Joy for the people pg. 8

FREE

Thursday • January 24, 2013 • www.baystatebanner.com

FREE

The ABCs of cold and flu season Karen Miller and Howard Manly People often confuse the flu with the common cold. That’s a mistake. “They’re completely different viruses,” said Dr. Richard D. Zane, professor and chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, formerly the vice chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “The symptoms can be similar, but those of the flu are more severe. The fever can be higher and of longer duration. Exhaustion, fatigue, and aches and pains are more pronounced with the flu.” Influenza, more commonly referred to as the flu, is a contagious virus that attacks the respiratory system — nose, throat, bronchial tubes and lungs. Anyone is susceptible, but some people are at higher risk of developing serious complications. Small children, the elderly, those with weakened immune systems or certain chronic medical conditions can be hit hard by pneumonia and other infections. These complications can be deadly. Although flu-related deaths vary from year to year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as 48,000 succumbed during the 2003-2004 flu season. That’s more than the estimated

number of deaths every year from breast cancer. “It’s not an entity to be taken mildly,” said Dr. Nancy Norman, Medical Director of Integration at Massachusetts Behavioral Health Partnership, formerly the chief medical officer of the Boston Public Health Commission. “Some people have the attitude — I’m young, I’m healthy — and don’t pay attention to it. Yet some of these very people died of complications.” There are three types of influenza virus — the As, Bs and Cs. Influenzas A and C can infect animals as well as humans, while Influenza B circulates among humans only. Type A is more serious and the cause of deadly worldwide pandemics, including H1N1. But the flu virus is forever changing. It mutates, establishing a slight variation of its previous form. It is this variation that causes problems when developing vaccinations against the disease. Seasonal flu vaccine typically contains two strains of A and one of B virus, but scientists can only estimate which types and subsets will circulate each year. “It’s hard to be 100 percent correct,” said Zane. “But that’s not a reason to not get a vaccine. Even if wrong, the symptoms are much less severe.” The CDC estimates the effectiveness at closer to 60 to 90 percent. Regardless, the vaccination helps reduce the risk and severity

Influenza, more commonly referred to as the flu, is a contagious virus that attacks the respiratory system — nose, throat, bronchial tubes and lungs.

Flu, continued to page 12

Obama’s inaugural address before a crowd of 700,000 on Monday was lit by the torch of equality. At the same time, he blasted Congress’ obstructionism and unveiled bold plans for the future. (Caitlin Yoshiko Kandil photo)

Obama invokes legacies of King, Lincoln at 2nd inauguration Caitlin Yoshiko Kandil In a rousing speech marking the beginning of his second term, President Barack Obama urged Americans: “Let us answer the call of history.” History was steeped in Monday’s inauguration festivities. Obama’s swearing-in ceremony fell on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and the start of his next four years in office also coincides with the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Obama marked these occasions by using two Bibles to take the oath of office — one that belonged to Abraham Lincoln and

another that belonged to Martin Luther King, Jr. — and also by making equality the central theme of his inaugural address. Calling the notion that all humans are created equal “the star that guides us still,” Obama recalled those who marched on the National Mall five decades ago “to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone, to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth.” “Today we continue a neverending journey to bridge the meaning of those words with the realities of our time,” he said. “For history tells us that while these truths may be self-evident, they’ve never been self-executing.”

While invoking the legacies of Lincoln and King — who made history fighting for racial equality — Obama spoke of equality for other groups as well, including women, gay Americans and immigrants. “Our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts,” he said. “Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law, for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well.” The president also used the speech to outline the issues on top of his agenda for the next term Obama, continued to page 3

MFA exhibit traces life, artistic legacy of Loïs Mailou Jones Susan Saccoccia

Loïs Mailou Jones’ “Glyphs,” a 1985 acrylic on canvas on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. (Photo courtesy of the MFA)

Whatʼs INSIDE

LISTINGS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT . . 8-10

Born and raised in Boston, Loïs Mailou Jones (1905 – 1998) overcame obstacles she faced as a woman and an African American to become an artist recognized as an individual rather than an exemplar of her gender or race. During her distinguished 70-year career, Jones created a body of work that ceaselessly incorporated what she learned and experienced along the way. Her paintings draw the eye with their warm colors, strong design

elements and African American motifs. Although some would look at home in a show with early 20th century Modernists, her paintings are seldom entirely abstract. You can detect the presence of the artist and her lived experience. Building from her classical education in the fine arts at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where she majored in textile design and graduated with honors in 1927, Jones wove the myriad threads of her teaching and art-making into a Jones, continued to page 10

PERSPECTIVE

CLASSIFIEDS

EDITORIAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

HELP WANTED . . . . . . . . 14-15

BUSINESS DIRECTORY . . . . 11

OPINION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

LEGALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-14

CHURCH GUIDE. . . . . . . . . 11

ROVING CAMERA . . . . . . . . 5

REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . 14


2 • Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

in[OLMix with Colette Greenstein

“Inside Man,” but it didn’t work. The writing and directing didn’t make sense and I was left at times wondering what the characters just said. Jeffrey Wright, who makes every role unique and adds depth, was the only saving grace, and I perked up whenever he was in a scene, but alas, it wasn’t enough to hold “Broken City” together.

Up Close and Personal…

Smokey Robinbson on his Up Close and Personal Tour at The Wilbur Theatre, Boston, Wednesday, Jan. 16. (Photo courtesy of The Wilbur Theatre)

Broken City… I so wanted to love this movie for a variety of reasons. First, it’s the solo directorial debut of Allen Hughes (of “Menace II Society” and “Dead Presidents” fame). It’s a crime thriller with a great cast (Mark Wahlberg, Russell Crowe, Catherine ZetaJones and the always magnificent Jeffrey Wright), with action and a good premise. “Broken City”

is about political corruption and ex-cop Billy Taggart (Walhberg), who is hired by Mayor Nicholas Hostetler, played by Crowe, to look into whether his wife Cathleen (Catherine Zeta-Jones) is having an affair during his reelection campaign, only to be double-crossed and then framed by the Mayor. The film tried to have the grit of “Serpico” with the suspense of

Legendary singer and songwriter Smokey Robinson was in town recently at the Wilbur Theatre as part of his “Up Close and Personal Tour,” and hit the stage impeccably dressed, with a twinkle in his eyes as he smiled to the audience. Smokey was personable and engaging, telling stories and cracking jokes. He made everyone feel like they were right in his living room and that’s exactly how the format of the show went for the evening. He would pull a card out of a basket that listed a member of the audience’s name on it and that person would be called on by Smokey. He would chat with them for a few minutes and ask them what song they wanted to hear. It was a night filled with Motown classics like “Being With You,” “Ooo Baby Baby,” “Tracks of My Tears,” “Cruisin’” and “The Tears of a Clown.” Audience members couldn’t help but feel like they just experienced something special.

I’m not compromising…. Tracy Morgan opened up

his show at Wilbur Theatre talking about not compromising his comedy when he heard that there was a 15-year-old with his parents sitting right up front (that could be dangerous at any comedy show). It was no holds barred as he kicked off with sex, sex and more sex. He did touch upon women being God’s greatest creation, and of course the women cheered. Morgan did inject a bit of politics into his set when he spoke about the inauguration and one of the best lines of the night was when he said “Politics is nothing but politricks.” If you’ve never seen Tracy Morgan live, just remember he’s not his character Tracy Jordan from “30 Rock.” As he said when someone in the audience started heckling him, “This ain’t TV. I can hear you.”

Coming Up… Tonight (Thursday) through S u n d a y, c o m e d i a n R u s s e l l Peters returns to town with four shows at the Wilbur Theatre. Here’s your chance to try out a new restaurant and donate to a worthy organization. Local chefs from more than 15 participating restaurants (including La Morra, Sel de la Terre, Tres Gatos and The Elephant Walk), are donating their time and services to offer a brunch at $25, $35 or $50 per person as part of the 31st annual Super Hunger Brunch taking place on Saturday, Jan. 26 and Sunday, Jan. 27. Proceeds will benefit the Greater Boston

Food Bank. For more info visit, www.gbfb.org. From Jan. 31-Feb. 5, the Boston Jewish Film Festival presents the second annual ReelAbilities Boston Disabilities Film Festival showcasing nine international films about the lives of people with different disabilities from a variety of communities. One of the highlights of the festival is the uplifting documentary “Body and Soul” following three young Mozambicans with physical disabilities. The film explores how they look at themselves and others and raises universal questions about self-acceptance and how to find one’s place in society. Body and Soul screens at the Museum of Fine Arts on Sunday, Feb. 3 at noon. Visit www.bjff. org for more information. George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic return to the House of Blues on Friday, Feb. 8. World Music/CRASHarts presents the South African a cappella singing group Ladysmith Black Mambazo on Saturday, Feb. 9 at Sanders Theatre in Cambridge. Renowned drummer, composer, producer, Berklee professor (and Medford native) Terri Lyne Carrington presents her new album “Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue” as part of Berklee’s Signature Music Series on Thursday, Feb. 14 at the Berklee Performance Center. If you would like me to cover or write about your event, email me at inthemixwithcolette@gmail.com.

