Page 1

THE ROYAL MOTOR YACHT CLUB OF NEW SOUTH WALES

YEARBOOK

2O1O - 2O11


opening soon n o v e m b e r , 2 0 1 1 lk boutique t h e s ta r , 8 0 p y r m o n t s t, s y d n e y


Royal Motor Yacht Club of New South Wales Ltd Patron-in-Chief of the Royal Motor Yacht Club Her Excellency Ms Quentin Bryce, AC Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia

Patron Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir, AC Governor of New South Wales

Vice Patron Rear Admiral Stephen Gilmore. AM CSC RAN

2 RMYC YEARBOOK


Royal Motor Yacht Club of New South Wales Office Bearers for 2011/2012

Commodore John Barbouttis

Vice Commodore Michael Courtney

Rear Commodore Ian Dale

Honorary Treasurer Matthew Scarf

Board of Directors

Michael Zammit Stephen Geissler Richard Poole Neil Webster Robert Paridis RMYC YEARBOOK 3


320376A RHS_Riviera International | 1738 HIGHRES.pdf

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Sydney Harbour has two icons In 1932 the Sydney Harbour Bridge was officially opened. It took over 2000 people and 8 years to construct, and linked, for the first time, the city of Sydney directly with the North Shore. The ‘coat hanger’ as it is commonly known has become one of Sydney Harbour’s and Australia’s most instantly recognisable icons. Some 48 years after the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, a set of plans were drawn for a new style of pleasure boat. It was 38 feet long, built of fibreglass, had an open flybridge and was powered by twin diesel engines. The year was 1980 and these were heady days indeed. Australia was enjoying strong economic growth and the boat-buying public liked what they saw when the Riviera 38 was officially launched in 1981. It was a modest launch for what has become, over three decades, the most recognised boat brand on Sydney Harbour. A visit to any marina will demonstrate the clear acceptance and trust that Sydney boat owners place in the Riviera brand. Come the weekend, as boats emerge from their berths or leave their moorings, the glistening waters of the world’s most beautiful harbour come alive with the other Sydney Harbour icon — Riviera. R Marine Sydney is the official Sydney Harbour dealership for Riviera. Based at Rushcutters Bay, this has been the home for Riviera on Sydney Harbour since 1988. Over the last 23 years, R Marine Sydney has consistently won many Riviera accolades for sales excellence. Indeed R Marine Sydney is the largest Riviera dealership in the world; a status only achieved by consistently delivering excellence. R Marine Sydney offers a broad range of new and pre-owned boats for sale. It also has an extensive service division with shipwright and specialist trade services, and is a fully accredited service dealer for CAT and Volvo Penta marine engines. Mike Joyce and the award-winning R Marine Sydney Team would welcome an opportunity to introduce you to the iconic Riviera Collection and demonstrate their world-leading commitment. There is a size and style of boat in the new Riviera range that will suit your taste and your dream harbour lifestyle.

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Royal Motor Yacht Club of NSW Ltd 21 Wunulla Road, Point Piper, Sydney NSW 2026 Tel: (02) 9327 6828 Fax: (02) 9363 9268 Boat Shed: (02) 9362 2129 Mobile: 0418 406 816 Email: admin@rmycnsw.com.au

ZEST – Function caterers to RMYC Tel: (02) 9327 3441 Fax: (02) 9328 0052 Email: events@zest.net.au

Official Yearbook 2O1O – 2O11

CONTENTS Patrons

2

Office Bearers

3

Commodore’s Message

8

A Brief History

10

Longitude: Only a Matter of Time

16

Opening Day 2011

26

Restaurant Louis XV – Monte Carlo

34

Commodore’s Ball 2011

41

The Tragic 60 Milers

46

Vanuatu Fishing

52

Islands in the Sun – an Eastern Mediterranean charter voyage

56

A Family Lycian Jaunt – Turkey the Gulet Way

62

The Birth of the RIB

70

Nautilus II Steps Up – The origins of powerboat racing in Australia

76

Royal Motor Yacht Club Gym

80

Father Neptune’s Day 2010

84

Memorandum of Association of RMYC of NSW Ltd

88

Honour Roll of Life Members

91

Articles of Association of RMYC of NSW Ltd

92

Members List

103

Honour Roll of Flag Officers

112

Royal Motor Yacht Club Uniforms and Flags

115

Royal Motor Yacht Club Flags & Epaulettes

120

Cover Photo: Tom Isitt 6 RMYC YEARBOOK

Published by:

ABN 30 007 224 204 Suite 6. 110 Botany Road Alexandria. NSW 2015 Tel: (02) 9690 3000 Fax: (02) 9690 3055 Email: media@executivemedia.com.au Web: www.executivemedia.com.au Offices also in Melbourne, Brisbane & Adelaide. Editor Helena Heidenreich, Harbourside Media Art Director Jody Green, Graphic Solutions Contributors Barry Tranter, Cia Stumm, John Ashley, Andrew L. Urban Disclaimer: The editor, publisher, printer and their staff and agents are not responsible for the accuracy or correctness of the text of contributions contained in this publication or for the consequences of any use made of the products, and the information referred to in this publication. The editor, publisher, printer and their staff and agents expressly disclaim all liability of whatsoever nature for any consequences arising from any errors or omissions contained in this publication whether caused to a purchaser of this publication or otherwise. The views expressed in the articles and other material published herein do no not necessarily reflect the views of the editor and publisher or their staff or agents. The responsibility for the accuracy of information is that of the individual contributors and neither the publisher or editor can accept responsibility for the accuracy of information which is supplied by others. It is impossible for the publisher and editors to ensure that the advertisements and other material herein comply with the Trade Practices Act 1974 (CtH). Readers should make their own inquiries in making any decisions, and where necessary, seek professional advice. © 2011 Executive Media Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part, without written permission is strictly prohibited.


Why beacon registration

matters Since the introduction of mandatory carriage of 406 MHz distress beacons in vessels proceeding offshore and the cessation of satellite detection of 121.5 MHz signals in February 2009, over 2000 people have been rescued in the Australian region through the use of distress beacons. The speed and success of their rescues are due to efforts of a wide range of people, from search and rescue officers working in the Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s (AMSA) Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC Australia), police officers coordinating the searches, passing ships and aircraft, as well as marine rescue volunteers who give up their time to assist others. In all of the cases involving distress beacons, one action has been repeatedly demonstrated as being crucial – distress beacon registration. By registering your distress beacon with AMSA, you provide information that can be accessed by RCC officers in the event of an emergency. Having contact details, vessel or vehicle information, and the names of people who are likely to have information to assist in forming a response, is invaluable. Registration is vital as satellite detection of a 406 MHz distress beacon’s signal will initially generate two positions, which can sometimes be thousands of miles apart. Without accurate contact details, and if your beacon is not GPS-enabled, rescue officers face a delay in establishing your position until a further report is received from a polar orbiting satellite. If the beacon is registered enquiries can start immediately.

To ensure that your beacon can serve you best in an emergency, there are some simple actions you can take: •

Ensure that your beacon registration details are up-to-date and that you have entered your trip details, including the number and names of your passengers.

If you have bought your beacon second-hand, ensure that the beacon registration is transferred to you, and your details are recorded.

Carry your beacon in a grab bag with other safety and survival equipment, such as flares and a first aid kit.

Before you go, let your emergency contacts know your itinerary and what time you’re expected back.

There are now over 207,000 distress beacons registered in Australia. However, despite all the reminders, some 25 per cent of all beacons sold are still unregistered. If you have an unregistered beacon, or know of someone who has yet to register their beacon, take the time to go online to www.amsa.gov.au/beacons or call 1800 406 406 to register it now. It may be the smartest thing you ever do. For more information regarding distress beacons, visit the website: www.amsa.gov.au/beacons or call the 406 Database registration team on 1800 406 406.

Australian Government Australian Maritime Safety Authority


COMMODORE’S

MESSAGE Dear Fellow Member I am pleased to present to members the 2010-2011 yearbook for our Club. This year we decided to include some articles featuring chartering in the eastern Mediterranean. In this regard I wish to thank journalist and photographer Mr Tom Isitt who kindly permitted us to use an article on chartering super yachts in Greece, which featured in January’s edition of International Boating magazine, and who also provided some of the wonderful photography. I also wish to thank Mr Trevor Joyce and Mariner Boating who provided the article and photographs in relation to chartering traditional Gulets and yachts along the Turkish coast. We feature two further travel articles, one by John Ashley highlighting fishing in Vanuatu, and an article on the restaurant Louis XV in Monte Carlo, written by Andrew Urban. We have also included some historical pieces on the history of Longitude, the birth of the RIB, the history of motor boat racing in Australia and our coal hauling ships of years gone by – the 60 Milers. On behalf of the Board, I hope you find these articles of interest. Of course the yearbook gives us an opportunity to reflect on the past and on the significant functions that members attended during the year, and it is also a time when we reflect on those members who have passed away since the publication of our last yearbook. Those members are: Lionel Abrahams

Lewis Malouf

Bill (Samuel) Bursill

Joseph Morris

Guy Dillon

Terrence Ryan

Brian Hannan

Dorothy Spry

Bruce Jackson

John Stranger

As many will know, Lewis Malouf, Bill Bursill and Brian Hannan were not only long-term members of the Club, but also stalwarts of the Club.

John M Barbouttis Commodore

8 RMYC YEARBOOK


That annual break in Aspen?

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Royal Motor Yacht Club of NSW

A Brief History 10 RMYC YEARBOOK


A BRIEF HISTORY

July 6, 1905 A group of motorboat owners in Sydney formed a motor boat club – The Motor Boat Club – the second in the British Empire. The first one was formed in Victoria the year before. This meeting was held at Aaron’s Exchange Hotel, Sydney. The first Commodore was Phillip Mitchell, and Vice Commodore was Dr George Read, with Rear Commodore, Frank Albert. The club was formed to promote motor boating, which included racing and social activities.

The first committee

1900

1910

The Club’s first officers

November 5, 1905 The Club opened its first season at Clifton Gardens. It was a Saturday.

December 10, 1910 The club purchased a bungalow style clubhouse at Point Piper. This property had a jetty that ran into deep water, which was ideal for the members’ boats. Social activities increased due to the new waterfront premises and boat racing became the Club’s predominant sporting event. Among the races was the renowned Griffith Cup, which was competed for by different states. By 1912, with Frank Albert as Commodore, there were 25 racing days and 2 ocean races. These all came to a halt with the outbreak of World War I.

RMYC YEARBOOK 11


A BRIEF HISTORY

Victory RMYC Clubhouse

October 28, 1926

November 1, 1927

April 17, 1934

A branch of the RMYC was opened at Broken Bay in Newport.

A branch of the RMYC was opened on Lake Macquarie in Newcastle.

A branch of the RMYC was opened at Port Hacking.

1920

January 1929 Cover

The ‘Younger Set’ was formed for members under 20 years of age. This stopped during the war years but was reorganised in the 60s and membership rose to over 100.

1930 1927

1939

His Majesty, King George V, conferred on the club the right to use the word ‘Royal’. The club was then renamed the Royal Motor Yacht Club of NSW, the first motor yacht club in the British Empire to use the ‘Royal’ prefix. Boat owners were allowed to apply to fly “The Blue Ensign Defaced”. The first were approved that same year and became keenly sought after.

The club encouraged the formation of a Yachtsman Auxiliary to the National Emergency Services. This was later absorbed into the Naval Auxiliary Patrol. Many members gave their services to this operation.

Union advert 1929

12 RMYC YEARBOOK

1936


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A BRIEF HISTORY

RMYC swimming pool

May 31, 1941 Japanese midget submarines attacked Sydney Harbour causing considerable damage to shipping. The RMYC boat Serenade was one of the small naval patrol boats that was destroyed.

1961 The site expanded with a new marina being built, a new enlarged clubhouse and increased decking in front of the bar. Cocktails from the ‘Down under Bar’ became very popular. The official opening was held in 1963 by the Governor General of the time, the right Honourable Viscount De Lisle.

1940

14 RMYC YEARBOOK

1970 The swimming pool was constructed – An area that was very popular with families.

1970

1980 The Club celebrated its 75th Anniversary. This also established the Anniversary Cup and Port Hacking’s Harry Peel Trophy. The Anniversary Cup became one of the most prestigious events on the Club’s racing calendar.

1950

1960

1980

1959

1965

1967

August 27, 1984

Land form the Club’s northern boundary was purchased allowing the building of a BBQ area and bar.

The old Boatshed, which had served as the bar for four years, was demolished.

The waterfront on the Club’s northern boundary was purchased.

Disaster struck the Club with a massive fire destroying the speedboat shed and bar, kitchen, stores, and part of the marina. Twenty three speedboats were destroyed along with equipment in the building. The operations of the Club had to be suspended.


A BRIEF HISTORY

August 2000 The old timber marina was demolished and replaced by a new concrete floating marina. The marina was opened on 5th August 2000.

1988

1995 – 6

The waterfront rebuilding program was completed. The new building included a modern kitchen, Marina Restaurant, bar, dining room, showers and change rooms.

July 6, 2005

Plans were approved by council to start the redesign concept which created the renaissance of the club. A new elevator was built from street level to the marina area.

The Royal Motor Yacht Club of NSW celebrated its 100th Anniversary – a significant milestone in the Club’s long and proud history.

1990

2000

2010

1993

1998

2003

2006

The Marina Restaurant was refurbished. A total redesign of the concept was developed.

Further major building works were completed at the club.

During the summer season that year, the Club saw the opening of the new swimming pool for use by its members.

The Marina Restaurant was refurbished.

RMYC YEARBOOK 15


Longitude Only a matter of

TIME

An English woodworker turned clockmaker to invent one of the most significant machines of all time. By Barry Tranter 16 RMYC YEARBOOK


LONGITUDE

A

FRIEND of mine who completed a circumnavigation a few years ago had no idea of celestial navigation so he took four GPS units, one for daily use and three spare units vacuum-sealed in plastic bags. As a complete contrast think back, say, to the Dutch navigators of the 17th and 18th centuries. To reach Indonesia from Europe after rounding the Cape of Good Hope they preferred to stay in the southerly latitudes and enjoy the benefits of the consistent westerly winds. But if they failed to turn left at the right time, to head north for Jakarta, they could bump into bits of Western Australia. And there, on the WA coastline, many Dutchmen left their bones, as that is an unforgiving part of the world. When James Cook set off on his second voyage in 1772, he took with him a marine chronometer, which helped him determine his position and changed forever the black art/science of navigation.

SURELY everyone has read Dava Sobel’s book Longitude. Or seen the TV film. Sobel is a one-time science writer who, with this book, helped create the genre of heavily-researched, easy-to-read science/ history. Latitude reads like popular fiction: Sobel states the book was devised as an entertainment rather than history. And entertain it does. Latitude is largely about John Harrison. Born in North Lincolnshire in 1693, Harrison was a woodworker who began making clocks in wood. No one knows why he decided to make clocks; at the time of his first clock (1713) clockwork was hugely expensive and no clockmaker was known to be working in the region. Whatever initiated it, his interest became an obsession. John Harrison RMYC YEARBOOK 17


LONGITUDE

Harrison certainly knew his wood. The tower clock, made in 1722 and shown in the opening sequence of the TV film of the book, has been running since it was built, except when it was stopped for maintenance in 1884. In 1727 Harrison learned of the 20,000 pound prize offered by the Board of Longitude for the first reliable means of determining longitude (in fact the Longitude Act was posted in 1714). 20,000 pounds is a staggering amount of money, but the Brits understood that for an aggressive maritime trading nation such knowledge would be rewarded by untold wealth. Fixing latitude is easy; with a sextant you can measure the height of the sun by the angle it makes, at noon, with the horizon. But for millennia sailors had been limited to elaborate guesswork to fix longitude. But the knowledge of time tells you where you are because the speed of the earth’s rotation is known, so the time displaced from Greenwich (home of the Prime Meridian) can be used to fix position. Harrison also realised that a pendulum clock was no good as the ship’s motion would affect the pendulum. So he conceived a mechanism, which Sobel describes as “a set of seesaws”, to replace the pendulum. Off he went to Greenwich to see Dr. Edmund Halley (the Comet man), Astronomer Royal at the Royal Observatory, the place where millions of tourists have stood astride the strip in the pavement that marks 0 degrees, the starting and finishing point of longitude. And indeed the measurement of earthly time itself.

TOP: Harrison’s first Marine timekeeper H1. Above LEFT: STABLE CLOCK 1720. ABOVE RIGHT: DR EDMUND HALLEY

18 RMYC YEARBOOK


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LONGITUDE

Halley was a member of the Board of Longitude, set up to administer the prize. He was a smart bloke who recognised that, because the Board was made up of astronomers and mathematicians and navigators, they would be looking for a mathematical solution to the problem of fixing longitude and may respond badly to a box full of cogs and springs. Halley wisely sent Harrison to clockmaker George Graham who was so impressed by Harrison he offered him an interest-free loan to pursue the work. Five years pass before Harrison’s clock, H-1, is ready. It looked like “a model ship escaped from its bottle”, weighed 75lb or 34kg, and was housed in a box 4ft in each dimension. H-1 can still be seen in London. Harrison took H-1 to the Admiralty, who, in 1737, tested it by sending it on a trip to Lisbon. It performed perfectly but on its return Harrison stood before the Board and told them it wasn’t good enough. So they gave him 250 pounds and off he went to try again. Another four years pass and in January 1741 Harrison shows H-2 to the Board. But again he was unsatisfied and again shot himself in the foot by telling the Board he could do better. H-2 never went to sea but performed perfectly during violent on-land testing. By this time Harrison is 48 years old and living in London. He knew his clocks had to get smaller so he spends the next 20 years working on H-3, emerging from his workshop now and then to ask the Board for a few quid to keep him going. One has to feel sympathy for Mrs Harrison and the younger Harrisons. H-3 was only 2ft high and 1ft wide, but it suffered the fate of its predecessors. While Harrison was working on H-3 he had asked John Jeffreys of London to make a pocket watch to his – Harrison’s – design. Harrison was so impressed by the result that he used it as the basis for H-4, completed in 1759. And it was H-4 that finally won the Longitude Prize. Well, sort of. H-4 is 5 inches in diameter, weighs 3lb and can be seen at the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich, though when I went to have a look the NMM was closed for renovation and I still haven’t spotted it. The Board originally specified that to win the prize the candidate had to undergo a return trip to the

Harrison’s first longcase clock

Halley was a smart bloke who recognised that, because the Board was made up of astronomers and mathematicians and navigators, they would be looking for a mathematical solution to the problem of fixing longitude and may respond badly to a box full of cogs and springs. RMYC YEARBOOK 21


LONGITUDE

West Indies. Harrison’s son William accompanied H-4 on the trip and on the east-west crossing the first true marine chronometer lost 5 seconds in 81 days at sea.

Maskelyne, the fifth Astronomer Royal and the man who determined that Greenwich was the point of the Prime Meridian, much to the chagrin of the French.

On the return trip the ship was battered by wind and wave and William had to wrap the clock in a wet blanket for protection. Despite all that the total error for the double crossing was just under two minutes, which more than met the Prize conditions.

Maskelyne white-anted Harrison at every opportunity. He had a barrow to push as he had devised a so-called lunar method of navigation that involved observation (of sun and moon) and hours of laborious mathematical calculations. Nevil, too, was trying to get his hands on the prize money.

In a kinder world, at this point Harrison would have taken his 20,000 pounds and had a happy retirement, feted by a grateful king and country, comforted by both the money and the knowledge that he had cracked one of the great scientific problems of all time. Instead, what followed were years of bureaucratic ratbaggery and the individual skulduggery of Nevil

Nevil Maskelyne

22 RMYC YEARBOOK

For years Harrison fought and complained and resisted the pressures from the Board and the powerful Maskelyne. Finally the Board gave in and gave Harrison 10,000 pounds, the other half held back until he met more and more conditions. Even 10,000 pounds was a king’s ransom at that time; 20,000 pounds was probably worth more than any mere king.

Maskelyne had a barrow to push as he had devised a so-called lunar method of navigation which involved observation (of sun and moon) and hours of laborious mathematical calculations. Nevil, too, was trying to get his hands on the prize-money.


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LONGITUDE

Harrison kept working and completed H-5 when he was 79 years old. At this point King George the Third took an interest in the Harrison story, realised the family had been messed about and was instrumental in getting Harrison a special grant of 8750 pounds. But it was an act of Parliament, not the Board of Longitude. Harrison died in 1776 at the age of 83. No doubt he was rich, but you would have to doubt that he died a happy man. We would forgive him for spending his declining years sticking pins in dolls representing Maskelyne and the various Board members.

TO FINISH the story we need to go back a few years. The Board wanted to continue evaluating H-4 so they asked Larcum Kendall to make a copy. This was done with Harrison’s OK because he knew Kendall and approved of him. It took Kendall 2 1/2 years and everyone was happy with K-1, including Harrison. But he was probably less happy when the Board allocated K-1 to James Cook for his voyage of 1772-75. Harrison wanted Cook to take H-4 but the Board wanted to keep working on it. There was still 10,000 pounds at stake, don’t forget. Sobel suggests Harrison was willing to risk the second payment for the satisfaction of having Cook navigate successfully with his brainchild.

ABOVE: PRIZE-WINNING H-4. Below: H-4 BACK PLATE

So the timekeepers used on many of the great voyages that followed came from the hand of Larcum Kendall. K-1 was used by Cook aboard Resolution (1772-75); for his third voyage, also on Resolution (1776-80); on the First Fleet (with Supply) 1787-88; aboard Sirius to Cape Town and again on Supply (1790-92). With K-2 Larcum tried to simplify the mechanism to save money, but it gained and lost much more time than the earlier clocks. However, it was used by Bligh on the Bounty (1787-9); the Bounty after the mutiny (1789-90); and it was then sold by the mutineers to a passing American ship and it served from 1808 to1841. K-3 was used by Cook for his third voyage with Discovery and Resolution 1776-80; by Vancouver (Discovery, 1791-1795); and by Flinders in 18021804. 24 RMYC YEARBOOK

FOR MY MONEY the greatest heroes of history are the seamen of all nationalities and eras who set out on voyages of discovery knowing there was every chance they would not return as they could be beset by illness, bad weather or hostile natives. The one thing they could count on was that they could never be certain of their whereabouts. So


LONGITUDE

they shortened sail at night in case of hitting uncharted rock or reef, island or even continent. Indeed, on his voyage up the East Coast of Australia, Cook hit the Barrier Reef only after he relaxed his usually cautious discipline. So, when I think of the great voyagers – the Chinese, Arabs, the Portuguese, Spaniards, the Dutch and the Brits – I dips me lid. And you have to do the same for John Harrison, a bloke described by the Board of Longitude as “cantankerous”. But surely it was the very prickliness of his nature that kept him going. Sobel’s book is subtitled “The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Great Scientific Problem of his Time”.

Longitude by Dava Sobel was published by Fourth Estate, London. It was followed by The Illustrated Longitude by Dava Sobel and William J.H. Andrews, also published by Fourth Estate.

Genius indeed.

RMYC YEARBOOK 25


OPENING DAY RAN Commodore Daryl Bates AM took the salute at the RMYC sail past for the 2010-11 opening day marking the start of the club’s 105th season. The great occasion was not marred by the uncooperative weather; the rain held off for the sailpast, led by boats representing the Water Police and Waterways, while the fleet from RMYC Point Piper followed Legend III. The salute was taken aboard Sirdar. Also on board were Club Commodore John Barbouttis, Commodores from other yacht clubs, Commander of the NSW Water Police and special guests.

26 RMYC YEARBOOK


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Restaurant Louis XV

at the Hotel de Paris Monte Carlo

BY Andrew L. Urban Photos Š B Touillon, Bureau Alain Ducasse

34 RMYC YEARBOOK


P

rince Albert of Monaco walked in to the Bar Americain and joined a small group who were sitting to the left of the door, a few feet from our own table. The Bar, a spacious, restrained room off the lobby of the legendary Hotel de Paris in Monte Carlo, is directly opposite the entrance to the hotel’s pride and joy, the Louis XV restaurant. Even among the world’s finest restaurants, this establishment is the equivalent of royalty.

One behaves with due nonchalance, of course, and we sipped the house champagne with cool to spare, only glancing at His Royal Highness surreptitiously, so the bar staff wouldn’t notice the vulgarity. Drinking the house champagne here is not like settling for the house wine at the corner cafe. It comes from Pommery, the house with a place in history; it was Monsieur Pommery’s widow, Louise, who pioneered brut style champagne in 1784, after which the sweet styles were abandoned altogether, and champagne became a drink for any time. Well done, Louise. Declining a second ‘coup’, we strolled into the lobby, one of the most elegant, beautiful and awe inspiring hotel lobbies in the world, its proportions impressive yet so designed that you never feel insignificant. The stained glass cupola, several stories above you, and the discreet positioning of the reception and concierge counters, further promote the air of grandeur and luxurious serenity. This serenity is never disturbed by the sight and sound of guest luggage arriving and departing, since a separate entrance around the corner is provided just for luggage, which is carried from the side door to the guest rooms in a special lift by the bell boys. We presented ourselves at the antechamber that serves as the entrance to the Louis XV, where a hand-carved walnut book stand supports the reservations manual. The door to the RMYC YEARBOOK 35


RESTAURANT LOUIS XV

restaurant itself is never left open; once inside, you are in a glorious private world, shared by no more than 50 people at a time, at round tables set well apart. It is immediately obvious why they named it after Louis XV, the French king known as Louis le Bien Aime (the Well Beloved) whose reign (1715 – 74) coincided with the great age of decorative art in the Rococo mode, which in fact has been dubbed the Louis XV style. Exquisitely beautiful frescos, chandeliers, giant oil paintings by 18th century artists, carefully chosen pieces of antique furniture and masses of flowers on the tables massage the senses with their elaborate abundance. To the right of the entrance, two sets of tall, richly curtained French windows open onto the terrace which overlooks the square surrounded by the famous casino and the Cafe de Paris opposite. (Cafe by name, but de Paris by nature.) Despite its name and its ambiance, the Louis XV is not an old, well established restaurant, having been opened only a couple of decades ago. It was designed to feature the creative talents of the then relatively young chef, Alain Ducasse, whose name is proudly displayed on the smart canvas awnings over the terrace outside. The Monagesques take their chefs just as seriously as the French, treating them with the sort of adulation and respect that Melburnians show star football players. One look at the table setting and it’s obvious that you could quite happily eat the flowers and be satisfied, but the waiters will have none of that. They fuss, quietly and professionally, and there is one for every task. The junior waiter holds back the chair, the bus boy undoes the thick linen serviette with a minimal flourish and lays it on your lap, and the sommelier, his solid silver tasting cup around his neck, asks if Madame et M’sieur would like un coup de champagne. Dizzy from the attention, M & M accept, just to settle things down a bit. Besides, as guests of the hotel, refusal may offend. This was a dangerous notion to adopt, as we eventually discovered after eight courses and three bottles of wine. It is still something of a mystery how we rose to our feet after dinner – perhaps it is the lightness of the Ducasse touch. The maitre d’, a charming man whose confidence in his restaurant was palpable, allowed us to gape and worry over the awesome menu for half an hour.