Loïs Mailou Jones’ “My Mother’s Hats,” a 1943 oil on canvas on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Story on pages 1 and 10. (Photo courtesy of the MFA)


Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 3

Obama

continued from page 1

— progressive causes such as climate change, poverty, immigration reform, gay marriage, women’s rights, infrastructure, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. And unlike the beginning of his presidency, when he stressed the importance of bi-partisanship, Obama directed criticism at Congress and its unwillingness to work with him. “Progress does not compel us to settle centuries-long debates about the role of government for all time, but it does require us to act in our time,” he said. “We cannot mistake absolutism for principle or substitute spectacle for politics, or treat name-calling as reasoned debate.” Boston City Councillor AtLarge Felix Arroyo attended the inauguration and noticed that in contrast to his first inaugural address, Obama seemed “a lot bolder.”

ard Blanco, the first Latino and openly gay inaugural poet; and singers Beyoncé Knowles, Kelly Clarkson and James Taylor. While the crowd stretched from the Capitol Building all the way to the Washington monument, it was far smaller than the record-breaking 1.8 million who attended Obama’s historic inauguration in 2009. But those who showed up did so with pride. Many waited up to five hours in 30-degree weather to witness the ceremony, while others were decked out in shirts, jackets, hats, scarves and pins bearing the president’s image. Dorchester resident Debbie Chambers was one of those in the crowd — after spending nine hours on a bus from Boston to Washington — and said that even though this inauguration was smaller than in 2009, it was “even better” and the “spirit was even more powerful.” Calling the coincidence of inauguration with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day something “only God could have put together,” Chambers said she

“I had the sense that [Obama] was saying, ‘I’m not going to let Congress bog me down, I’m not going to let people who don’t want to move forward allow the country to not move forward.’” — Boston City Councillor Felix Arroyo “I felt like he had a very clear idea of what he wants his last four years as president to be like,” Arroyo said. “I had the sense that he was saying, ‘I’m not going to let Congress bog me down, I’m not going to let people who don’t want to move forward allow the country to not move forward.’” Rev. Miniard Culpepper of Dorchester’s Pleasant Hill Baptist Church was also in attendance on Monday, and liked what he heard. “I think the president appealed to everyone,” Culpepper said. “He wants everyone to be involved, and today he gave everyone an invitation for a new beginning. Now we’ll have to see whether everyone accepts his invitation.” Culpepper also noted that “the struggles on Capitol Hill are a lot clearer than they were the first time,” and thinks the president will continue to push ahead, even if his political opponents don’t accept his “invitation.” An estimated 700,000 people gathered on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. to witness the inauguration ceremony, which also featured Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of the slain civil rights leader Medger Evers; Rich-

believes Dr. King’s dream is still alive today. “And it’s not because we have an African American president,” she said. “It’s because we have a country that was willing to put into office a man of color.” Robin Saunders, another Dorchester resident, organized a bus trip that brought 43 Bostonians to the inauguration. “Obviously the first black president to be re-elected is an historic event, and I’ll probably never see it again in my lifetime,” she said. “Martin Luther King Day was another reason I was like, ‘Yes, I have to be there.’ If it had been a Republican president, they probably would have cancelled it. I don’t think it would have happened.” Chambers echoed these sentiments: “I never thought I would see a president who was African American in my lifetime. It was very important for me to witness it not just the first time, but the second time — I needed to be part of that history.” And Chambers hopes this won’t be the last time she witnesses history. “I’ll be there when we have the first woman president as well,” she said. “It’s not just about color.”

The Dimock Center 55 Dimock Street, Roxbury, MA

Dimock has Day and Evening GED classes! GE ChanceDo Lifetimef a !

Get Started NOW!!! Earn Your GED CALL (617) 442-8800 ext. 1219 GED classes start after the new year! The Time is Right to make a fresh start • Come and find your success!

CALL NOW! CLASSES STARTING SOON!

Classes Starting Soon!


4 • Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

Established 1965

Prosecutorial malpractice “Let the punishment fit the crime” is a famous line from one of Gilbert and Sullivan’s operettas. However, Massachusetts citizens are even more sophisticated than that Victorian concept of justice. They insist that the prosecutor’s charge must be appropriate to the circumstances. U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz aggressively prosecuted Aaron Swartz, a 26-year-old computer prodigy, for wrongfully downloading numerous academic journal articles from an MIT website available only to subscribers. Swartz acted not for personal gain but because of a strong political belief that the internet should be free and open to everyone. When confronted with being branded a felon, threatened with imprisonment for an extended period, as well as being subjected to a substantial fine, and when required to pay substantial legal fees for his defense, Swartz committed suicide. Swartz was known to suffer from clinical depression. Those who support Ortiz’s scope of prosecution that allowed for a 35-year imprisonment and a $1 million fine assert that she was merely doing her job. Opponents argue that she lacks sensitivity and sound judgment and should be replaced. Ortiz demonstrated a similar insensitivity in the case against former Boston City Councilor Chuck Turner. While Swartz was just beginning a strategy

of civil disobedience in support of his commitment to an open internet, Turner had been a community activist since 1966, aggressively in defense of civil and human rights. He successfully first ran for city council in 1999. Turner was charged primarily with accepting a $1,000 bribe as compensation for helping a constituent receive a liquor license. The constituent, Ron Wilburn, was an FBI plant. The action against Turner was an offshoot of the FBI case against former State Sen. Dianne Wilkerson, who was convicted with much more persuasive evidence. The evidence against Turner was flimsy and he had no recollection of the incident that had allegedly occurred several years before. Turner is an opinionated and stubborn individual who can sometimes irritate even those who support him. Everyone who knows Turner knows that it is uncharacteristic for him to accept bribes. He is well known to be unacquisitive and often used his own funds to benefit others. This unjust decision brands Turner as a felon and causes him to forfeit his annual pension of $21,800. As a man in his 70s, it will not be easy for Turner to start over upon his release from prison. This case was not originally brought by Ortiz but she did nothing to mitigate the gross injustice.

Gun control not enough There were 506 murders in Chicago last year. That is more than the number of military fatalities in Afghanistan for 2012. Nonetheless, Americans seemed to be unconcerned about the availability of guns until 20 first-grade students and six adults were massacred in Newtown, Conn. There is now a public outcry to restrict access to firearms. President Barack Obama has established some policies by executive order, but significant change will have to come from Congress. As expected, the National Rifle Association has been conducting a major PR campaign to alter the current public sentiment.

A standard slogan of the NRA is that “guns don’t kill people, people do.” As repugnant as this statement might be, it does express a truth. African Americans must question what in black culture causes young men to revert to murder so readily. And most importantly, what can be done to change this? According to polls, blacks support changes in the gun laws more than other groups, but that alone will not alter murderous hostilities. It is time for profound self-inquiry to find the destructive causes that so disrupt the tranquility of black communities.

January 22nd marks the 40th Anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that held that the fundamental constitutional right to privacy includes a woman’s decision whether or not to terminate her pregnancy. The Roe v. Wade decision transformed women’s lives and transformed women’s role in society. It was a critical milestone in the fight for women’s reproductive autonomy and equality. In the forty years since Roe v. Wade, women’s lives have improved by leaps and bounds. Because women were given the right to control their reproductive health choices, they are pursuing higher education and entering the workforce in record numbers. Women are no longer living in fear of some of the health risks associated with pregnancy, as the United States has seen a significant decline in both maternal and infant mortality rates. Freedom to make decisions about reproductive health care has directly translated to opportunities and independence for women.

USPS 045-780

Publisher/Editor Assoc. Publisher/Treasurer Executive Editor

Melvin B. Miller John E. Miller Howard Manly

ADVERTISING Marketing-Sales Director Advertising Coordinator

Sandra L. Casagrand Rachel Reardon

NEWS REPORTING Health Editor Managing Editor

Karen Miller Lauren Carter

Deputy Editor

G. Valentino Ball

Contributing Writers

Gloria J. Browne-Marshall Kenneth J. Cooper Colette Greenstein Caitlin Yoshiko Kandil Sandra Larson Shanice Maxwell Anthony W. Neal Brian Wright O’Connor

Staff Photographers

Ernesto Arroyo John Brewer Eric Esteves Tony Irving Don West

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Contributing Writers

LETTERSto the Editor On the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade

This is our technology to chase down society’s malcontents.

Dart Adams Robin Hamilton Susan Saccoccia Lloyd Kam Williams

But having the right to have an abortion is not the same as having the access to abortion care. The ability for all women to access reproductive health care, including abortion, is the fight that NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts continues to fight today. Over the last few years, women have been under unprecedented attack. Access to basic health care, including contraception, has been under assault in Congress. State after state has passed laws that restrict access to abortion care and force abortion providers to close their doors. In Massachusetts, NARAL ProChoice Massachusetts has been fight-

ing a similar battle. In the last legislative session, a record number of anti-choice bills were filed in Massachusetts. And while Massachusetts has held back the wave of anti-choice fervor that has swept the nation and sent women back in time, the fight continues even here. The 40th Anniversary of Roe v. Wade is a time to reflect on how far women have come, and how far women have yet to go before they can access the basic health care the Constitution promises. Megan Amundson Executive Director of NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts

PRODUCTION Production Manager Production Assistant

Marissa Giambrone Heather Austin ADMINISTRATION

Business Manager

Karen Miller

The Boston Banner is published every Thursday. Offices are located at 23 Drydock Ave., Boston, MA 02210. Telephone: 617-261-4600, Fax 617-261-2346 Subscriptions: $48 for one year ($55 out-of-state) Web site: www.baystatebanner.com Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA. All rights reserved. Copyright 2010.

Quotes from Swami Muktananda reprinted with permission from SYDA Foundation. © SYDA Foundation

The Banner is certified by the NMSDC, 2009. Circulation of The Bay State and Boston Banner 33,740. Audited by CAC, March 2009.

Send letters to the editor: By Fax:

617-261-2346

From Web site: www.baystatebanner.com click “contact us,” then click “letters” By Mail:

The Boston Banner 23 Drydock Avenue Boston, MA 02210.

Letters must be signed. Names may be withheld upon request.

The Banner is printed by: Gannett Offset Boston, 565 University Ave., Norwood, MA 02062


Thursday, Thursday, January January 24, 3, 2013 2008 • BAY • BOSTON STATE BANNER • 5