36 RMYC YEARBOOK


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RESTAURANT LOUIS XV

Awesome for its variety and imagination; Ducasse has gained a reputation for his love affair with fresh vegetables, using the best available in myriad simple but innovative ways, and for his clever ideas with seafood. By the time we had become totally confused over the menu, help arrived, by way of a message from Ducasse: perhaps M & M would allow him to prepare a selection of dishes for our amusement? This sounded an exceptionally fine idea, and the sommelier adopted the same strategy, sensing our limitations with the wine list. No wonder; earlier, we had been taken on a short tour of the magnificent caves beneath the hotel. Here, 250,000 bottles are kept, on ‘double rotation’ – that means the hotel and restaurant between them sell 500,000 bottles a year. There are, for instance, 270 different Bordeaux, and in one little alcove there are things like some 1934 Chateau Latour, and even a few 1920 Chateau Margaux. Heady to look at, never mind drink. The two house cognacs (in giant oak barrels) are nothing less than an 1818 Premiere Empire and an 1865 Louis Philippe. Big deal, you could say – until you taste one. Then you can’t say anything because it takes your breath away.

It’s an experience, a legendary moment in life, a bit of a fairytale, something to recall with a beatific smile

38 RMYC YEARBOOK


RESTAURANT LOUIS XV

Ducasse made two excursions to our table from the kitchen, the first to explain some of the dishes he was preparing, the second to discuss desserts. Yes, plural. His cuisine is best characterised by a sense of inventiveness, playing with the textures, aiming to draw out the best natural flavours from all the produce, but basically traditional. The portions are elegant, served well spaced out and with style – but not with that showy flamboyance that is so embarrassing. Most memorable of all are the subtleties he extracts from every single ingredient, so that as you eat, you feel you are tasting familiar things for the very first time. The menu is completely redesigned each season, to make the most of fresh produce from the region, but the essential Ducasse approach remains the same. Of course, the food is only the pinnacle of pleasures at Louis XV; the fabulous decor, the impeccable service, the secret pleasure of observing other diners in one of the world’s best restaurants, and the sense of occasion that all this generates, makes such an evening more than a meal. It’s an experience, a legendary moment in life, a bit of a fairytale, something to recall with a beatific smile as we flip through our mental photo album.

RMYC YEARBOOK 39


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Commodore’s 2O11 Ball T

he colours of Royalty – purple and gold – provide the theme for the social event of the year, the Commodore’s Ball for 2011.

The evening featured dinner, drinks and dancing, and entertainment was provided by magician Phil Cass.

RMYC YEARBOOK 41


Commodore’s Ball

Commodore’s 2O11 Ball

42 RMYC YEARBOOK


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Commodore’s Ball

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BRANXTON

THE TRAG I C

6O MILERS The small ships carried coal to Sydney at a terrible price. By Barry Tranter

T

hey used to loom out of the dark like giant prehistoric creatures, monoliths of black that were made more eerie by the fact that no noise heralded their coming. I was very small, perched in the bow of the family’s launch, in the middle of the Hunter River in the dead of night. The monsters were ships that had been sent to terrorise me; first they blotted out the stars, then

the bow wave threatened to sink our little craft and finally, as the great black hull passed, came the throb throb throb of engines and the swish swish swish of the prop, which pushed out the wake to finish the job of scaring me to death as our boat rose and fell to the walls of water that marched our way. Then the monster was gone, and all I could see were a few pale decklights as the ship pushed downriver,

ABERSEA

46 RMYC YEARBOOK


HEXHAM BANK

the lights somehow reassuring because they meant that human beings were on board, that the great fright machine perhaps had a soul. Why was I in the middle of the Hunter River at night? The men of my family loved to trawl for prawns so they were driven by time and tide. Why was I there, at the age of six, frightened by these steel juggernauts and savaged by mosquitoes? Bonding, I think, with the men of my family. A futile pursuit, as it turned out. Twenty years later I moved to Balmain and from the end of my street I could see these ships, the 60-Milers, arrive to discharge their cargoes of coal at the power stations around the western Harbour and Parramatta River, coal that kept the lights of Sydney burning. This is not ancient history; the coal loader at Balls Head closed as recently as October 1992. Moving to Balmain completed a circle for me; as a kid I had witnessed the start of the 60-Milers’ journeys and it gave me some satisfaction to be living where the ships ended their voyages. Only a few years later they were gone forever. And considering the terrible toll on human life exacted by the small colliers, that is not a bad thing. According to historian Ronald Parsons, the 60-Milers were so named because the distance

AYRFIELD

TERALBA

between Nobby’s Head in Newcastle, and North Head in Sydney, is 64 nautical miles. Not all the coal came from the Hunter; some of the same ships brought the fuel north from Port Kembla, too. And not all the ships ran from Newcastle; the magnificent jetty at Catherine Hill Bay (south of Swansea) where the ships also loaded coal, is still there. In fact the local mines are still active. The coal trade started early in the Colony’s history. “In 1802 it was noted that the government schooner Francis, 40 tons, sometimes brought coals to Sydney from the Hunter”, says Ronald Parsons in his publication Coals by ship from Newcastle. The traffic became more frequent the following year though cedar was still the cargo of choice. The first steamship delivery was in 1831 but steam was still uneconomic so sail was to rule for some time yet. Coal shipment from Newcastle in 2011 is a sight to behold. Ships queue offshore until they get their turn to accept their cargo from one of the port’s three coal loaders. These are fed in turn by an almost endless procession of huge trains carting coal from the Valley’s mines. Things were different in the early 20th century. “Hard to believe”, says author Norma Sim, “but I had been told that in the twenties it was a common

BALLS HEAD

RMYC YEARBOOK 47


60 MILERS

DIVING AROUND BIRCHGROVE PARK

sight to see three or four 60-Milers entering or leaving Sydney Heads at one time and a line of others stretching north, the path of those just out of sight marked by long trails of black smoke. “ This virtual conveyor belt of coal exacted a huge price. The little ships sailed every day and disaster was inevitable. Consider the sidewheel paddler Yarra Yarra, a 555-tonner built in 1852. She had been rigged as a barque and operated as a passenger ship operating between Sydney and Melbourne. By 1874 she had a far less glamourous career carting coal on the 60-miler run. On her final trip she left Newcastle Harbour in weather so bad that when she turned in an effort to regain the harbour she was swept onto Oyster Bank and sank. Watching from the shore was the ship’s owner, Captain Summerbell, who looked on while the ship’s skipper, his son, tried desperately to save his craft. All hands were lost. Included in the findings of the official enquiry into the loss was the statement “…the reckless condition in which colliers put to sea from Newcastle has been well-known for a long time. They load to perilous depths, leave port with hatches open, decks piled high with coal even after their holds and bunkers are filled.” Eighty years later owners and skippers were still ignoring the basics of good seamanship. Even the conclusion of the return trip could be fraught; regaining the security of Newcastle Harbour was a hazardous enterprise. The long arm of Nobbys breakwater, which connects the headland to the shore, points resolutely to the north east. In a classic SE storm, ships entering harbour from the south have to turn to port and take the seas on the beam until they reach safety. For lightly-loaded collier or fully-laden freighter this could be a heartin-mouth transition, with the western breakwater, Oyster Bank and the sands of Stockton Bight all beckoning to leeward. Stockton Bight, and particularly Oyster Bank near Stockton township, is the final resting place of more 48 RMYC YEARBOOK

than 40 ships. A friend of mind who grew up in Stockton during the 1920s and 1930s remembers that after a big storm the local pensioners would head for the beach and load their buckets with coal which had been spewed onto the sand, coal which had been washed from the wrecks of the coal ships. The coal lumps had been rounded off after being tumbled for years in the sea, and the only drawback was that because it had been soaked in salt water it spat noisily from the grate when lit, frightening grandma and the dozing dog sitting too close to the fire in an effort to get warm. Norma Sim’s book The Sixty Miler is in fact the love story of her parents. Her father William Sim was a Scottish marine engineer who married a Sydney girl and settled here to work the 60-Milers. William was happy with his Aussie family but he had the misfortune, in August 1956, to be on board the 60-Miler Birchgrove Park. As on a lot of the 60-Milers, loading and trimming the coal could be a little casual, as could safety precautions. Time was vital, the trip was a milk run, and the power-hungry metropolis of Sydney needed its coal. Birchgrove Park’s skipper cut corners; for example, the radio aerial wasn’t rigged, which was later to prove vital. As the Birchie punched into a wild August sou’easter the tarps over the hatches worked loose and it became too dangerous to send crewmen forward to re-secure them. The sea began working its way into the holds. As the ship approached Broken Bay the crew suggested it might be smart to seek refuge there but the skipper decided to push on to the Harbour. From only two miles offshore the crew could see the lights of Palm Beach as well as the beam of Barrenjoey Light. At 1.15am a tenuous situation deteriorated rapidly. The list worsened, reaching ten to 12 degrees and the vessel sank deeper into the water.


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RMYC YEARBOOK 49


LISA MILLER

HARWOOD

60 MILERS

After another 15 minutes crashing into 40mph winds and the head seas she appeared to be going down by the head, becoming sluggish and unable to lift herself. Then she took a sudden list to port and stayed there. The radio was inoperative – there was no aerial, remember – and a scrambled message was sent by lamp, picked up in Sydney but not fully understood. She went down in the bitter August sea on a filthy August night. Rescue craft were sent out from Sydney but because information was sketchy many searched the wrong areas. One of the survivors reported seeing ships’ lights in the Long Reef area instead of near Barrenjoey. Two crewmen were rescued, three made it into Broken Bay in a lifeboat. Of the 14 crew, four reached shore or were rescued, eight were found dead and two were lost, including Norma’s father William Gordon Sim. The Marine Enquiry found that ineffective placing of tarpaulins and unplugged goosenecks allowed ingress of water. With the vessel down by the head the pumps became ineffective. “It would have been prudent of the master to shelter in Broken Bay when passing” instead of having to turn broadside to get back there when off Palm Beach. The wreck is now a popular dive site two miles off Avalon in 51 metres of water. The last 60 miler, the 153ft Camira, was built in 1980. She left Sydney in June 1993 for Singapore. I wish I had been able to stand on North Head and see the train of small ships chugging up the Harbour. Perhaps one could have hopped over to the Manly side to watch the parade of 60-Milers as they ploughed towards Sydney fully-laden, or sailed back to Newcastle, lighter by many tons.

CANOPUS

50 RMYC YEARBOOK

In the back of Norma Sims’ book she lists a random selection of 170 60- Milers, their dates of birth and their fates. No less than 100 of them are recorded as ‘lost’. Even for those who survived life was full of incident. Take the Hexham Bank, a ship I remember well. Parsons records that in May 1956 she was in ‘collision’ with a low-flying RAAF Dakota aircraft 12 miles south of Newcastle. In 1960 she hit the swing span of the Gladesville Bridge, and in 1978 she was seriously damaged by fire. At least she survived, and the same year she was converted to a barge and towed to Manila. On the harbourfront at Cairns there’s a memorial to the merchant mariners lost to enemy shipping off the Australian coast during World War II. The numbers of the dead are shocking but I suggest no more shocking than the number who died aboard the 60-Milers, which were such a familiar sight on Sydney Harbour, and chugging their way over 60 innocent-looking miles, from North Head to Nobbys, within cooee of the coast, within sight of the beaches, past place names and refuges familiar to us all. There should be a similar memorial in Sydney to honour those who died bringing to this city such a banal commodity as coal. I promise to be the first to chip in.

References: The Sixty Miler by Norma Sim. Coals by ship from Newcastle by Ronald Parsons. Both titles can be found on the web.

BIRCHGROVE PARK


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vanuatu fishing JOHN ASHLEY EXPLORES THE BEAUTY OF THE VANUATU ISLANDS... AND ENJOYS THE AMAZING FISHING THE ISLANDS HAVE TO OFFER.

52 RMYC YEARBOOK


VANUATU FISHING

T

he pretty South Pacific Archipelago of Vanuatu was once known as the New Hebrides Group. These islands were jointly administrated by France and Great Britain as a condominium. Today they are completely selfgoverned by the local Melanesian people and the distinctly different cultures and various languages still thrive there today. Small communities of French, British, Australian, Vietnamese and other Pacific Islanders live in harmony in this very friendly region. Vanuatu’s relaxing theme, another time, another pace, is well recognised in many countries around the Pacific. Because of the close proximity to Australia and New Zealand, Vanuatu has become a very popular tourist destination and its wonderful resorts, climate, great food, friendly people and exotic water sports are the reasons why. The diving around these islands is second to none, particularly around Santo Island, the largest of 83 islands in the group. Santo offers amazing shallow water diving on an array of sunken American Naval wrecks from the Second World War, which are still pretty much intact with corroded cars, trucks and other equipment still sitting on the decks. The best of these wrecks is the 30,000-tonne troop carrier, the President Coolidge, which lies on the harbour floor in only 50 metres of water. The pristine reef diving in the harbour is also spectacular and a marine park they call ‘Million Dollar Point’ is alive with all kinds of exotic reef fish and sea life. The game fishing around these islands is also absolutely brilliant because the warm, cobalt Pacific currents push through here all year round. Top of specie list would be the blue, black and striped marlin, as well as sailfish and shortbilled spearfish. The tuna fishing is also very good and giant yellowfin come through the area regularly and 100lb to 200lb fish are common. Other species such as mahi mahi, wahoo and huge dog tooth tuna are also in abundance and great trevally (GT’s) have also become a very sought after fish by sport fishing anglers. Over the past 15 years I have visited these islands annually and the best thing for any traveller from Australia is it’s only a 3½ hour flight from Sydney. All the years I have spent there now I’ve seen the

RMYC YEARBOOK 53


VANUATA FISHING

professional charter-boat fleet in Port Vila grow steadily and in the last few years a couple of new charter operator’s have started up on Santo Island. Santo has proved to me to be the ‘best of the best’ of all the islands in this group. A huge protected harbour and numerous close reefs and sea-mounts have the potential for record size fish. The local fishermen even established a Fad (a floating ‘fish aggregation device’) just off the northern harbour entrance, which consistently attracts and holds all kinds of gamefish. A recent trip to Santo with an old mate of mine Mick Smith from Sydney again proved this island to be one hell of a fishing hole! After checking into the beaut little Aore Island Resort the local charter boat Fiesta was soon waiting for us at the resort’s jetty. Within five hours of leaving Sydney we were heading out to sea with a spread of lures in the water. Our destination was the Woosi Seamount, which is the largest of many underwater mountains in the area. The top of this huge reef is that close to surface you can actually see the peaks as you troll over them. These seamounts are always alive with giant wahoo and big dogtooth tuna and the deeper drop-offs are where the big marlin and yellowfin tuna are found. The time of year you fish here determines the type of marlin you can expect to catch, but the mighty blue marlin can turn up anytime. During the cooler months of the year between May and September there’s a good chance of catching black and striped marlin. A few years back we caught and released a black marlin on a lure here that would have given 800-pounds a real good nudge. The striped marlin can also be a good size and we have released a number of these over the years around 200-pounds or better.

The game fishing around these islands is also absolutely brilliant because the warm, cobalt Pacific currents push through here all year round. 54 RMYC YEARBOOK


VANUATU FISHING

Our first trip out on the big comfortable 46-foot game boat Fiesta might have been a short one, but it certainly provided some amazing fishing. It was action stations just going past the Fad and Mick caught his biggest ever yellowfin tuna weighing 140-pounds. Heading to the seamount the scream of a reel spun us all around to see beautiful mahi mahi leave the water in a shower of spray. These fish are also extremely good to eat and the colourful specimen soon joined the tuna in the ice box. The chef at the resort was very happy with our catch when we returned, I can tell you! Mick couldn’t believe his luck catching two big fish in such a short time and when I said, “you might

320517A_Aquila Marine | 1738.indd 1

even get a marlin shortly”, he said “you’d have to be joking”. The words had hardly left our mouths when the pink and blue coloured lure on the left outrigger was pounced on by a very large blue marlin. Mick soon found himself back in the fighting chair battling his first ever marlin and the big Shimano reel absolutely screamed as half the line was stripped from the spool. Mick had a grin from ear to ear and the marlin gave him one hell of a fight, taking an hour to get to the boat. We eventually stuck a fisheries tag in the back of the marlin and let it go to fight another day. Mick’s still talking about his afternoon’s tri-fector.

4/10/11 3:20 PM

RMYC YEARBOOK 55


Islands in the sun words & photographs BY TOM ISITT 56 RMYC YEARBOOK


GREEK ISLANDS

As a destination for a superyacht charter, there are few places more lovely, or more interesting, than the Greek islands. Tom Isitt spent a week exploring.

A

s the late summer sun dips towards the horizon, the crew go smoothly about their business of getting you moored up, while you sit on the aft deck and sip your afternoon tisane. The town, a picture-postcard collection of whitewashed houses with terracotta tiled roofs clustered around the harbour, lies stretched out before you, bathed in the soft golden light of late afternoon in the Greek islands. Greece, it seems, still continues to draw us in, seducing us with her blend of hospitality, romance, simplicity, climate and culture. But it’s a curious phenomenon that the eastern Mediterranean is regarded as the poor relation to other parts of the world when it comes to superyacht chartering. The Caribbean is perennially popular, and the western Mediterranean

equally so, but for some strange reason the eastern Med remains a superyachting backwater. Maybe it’s because the glitterati tend to stick to old favourites, where chic boutiques and Michelinstarred restaurants are within walking distance of the superyacht quay. Or maybe it’s because the eastern Med appears to be more about package holidays and backpackers than about exclusivity, luxury and indulgence. Perhaps the lack of palm trees and coral beaches make it somehow less appealing, even though Greece has olive trees, citrus groves, and some of the best beaches in the Med. The up side of this is that the islands are surprisingly free of charter fleets, the down side is…well, there is no down side, unless you need a Gucci shop in every port of call. There is a relaxed, unhurried feel RMYC YEARBOOK 57


GREEK ISLANDS

about the Greek islands, a timelessness perfect for recharging your metaphorical batteries. Although the number of charter boats operating in the Greek islands is modest compared to other parts of the globe, there are a number of companies offering good quality yachts for charter. Chartering a boat for a holiday such as this is as much about the boat and crew as it is about the places you visit. The boat needs to be well-designed for chartering, in excellent condition, and crewed by a very special team of people. You could charter the best boat in the world, but if the crew are not up to scratch then you’re not going to enjoy your holiday. Happily the crews of the two boats I was a privileged guest of are among the best I’ve come across in this business, providing superlative attention to detail and a level of service unusual, even in this market. The Islands It would be impossible to do justice to the Greek islands in just a couple of pages, so we’re going to look at some of the popular ones and some of the unmissable ones. The islands are generally divided up into groups, according to geographical location: • The Ionian islands (Corfu, Zakynthos, Ithaca and Lefkada), which run down the west coast of the mainland. • The Argo-Saronic islands (Aigina, Salamina, Poros, Agkistri, Hydra, Spetses), which are situated between and around Athens and the Argolis peninsular. • The Sporades (Evvoia, Skyros, Skiathos, Skopelos) situated along the eastern side of the mainland. • The North-East Aegean islands (Samos, Thasos, Lesvos, Samothraki, Chios, Limnos) situated over by the Turkish mainland. • The Dodecanese (Rhodes, Kos, Patmos, Kalymnos, Symi, Karpathos), situated south of the North-East Aegean islands, on the coast of Turkey. • Cyclades (Naxos, Mykonos, Delos, Paros, Santorini, Kynthos, Kea, Milos), the main group of islands south-east of Athens. • Crete the large, long, thin one along the bottom.

58 RMYC YEARBOOK


GREEK ISLANDS

For most visitors, it’s the Cyclades that most epitomise the Greek island experience. Here, on islands such as Santorini or Mykonos, the archetypal Greek towns can be found on hillsides or clustered around fishing harbours. Whitewashed houses, narrow alleys smelling of cat, Greek orthodox churches, tavernas smelling of stewing octopus, pungent Greek cigarettes, old men sitting in the shade playing backgammon…again, there’s a timelessness about the islands. It feels like this has been going on for thousands of years, with only the buzz of tourist scooters as a reminder of the 21st century.

For those in search of a bit of nightlife, Mykonos is the place to head to, while those in search of peace and quiet should head for Tinos or Andros. The historically-inclined will want to make a stop at the island of Delos, an uninhabited island that is one of the most important archaeological sites in Greece. Legend has it that this is the birth-place of Artemis and Apollo, and for over 1000 years this was one of the most sacred places in the Mediterranean. The Lion Terrace, the House of Dolphins and the amphitheatre are all wonderful, and it’s worth spending a day here.

Santorini and Milos, to the south of the Cyclades, are the most dramatic islands, both volcanic and both boasting stunning coastlines and pretty villages.

The Argo-Saronic islands maybe right on the doorstep of Athens, but that’s no reason to disregard them. Hydra and Spetses are fabulously beautiful

60 RMYC YEARBOOK


For most visitors, it’s the Cyclades that most epitomise the Greek island experience. (Hydra has no cars on it), Poros town is picturepostcard quaint, and Aigina has one of the best Doric temples (the Temple of Aphaia) in Greece on it… definitely worth a look. The Sporades are also worth a visit, and fans of Mama Mia (there must be some, somewhere) will be able to see where much of the film was shot in Skopelos. Indeed, Skopelos is refreshingly unspoiled, more so than neighbouring Skiathos.

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Whether you want to go as far afield as the Dodecanese and the North-East Aegean islands rather depends on time and inclination. They are 200 miles from Athens and you’ll be burning a lot of fuel to get there. That’s not to say they aren’t worth visiting, it’s just that you might want to start closer to home and save them for when you’ve exhausted islands closer to Athens. As you cruise from island to island, and Homer’s “wine-dark sea” slips gently beneath you, it’s hard not to feel the magic and history of these islands. Familiar names come to mind — Odysseus, Pericles, Hippocrates, Polykleitos, Ajax, Patroclus. Great warriors, brilliant architects, poets and sculptors, writers and statesmen…fleeting glimpses of longdead heroes amongst the olives, the distant tinkle of goat’s bells, the clear blue skies, the scent of pines in the sunshine.

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RMYC YEARBOOK 61AM 11/08/11 9:29


A Family Lycian Jaunt Story and photos by Trevor and Maggie Joyce

62 RMYC YEARBOOK


TURKEY

The Lycian or Turquoise Coast of Turkey stretches from Marmaris to Antalya. Waterways, lakes, bays, and soaring mountains, ancient sites, seaside villages, fertile inland valleys producing fruits, nuts, salad and vegetables and of course carpets, jewellery and old crafts handed down through generations – the mix is fantastic! This is where we chose to take a two-week yachting holiday with family and friends.

T

he youngest members of our group, two teenaged females pulled out of their comfort zone, packed with their mother and a few ‘older folk’ like sardines into a fully loaded Boeing 747, flown 24 hours to Istanbul then directly on to Marmaris, felt seriously scrambled on landing. It’s time to board the yacht to go sailing. Much of their mother Sarah’s childhood was spent in Greece and she is returning for the first time in 24 years so it is quite an emotional time for her. We arrive in Marmaris after a short local flight followed by an hour in a bus. All totally exhausted we check the yacht, pack away the pre-ordered provisions, select our cabins, drag on the baggage, have a meal at the marina restaurant and hit the sack. Dawn arrives with a deep ruby blush and as we are not yet functioning on ‘Turkish time’ we are awake early so we decide to set off at 6.00am. Our yacht has nine people in five cabins, five heads, air-conditioning, two fridges, ice-maker, gen-set, hydraulic winches, all the latest navigation toys, and a 100 HP engine for power in this sometimes windless part of the world. Pure heaven! Our first port of call is Ekencik Bay, where we stop for a swim and lunch before continuing on to access the mouth of the Dalyan River and the iconic Lycian cliff tombs tour. Proclaimed a World Heritage Listed site to protect the nesting grounds of a rare turtle, it escaped becoming the site of a proposed extensive hotel resort. We make the tour to the tombs with our heads in a bit of a spin (jetlag hits!) then head back to the yacht, which is already feeling very much like home. Next day we sail close-hauled on a gentle 12 knot breeze in the Gulf of Fethiye and Skopea Limani, the jewel in the cruising crown in this part of Turkey. Entering the enclosed waterway through a tiny opening we cruise past three options for the evening anchorage before deciding on Kape Creek, with a swim stop along the way of course. Ismail, our newest best