ROVINGCamera

OPINION Executive orders on guns good start but Congress is still the cure Earl Ofari Hutchinson President Obama’s unilateral White House action on gun control is a good start. But Obama took the action precisely because he knows that gun control legislation is a virtual dead letter in Congress — at least for the time being. To force the issue, Obama would have to spend precious time, energy, and resources jawboning anti-gun control congressional Democrats, wage an all-out battle with the gun lobby and the NRA, and risk losing the political momentum that he needs to do battle with GOP congressional obstructionists on the coming fight over the debt ceiling, spending cuts and deficit reduction. The reported checklist of executive orders he’s proposed include strengthening federal laws against illegal gun trafficking, better coordination and tracking by federal agencies of gun sales, banning the import of military-style weapons, better record-keeping on guns sales and buyers, and stronger background checks on gun buyers. But none directly strike to the heart of how to stop an Adam Lanza, James Holmes, or Jared Loughner and the handful of other shooters from getting guns. That’s Congress’ job. The few congressional leaders that have led the president for taking action on guns and have pushed for more stringent gun control flatly said that Congress will not budge on gun control. That includes reimposing the ban on assault weapons. Polls show that the majority of Americans support the ban. But polls have carried zero weight with Congress in the past and there’s no evidence that they do this time around either. In the decade since the expiration of the assault weapons ban, Congress has had ample chance to enact a slew of gun control curbs that would have compelled legal gun owners to store guns in a tamper-proof safe and secure enclosure, bar anyone undergoing or referred to treatment for mental or emotional disorders from purchasing or having direct access to guns, and clamping Polls show that the an absolute ban on the sale of assault weapons. These provisions might, majority of Americans just might, have kept guns out of the support the ban. But polls hands of Lanza. These and other measures were repeatedly introduced have carried zero weight in Congress and just as repeatedly with Congress in the past buried before they ever reached the and there’s no evidence House or Senate floor. Obama’s proposed executive that they do this time orders touch on many of the meaaround either. sures that the dogged handful of Congressional gun control proponents has pushed for in the past. But they don’t have anywhere near the wallop that Congressional gun control laws would pack. The NRA is well aware of that. It will bluff and bluster against the proposed executive orders, and Obama, and loudly pander to ultra-conservatives who scream for massive resistance to alleged “federal intrusion” on gun owners’ rights. The NRA, however, knows the name of the game on gun control is Congress, and to a lesser but important extent, the courts. It has plowed millions into a well-financed, well-honed machine to lobby, harangue, threaten and intimidate gun control advocates in Congress, and to try and defeat pro-gun control candidates. It has played watchdog over judicial appointments and moved quickly to torpedo the confirmation of any judicial appointee who gives even the vaguest hint that he or she would be likely to issue a ruling upholding a gun curb. This has paid dividends. Time and again, state and federal appeals courts and the Supreme Court have overturned city and state gun control laws. There’s also the threat that the courts, as well as Congress, could swing into action on Obama’s executive orders. Congress has the power to change (in this case, scrap) an executive order. The courts have the power to declare them unconstitutional or simply vacate the orders. The gun lobby almost certainly would try to arm twist one or the other to go after the orders. Still, Obama’s proposal to issue executive orders thrusts him squarely in the center of the gun control battle. This amounts to a frontal challenge to Congress to seriously debate the need for gun control legislation. The debate will force the NRA and its congressional allies to explain why they adamantly oppose the ban of assault weapons, universal background checks and provisions to ensure that guns are kept out of the hands of those with mental and emotional challenges. It would force gun control opponents to explain how these protective measures infringe on the rights of law-abiding citizens to own and use guns for protection and sporting purposes. The NRA has had free rein to make its case that even the weakest, most tepid, common sense gun curb would be tantamount to repealing the Second Amendment. It will scream the same again if Obama signs the proposed executive orders. But if he does, they would not be the cure all for unchecked gun violence; only Congress has the power to provide that cure. But the orders would be a good first step. Earl Ofari Hutchinson is an author and political analyst.

The Banner welcomes your opinion. Email Op-Ed submissions to:

hmanly@bannerpub.com Letters must be signed. Names may be withheld upon request.

How do you celebrate Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday?

For several years now, I’ve been attending the breakfast put on by Union United Methodist Church and St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church. It’s a great reminder of the true meaning of the day.

In order to celebrate it, we should volunteer and provides services and support to communities where there are needs. One person makes a difference.

I celebrate by attending the annual breakfast. It’s the oldest event of its kind in the nation and a great way to start the day.

Heidi Brooks

Queon Jackson

Stephanie Anderson Garrett

Citizens Bank Jamaica Plain

Madison Park TCHS Headmaster Boston

The Community Builders, Inc. Dorchester

By focusing on building relations with my family and my community.

I work every year and feel more people should come out to support events like the memorial breakfast.

By remembering what he stood for and instilling that in my children.

Michael James

Denise Drayton-Lloyd

Charlotte James

Director of Diversity & Inclusion at Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA Boston

Banquet Server Dorchester

Entrepreneur Boston

INthe news Sherrilyn Ifill The Board of Directors of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF) recently announced the appointment of Sherrilyn Ifill as President and Director-Counsel. A civil rights scholar, litigator, author, philanthropist and civic leader, Ifill is a long-time member of the LDF family. Early in her career, she served as assistant counsel in LDF’s New York office, where she litigated voting rights cases, including the landmark Voting Rights Act case Houston Lawyers’ Association v. Attorney General of Texas. In 1993, Ifill joined the faculty of the University of Maryland’s Francis King Carey School of Law. In addition to teaching in the classroom, Ifill launched several innovative legal clinics while at Maryland Law School, including an environmental justice clinic and one of the first legal clinics in the nation focused on the legal rights of ex-offenders. A critically acclaimed author,

her book On the Courthouse Lawn: Confronting the Legacy of Lynching in the 21st Century, reflects her lifelong engagement in, and analysis of, race in American life. For the past two years, Ifill

has served as the chair of the U.S. Programs board of the Open Society Foundations, one of the largest philanthropic supporters of civil rights and social justice organizations in the country.


6 • Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

‘Invisible Man’ celebrates its 61st birthday on stage

Before braving the New England cold, stars of Invisible Man pose after their Friday night performance. (L to R): Johnny Lee Davenportt, McKinley Belcher III, De’Lon Grant, Joy Jones, Brian D. Coats, Deidra LaWan Starnes, Julia Watt and Edward James Hyland. Not shown: Main actor Teagle F. Bougere and Jeremiah Kissel. (Daniel Irvin photo) Shanice Maxwell A wave of silence gripped the crowd as lights dimmed in the packed Boston University theatre last Friday. Moments earlier chattering voices buzzed, but suddenly a pin drop could be heard. Everyone seemed to be holding their breath, unsure of what the production of Invisible Man would bring. Invisible Man is an AfricanAmerican classic published in

1952 and written by Ralph Ellison. Since then it’s been highly acclaimed. But it was this production, written by Oren Jacoby and directed by Christopher McElroen, that brought life to Ellison’s book for the very first time. The theatrical adaptation depicts the story of an “unnamed, idealistic, young African-American [as he] searches for identity and his place in the world as he journeys through 1930s America – from the Deep South to Harlem,”

according to Rebecca Curtiss, Huntington Theatre Company’s communications manager. Facing the small stage were nearly 500 people who watched intently as Teagle F. Bougere, the star of the show, opened with the line “I am an invisible man.” With every line, he and fellow cast members, 10 actors total, spoke emphatically. Looks of attentiveness and murmurs of affirmation — especially from the few invisible men and women present — were frequent. Occasional laughs, when echoed, lightened the mood, if only for a short while. “I think it’s good. It’s in your face, it’s out there and they’re definitely not sugar-coating anything up in here which is good,” said Jennifer Tawiah, 31, of Jamaican Plain. “It’s interesting to look around, there aren’t too many colored folks in here but that’s Boston for you.” Invisible Man’s storyline, though not grotesque, is a dense tale of race, class, power and freedom told from the perspective of one of society’s marginalized groups: the black man. If only more invisible men were present to enjoy it. The curtain closed three times for intermissions. Though only 10 minutes long, the breaks seemed like an hour for enthusiastic attendants like Amelia Cain, 20, a BU theatre student from Ashfield. “I am enthralled by the use of their stage … the use of the multimedia is really powerful. It’s [just] a beautifully written script so far,” she said. Screens on stage helped reinforce the actors’ words and propel them even further into the minds of viewers. Black and white pictures of people and places as well as seemingly old video footage added dramatic effect without taking away from spoken lines.

Unlike the atmosphere of a movie theatre, people seemed less preoccupied with being entertained and more interested in connecting with the characters and gaining a true understanding of their words, Ellison’s words. “It’s such a dense piece of art in terms of what it has to say to African-American men specifically, African-American people specifically, and the role in general,” said actor Deidra LaWan Starnes. Sixty-one years after the publication of Invisible Man, many of Ellison’s words are relevant today. “There are just things that are still happening today that you really wouldn’t expect. So it’s almost like, even though you’re watching his play, you’re identifying with issues that are alive and current,” Starnes added. When the play ended, the entire audience rose to its feet and gave a thunderous round of applause. One person even shouted “Encore!” The crowd took its time leaving the theatre, while many stayed for a post-show audience conversation. “Invisible Man is one of my favorite books,” said Sam Shupe, 23, a BU grad student from Portland, Maine. “It’s one of those books that kind of shaped who I was at the time [I was reading it]…It’s great. I [had] a great time.” Invisible Man will be showing until Feb. 3, 2013. Ticket information can be obtained at www.huntingtontheatre.org

Behind the scenes Q&A with Invisible Man actor Deidra LaWan Starkes What do you feel is the significance of this play? It’s such a dense piece of art in terms of what it has to say to African-American men specifically, African-American people specifically, and the role in general. I think one of the most intriguing things about this piece of work that’s 60 years old is that a lot, a lot of what Ellison had to say and a lot of what he projects in the book is prevalent today. There are just things that are still happening today that you really wouldn’t expect to happen 60 years later. So it’s almost like even though you’re watching his play, you’re identifying with issues that are alive and current.

Can you give me some examples of those issues? Well, one of my favorite lines in the play is: “You sacrifice the people — the trick is to sacrifice them in their own best interest.” And that gets [a] response almost every night! You can hear the audience go “hmph” or even laugh at the absurdity of this very real comment. If you look at something like health care, health care is a really big issue. It shouldn’t be an issue but people are being sacrificed at the expense of not keeping us healthy and for me, that’s just one of the very poignant moments that sticks out in my head.

Should people care about Ellison’s message some 60 years later?

Deidra LaWan Starnes plays Mary Rambo, who helps take care of Invisible Man, played by Teagle F. Bougere, once he gets out of the factory hospital. (T. Charles Erickson photo)

I don’t know if it’s as much that they need to care about it as much as it is about that old saying — “Those who don’t know their history are bound to repeat it.” For me it’s about that whole conversation and so even if people believe that this isn’t relevant I feel like people need to listen, to see, to experience and to feel [this].

Tell me about the character(s) you play. All of us except Teagle [Bougere] — who plays Invisible Man — have more than one character that we play. My prominent character is Mary Rambo, who took care of Invisible Man after he got out of the factory hospital when he was in Harlem. That’s my main character, and then I have smaller speaking roles and portrayals. She is absolutely the only matriarchal symbol in the production and in his book. She’s very nurturing and she teaches [invisible man about] giving, because she opens her home to him and you don’t get it in the play, but if you read the book, he’s behind on her rent and she’s like “Don’t bother me about that.” She’s just really understanding.

How would you describe the overall cast? RE-MARK-A-BLE! They are nine of the most amazing talents that I’ve ever been blessed to work with. I really stand in awe and it blows my mind. There are some scenes I watch and I see the [other] actors on stage and I’m only grateful to be blessed to be a part of this journey. You’ll see tonight when you see the show. It’s a stellar cast.


Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 7


8 • Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

Joy for

the people Meet Joy Daniels, multi-talented songstress on the rise Shanice Maxwell

they’ll tell you that encapsulated in her music, influence and personalWebster’s dictionary defines ity are proof she’s a rare gem. joy (n) as “1. the emotion of great “Joy is someone that I think is delight or happiness caused by different, a good different,” said something exceptionally good or promoter and event organizer satisfying; keen pleasure; elation.” Justin Springer, a friend and former At 26, artist Joy Daniels is doing co-worker. “She brings something more than just living up to her name. I don’t think has been seen in music If asked, she’ll tell you she wasn’t itself. She channels a lot of energy, extremely talented but always and given the right platform, she had a love for music. Ask anyone will make you love her.” who knows her, though, and Daniels’ smile alone is enough to light up a room. But it’s her powerhouse voice, passion for people and the art of music that reign supreme. T h a t ’s w h a t prompted the New Jersey native to turn down a near full academic scholarship, move to Boston and attend the prestigious Berklee College of Music, where she would graduate in just three and a half years. It was during her time there that she “stopped caring about what to) others thought and pho vitt Lea (Jaymes started working on an album.”

Since then, the rest has been history. Daniels eventually went on to organize and host a longrunning live music event called Boston Renaissance. While working on albums and exploring this new musical venture, she learned much about herself as a singer and songwriter, as well as the ins and outs of the local business scene. “I went through a lot of criticism and a lot of messy stuff [as] I was growing up and figuring out what I wanted to do as a business woman and who I wanted to be,” Daniels said, referring to her experience running Boston Renaissance and her inexperience at the time of working with peers. “I’m a lot more confident now and I have a lot more tact and know-how and wisdom on how to deal with [issues].” Always finding joy in the midst of things is just her style. Dealing with haters, social network slander, unexpected obstacles, uncalculated struggles and wavering so-called supporters are just some of the things she’s had to overcome. And despite candidly admitting the road to stardom has been far from a cakewalk, Daniels acknowledges the highs and lows have helped shape her story to what it is today. But it’s far from over. In just a few short years, Daniels has gleaned from her experience

(Niki Hinkle photo) the importance of counting every test towards her testimony and savoring sweet moments all the more because of the bitter ones. Thus, creating her album “After the Rain” was a project of much clarity and awareness. “Mainly my awakening came from a really crappy relationship,” Daniels said. “I had a really tumultuous one where I fell so deeply in love that I was acting stupid and willing to put myself in really horrible positions in order to maintain [it]. And as a result of that, when I lost it I had to really re-find out who I was. “So the album is a compilation of some of that relationship, some of my past relationships and then with higher self — just some of who I wanna be and what I wanna do. It’s vulnerable. Everything you hear on that record I’ve been through and probably 10 times worse.” After spending time in the trenches with best friend, producer and “partner in crime” as she calls him, Harold “Levelsoundz” Shawn, “After the Rain” was written and produced solely by their joint effort. “Joy has a healthy, quiet confidence that just rubs off on you,” said Shawn. “It’s nice to have in a friend someone that can uplift you and make you believe in yourself, and she’s definitely had that effect on me, my music composition and life.

She just inspires me the most. I’m proud of her successes but know she has so much further to go.” Proud of her work and overall progress, Daniels decided after eight years of living in the Bean that it was best to explore other horizons. That’s why in January, Daniels took her talents to L.A. The move was necessary to take her career to the next level, though she’ll miss the bonds she’s built on the East Coast. “Boston is a really great place to nurture and cultivate your talent, but places like New York and Los Angeles are epicenters where it’s now time to present the product,” she said. In every strategic move she makes, Daniels makes it a point to actualize her musical goal: changing people’s lives with her music. As a “disciple of Christ” she wants people who may be brokenhearted, hurting and going through difficulties to be reminded of a “higher power, something more, and prompt them to start searching for whatever that is.” That’s what brings her joy. “If I could say anything about myself it’s like yes, I do music, I love music and this is my profession and I take it very seriously,” she said. “I’m a great businesswoman [and] all that stuff, but at the end of the day, inside of me is just a little girl who really loves to sing. That’s who I am.”


Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 9

Meagan Good talks new drama, ‘Deception’

Meagan Good says her character on “Deception,” Joanna, has a “moral heart and wants to pursue justice.” (Photo courtesy of NBC) Kam Williams Meagan Good stars in NBC’s midseason drama “Deception” as Joanna Padget Locasto, a San Francisco narcotics detective with childhood ties to a notoriously secretive

and powerful New York family, the Bowers. When her childhood best friend, Vivian Bowers, is found dead under mysterious circumstances, Joanna is enlisted by the FBI to help to find the killer, agreeing to go undercover into the opulent lifestyle

January 24th 7pm Welcome Back for

Art is Life itself! Haley House Bakery Cafe – 12 Dade Street, Roxbury, MA 02119 Screening of Documentary Short, “Re-Enter: My New Community,” film made by Emerson College Service Learning & Community Students on Haley House Bakery Cafe’s Transitional Employment Program followed by Panel Discussion on “Incarceration, Business and Community” followed by London Bridgez, Soul Word Artist & Founding Member of the Neo.Logic Beatnik Assembly + Open Mic. Donations accepted

come early for dinner! January 31st 7pm – Art is Life itself!

Haley House Bakery Cafe – 12 Dade Street, Roxbury, MA 02119 “Daddy King,” a one-hour presentation of storytelling, song & dance on Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Storyteller Performers, Linda & Sumner McLain + Open Mic. Donations accepted – come early for dinner!

February 7th 7pm - Art is Life itself!

Haley House Bakery Cafe – 12 Dade Street, Roxbury, MA 02119 Nubian Queens of Rhythm, a 10 Woman Drumming Group with the Rhythms of Africa + The Fulani Haynes Jazz Collaborative + Open Mic. Donations accepted – come early for dinner!

Save the Date:

FEBRUARY 10 – SOUPER BOWL FUNDRAISER FEBRUARY 16 – ODESSA PIPER/DIDI EMMONS COOKING CLASS/DINNER MARCH 8 – DINNER & A MOVIE

JOIN US FOR SUNDAY BRUNCH

every Sunday 10am-4pm 12 Dade Street, Roxbury, MA 02119 617-445-0900 www.haleyhouse.org/cafe

she thought she’d left behind. Meagan has become one of Hollywood’s most sought-after young actresses, recently completing a season-long arc on Showtime’s acclaimed series “Californication” as well as a role in “Think Like a Man,” the feature film based on the bestselling book by Steve Harvey. In 2011, she starred on the big screen alongside Angela Bassett and Paula Patton in “Jumping the Broom.” The versatile actress has mastered a variety of film genres, ranging from horror with “The Unborn” opposite Odette Annable and Gary Oldman to comedy with “The Love Guru,” co-starring Mike Myers, Jessica Alba and Justin Timberlake. She rose to fame as a result of her box-office hit “Stomp the Yard,” but was recognized earlier for her acclaimed performance opposite Samuel L. Jackson in the eerie family drama “Eve’s Bayou,” for which she received an NAACP Image Award nomination. Besides acting, Meagan has produced independent films such as “Miles from Home,” which she starred in opposite actor/director Ty Hodges. The picture screened at the Pan African Film & Arts Festival, the Washington, D.C., Independent Film Festival and the Atlanta Film Festival, where it swept all of the awards - Best Feature, Best Actor and Actress (Meagan Good) and Best Di-

rector. More recently, she produced and starred in “Video Girl,” which depicts the sordid and misunderstood life of a music video model. Born in Panorama City, Calif., Megan began appearing in commercials at the age of 4 and to date has completed over 60 national television commercials. She made her primetime television debut on the WB nighttime series “Raising Dad,” and her first major television role was as a regular on the hit show “Cousin Skeeter.” And she has guest-starred on “Moesha,” “The Steve Harvey Show,” “The Division,” “The Parent ‘Hood,” “My Wife & Kids” and “All of Us,” too. Meagan was recently married to DeVon Franklin, an executive for Columbia Pictures who is also a preacher and motivational speaker. Here, she talks about her new show, “Deception,” which airs Monday nights on NBC at 10 PM ET/PT. (Check local listings)

What interested you in “Deception”? The script was incredible and there were so many elements that appealed to me creatively and physically, and the cast seemed like an amazing group of people.

FBI brings me in undercover to find out who did it.

How would you describe your character, Joanna Locasto? Tough, ballsy, and vulnerable, with a strong moral compass. She has a moral heart and wants to pursue justice and see the right thing happen.

How did you prepare for this role? Did you consult your father, since he was a police officer in the LAPD? Yes I did, and also his wife who is currently in the FBI. They helped me learn about the mentality of a police officer and what a day in their life is like, and what it takes to be a person who will give their life for the call of duty.

What advice do you have for anyone who wants to follow in your footsteps? Keep God as your main focus. Make sure your desire to do what you’re aspiring to do is deeper than just fame and being a celebrity. Be willing to work hard, and don’t believe that when a door closes it’s anything personal.

Tell me a little about the show.

How do you want to be remembered?

My character’s name is Joanna Locasto. Her mother worked for the Bowers family and she grew up in the house and was best friends with Vivian. They had a strange falling out when they were 17 and I moved to San Francisco and went on to become a narcotics officer with the SFPD, while Vivian went on to become a “celebutante.” The show opens with Vivian’s murder and the

As a woman who represented God but was controversial, stood by what she believed and wouldn’t allow other people’s opinions of her to manipulate her directions. As someone who helped others, loved others deeply even if they tried to hurt her, was there for people when she could be, and ultimately made everything she did about God and not just about herself.