RMYC YEARBOOK 63


TURKEY

friend, owns the only restaurant in Kape Creek and seats us for dinner at a table set on a small ‘stage’ over the bay. Tersane Creek, Tomb Bay, Deep Bay and Sarsila Cove are anchorages in the same waterway. We spend the next day drifting from one to the next in search of our next dinner venue. We chose the Nomad restaurant on Tomb Bay where we also climb to one of the tombs, but there was no one there to tell us the story. Then we cross the gulf to Fethiye, which seems to have little going for it from a distance. The original town was flattened by the earthquake in the 50s after which it was rebuilt without time or money for aesthetics. However we discover a warren of narrow streets alive with merchants, which attract the immediate attention of the teenagers who wander off to make some small purchases. We also find restaurants, a collection of bars and night clubs – everyone has something to amuse! There is an ancient Greek theatre here and behind the town we could also climb up to view more Lycian tombs. A little further south-east we pull into Aquarium Bay, or Karacaoren in Turkish, lured by a rickety structure with restaurant written on the front, which obviates the need for that dreadful ‘cooking on board’ exercise. Authentic oven baked bread and Turkish cuisine makes its way to our table, as does Osman who tells us that our plan to walk up to Kayakoy the next morning is not wise. “Is for you too big mountain”, he says, “I take you in my car – is for 8 people good”; and he did but would not accept any payment. I think the attraction of the teenagers may have had something to do with the offer. The historical novel, Birds Without Wings by Louis de Bernieres was apparently inspired by this town and tells the story of Kamal Ataturk’s purging of foreigners from Turkey after World War 1 and the subsequent British backed Greek invasion. 64 RMYC YEARBOOK

Kayakoy had a mix of Turkish, Greek and Armenian inhabitants, and was devastated by the forced evacuations. The population brought into the area from eastern Turkey as replacement population decided the land was too poor so would not settle there – the village was left deserted. Walking through the streets is a ghostly experience. We return to our yacht feeling very humbled and truly lucky to live in a country that has never experienced such upheaval. We then take the big hop around the seven capes to Kalkan. The anchoring complete, we head away from the harbour to explore the town. We find narrow streets peopled by gentle merchants plying their wares who are more than happy to spend time to chat, enjoy an apple tea and get to know some Ozzie travellers. In the evening we recline oriental style at an excellent, reasonably priced rooftop restaurant. We tackle the night time shopping scene with Luana in the lead. Pretty soon she’s onto something she wants to buy but she doesn’t have the cash and its closing time. “Take it, take it! Pay tomorrow. I see to your eye you will come back”, the shopkeeper says and she does and Luana has had her first encounter with Turkish generosity. She and Rani are also in charge of the boat ‘kitty’ so they are learning the currency business as we travel. The two girls are now swimming where there is no bottom to be seen, being towed behind the boat while underway and diving underneath the keel of the yacht at anchor; all big confidence steps forward for girls who were originally waiting for a shark attack each time they dipped their toes in the water. The water temperature is perfect and long swims are part of our everyday life. Luana has also dispensed with her makeup bag of cosmetics – for which we are all thankful.


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TURKEY

The ten mile leg to Kas (pronounced Kash) starts off on a glassy sea but a breeze line appears and we set up to sail. It builds to 20 knots and our less than fleet footed cruiser is romping along at 7 plus and its champagne stuff…unless you are Luana who loves rough water “but not on a boat that isn’t standing upright”. The sailing gets the thumbs down from her and we head for Kas Harbour where in no time at all we are savouring cocktails at the bar set upon the sea wall overlooking both the harbour and the sea. Kas is a friendly town. Many summer inhabitants are holiday makers; carpet shops and good local restaurants abound. We finish the night in a club with a glass floor revealing a roman well beneath. After a day of rest the island of Kastellorezo beckons across the 3 miles of water separating this lone Greek outpost from the Turkish mainland. We make the mandatory swim stop in stunning indigo water then head into the harbour where the same Vangelis who tied us up 10 years ago again welcomes us to Europe.” For you I have special lobster”, (as he did 10 years ago) –“just is fresh today”. Sarah bursts into emotional tears as her feet touch Greek soil and the strains of the bouzouki drift across the bay, which was also the setting for the movie, Mediterraneo. But not all is perfect in this microcosm. From a table in the taverna comes an Australian voice of a young female, “I’m eighteen! I’m old enough to decide what I want to do. My friends are all in Mykonos and I want to go to Mykonos. I’m not Greek, I am

66 RMYC YEARBOOK

Australian and I’m sick of hearing about the past. I live for the future not for the past”, she laments in a flood of tears. We also hear of land disputes between Greeks who stayed and those who have returned to claim family property after generations. By now the boat “kitty” is becoming a World Bank exercise with transactions in New Turkish Lira, Aussie dollars and Euros complicated by loans from the float and credit card transactions. Luana is the designated treasurer and she has her XL spreadsheet to sort the mess. But we do need an ATM soon! Leaving Greece next day we make for Kale Koy, in Kekova Roads. The hamlet on the calm turquoise bay is a gaggle of cottages, doubling as shops during the summer. Yachts are moored to finger wharfs protruding from restaurants at the water’s edge, gulets rest at anchor in the bay and from the crusader castle overlooking the scene one can clearly see the submerged ruins of what the book says is the ancient city of Simena. It’s all a bit surreal. Surrealism is compounded next morning as we drift along the opposite shore of Kekova Roads, the enclosed waterway created by the island of Kekova. Viewing the sunken remains of an unnamed ancient city visible above and below the waterline as we drift through the warm crystal clear water is amazing. We tow Luana and Rani on a trailing rope before once again dropping the pick while we swim ashore to a beach where yet another imposing ruin awaits inspection – this must have been the top end of town 2,500 years ago.


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TURKEY

Cruising the

Gulet way A POPULAR way to cruise Turkish waters is aboard a Gulet, the traditional broad-beamed wooden coastal sailing vessel with a raised bow, a broad, flat stern, a main foremast and secondary mast aft.

After a final stop in a key-hole of a bay called Karaloz on the island of Kekova we head to Finike. The girls are in the water faster than a couple of sea otters in an oyster lease and had it not been for the five or six other yachts already there we would have ranked it 12 on a scale of 10. Next day at Finike we sadly climb aboard the bus for Antalya, with its ancient port of Kalichi where we spend a couple of nights ashore in denial of the reality that we are at the end of our family holiday. Compensation awaited in the form of an Ottoman House, which has been converted into a simply fantastic boutique hotel in the old part of Antalya overlooking the old harbour. Heaven! We vow to return sooner rather than later – including our teenagers who never once asked where the disco was. The Lycian Coast Yacht Rally will follow this route in September 2011 and 2012. Call Mariner Boating Holidays for more information.

These days Turkey’s wooden gulets (the name derives from the French for schooner) are mostly configured as motor-sailers with powerful diesel engines for primary power, and sails for use in strong winds. Gulets are particularly good for pleasure sailing because of their broad beam, which gives them lots of deck space — particularly aft — and plenty of spacious cabins belowdecks. Turkish gulets come in many sizes, from 15-metre craft with all the necessary equipment to luxurious 33-metre air-conditioned vessels with every convenience and luxury. A gulet may have from three to 12 two-person cabins (for six to 24 people), but five- and sixcabin vessels capable of sleeping 10 to 12 are most common. The two- or three-person crew usually sleeps in a lazarette at the bow. Many gulet cabins have private heads (toilets) and sinks, some even have private fresh-water showers, though communal showers are more common. The stern deck of a gulet is fitted with a low, wide cushioned bench all around lounging, reading, or napping. The stern deck area, shaded by an awning if the sun is hot, is large enough for a small table for games, drinks or simple meals. A gulet’s main cabin is spacious, high enough for the tallest voyager. Fittings and furnishings range from pine and stainless steel to rich mahogany and burnished brass. Typical yacht charter agreements in Turkey include the yacht, crew, insurance, fuel for four hours’ motoring per day (on average), standard port taxes and fees. Some meals, soft drinks, water and local (that is, Turkish domestic) alcoholic drinks (beer, wine, raki, brandy, gin, etc.) are included in some charter agreements or may be ordered by the voyagers and paid for separately. Crew tips/gratuities of 5% to 10% of the charter fee are traditionally given to the captain at the end of the voyage, to be shared among the crew.

68 RMYC YEARBOOK


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Fleetwood D-class inshore lifeboat D-187

the birth of the RIB THE BRITS, the Poms, the dear old To-and-Froms, have invented a lot of things over the centuries. Barry Tranter writes about one British Creation.

70 RMYC YEARBOOK


THE BIRTH OF THE RIB

The first Flatacraft Force 4 by the Lee Elliott brothers

T

heir most significant creation was the Industrial Revolution which gave us the world as it is today, though they shouldn’t have to shoulder all the blame for that as they had many willing collaborators.

They Brits also gave us Yorkshire pudding and Rolls-Royces and the concept of chips with everything. In recent times they invented the Hovercraft and the Harrier jump-jet, both of which the world applauded vigorously and then, equally vigorously, ignored. But I would like to think that the RIB – the Rigid-Bottomed Inflatable Boat – is one British creation that is here to stay. A quick surf of the Internet reveals that in 1964, young people studying at Rear-Admiral Desmond Hoare’s Atlantic College in South Wales ripped the bottom of their 3.7m inflatable rescue craft. Casting around for a quick fix, they found a sheet of plywood in the shed and cut it to fit the tubes and created a substitute floor. This worked well on smooth water but in a chop this flat-bottomed inflatable rode about as my mother’s tea-tray when I used it to slide down the grassy slope in the yard next door. So the next step was to build a rigid vee onto the rigid bottom. This was a success and then followed a succession of vee-bottomed RIBs, each one bigger than the last. At the same time, two British brothers, Tony and Edward Lee-Elliott, were developing their own rigid-bottomed inflatables and reaching conclusions similar to those of the Atlantic College group. No matter who was actually first, it was Hoare who patented the idea of the Rigid Bottom Inflatable. The Rear Admiral rather generously reached an agreement with the RNLI (Royal National Lifeboat Institution) to develop the RIB. The RNLI ultimately came up with the Atlantic 21, which went into service in 1972 and, although now highly evolved, is still operating around the shores of Great Britain. By the 1980s these specialist rescue boats had become highly sophisticated. To launch the craft from gravel beaches the boffins developed a highly-specialised trailer. This was pushed by tractor to the water’s edge so the RIB, mounted with the bow pointing away from the tow vehicle, could be launched straight into the sea. The crew was already aboard and the twin outboards plugged into a water jacket on the trailer so they were RMYC YEARBOOK 71


THE BIRTH OF THE RIB

Bournemouth D-class inshore lifeboat taken in1971

Aldeburgh D-class inshore lifeboat D-376

running and warmed up by the time the trailer was tipped up and the boat spat into the briny. An inflatable bag on a targa bar ensured the craft could be righted if capsized. Which does happen. The first RIB developed for the consumer world is generally believed to be Avon’s Searider, released at the 1969 London Boat Show. Come to think of it I was at the 1969 London Boat Show but I can’t remember this craft so important to maritime history. But that’s typical, always looking the wrong way at the pivotal moment. Any claim that the British got there first is bound to be disputed by the French and there is no doubt that Zodiac – the brand name that became a generic for the inflatable boat – was never far behind the Brits. As early as 1952 Frenchman Alain Bombard sailed a rigid (flat)-bottomed

Zodiac inflatable – fitted with a rectangular sail and leeboards – across the Atlantic, from Las Palmas to Barbados. Bombard lived on a diet of plankton and fresh air and represented one of a long line of highly-adventurous Frenchmen who virtually created extreme sport. The Brits, too, are good at this. Whoever claims to be first, there is no doubt the concept of the RIB was European and the European public embraced the idea. As the 20th century drew to a close the RIB was long-established as a glamorous toy for Mediterranean waters. But it was the Brits who formed RIB clubs and ran highspeed tours around their own coastline, across the Channel and hop along the French coast, from port to port. This is made possible by the RIB’s now-legendary ability for speed and stability, which enabled the Brits to coast-hop and dive for cover

A boat built in the 80s – maker unknown

Cabin RIBs were rare in the 80s & 90s. A Zodiac Hurricane.

72 RMYC YEARBOOK


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THE BIRTH OF THE RIB

when the weather lost the plot which, in those high latitudes, can be frequent. And sudden. Not unlike the weather of eastern Australia in recent times, come to think of it. According to RIB pioneer Tony Lee-Elliott, there are now about 120 RIB manufacturers worldwide, perhaps a third of them in Britain. “The British RIBs are the macho craft, the Mediterranean boys build the pretty boats and the Yanks are into the commercial and military craft”, he says. Perhaps a simplistic summary, but you get the idea. RIBs come in all shapes and sizes. I became a convert when, several decades ago now, I spent many happy days in a 5m Avon. The seating was the best-ever for a sporty powerboat; you sat astride the seat, as on a motorbike, so your legs can absorb sudden impact. The Avon’s most distinctive feature was the flooding hull so when she came to a stop

she floated low and the tubes sat on the surface of the water, presumably to make it easier to haul bodies aboard. This had a downside; if you hit the throttle too hard with the outboard trimmed out, the sudden rush of water trying to escape through the transom could cause the nose to point heavenwards; not dangerously, but enough to make the heart beat a little faster. I did it once, about 30 metres in front of the entire Sydney Hobart Yacht Race fleet as it rounded the turning mark off Sydney Heads and thundered towards me, like a stampede of particularly quiet cattle. The only prayer I had time to summon was for a quick and merciful death. But the Avon did the right thing and I survived. But I never tail-walked again. Photo credits: With thanks RNLI and RIB Magazine – United Kingdom

The latest style of modern RIBs – BRIG Eagle 580

74 RMYC YEARBOOK


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Nautilus II steps up Australia has a proud record of achievement in the sport of powerboat racing, aS David Payne, curator of the Australian Register of Historic Vessels, REVEALS.

W

hen power-boating was introduced in the early 1900s, Australian enthusiasts closely followed developments in Europe and the USA, importing or building craft and engines of their own. Racing began around 1905, and by 1912 a small fleet of planing craft provided a popular spectacle when they raced each other at major events, reported in the press and witnessed by large crowds. Recently acquired from Victoria where it was built in 1912, the 7.6-metre-long, multi-stepped wooden hydroplane Nautilus II is a remarkable survivor from that period. It is likely to be the earliest example of this type remaining in Australia, and is probably the earliest surviving winner of the E C Griffith Cup at the Australasian Championship. This was the premier motor-boating event in Australia and New Zealand, with one of the earliest motorboat trophies contested anywhere in the world. Both the Cup and Nautilus II will be 100 years old next year. Researching the background of this important craft has begun to tease out its design and construction secrets. What is not secret is the stunning-looking multi-stepped configuration, an example of the USpatented Fauber stepped-hull designs. The steps were designed to increase lift and reduce wetted surface drag, a popular concept being developed in Europe and the USA at the time.

76 RMYC YEARBOOK

Nautilus II was designed and built for Fred and Percy Cornwall, who had a manufacturing business in Melbourne. The Sydney Morning Herald of 2 March 1914 reported: ‘According to the officials of the Victorian Motor Yacht Club, Nautilus II’s hull was designed by Mr. H Maumill of Victoria.’ The same report notes that the boat was built at Jas Edwards & Son’s yard on the Yarra, while another article notes that it was Maumill who built the craft at this yard. Evidence that Nautilus II was both designed and built in Australia is exciting. Its multistep hull style was


POWerBOAT RACING

Story and images compliments of the National Maritime Museum at the
leading edge of international hydroplane evolution for the period, and Australians were already creating their own. An examination of the Nautilus II hull shows all the classic elements for the type: plumb stem, deep forefoot, straight keel, concave sections, the number, depth and rake of the steps that are ventilated by pipes toward the centreline, along with aft tumblehome and bevelled transom. All these features compare favourably with the famous Maple Leaf IV, the UK-built winner of the international Harmsworth Trophy in 1912–13. The stepped-hull shape was not easy to build, compared to a normal hull with its full run of bottom planking. The steps added weight and broke up the continuity of the planking, contributing to a loss of strength in some boats. The double-planked King Billy pine hull of Nautilus II was clearly robust, however, with clever diagonal and fore and aft planking at the steps, combined with significant-sized engine girders and stringers. The hull structure has retained most of its original integrity, and only the deck has been modified during its life. An interesting feature that has been lost is the mounting of its original 90 kW (120 hp) Napier, six-cylinder petrol engine. It used an early form of vee-drive at the forward end of the engine, coupled to the propeller shaft that ran back aft under the engine to the shaft log where it exited the hull. This allowed the engine to be located optimally for fore and aft trim, while reducing the shaft angle for better performance. How all this was developed in apparent isolation in Australia remains the mystery. Owner Percy Cornwall was 
the boat’s engineer or mechanic. Maumill is an enigma; of the few references found, one notes that he was working in Sydney in 1904 and had built an ‘oil launch’ or motorboat called Dawmea, designed by the innovative Australian naval architect Walter Reeks. Contemporary media articles indicate that considerable information was available from

78 RMYC YEARBOOK

overseas, even if it came 
a few months late by sea mail. There are descriptions and images of the latest boats, articles on construction, and 
letters to editors debating the theories of high-speed design. Weighing up the evidence it seems quite plausible that a combination of the owners’ and builders’ skills and practical knowledge could produce this design in Australia, with excellent results. Stepped hulls had arrived on the racing scene around 1910, and Nautilus II’s main local rival was the single-step hydroplane Kangaroo/Meteor II, imported that year from Monaco by retail magnate Anthony Hordern. Nautilus II was Victorian Champion in 1913, racing at 32 mph, but lost the title in 1914 to Meteor II from NSW. A month later it turned the tables on Meteor II and won the nationally contested E C Griffith Cup for the Australasian Championship over a 20-mile course, setting speeds around 34 mph. It won again in 1915, reaching 40 mph. A second engine, a Sturtevant aircraft motor, was fitted around 1919. Nautilus II remained in use until the 1980s, fitted with an outboard motor in its later years. In the 1990s it was noticed under covers in a shed at Williamstown and was given to the National Trust of Australia’s Victorian division. For many years it was on display at the Polly Woodside Museum, but a change in the museum’s collection focus and resources made it available for acquisition by the Australian National Maritime Museum. It’s a very important and rare example of a multi-stepped hull from the early period of Australian and international power-boating that shows Australians successfully adopting the latest developments in motorboat design and construction of that era. Representing the origins of motorboat racing in Australia when the sport was the preserve of the very few, this important example of early powerboat technology is a significant addition to the National Maritime Museum’s diverse collection of powercraft.


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let’s get

physical Riding on the wave of its stylish upgrade, The Royal Motor Yacht Club (RMYC) Gym is more popular than ever with its members looking to invest in their health and wellbeing.

80 RMYC YEARBOOK


GYM

A

sk a fellow member of the RMYC Gym and they’ll tell you: it’s not difficult to remain committed to a fitness plan when you belong to a gym with state-of-the-art equipment, luxurious amenities and motivated trainers… and the view doesn’t hurt either. Enviably positioned on Australia’s most prestigious marina, the RMYC Gym has quickly become known as one of Sydney’s premier fitness centres. Since undergoing refurbishment last year, the gym has established a peerless reputation for delivering proven fitness results in a well-appointed, professional environment. And the figures speak for themselves. Since 2006, membership to the prestigious gym has almost doubled, with the average number of visitors per month rising from 477 to 820. In addition to housing the latest equipment and industryleading trainers, the RMYC gym features fresh, unique fitness options to keep members challenged – from yoga, stretch sessions and massage, to cardio/resistance training classes and TRX. An adults member only facility, members are guaranteed a peaceful and uninterrupted work-out. The gym’s opening hours are from 5am until 10pm – but for members’ security and peace-of-mind, the site features 24 hour video surveillance.

RMYC YEARBOOK 81


GYM

RMYC GYM Membership Guidelines Through its membership guidelines, RMYC endeavours to deliver a harmonious, safe and comfortable work-out environment for all its members: •

Swipe your membership card on entry (membership cards are non transferable);

Always keep your membership card with you and on display when using the gym;

Sign in on entry, and sign out on exit (the book is located at the gym front desk);

For the safety of all members, please replace all equipment after use;

For hygiene reasons, towels are compulsory (no towel – no entry);

Please wear enclosed footwear and appropriate attire at all times;

Private tuition, personal training and coaching is to be conducted by RMYC staff only; and,

Please turn off the equipment and lights if you’re last to leave.

82 RMYC YEARBOOK


84 RMYC YEARBOOK


Father Neptune 2010 S

hrek and his Princess Fiona shared the limelight with around 200 children when Father Neptune came to the club.

The children enjoyed face painting, jet boat rides, and the obligatory visit to Neptune’s dunk tank. There was plenty of food, including the essentials – lollies, ice cream and chips.

RMYC YEARBOOK 85


Father Neptune

86 RMYC YEARBOOK


Companies Act, 1961 Company Limited by Guarantee and not having a Share Capital

Memorandum of Association of Royal Motor Yacht Club of New South Wales Ltd 1.

2. (a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

(h)

(i)

(j)

88 RMYC YEARBOOK

The name of the Company (hereinafter called “the Club”) is ‘ROYAL MOTOR YACHT CLUB OF NEW SOUTH WALES LIMITED.’ The objects for which the Club is established are: To acquire and take over all the assets and liabilities of the present unincorporated body known as “Royal Motor Yacht Club of New South Wales” and to enable that Club to comply with the relevant provisions of the Liquor Act 1912 as amended To promote the use of all classes of power boats to promote seamanship and teaching of navigation and to formulate rules for and conduct trials of speed, endurance, navigation and seamanship and such other pastimes, entertainments and recreations as the Club may deem expedient to promote social intercourse between members of the Club and other clubs. To establish and maintain Club houses, boathouses, marinas, dwellings, workshops, garages, and other conveniences in connection with the Club’s activities. To purchase, hire, make or provide and maintain and to sell or otherwise dispose of all kinds of meals, food provisions, refreshments, furniture, plates, glass, books, periodicals, billiard table, tools, implements, machines, engines, utensils, and other things required or which may be conveniently used in connection with the Club’s activities or premises. To purchase and/or apply for a licence or permit or other authority under such act or acts as shall for the time being be in force in the State of New South Wales for the purpose of selling or distribution of soft drinks, intoxicating liquor, tobacco, cigarettes, and other supplies and the operation of automatic machines. To subscribe to, become a member of and cooperate with any other club, association or organisation, whether incorporated or not, whose objects are altogether or in part similar to those of the Club provided that the club shall not subscribe to or support with its funds any club, association or organisation which does not prohibit the distribution of its income and property among its members to an extent at least as great as that imposed on he Club under or by virtue of Clause 3 of this Memorandum. To purchase, take on lease or in exchange, hire and otherwise acquire any lands, buildings, easements or property, real and personal, and any rights or privileges which may be requisite for the purpose of or capable of being conveniently used in connection with any of the objects of the Club. Provided that in case the Club shall take or hold any property which may be subject to any trusts the Club shall only deal with the same in such manner as is allowed by law having regard to such trusts. To enter into any arrangements with any Government or authority, supreme, municipal, local or otherwise, that may seem conducive to the Club’s objects or any of them; and to obtain from any such Government or authority any rights, privileges and concessions which the Club may think it desirable to obtain; and to carry out, exercise and comply with any such arrangements, rights, privileges and concessions. To appoint, employ, remove, or suspend such managers, clerks, secretaries, servants, workmen, and other persons as may be necessary or convenient for the purpose of the Club. To establish and support or aid in the establishment

(k)

(l)

(m)

(n)

(o)

(p)

(q)

(r)

(s)

(t)

(u)

and support of associations, institutions, funds, trusts, and conveniences calculated to benefit employees or past employees of the Club or the dependants or connections of any such persons; and to grant pensions and allowances; and to make payments towards insurance; and to subscribe or guarantee money for charitable or benevolent objects, or for any public, general or useful object. To construct, improve, maintain, develop, work, manage, carry out, alter or control any houses, buildings, groundwork or conveniences which may seem calculated directly or indirectly to advance the Club’s interests, and to contribute to, subsidise or otherwise assist and take part in the construction, improvement, maintenance, development, working, management, carrying out, alterations or control thereof. To invest and deal with the money of the Club not immediately required in such manner as may be permitted by law for the investment of trust funds To borrow or raise or secure the payment of money in such manner as the Club may think fit and to secure the same or the repayment or performance of any debt liability contract guarantee or other engagement incurred or to be entered into by the Club in any way and in particular by the issue of debentures perpetual or otherwise charged upon all or any of the Club’s property (both present and future) and to purchase, redeem or pay off any such securities. To make, draw, accept, endorse, discount, execute and issue promissory notes, bills of exchange, bills of lading and other negotiable or transferable instruments. In furtherance of the objects of the Club to sell, improve, manage, develop, exchange, lease, dispose of, turn to account or otherwise deal with all or any part of the property rights of the Club. To take or hold mortgages, liens and charges to secure payment of the purchase price or any unpaid balance of the purchase price, of any part of the Club’s property of whatsoever kind sold by the Club, any money due to the Club from purchasers and others. To take any gift or property whether subject to any special trust or not, for any one or more of the objects of the Club but subject always to the provision in paragraph (g) of this Clause 2. To take such steps by personal or written appeals, public meetings or otherwise, as may from time to time be deemed expedient for the purpose of procuring contributions to the funds of the Club, in the shape of donations, annual subscriptions or otherwise. To print and publish any newspapers, periodicals, books or leaflets that the Club may think desirable for the promotion of its objects. In furtherance of the objects of the Club to amalgamate with any companies, institutions, societies or associations having objects altogether or in part similar to those of the Club and which shall prohibit the distribution of its or their income and property among its or their members to an extent at least as great as that imposed upon the Club or by virtue of Clause 3 of this Memorandum. In furtherance of the objects of the Club to transfer all or part of the property, assets, liabilities and engagements of the Club to any one or more of the Companies, institutions, societies or associations with which the Club is authorised to amalgamate.