10 • Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

Loïs Mailou Jones’ “La Baker,” a 1977 acrylic and collage on canvas on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. (Photo courtesy of the MFA)

Jones continued from page 1

rich and unique body of work. “Being basically a designer,” Jones said to fellow African American artist Romare Bearden, “I am always weaving together my research and my feelings — taking from textiles, carvings, and color — to press on canvas what I see and feel. As a painter, I am very dependent on design.” A compact and alluring survey of her art and life entitled “Loïs Mailou Jones,” is on view at the Museum Of Fine Arts, Boston, through Oct. 14, 2013. Installed in the Bernard

and Barbara Stern Shapiro Gallery on the second floor of the Art of the Americas Wing, the mini-retrospective presents nearly 30 works in various media and styles. The show presents the MFA’s entire collection of 21 paintings and drawings and illustrated books, as well as her illustrated books and works on paper lent by the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists in Roxbury. “Jones is a major 20th century artist,” says Elliot Bostwick Davis, John Moors Cabot Chair of the Art of the Americas Department. “This mini-retrospective gives a sense of her career unfolding, her muses and what it takes to develop a voice.” Jones regarded the MFA as her home, notes Davis. In 2005 and

2006, Jones bequeathed eight paintings and eight works on paper to the MFA through the Loïs Mailou Jones/Pierre-Noël Trust and established a scholarship at the Museum School. The artist’s bequest has been a catalyst, observes Davis, who oversaw the recent expansion of the MFA’s works by African American artists to nearly 450 objects, among the largest such holdings by any museum in the U.S. Jones was encouraged to achieve by her parents, Carolyn Dorinda Adams Jones, a cosmetologist and milliner, and Thomas Vreeland Jones, the first African American graduate of Suffolk Law School. Jones found mentors both at the MFA and among the African Ameri-

can intellectuals who frequented Martha’s Vineyard, where her family had a summer home. Driven to make a name for herself, Jones turned obstacles into opportunities. Well into her first year as a successful freelance textile designer, Jones spotted her work on display in an interior decorator’s shop. When she introduced herself as the artist, the proprietor said, “How could you have done that? You’re a colored girl.” Not only stung, Jones also felt thwarted by the anonymity of textile design. She turned to painting and to support herself, applied for a teaching post at her alma mater. Its director, Henry Hunt Clark, advised her to instead go South and “help her people.” Jones decided that moving ahead meant moving away. Soon after she began teaching fine arts at Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia, N.C., she was recruited by Howard University in Washington, D.C. In 1930, she joined its art department faculty. Almost three decades later, in 1977, she retired as an honored professor emerita. “Howard was a crucible for her,” says Davis. “She met the foremost African American intellectuals of the era. Her colleagues were leading lights of the Harlem Renaissance.” They included African American intellectuals such as Alain Locke, known as the father of the Harlem Renaissance, who urged Jones to bring her African heritage into her work. Perhaps in response, in 1932, Jones created one of her greatest paintings, “The Ascent of Ethiopia” (not on view), which unleashed a visual vocabulary she would return to in later years. A surging Afro-American rhapsody in blue, black and gold, the strongly geometric composition integrates images of Africa — a mask-like profile of a pharaoh and pyramids — with the silhouettes of skyscrapers and a jazz combo. Photos of Jones at various stages of her life accompany introductions to the four sections of the exhibition: her refined copies of MFA works as a student; her teaching career at Howard; her 1937 sabbatical in Paris and later travels to Haiti and Africa. The section on her teaching career displays a variety of works on paper, including commanding charcoal portraits of her young students. Among her Howard colleagues was the pioneering African American historian Carter Godwin Woodson, who founded The Associated Publishers, Inc. Jones illustrated its children’s history and literature books, which cast African Americans as protagonists, encouraging racial pride. Her exquisite pen and ink drawing for Gertrude Parthenia McBrown’s poem “The Paint Pot Fairy,” shows a dainty fairy with an Afro painting autumn leaves. A life-changing sabbatical year at the Académie Julian in Paris in 1937 is the subject of the show’s third section. In Paris, Jones felt “shackle free.” She was inspired by the sensational African American dancer Josephine Baker and captivated by the Impressionist paintings of Mary

Cassatt and Edgar Degas as well as Post-Impressionist works of Paul Cézanne and Émile Bernard. While in Paris, Jones formed a lifelong friendship with fellow art student Céline Tabary, who later helped Jones win a prestigious award from the Corcoran Gallery of Art by submitting a work by Jones as her white surrogate. In 1994, the Corcoran hosted a birthday party in honor of Jones to open its exhibition, “The World of Loïs Mailou Jones,” and made a public apology for its past racist policies. The influence of Degas is visible in the oil painting “My Mother’s Hats” (1943), but so are stylistic elements true of her later work: an interplay of rectangles and ovals, strong oranges and reds, and a richly textured surface that crackles with energy. Contemplative but animated, her watercolor and pencil drawing, “Portrait of Céline Tabary” (1940) is a luminous rendering that frames Tabary’s delicate face with her jaunty hat, wide lapels and the paintings behind her. The exhibition’s fourth section, entitled “Further Travels,” shows how visits to Haiti and Africa transformed Jones’s paintings, injecting bolder color and a return to pareddown, sculpted forms. In 1953, Jones married Haitian graphic artist Louis Vergniaud Pierre-Noël and together, they often frequented the island. She absorbed its lively palette and its spiritual icons rooted in Africa. In 1970, traveling on a Howard research grant, Jones made the first of four trips to Africa. Like so many other Western artists in the 20th century, Jones drew from its masks, sculptured forms and cultural symbols. In her most abstract painting on view, “Glyphs” (1985), based on African hieroglyphics, striped birds with saucy tail feathers are kindred in spirit to Josephine Baker’s costumes. Her acrylic and collage tribute “La Baker” (1977) reigns in the gallery. The riveting image sets Baker, her fellow pioneer, within her own self-made iconography as well as African and Afro-American imagery. Delicate tufts of handmade paper evoke the dancer’s jaunty feathered skirts. The sleek, minimalist rendering of her body, in brown and white, conveys unbridled joy that transcends race. Another of the show’s most arresting works is the latest on view, an illustration from her 1996 collaboration with the first president of Senegal, “The Poems of Léopold Sedar with Silkscreens by Loïs Mailou Jones.” Displayed in a glass case, the large book is open to his poem, “À New York,” an ode to the city’s verve. Like heirs of Baker, chorines in white feather headdresses and tutus move to a jazz band. Jones surrounds her ebony figures of dancers and musicians with a fuchsia backdrop with a green palm tree. The composition is an angular convergence of line and color brimming with life. Here was Jones, at age 91, two years before her death, still experimenting, and still rendering the richness of her colorful life.

LECTURE: Loïs Mailou Jones as Pioneer and Friend Wednesday, Feb. 20, 7 p.m. Remis Auditorium, Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston Tickets: $10 for members, seniors, students; $13 for non-members Edmund Barry Gaither, Director of the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists in Boston, in a conversation with exhibition curator Elliot Bostwick Davis, will reflect on his friendship with Jones and discuss her role as a pioneering 20th-century artist and teacher. Gaither and Davis will expand the discussion to the artist’s place in the broader context of American art, exploring how her style influenced many during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond.


Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 11

OBITUARY

John Thomas of Brockton, two-time Olympian, dies

John Thomas after winning the bronze at the 1960 Olympics. John Thomas, a legendary figure in track and field and twotime Olympic medal winner, died last week at Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital. He was 71. Thomas won a bronze medal in the high jump in the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome and a silver medal at the 1964 games in Tokyo. He was the first man to clear 7 feet indoors and made 13 world-record jumps. He was also a trustee at Brockton Public Library and a volunteer at the library and the YMCA. He was athletic director at the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center in Roxbury, where he was known as “JT.”

Thomas was a 17-year-old freshman at Boston University when he became the first athlete to break the 7-foot barrier indoors on Jan. 31, 1959, at the Millrose Games in New York. He eventually eclipsed the world indoor record with a leap of 7 feet 1 ¼ inches at the 1959 National AAU Championships. He broke the world outdoor record three times in 1960, including a career-best jump of 7 feet, 3 ½ inches. Thomas was the NCAA high jump champion in each of his four years at Boston University and captured seven national AAU titles. In his career, he cleared seven feet 191 times and lost only eight competitions. “John meant a lot to me and to BU,” the school’s director of track and field and cross country Robyne Johnson said in a statement. “In the eight years I’ve been here, I found him to be a sincere and nice man. He was a tremendous athlete and he meant a lot to both track and field and to the BU community. He will be missed and we have heavy hearts at the Track and Tennis Center. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family.” Thomas graduated from Boston University in 1963 and was inducted into the school’s Hall of Fame in 1968. He was inducted into the USA Track & Field Hall of Fame in 1985

ARCHITECTS D/R/E/A/M COLLABORATIVE, LLC • Customized Residential and Commercial Designs – Free Initial consultations Homeowners | Small Business | Developers • New Construction • Renovations • Code Compliance • Development Concepts & Feasibility • Energy Upgrades Email: gminott@dreamcollaborative.com Web: www.dreamcollaborative.com Free in-house consultations every Saturday by appointment Tel. (617) 606-7029

AUTO BODY HICKS AUTO BODY, INC 10 Talbot Ave, Dorchester, MA 02124 Repair, refinish damaged vehicles. Complete interior and exterior recondition/detail 24 Hour Towing • (617) 825-1545, fax: (617) 825-8495 www.hicksautobodyinc.com

CAR WASH OJ CAR WASH, INC. 273 Columbia Rd, Dorchester, MA 02121 Proudly Providing Auto Wash Services For Over 20 Years! Contact Person: Tucker Owens Tel/Fax: (617) 265-0117 • EMAIL: ojcarwash@verizon.net WEB: http://www.wmtn.biz/ojcarwash.html (8) Self-Service Bays — (1) Super Bay — (2) Truck Bays. A total of 10 bays. 100% brush-less & soft touch wash. JOIN OJ’s AUTO CLUB NOW! — 50 hour guarantee FREE VIP CARD FOR TUNNEL WASH MONTHLY PASS • ANNUAL PASS WE CAN CUSTOMIZE WASH PLANS TO YOUR SATISFACTION.

CATERING HALEY HOUSE BAKERY CAFÉ Breakfast Specials, Signature Muffins and Scones, A la Carte Breakfast, Lunch Package Deals, Wrap and Sandwich Platters, Steamin’ Hot Entrees, Soup and Salads, Pizza, Side Dishes, Appetizers, Desserts, Beverages and more. To place an order call catering line Monday through Friday 8am-4pm at (617) 939-6837

CONSTRUCTION KERRY CONSTRUCTION, INC 22 Sylvester Rd, Dorchester Interior & Exterior Painting Replacement Windows & Doors • Carpentry • Roofing • Gutters • Masonry • Kitchens • Bathrooms • Vinyl Siding Free Estimates • Licensed & Insured Call James O’Sullivan (617) 825-0592

and also named to the Helms Athletic Foundation Hall of Fame. “John Thomas transcended what it meant to be a champion and an Olympian, and he achieved legendary status not only within the Boston Athletic Association but also in Boston sports,” said Joann E. Flaminio, B.A.A. President. “As the first African American member of the B.A.A., he made a profound, positive impact on us. He was a gentleman who we greatly respected, and he displayed the very best that sports can offer through his successes and how he represented himself and others. John was an inspiration to all…” B.A.A. Executive Director Thomas S. Grilk was equally saddened. “For those of us growing up in Greater Boston in the 1950s and 1960s, John Thomas in the high jump was our personal connection to national, international and Olympic track and field,” Grilk said. “He was on TV in the Olympics, and he competed against the Russians on Wide World of Sports. To us in that day, his name meant ‘excellence’ on the world stage, and it felt personal to us. His was the name we looked for in every track meet and two Olympics.”

Religious Worship Guide

The First Church of Christ, Scientist Sunday Church Services & Sunday School

10 am and 5 pm (no evening service July & Aug.)

Wednesday Testimony Meetings 12 noon and 7:30 pm (2 pm online)

Sunday & Wednesday Live Services Online ChristianScience.com/OnAir

Near the corner of Huntington & Mass. Ave. Free Parking at all services. T Hynes, Prudential, Symphony, or Mass. Ave.

Material from published articles contributed to this report.

TANKO CONTRACTING LLC Asbestos and lead Abatement, Roofing, Masonry, Kitchens, bathroom general capentry complete rehab free estimate. license and insured call AMID ALASA 508-269-7073.

CONSULTING CAROLE COPELAND THOMAS, MBA, CDMP High Energy Programs Conventions • Training Workshops • Retreats Speaker • Trainer • Author Global Diversity • Leadership • Multiculturalism • Empowerment (508) 947-5755 • carole@mssconnect.com www.tellcarole.com • www.mssconnect.com

DENTISTS RICHARD D. CARR AND ASSOCIATES Richard D. Carr - D.D.S. Bahram Ghassemi - D.M.D., Badrieh Edalatpour - D.M.D. Gail Fernando - D.M.D. Diba Dastjerdi - D.M.D 68 New Edgerly Rd, Boston, MA 02115 • (617) 262-5880 • Fax: (617) 859-8804

ELECTRICIAN JAMES M. BUTLER ELECTRICIAN Great with old wiring • No Job too small Ceiling Fans, Knob and Tube Rewiring, Electrical Service Upgrades and Much More Free Estimates • Fully Insured License # 12077-B • 24 Hour Emergency Service (617) 593-0573

EYE DOCTORS & GLASSES URBAN EYE MD ASSOCIATES. P.C. 183 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 720 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (617) 262-6300 • (617) 638-8119 Web: www.urbaneyemd.com Benjamin Andre` Quamina, M.D. • Lawrence I. Rand, M.D. Clifford Michaelson, M.D. • Sergey Urman, M.D. Lessa Denis Mahamed, O.D. Treating: Glaucoma, Cataracts, Diabetes, Ocular Plastic/ Cosmetic Surgery and other vision threatening conditions and diseases. Offering: Routine Eye and Contact Lens Exams

For further information, call 617.450.3790 or visit www.ChristianScience.com

EVENT PLANNING

LAWYERS

ONE LIFE EVENTS

BOSTON ATTORNEY CYNTHIA E. MACCAUSLAND

A full service event management team 83 Everdean St, Suite 1R Boston, MA 02122 (617) 435-9339 or (617) 970-8794 onelifeevents@gmail.com Banquets & Dinners, Corporate Events & Functions, Fundraisers, Private Parties, Stage Performances, Themed Events, Weddings and more. www.onelifeevents.com

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS FIRECODE DESIGN LLC. 195 Dudley Street, Roxbury, MA 02119 (617) 442-CODE (2633) Roxbury's #1 Full Service Fire Extinguisher Company Inspections • Maintenance • Sales • Installation FREE Workplace Fire Extinguisher Training (some restrictions apply)

FITNESS UNIFIED FITNESS, INC. Personal Fitness Studio • One-on-one personal fitness training • Nutritional Consultation • Group Sessions • Party and Fitness Fun • Massage Therapy 1 Westinghouse Plaza, Bldg. D, Hyde Park, MA 02136 (857) 345-9252 office (617) 803.8904 mobile unifiedfitness1@gmail.com http://www.facebook.com/UnifedFitness

INSURANCE MUTUAL OF OMAHA • Life Insurance • Disability Insurance • Long-Term Care Insurance • Annuities • IRA • 401(k) • Mutual Funds • 529 College Savings Plans • Buy-Sell Funding • Key Person Protection • Executive Bonus Contact: Trevor Farrington Telephone: (617) 407-2684 Email: trevor.farrington@mutualofomaha.com Website: http://www.TrevorFarrington.com Boston Division Office, 400 Crown Colony Drive, Suite 201, Quincy, MA 02169

EMPIRE INSURANCE AGENCY AND REAL ESTATE SERVICES Home • Car • Life • Business Insurance also Real Estate Services helping Buyers and Sellers 1065 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02120 Call Now 617-445-5555

BUSINESS DIRECTORY $250/six months for a 30 word listing in print and online. Email: ads@bannerpub.com

provides compassionate, high quality legal services in Divorce, Custody, Support and Guardianship. Sliding-Scale and Income-Based Fees. Call 617-284-3804 or visit www.maccauslandlaw.com.

PHYSICIANS MARIAN H. PUTNAM, M.D. Pediatrician, Newborn to age 22 • Mass Health Plan patients welcome • Children's and BIDMC Hospitals • 36 Maple St, Hyde Park. (617) 364-6784 • home.earthlink.net/ ~mputnam3

PLUMBING SEAN’S PLUMBING & DRAINS Since 1970, A1 References, no job too small. Drains cleaned, disposals, water heaters, washers/dryers, damaged bathroom & kitchen, floors repaired. Quotes over phone. Shower Diverters Expertly Rebuilt 24 hours Cell: 617-610-0492 Boston area only. License B18081. Fully Insured

REMOVAL SERVICES ROOF ICE & ROOF SNOW REMOVAL Call Akee Roofing (781) 483-8291

ROOFING AKEE ROOF LEAK REPAIRS Roof Leaks repaired, Gutters repaired, cleaned, and replaced, Flatroofs replaced. Call Richard (781) 483-8291

SKILLED NURSING FACILITY SKILLED NURSING & REHAB CENTER Proudly serving the Community since 1927

BENJAMIN HEALTHCARE CENTER 120 Fisher Ave, Boston, MA 02120 www.benjaminhealthcare.com Tel: (617) 738-1500 Fax: (617) 738-6560 Short-term, Long-term, Respite, Hospice & Rehabilitation Myrna E. Wynn, President & CEO, Notary Public

TELEPHONE & INTERNET MASSACHUSETTS LOCALTELEPHONE COMPANY Pay-As-You-Go! Fast, Friendly, Guaranteed! We'll install a new number, or re-use your existing number. Visit us at 1953 Dorchester Ave., corner of Fuller St. 1-888-248-6582 (Free month with a year sign-up!) INSURANCE


12 • Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

Flu

continued from page 1

of the illness should it strike. When asked if flu shots are necessary, Zane quickly responded, “Unequivocally yes. It protects you and prevents the virus from spreading.” Flu viruses spread easily — usually through a sneeze or cough of an infected person. When a person with the flu sneezes, they are in effect launching the virus into the air — and into the vicinity of anyone around them. Sometimes a person can become infected by touching something that harbors the flu virus — like a keyboard or doorknob — and then putting their hand to their face, allowing easy entry of the virus through their nose, mouth or eyes. Fortunately, the virus cannot live

for extended lengths of times on non-living surfaces; they require a host, such as a person or animal, in order to survive. It is not always necessary to seek medical care when you get the flu. Most often, you can treat yourself at home. Drink lots of fluids, get plenty of rest and use over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen (active ingredient of Advil) and acetaminophen (active ingredient of Tylenol), to reduce body aches. With rest, fluids and anti-fever medications, most people are fine. But some symptoms warrant medical treatment. “Not being able to keep food down is one of them,” said Zane. Very high fevers, shortness of breath or chest pain are other symptoms. Headaches, especially in the presence of neck pains, should also be evaluated.

In some cases, the doctor may recommend an antiviral medication. These drugs treat influenza A and B and can shorten the illness by one or two days and reduce the severity of symptoms. Antivirals are frequently recommended for high-risk people. There is one hitch — you have to start the regimen within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. The best approach is to prevent the seasonal flu’s onslaught. First, get an annual flu shot. They are available now at doctors’ offices, clinics and many local pharmacies. The best time to get a shot is when the vaccine is first available — usually in September. But if you miss September, you’re not too late. You can still get the shot even beyond January. A reason to get vaccinated sooner rather than later is to give

the body enough time to make antibodies against the seasonal flu. This process is not immediate; it usually takes a couple of weeks. If you wait too long, it is possible to become infected before the body has had enough time to arm itself. Doctors recommend that everyone be vaccinated. However, some groups are particularly targeted — young children, pregnant women, those 65 and older, those with chronic conditions like diabetes and heart disease, and people who live with or care for sick people. Health professionals are inoculated every year for the safety of their patients. An additional approach is to get the virus before it gets you. That’s when personal hygiene comes into play. Fortunately, heat and various chemicals, such as alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide and chlorine,

can destroy influenza viruses. Detergents and soaps work wonders. Washing your hands is one of the most effective ways to avoid the flu infection. And a quick dip under water does not do the trick. You need to lather up with soap and wash for at least 20 seconds. Rinse well, dry off your hands thoroughly and turn off the faucet with a paper towel. Washing your hands once or twice a day does not suffice. Wash often — before and after handling food, after using the toilet, after sneezing or coughing — following any activity that fosters the growth of germs. Being away from a sink is no longer an excuse for not washing your hands. Hand gels that contain at least 60 percent alcohol are now readily available and can be used in the absence of soap and water. Get rest, avoid crowds and exercise. Exercise does not prevent infection, but it boosts your immune system so you can ward off severe symptoms. If you become a statistic, do your part to prevent spreading the flu. Cover your mouth with a tissue when you sneeze or cough and throw the tissue away. Cough into your elbow if a tissue is not available. If you cough into your hand without the use of a tissue, wash your hands. Surfaces you touch after an unprotected sneeze — including another person — can become contaminated. If you’re already infected, you are a public health hazard. Stay home and concentrate on getting well instead of sharing your illness. The CDC recommends staying away until your fever is gone for 24 hours without the benefit of fever-reducing medications. Keep in mind that the infectious period for the flu ranges from a day before symptoms surface to about four or five days after they occur. “Do what your parents told you to do,” said Norman. “Cover your mouth when you cough. Use a tissue and throw it away. Wash your hands and not only when you’re in the shower.” This article has been updated. It was first published in October 2009.

The City of Boston’s annual Martin Luther King Day celebration at Fanueil Hall featured Ernest Green (above), one of the Little Rock Nine, as keynote speaker. The Little Rock Nine were the first blacks to attend the all-white high school in Little Rock, Ark. (Patrick O’Connor photos)

Just as the meaning of a word is concealed within it, the secret of the awareness of Brahman lies in the absence of company. If you don’t remember the goal steadfastly, if you fail to abandon company, how can you reach your destination? — Swami Muktananda


Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 13

Follow us on

TWITTER @baystatebanner

Join the

Banner

www.baystatebanner.com

LEGALS

LEGALS

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU13P0062EA

Estate of Ruth Angela Fowler Also known as: Ruth A. Fowler Date of Death: 02/02/2012

Like us on FACEBOOK BAY STATE BANNER LEGALS MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

To all interested persons: NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication Estate of Fannye Oneta Coley Also known as: Fannye O. Coley Date of Death: 09/15/2012 To all interested persons: A petition has been filed by Stephanie Margo Davis of Roxbury, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that Stephanie Margo Davis of Roxbury, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 02/14/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you.