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(v) To make donations for patriotic or charitable purposes. (w) To transact any lawful business in aid of the Commonwealth of Australia in the prosecution of any war in which the Commonwealth of Australia is engaged. (x) To do all such other things as are incidental or conducive to the attainment of the objects and exercise of the powers of the Club. The powers set forth in the Third Schedule to the Companies Act 1961, shall not apply to the Club except insofar as they are included in this Clause 2. 3. The income and property of the Club, whencesoever derived, shall be applied solely towards the promotion of the objects of the Club as set forth in this Memorandum of Association and no portion thereof shall be paid or transferred, directly or indirectly, by way of dividend, bonus or otherwise howsoever by way of profit, to the members of the Club. Provided that nothing herein shall prevent the payment, in good faith, of reasonable and proper remuneration to any officer or servant of the Club, or to any member of the Club, in return for any services actually rendered to the Club, nor prevent the payment of interest at a rate not exceeding interest at the rate for the time being charged by Bankers in Sydney for overdrawn accounts on money lent, or reasonable and proper rent for premises demised or let by any member to the Club; but so for that no member of the Council of management or governing body of the Club shall be appointed to any salaried office of the Club, or any office of the Club paid by fees, and that no remuneration or other benefit in money or money’s worth shall be given by the Club to any member of such council or governing body except repayment of out-of-pocket expenses and interest at the rate aforesaid on money lent or reasonable and proper rent for premises demised or let to the Club. Provided that the provisions last aforesaid shall not apply to any payment to any company of which a member of the council of management or governing body may be a member and in which such membershall not hold more than one-hundredth part of the capital, and such member shall not be bound to account for any share of profits he may receive in respect of such payment. It is further provided that no member of the Club shall practice his trade, professions or other calling in or on the premises of the Club and shall not employ any persons to do so on his behalf. 4. No addition, alteration or amendment shall be made to or in the Memorandum or Articles of Association for the time being in force, unless the same shall have been previously submitted to and approved by the Minister of the Crown for the time being administering the Companies Act, 1961 (hereinafter called “the Minister”). 5. The third and fourth Clauses of this Memorandum contain conditions on which a licence is granted by the Minister to the Club in pursuance of Section 24 of the Companies Act, 1961. 6. The liability of the members is limited. 7. Every member of the Club undertakes to contribute to the assets of the Club, in the event of the same being wound up while he is a member, or within one year after he ceases to be a member, for payment of the debts and liabilities of the Club contracted before he ceases to be a member, and of the costs, charges, and expenses of winding up and for the adjustment of the rights of the contributors among themselves, such amount as may be required, not exceeding twenty dollars ($20.00). 8. If upon the winding-up or dissolution of the Club there remains, after satisfaction of all its debts and liabilities, any property whatsoever, the same shall not be paid to or distributed among the members of the Club, but shall be given or transferred to some other institution or institutions having objects similar to the objects of the Club, and which shall prohibit the distribution of its or their income and property among its or their members

88 RMYC YEARBOOK 90

to an extent at least as great as is imposed on the Club under or by virtue of Clause 3 hereof, such institution or institutions to be determined by the members of the Club at or before the time of dissolution and if and so far as effect cannot be given to the aforesaid provision, then to some charitable object. 9. True accounts shall be kept of the sums of money received and expended by the Club, and the matter in respect of which such receipt and expenditure takes place, and of the property, credits and liabilities of the Club; and subject to any reasonable restrictions as to the time and manner of inspecting the same that may be imposed in accordance with the regulations of the Club for the time being in force, shall be open to the inspection of the members. Once at least in every year, the accounts of the Club shall be examined by one or more properly qualified Auditor or Auditors who shall report to the members in accordance with the provisions of the Companies Act, 1961. 10. The full names, addresses and occupations of the subscribers are as follows: NAME, ADDRESS AND OCCUPATION OF SUBSCRIBER Frederick George Harvie, 44 Coolong Road VAUCLUSE, Managing Director Harry Philip Castle, 246 Old South Head Road, VAUCLUSE, Retired Robert William Mirrington, 45 Liverpool Street, DOVER HEIGHTS, General Manager Ronald Edward Tildesley, 24 Beresford Road, ROSE BAY, Builder and Investor Percy James Thomas Swain, 2a/8 St Mervyns Ave, POINT PIPER, Managing Director John Joseph Minahan, 1 Calga Avenue, BRONTE, Production Mgr Michael George Barbouttis, 62 Gilbert Street, DOVER HEIGHTS, Public Accountant Phillip Raymond Paraggio, 21 Paton Street, KINGSFORD, Customs Officer Harry Charles Bowden, 10 Golden Grove Street, DARLINGTON, Director John Charles Needham, Roxton House, 29 Berry Street, NORTH SYDNEY, Solicitor Arthur William Titterton, 40 Coolong Road, VAUCLUSE, Company Director. 11. We, the several persons whose name and addresses are subscribed are desirous of being formed into a company in pursuance of this Memorandum of Association. Signatures of Witness to signature Subscribers and address of witness F. Harvie F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay R. Mirrington F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay P.J.T. Swain F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay M.G. Barbouttis F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay Harry C. Bowden F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay A. W. Titterton F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay H.P Castle F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay R. Tildesley F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay John J. Minahan F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay P.R. Paraggio F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay John Needham F.M. Murray, 6/21 The Avenue, Rose Bay Dated this 14th day of November, 1972.


Honour Roll of Life Members 1916 * Mitchell P.C. 1916 * Arnott S. 1919 Marks (Lieut) W.H. 1922 * Albert F. 1929 * Milne J. 1930 Griffith E.C. 1932 * Doyle S.F. 1935 Paul A. 1936 Norris C. 1938 Davies A.H. 1948 * McDonald A. S. 1950 * Lawson G.D. 1950 Halloran A. O.B.E 1951 Adams S.M. 1953 Cant R. A. 1955 Cross S.W. 1958 French W C. 1959 Hannan F.N. 1960 Harrington E.G. 1963 Potter B. 1965 Raymond C.H. 320399A_Boatmate Marine | 1738 HIGHRES.pdf 1967 Rettenmaier K.

1

1970 Storey R.T.C. 1970 Richardson Norma 1972 * Harvie F.G. 1973 * Anderson A.J. 1974 * Auswild R.W. O.B.E 1975 * Bowden H.C. 1976 Sharrock W.J. 1977 Fausett T.H. 1978 Meagher B.D. 1979 Swain P.J.T. 1981 * Barbouttis M.G. M.B.E. 1982 Muddle B. 1984 Jacoby Elsa M.B.E. 1988 * Mirrington R.W. 1989 Nikolaidis J.M. 1992 Roche W. 1993 * Calligeros G.P. 2009 Freeman D.D. 2010 * Gresham K.J. * Denotes Past Commodore

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www.boatmate.com.au RMYC YEARBOOK 91


Companies Act, 1961 Company Limited by Guarantee and not having a Share Capital

Articles of Association of Royal Motor Yacht Club of New South Wales Ltd Interpretation 1. In these Articles “the Code” means the Companies (New South Wales) Code. “the Club” means the Royal Motor Yacht Club of New South Wales Limited, the premises of which are situated at number 21 Wunulla Road, Point Piper. “the unincorporated Body” means the unincorporated Body which was known as the Royal Motor Yacht Club of New South Wales the funds and other assets and liabilities of which the Club is authorized to take over by clause 2 (a) of the Memorandum of Association. “the Board” means the Board of Directors of the Club within the meaning of the Code. “Flag Officers” means such of the members of the Board as have been elected by a General Meeting to the offices of Commodore,Vice Commodore and Rear Commodore, of the Club. “Secretary” means an “approved Secretary” or an “acting Secretary” as defined by section 33 and 34 of the Registered Clubs Act 1976 as amended appointed by the Club to perform the duties of the secretary. “State” means the State of New South Wales “Member” unless otherwise indicated by a prefix or by the context of the relevant Article means any member of the Club irrespective of the class of membership to which he may belong. “Register of Vessels” means the register containing the names of the boat-owner members of the Club and the names, the descriptions and the class of their vessels, pursuant to Article 101. “month” means a calendar month “notice” means any communication in writing. “the seal” means the Common Seal of the Club. Expressions referring to writing shall unless the contrary intention appears to be constructed as including references to printing, lithography, photography and other modes of representing or reproducing words in a visible form. Words importing the masculine gender only shall include the feminine gender and words importing the singular number only shall include the plural number and vice-versa. Words or expressions contained in these Articles shall be interpreted in accordance with the provisions of the Interpretation Act 1897, of the Code of the Registered Clubs Act 1897, as amended or any other relevant statute in force at the date on which the Articles become binding on the Club. 2. The Club is established for the purposes set out in the Memorandum of Association.The name of the Company (hereinafter called “the Club”) is “ROYAL MOTOR YACHT CLUB OF NEW SOUTH WALES LIMITED.” Membership 3. The number of members of the Club (not including Junior Members or Honorary Members) shall not for the time being exceed two thousand (2,000). 4. The subscribers to the Memorandum of Association and such other persons as the Board shall admit to membership in accordance with these Articles shall be members of the Club. 5. If the whole of the funds and other assets of the unincorporated Club become the absolute property of the Club forthwith after its incorporation then every person

88 RMYC YEARBOOK 92

who at the date of incorporation of the Club is a member of the unincorporated Club and who on or before the thirty-first day of December, 1972 agrees in writing to become a member of the Club shall be admitted by the Board to membership of the Club in the appropriate class. Every member of the Club who previously to his agreeing to become a member of the Club has paid his subscription due on the first day of July 1972, as a member of the unincorporated Club shall not be liable to pay any further sum by way of annual subscription to the Club for the period prior to the first day of July, 1973 Classes of Membership 6. The Club shall consist of five (5) classes of members but Boat Owner members, General members and Life members only shall have the rights accorded by the Articles to full membership of the Club and shall be entitled to use all of the facilities and amenities of the Club and the right to nominate or second any person for membership and have credit facilities. Notwithstanding anything contained in Article 6 of these Articles and in order to make clear the voting rights of the various classes of members only Boat Owner members, General members and Life members (who immediately prior to being elected to Life membership were either Boat Owner members or General members) shall be eligible to vote for the election of the Board of Directors and vote on any matter at a General Meeting of the Club. (a) BOAT OWNER MEMBERS An application of this class of membership must be either solely or jointly with another member or members of the Club, an owner of a vessel eligible to be included in the Register of Vessels and must immediately upon being admitted as a member apply to have his name and the name, description and class of his vessel entered in the Register of Vessels. The members of this class shall have all the rights accorded by these Articles and shall be entitled to the enjoyment of all the facilities and amenities of the Club. For the purpose of this paragraph a Boat Owner member who disposes of his vessel with the intention of replacing same and within seven (7) days of such disposal notifies the Secretary in writing of his intention so to do shall be deemed to belong to his class for a period of three months from the date of the disposal of his vessel notwithstanding the fact that he will be owning no vessel during such a period.The Board may at its discretion grant extensions of the aforesaid period on being requested in writing by the member concerned and being given satisfactory reasons for such a request. (b) GENERAL MEMBERS General Members shall be: (i) Those persons who at the date of the Special Resolution adopting this Article are recorded in the Register of members as General Members or as Social Members. (ii) Such other persons who in the opinion of the Board of the Club are suitable for General membership. (c) LIFE MEMBERS The Board may once during the term of its office if it so resolves, by the vote (taken by ballot) of three fourths (3/4) of its members make a recommendation to a General Meeting for the conferment of a Life Membership on a member who having been a member for a period of


(d)

more than ten (10) years and in special circumstances for a shorter period, has rendered exceptional services to the Club beyond call of duty. On the Board’s recommendation being endorsed by the vote (taken by ballot) of the threefourths (3/4) of the General Meeting the nominee of the Board shall be declared Life member of the Club.The conferment of Life Membership apart from the honour which is intended to be bestowed upon the recipient and the privilege of paying a nominal amount only in lieu of the full annual subscription of his class shall not be deemed to accord to him any rights which he did not have theretofore, nor shall exempt him from any other financial obligations to the Club. JUNIOR MEMBERS The sons or daughters of a member or of a deceased member or such other young persons as the Board may consider suitable for admission to the Club’s membership who are over the age of eight years and under the age of eighteen years shall be eligible to this class of membership, and on being admitted, shall have the right to remain in this class until they attain the age of eighteen years.The members of this class shall have only such rights and shall be subject to such restrictions and conditions as regards the use and enjoyment of the Club’s facilities and amenities as the Board may from time to time accord to or impose on them and they shall at all times strictly observe the provisions of the Liquor Act 1912 (as amended) and the Registered Clubs Act 1976 (as amended) concerning the supply and consumption of alcoholic and spirituous liquors to the operation of poker machines by and the presence in restricted areas of persons under the age of eighteen (18) years.

Patron of the Club 7. There shall be at all times a Patron-in-Chief and a VicePatron of the Club 8. The Board from time to time may request a representative of Her Majesty the Queen of Australia in the Commonwealth of Australia or in the State of New South Wales to be Patron-in-Chief of the Club and who upon

acceptance of such invitation the Board shall appoint as Patron-in-Chief of the Club. 9. A serving Admiral of the Royal Australian Navy provided he accepts the Board’s invitation in that respect shall be appointed Vice-Patron of the Club. Honorary and Temporary Members 10. (a) The following persons may be made Honorary members of the Club in accordance with procedures established by the Board from time to time. (i) the patron in chief, the patron and vice patron for the time being of the Club (ii) any prominent citizen or local dignitary visiting the Club (b) Honorary members shall be entitled to only the social facilities and amenities of the Club and shall not be entitled to attend or vote at any meeting of the Club, nominate or be elected to the Board or any office in the Club or participate in the management, business and affairs of the Club in any way. (c) When Honorary membership is conferred on any person the following particulars shall be entered in the Club’s Register of Honorary members: (i) the names in full of the Honorary Member (ii) the residential address of the Honorary member (iii) the date on which Honorary membership is conferred (iv) the date on which Honorary membership is to cease 11. (a) The following persons in accordance with procedures established by the Board may in the absolute discretion of the Board be made Temporary members of the Club: (i) Any visitor whose permanent place of residence in New South Wales is not less than a distance of 5 kilometres from the Club or such greater distance as may be determined from time to time by the Board by By-law pursuant to these Articles. (ii) Full Members (as defined in the Registered Clubs Act) of other clubs which are registered under the Registered Clubs Act and which have objects similar

K E E P A P R O P E R L O O KO U T In a boat, a proper lookout must be kept at all times. You have to watch and listen carefully, especially in bad weather, restricted visibility or darkness. Remember: • Don’t forget to look all around – even behind you • Special care should be taken in areas where higher speed vessels operate • Even when you have an observer while towing a person on skis or tubes, the skipper is always responsible for keeping a proper lookout • Keep safe, keep to the right. For more information see our website or call the Info line.