A petition has been filed by Diane S. Edwards of Upper Marlboro, MD requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that Diane S. Edwards of Upper Marlboro, MD be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 02/07/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration.

The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration.

WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 03, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 9, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Suffolk Probate and Family Court 24 New Chardon Street Boston, MA 02114 617-788-8300 Docket No. SU13P0110EA Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication Estate of Harold A. Gray Date of Death: 10/27/2012

A petition has been filed by Elizabeth Brooks of Charlotte, NC requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that Elizabeth Brooks of Charlotte, NC be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve With Corporate Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 02/28/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 16, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department Docket No. SU10P1785EA

Citation on Petition for Order of Complete Settlement of Estate Estate of Marguerite K Polin Date of Death: 07/18/2010 To all interested persons: A petition has been filed by Robert Polin of Randolph, MA requesting that an Order of Complete Settlement of the estate issue including to approve an accounting and other such relief as may be requested in the Petition. For the Amended First and Final Account. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 02/14/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 11, 2013 Patricia M. Campatelli Register of Probate

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Sealed General Bids for MPA L1025-C6, FINANCE OFFICE RENOVATIONS, LOGAN OFFICE CENTER, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02116, until 11:00 A.M. local time on, FEBRUARY 13, 2013 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10:00AM LOCAL TIME ON THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 2013. The work includes RENOVATIONS TO VARIOUS OFFICE SPACES WITHIN THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE LOGAN OFFICE CENTER, INCLUDING CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, CEILING, FINISH WORK, HVAC DUCT MODIFICATIONS AND RELATED ELECTRICAL WIRING AND LIGHTING MODIFICATIONS. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY JANUARY 24, 2013.

To all interested persons:

SUFFOLK Division

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY

Docket No. SU13P0009EA

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication

The estimated contract cost is $45,000. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority's Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44H inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer's or a cashier's check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and/or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance, Auto Liability Insurance, and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $1,000,000.00. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details.

Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. AP1308-C1, FY 13-15 WATERFRONT REPAIR TERM CONTRACT, MASSPORT WATERFRONT FACILITIES, SOUTH BOSTON AND EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10:00AM LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013. The work includes VARIOUS WATERFRONT REPAIR, ON AN AS-NEEDED BASIS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE AND REMOVAL OF SPILL CONTAINMENT BOOMS, RETRIEVAL AND DISPOSAL OF FLOATING DEBRIS, EXTRACTION AND DISPOSAL OF DAMAGED TIMBER OR TIMBER DEBRIS, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF NEW TIMBER FENDERS, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF NEW TIMBER CURBS, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF NEW TIMBER PILES, REPLACEMENT OF BUOY MOORING CHAINS AND HARDWARE. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013. The estimated contract cost is $500,000. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority's Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer's or a cashier's check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and /or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $10,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. This contract is subject to a Minority/Women Owned Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than FIVE PERCENT (5%) of the Contract be performed by minority and women owned business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor's Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

ZONING HEARING No filed sub bids will be required for this contract. This contract is subject to a Minority/Women Owned Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than FIVE PERCENT (5%) of the Contract be performed by minority and women owned business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor's Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals.

The Zoning Commission of the City of Boston hereby gives notice, in accordance with Chapter 665 of the Acts of 1956, as amended, that a public hearing will be held on February 13, 2013, at 9:30 AM, in Room 900, Ninth Floor, Boston City Hall, in connection with Text Amendment Application No. 435 and Map Amendment Application No. 622, filed by the Boston Redevelopment Authority. Said text amendment would amend Article 50, Roxbury Neighborhood District with respect to the establishment of where Planned Development Areas may be permitted and affordable housing provisions. Said map amendment would amend Map 6A/6B/6C, Roxbury Neighborhood District by changing the existing zoning designation of the Bartlett Yards parcel from “3F-4000”, indicating a Three-Family Residential Subdistrict, to “Dudley Square EDA,” indicating an Economic Development Area; removing the “Housing Priority Area Overlay District” designation from the Bartlett Yards parcel and Parcel 9; and removing the “Housing Priority Area Overlay District” designation from the map key A copy of the petitions may be obtained at the office of the Zoning Commission, Room 953C, Boston City Hall, between 9 AM and 5 PM any day except Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays. For the Commission, Jeffrey M. Hampton, Executive Secretary


14 • Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER

LEGALS MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. AP1313-C1, FY 13-16 CRASH ATTENUATOR, TERM CONTRACT, BOSTON, BEDFORD, AND WORCESTER MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2013, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) IN THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS EAST CONFERENCE ROOM AT 11:00 AM, LOCAL TIME ON WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013. The work includes REPAIRS TO THIRTY-FIVE EXISTING OR PROPOSED ATTENUATORS, LOCATED AT OR ON THE APPROACHES TO LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS AND OTHER ATTENUATOR LOCATIONS AS NEEDED AT ALL MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY FACILITIES. THE WORK SHALL BE PERFORMED AS DIRECTED BY THE AUTHORITY, WHEN THE NEED ARISES DUE TO DAMAGE TO THE IMPACT ATTENUATORS. THE REPAIRS SHALL BE PERFORMED WITH TRAFFIC CONTROL IN ACCORDANCE WITH MUTCD STANDARD REQUIREMENTS. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 2013 The estimated contract cost is $210,200. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority's Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer's or a cashier's check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and /or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of ONE MILLION DOLLARS ($1,000,000.00). Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor's Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals.

LEGALS obtained by depositing a company check, treasurer's check, cashier's check, bank check or money order in the sum of $20.00 payable to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. No personal checks or cash will be accepted as deposits. Refunds will be made to those returning the documents in satisfactory condition on or before FEBRUARY 27, 2013 (ten business days after the opening of General Bids) otherwise the deposit shall be the property of the Commonwealth. WE DO NOT MAIL PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS. Messenger and other types of pick-up and delivery services are the agents of the bidder and the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance assumes no responsibility for delivery or receipt of the documents. Bidders are encouraged to take advantage of a rotating credit plans and specifications deposit program initiated by the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance to encourage the easy accessibility of documents to contractors. Designer:

Parker Hill Apartments The Style, Comfort and Convenience you Deserve! Heat and Hot Water Always Included Modern Laundry Facilities Private Balconies / Some with City Views Plush wall to wall carpet Adjacent to New England Baptist Hospital Secured Entry, Elevator Convenience Private Parking Near Public Transportation and much more ...

ARUP USA, Inc. 955 Massachusetts Avenue, 4th Floor Cambridge, MA 02139

2 bedrooms $1264-$1850 1 bedroom $1058-$1450 Studio $993-$1350

Carole Cornelison COMMISSIONER

Call Today for more details and to schedule a visit...

INVITATION TO BID

888-842-7945

CLASSIFIED LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE DIVISION OF CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT & MAINTENANCE (DCAMM) Sealed proposals submitted on a form furnished by the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance (DCAMM) and clearly identified as a bid, endorsed with the name and address of the bidder, the project and contract number, will be received at the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance, One Ashburton Place, 16th Floor, Room 1610, Boston, MA 02108, no later than the date and time specified and will forthwith be publicly opened and read aloud. General Bids before 2:00 PM:

February 12, 2013

The Category of Work is:

M.G.L. Ch.30, 39M

Mass. State Project No.

DCP1234 Contract no. HC2

DCP-Transportation Building-Interior Stairs & Circulation Reconfiguration Boston, Massachusetts E.C.C: $37,336

91 Clay Street Quincy, MA 02170

Senior Living At It’s Best

A senior/disabled/ handicapped community 0 BR units = $1,027/mo 1 BR units = $1,101/mo All utilities included.

Call Sandy Miller, Property Manager

#888-691-4301 Program Restrictions Apply.

The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority is seeking bids for the following: BID NO.

DESCRIPTION

DATE

TIME

*OP-207

RFQ/P Energy Advisory Services

01/31/13

11:00 a.m.

ADVERTISE YOUR CLASSIFIEDS

OP-205

Fire Alarm and Fire Sprinkler System Service

01/31/13

2:00 p.m.

(617) 261-4600 x 119

Sealed bids will be received at the offices of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, Charlestown Navy Yard, Document Distribution Office, 100 First Avenue, First Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, up to the time and date listed above at which time they will be publicly opened and read.

ads@bannerpub.com

Find rate information at www.baystatebanner.com/advertising

*(indicates) Bid Documents available on the Comm-PASS Website (www. comm-pass.com).

Unquity House 30 Curtis Rd., Milton

1 and 2-bed Affordable Apts in

Watertown

Unquity House is a 139 unit apartment complex offering activities and security for ages 62 and over. Studio and One bedroom apartments with utilities included, prices range from $695 to $872. Accepting applications, some income restrictions apply. Please call 617-898-2032 or visit our website at www.mreinc.org

17 affordable apartments to be available by lottery in early 2013. 3 of the 17 will be for households earning 65% of the area median income. Units located in brand new 170 unit complex near the Charles River. This building contains an elevator. Income 1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person

Limits: $38,309 or $47,150 $43,794 or $53,900 $49,278 or $60,650 $54,722 or $67,350

SENIORS LIVE ROYALLY AT CASTLE COVE

Maximum Rents: 1 bedroom $919 – $1,172 2 bedroom $1005 – $1,289

Castle Cove Cooperative Apartments D & West Second Streets

A unique community of seniors managed by CSI Support & Development Services of Malden.

Deadline: Applications DUE Friday March 15, 2013. Lottery will be Thursday March 28th at 7:00 pm.

A cooperative apartment is a building controlled by the members. All major operating decisions are voted on by the members. Coop apartments help to keep quality housing affordable.

Visit http://metrowestcd.org/housing-services/ for information and application. Or call Robyn at Metro West Collaborative Development, Inc.

at 617-923-3505 x 5.

We Have: • Our own separate apartment • A non-profit organization; any profits are put back into coop services to benefit its members • Open voluntary membership without social, political, racial or religious discrimination • A building democratically controlled by the residents.

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

WOLLASTON MANOR

THE RESIDENCES AT BROOK HILL TOWN OF MILTON AFFORDABLE HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY

Each building has their own activities run by a committee of residents such as entertainment, bingo, gift case

The Residences at Brook Hill will offer 2 new affordable condominium units located near MBTA, employment opportunities and Boston. All units will be distributed by lottery to eligible *first time homebuyers and those whose family composition qualifies them for a one bedroom unit.

We have: A library, game room, community room, lounges on each floor, our own laundry room

The one bedroom homes are available for $156,500 The income limits are as follows:

The success of a Cooperative depends on the active participation of its members

1 person household

2 person household

$47,150

$53,900

If you would like more information or to apply please call

1-800-225-3151

Household asset limit is $75,000 ALL APPLICANTS MUST PROVIDE FULL FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION AND MORTGAGE PRE-APPROVAL IN ADDITION TO A COMPLETE APPLICATION. INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE INCLUDED IN THE LOTTERY REQUIRED INFORMATION MUST BE SUBMITTED PRIOR TO THE APPLICATION DEADLINE.

The application deadline is February 25th, 2013 at 2:00 PM This project is scheduled for 42 calendar days to substantial completion and in general includes: The project scope involves reconfiguration of approximately 1,500 SF of interior space (spread between 3rd and 4th floors) of portion of Massachusetts State Transportation Building. The scope includes demolition, relocation, and/or addition of portions of interior walls, ceilings, finishes, mechanical diffusers, fire alarm devices, light fixtures, doors, and a new sprinkler head. Pre-bid walkthrough at site, Wednesday, January 30 @10:00 AM, 2nd floor property management office, contact Paul Ford at 617-727-4030 X380. Category of Work is General Contracting.

Applications available at Milton Town Hall, Milton Public Library, Milton Housing Authority, and Hingham Housing Authority or by calling 781-741-6025/ TDD 1-800-974-6006 or email edirector@verizon.net

Open house will be held on Sunday, January 27, 2013 11:00am – 12:00pm applications will be available *certain exceptions apply

Minimum rates of wages to be paid on the project have been determined by the Commissioner of the Division of Occupational Safety under the provisions of Sections 26 and 27, Chapter 149 of the General Laws. Wage rates are listed in the contract form portion of specification book. Each general bid must be secured by an accompanying deposit of 5% of the total bid amount, including all alternates, in the form of a bid bond, in cash, a certified, treasurer's, or cashier's check issued by a responsible bank or trust company made payable to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The bidding documents may be examined at the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance Bid Room, One Ashburton Place, 16th Floor, Room 1610, Boston, MA 02108 Tel (617) 727-4003. Copies may be

SUBSCRIBE TO THE BANNER call (617) 261-4600

baystatebanner.com

We Help People Get and Succeed at Good Jobs Free job-search and career development help: • Most people who complete our 60-hour job-search workshop qualify for free, individual job-search help. • We refer people to jobs that pay $20,000 — $30,000 and offer benefits. • We mentor people who accept jobs through our referrals for two years.

If you are a low-income adult who is: • • • • •

Looking for a full-time permanent job; Willing to participate in our two-year mentoring program; Age 22 to 55; Legal to work in the U.S.; Able to succeed in an English-speaking workplace, then…

Orientation Every Thursday, 1:00 PM Call us to see if you qualify at (617) 424-6616. • You will need to bring your résumé • If you do not have a résumé, bring a list of: - Jobs and military service since high school; - Education and training. - Be sure to include month and year; be sure that all dates are correct.


Thursday, January 24, 2013 • BAY STATE BANNER • 15

Are you interested in a CAREER? Project Hope, in partnership with Partners HealthCare and Brigham & Women’s Hospital, is currently accepting applications for FREE entry level health care employment training programs.

Program eligibility includes: • Have a high school diploma or equivalent

Phoenix House Dorchester Facility has several openings for: Family Therapist - FT position responsible for facilitating Multi-Family Group, Parents Group, and Family Issues group as well as holding individual family sessions with parents and clients. Must hold a Master’s Degree.

• Have a verifiable reference of 1 year from a former employer • Pass assessments in reading, language, and computer skills • Attend an Open House to begin the eligibility & application process • Be legally authorized to work in the United States

For more information and to register for the next Open House held the 1st and 3rd Friday of the month please visit our website at www.prohope.org/openhouse.htm

Residential Counselor - Part Time and Per Diem positions, responsible for security and maintenance tasks while available to assist residents Recovery Specialist - Full Time, Part Time and Per Diem positions available, assist clients on their road to recovery from substance abuse

Please send resumes to dbrown2@phoenixhouse.org or fax 617-379-1715

Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc. . is an employee owned, mid-size national consulting engineering firm with offices in the Northeast, Florida and Virgin Islands. Our multi-disciplined work setting offers opportunities to take ownership of your career and growth potential. We are currently seeking the following professional for our Environmental Services Group in Manchester, NH:

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER Dynamic Senior Project Manager with 12 -15 years or more of experience in municipal water and wastewater engineering services to work in our Manchester, NH office. The individual will play a key role in managing new and existing projects in New Hampshire and other New England states. This highly responsible position requires senior level project management, significant client contact, and technical planning, design, permitting and construction phase services for the water and wastewater engineering practice. BSCE and PE license are required. MSCE preferred. (Career Code: MAT10113) Please send resume citing career code to: HOYLE, TANNER & ASSOCIATES, INC., 150 Dow Street, Manchester, NH 03101 or via e-mail to jhann@hoyletanner.com or by fax to 603-669-4168.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

@baystatebanner.com

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

Bay State Banner

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

www.hoyletanner.com

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

GET READY FOR

A GREAT OFFICE JOB!

The Board of Commissioners of the Saugus (MA) Housing Authority is presently accepting resumes for the full time position of Executive Director requiring a 37.5 hour work week. The Saugus Housing Authority is a medium size PHA, managing 100 units of Federal housing, 205 units of State aided Conventional housing, 150 Section 8 Rental Assistance vouchers, 8 units of Chapter 689 housing, and 8 units 705 State Family housing, for a total of 471 units. The present staff includes 10 full time employees, and one part time employee.

Train for Administrative, Financial Services & Medical Office jobs (ESL classes also available) Work in hospitals, health care, finance, banks, colleges, & more.

YMCA Training, Inc. is recruiting training candidates now! Job placement assistance provided. We will help you apply for free training. No prior experience necessary, but must have HS diploma or GED.

Minimum qualifications are four years in housing, community development, public administration, or another closely related field. In addition, knowledge of the principles and practices of housing management, finances, and maintenance systems in public or private housing is preferred. The candidate should possess written and verbal skills, and must be bondable. One year’s experience overseeing at least three staff persons or program administration is required. Knowledge of laws regulating State and Federal housing programs is preferred. Certification as a Public Housing Manager from a HUD approved organization is required, or the ability to obtain a PHM certification within one year of hire. The qualification may also be substituted by certification as a property manager or similar classification by a nationally recognized housing or real estate organization or by certification as a MPHA of a DHCD-approved Massachusetts Public Housing Administrator Certification Program. A bachelor’s degree in a related field may substitute for up to two years of experience.

Free YMCA membership for you and your family while enrolled in Training, Inc.

Call Today! Leigh Hewlett, YMCA Training, Inc. (617) 542-1800 ext. 128

Need Skills & Experience? Learn MS Office & customer service skills Train for jobs in growing Green Energy field

The salary range is $61,626 - $74,000. Interested applicants can submit a resume and cover letter by Friday, February 8, 2013 via regular mail or e-mail to: shaexdirsearch@yahoo.com.

Learn to use a computer for job hunting Benefit from on-the-job internships

The Saugus Housing Authority Attn: Stanley T. King, Chairman 19 Talbot Street, Saugus, MA 01906

Tuition funding may be available

Come to a Tuesday @ 3 p.m. briefing

Position is open until filled. No faxed resumes will be considered. The Saugus Housing Authority is an equal opportunity employer.

Call 617-542-4180 to pre-register Operation A.B.L.E. of Greater Boston

Reward...

‘Celebrating 50 Years of Helping People out of Poverty’

CAMPAIGN MANAGER Special Projects

Oversee three major payroll-deduction fundraising campaigns: Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), Commonwealth of Massachusetts Employees Charitable Campaign (COMECC) and City of Boston Employees Charitable Campaign (COBECC). Meet with campaign management designees at federal, state and city agencies to plan fundraising campaigns. Keep campaign authorities informed of progress throughout campaign periods. Conduct and oversee charity participant application process in accordance with government guidelines. Develop marketing brochures and update website listings of accepted charities. Oversee pledge collection, processing and reporting. Track award recipients in accordance with campaign management guidelines. Coordinate campaign kick-offs, award ceremonies and other special events. Prepare for and assist with campaign audits. Perform other related duties as required. Minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration, Human Services or related field, with three to five years of successful management and/or fundraising experience required. Must have exceptional management skills and attention to detail. Ability to meet multiple deadlines and challenges required. Must be able to inspire and motivate campaign volunteers and work well with others. Strong written and verbal communication skills required. Must be proficient in word processing and spreadsheet software. Must be able to work sensitively and effectively with individuals of diverse educational, socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.

All applications and inquiries should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 178 Tremont St. Boston, MA 02111, Fax: (617) 423-7693, or email hr@bostonabcd.org Please visit our website at www.bostonabcd.org for additional employment listings.

YOURSELF WITH TWO CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AS AN ADMINISTRATIVE AND BOOKKEEPING PROFESSIONAL

Do you need to upgrade your skills? Ready for a new career?

ADMINSTRATIVE AND BOOKKEEPING PROFESSIONALS PROGRAM

ADVERTISE

ONE PROGRAM…TWO CAREER CHOICES… MORE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

YOUR CLASSIFIEDS WITH

The Administrative and Bookkeeping Professionals Program uses a combination of hands on classroom instruction and online learning experiences designed to give you employer ready skills, and the self confidence from achieving new, professional level skills for today’s economy.

THE BAY STATE BANNER

(617) 261-4600 x 119

ads@bannerpub.com

FIND RATE INFORMATION AT

www.baystatebanner.com /advertising

The Administrative and Bookkeeping Professionals Program offers: • Introductory and advance levels of computer skills training using Microsoft Office 2010 (MS Word, Excel, Outlook) • Bookkeeping essentials and procedures for office professionals • Opportunities to create professional business documents using digital, social media and internet technologies • Computerized bookkeeping using QuickBooks • Procedures for recording, managing and securing client/ customer financial and non-financial data

Training Grants available to qualifying applicants. Contact: Mr. Royal Bolling, Computer Learning Resources Phone: 617-442-6199 Email: royalbolling1@yahoo.com

Licensed by the Massachusetts Division Professional Licensure Office of Private Occupational School Education


Bay State Banner 01/24/2013  

Newspaper for the greater Boston area

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you