MAR0245g/UC 09/11

YOU’RE THE SKIPPER YOU’RE RESPONSIBLE!

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11. (b)

to those of the Club; (iii) A full member (as defined in the Registered Clubs Act) of any registered club who, at the invitation of the Board of the Club or a Full Member of the Club, attends on any date at the premises of the Club for the purpose of participating in an organized sport or competition to be conducted by the Club on that day from the time on that day when he so attends the premises of the Club until the end of that day. (iv) Any interstate or overseas visitor

(i) Temporary members shall not be required to pay an entrance fee or annual subscription (ii) Temporary members shall not be entitled to vote at any meeting of the Club, nominate for or be elected to the Board or any office in the Club or participate in the management, business and affairs of the Club in any way. (iii) Temporary members shall not be permitted to introduce guests into the Club (iv) A Director or the Secretary of the Club may terminate the membership of any Temporary member at any time without notice and without having to provide any reason therefore. (v) No person under the age of 18 years may be admitted as a Temporary Member of the Club (vi) When a Temporary member (other than a Temporary member admitted pursuant to paragraph (a) (iii) of this Article) first enters the Club premises on any day the following particulars shall be entered in the Club’s Register of Temporary Members: (a) the name in full of the temporary member; (b) the residential address of the temporary member; (c) the date on which Temporary membership is granted; (d) the signature of the Temporary member.

18.

19.

Payment of Entrance and Subscription Fees 20. 21. 22.

23.

Honorary Life Members 12. The Board may pursuant to a resolution passed by threefourths (3/4) of its members recommend to a General Committee the conferment of Honorary Life Membership to any outstanding citizen not being a member of the Club who has rendered valuable and distinguished services to the Club or to the Nation as a token of the Club’s appreciation of such services. On such recommendation being endorsed by the vote of the General Meeting the nominee of the Board and his spouse shall be declared Honorary Life Members of the Club. 13. The conferment of Honorary Memberships to either of a temporary or of a permanent nature shall entitle the recipients of same to the enjoyment of all the amenities and facilities of the Club but shall not however bestow upon them any other rights whatsoever connected with the management of the affairs of the Club. Entrance and Subscription Fees 14. The entrance fees payable by the applicants for membership and the annual subscription fees payable by the members (not being Honorary Members) shall be such as the Board may from time to time prescribe. 15. When a member transfers from an existing class of membership and the entrance or subscription fees for the other class are greater than those for the existing class, the member shall be liable for the difference in fees but no reimbursement shall be made to the member where the entrance or subscription fees for the other class are lower than those for his then existing class. 16. Junior members applying to be transferred to any other class of membership upon attaining the age of eighteen (18) years and provided they have been members of the Junior Class for a period of not less than two years shall not be required to pay entrance fees. 17. Members admitted after the Thirty-first of May in any year shall be only liable to pay a pro rata part of the annual subscription of the then current year.

88 RMYC YEARBOOK 94

Notwithstanding anything to the contrary hereinbefore contained members who have been members for a continuous period of more than twenty five (25) years and who have attained the age of sixty (60) years shall be entitled to apply to the Board, if they so desire, to have their annual subscriptions reduced to one-half of the prescribed fee. Such reduction, however, shall not be deemed to effect the basis of the determination of any other obligations due by the member or imposed on the members generally. The Board shall have the right in its absolute discretion to grant exemption from the payment of the full annual subscription or of a portion thereof for a limited period of time or until the Board otherwise resolves to unemployed widows or orphans of a deceased member or to such other members whose financial or health conditions deserve such consideration Entrance fees are payable simultaneously with the lodgement of the application for membership. Annual subscription fees shall become due and payable in advance on the first day of December in each year. On or before the First day of November in every year, the Secretary shall cause notices to be sent to all members calling upon them to renew their membership. Such notice shall specify the amount of subscription payable by each member according to the class to which he belongs and shall state that the same shall be paid on or before the first day of December next. If any subscription remains unpaid after the expiration of the month of December the Secretary shall cause a final notice to be sent to the member in default in which he shall draw the attention of such member to the fact that failure to pay his subscription by the end of the month of January shall render his membership liable to termination by the Board.

Payment of Other Debts 24. At the expiration of every month the Secretary shall cause accounts to be sent to all members who are indebted to the Club for services rendered or for goods purchased or for license fees or rent of facilities licensed or rented to them or for charges imposed by the Board under these Articles, requiring settlement of such debts before the expiration of the month in which the account was rendered. 25. If settlement of any account is not effected by the end of the month in which the same was rendered, the secretary shall cause a further and final account to be sent to the defaulting member requiring immediate settlement of his account and drawing the attention of the member to the fact that failure to settle same shall not only render his membership liable to termination by the Board but also to the imposition of interest at the bank overdraft rate payable by the Club at the relevant time plus 5% and the Board shall have the power to impose such interest on unpaid accounts in accordance with this Article. 26. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary hereinbefore contained debts which were incurred by a member obtaining money in cash from the Club or through its employees against a cheque on his Bankers or any other negotiable instrument which is not honoured on first presentation for payment shall be payable on demand or within twenty four (24) hours thence. Consequences of Late Payment and of Non-Payment of Debts 27.

If debts of whatsoever nature owing by members to the Club remain unpaid after the expiration of the month in which the account for same was rendered, they shall bear interest at the rate prescribed in Article 25 hereinbefore. Such interest shall be computed as and from the end of the month in which the account was rendered and in addition, the rights, if any accorded to the member in


default by the Articles shall be suspended and the facilities of obtaining services or goods from the Club on a charge account may be denied to him during the continuance of the default. 28. Notwithstanding the provisions of the preceding Article in the event of the aforesaid debts being still unpaid after the expiration of the month in which the final notice was given or after twenty four (24) hours from the time demand for payment was made under Article 26, the Board shall have the right to forthwith terminate the membership of the defaulting member unless in its discretion the Board considers that there are mitigating circumstances deserving its leniency. Admission of Members 29.

30.

(a)

(b)

(c)

No person who is under the age of eighteen (18) years shall be admitted to the membership of the Club except as a member of the Junior Class. The procedure to be adhered to for admission of members not being members in respect of which these articles otherwise provide, shall be as follows: All applications for membership must be proposed and seconded by two members of the Club who are either Boat Owners or General members and who have been such members for at least five (5) years standing. Applications must be made in the form for the time being prescribed by the Board and obtainable from the Secretary on request, which when duly completed by the applicant and signed by him and his prosper and seconder must be lodged with the Secretary together with the appropriate entrance fee. On receipt of the application form duly completed and the appropriate entrance fee, the Secretary shall cause the names of the applicant, his address, the name of his nominator and seconder to be posted on the Club’s Notice Board for a period of two weeks. At the same time he shall notify the Membership Committee which shall

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(d)

(e) (f)

(g)

(h)

(i)

(j)

appoint forthwith a day and a time for an interview with the prospective applicant, his nominator and/or seconder. Fourteen days notice in writing shall be given to these parties. The Membership Committee will endeavour to obtain as much information as possible about the applicant to assist in its deliberation. Any member shall be at liberty to attend the said interview and speak in support of the applicant In the event of the Membership Committee not being satisfied with the adequacy of the material submitted to it concerning any application it may direct the Secretary to conduct further and more extensive enquiries in respect of such applicant. Following upon such interview the Membership Committee shall report its findings to the Board and shall make appropriate recommendations as to the acceptance or otherwise of each applicant. In light of the Membership Committee’s report and recommendations the Board shall resolve by secret ballot as to whether it should accept, defer its decision, or reject any application provided that no application shall be accepted unless a resolution to the effect is passed by the vote of three-fourths (3/4) of the members of the Board present at the meeting dealing with such application. The Board’s decision shall be forthwith communicated to the applicant by a notice in writing and in the event of the application being rejected or its consideration being deferred the entrance fee paid by him hall be refunded in full. In the event however of the application being accepted the notice to that effect shall contain a request to the applicant to forward to the Secretary within fourteen (14) days from the date thereof the subscription fee of the class to which he has been admitted. Under no circumstances will the Board be obliged to give any reasons for the rejection or the deferment of any application. Upon payment of the subscription fees and as from the date of such payment the applicant’s name shall be entered

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(k)

in the Register Book of members as required by the Code, he shall have the rights and/or shall enjoy the benefits of the class to which he has been admitted. The entrance fees paid by an applicant who having been notified that his application has been accepted fails to remit his subscription fees within fourteen (14) days of the date of the notice shall be forfeited unless a satisfactory explanation to the Board of such failure is offered in writing.

the meeting shall be held, the date of the meeting which shall not be less than 21 days after the date on which the notices are sent, the hour of the meeting and shall advise members of the provisions of Article 42 hereof. If the notices are not sent within the aforementioned period the requisitions may themselves cause the said notices to be sent to each member entitled to vote and they shall be entitled to reimbursement by the Club for any reasonable expenses incurred in the preparation and postage of the notices.

Cessation of Membership 31. (a) (b) (c)

(d)

(e) (f) (g) (h) (i) 32.

33.

34.

The membership of any member shall be terminated on the happening of any of the following events: If he on his own volition resigns his membership by a notice in writing to the Secretary of his intention to do so. If his membership is terminated by the Board pursuant to Article 28 herein before. If he is found guilty of an indictable offence by any Court of Law of Australia or of any Country the decision of the Courts of which are recognised as valid by the Australian Courts. If he is declared bankrupt or enters into a Deed of Assignment of Composition with his creditors generally pursuant to the provisions of any Bankruptcy Act in force for the time being. If he is declared of unsound mind or insane or he is dealt with in any way under the Law relating to mental health. If not being an Australian subject pays allegiance to a country with which Australia is at war. If he is expelled from the Club in accordance with the provisions of Article 96 hereinafter. Upon the death of a member If he has been found to have falsely completed his application for membership. Except in the case of voluntary resignation the Secretary shall forthwith notify in writing the member concerned of the termination of his membership and of the date as from which same became effective. Non-receipt of the said notice shall not invalidate the termination of membership. The termination of membership under any of the aforementioned circumstances shall not release the former member of his outstanding debts or obligations to the Club which had become due and payable prior to such termination nor shall release him or his liability to contribute a sum not exceeding twenty dollars ($20.00) as provided in clause 7 of the Memorandum of Association. Notwithstanding Article 31 the Board shall always have the right to reinstate a member whose membership has been terminated if on being requested in writing to reconsider the matter the Board is satisfied that there are special circumstances justifying such action.

Proceedings at General Meeting 40.

41. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

42.

43.

General Meetings 35.

36.

37.

38.

39

88 RMYC YEARBOOK 96

General Meetings of the club shall be held annually as required by the Code during the month of September at the premisis of the Club and at a date and time the Board may determine. The afore said General Meetings shall be called Annual Generel Meetings; all other General Meetings shall be called Extraordinary General Meetings. No business shall be transacted at any General Meeting unless a quorum of members is present at the time the meeting proceeds to business.Twenty members present at the time and having the right to vote shall be a quorum. Extraordinary General Meetings may be convened whenever the Board thinks fit or whenever it is required by at least three (3) members of the Board or by not less than five per centum (5%) members having the right to vote at a General Meeting. A Requisition for the Extraordinary General Meeting shall be made in writing to the Secretary stating the objects of the meeting and the Board shall within the fourteen (14) days thereafter cause notices of the meeting to be sent to each member entitled to vote. Such notices shall specify the general nature of business, the place at which

44.

45.

If within fifteen minutes of the time appointed for a General Meeting there is no quorum present, the meeting, if it has been convened on the requisition of members, shall be dissolved; in any other case, unless the Chairman, in his discretion, adjourns the meeting to another date and time, the meeting shall be adjourned for one half (1/2) hour at the same place.The members present at the adjourned meeting provided always that they are not less than ten (10) shall form a quorum in either of the aforementioned cases. The business of an Annual General Meeting shall be confined to the following: apologies; adoption of the Minutes of the last Annual General Meeting and any other prior general meetings of the Club business arising from Minutes; the presentation of the Board’s Annual Report; the presentation by the Honorary Treasurer of the Balance Sheet, Profit and Loss Accounts and the Auditor’s Report: the declaration of the ballot for the election of Flag Officers, Honorary Treasurer and other Board members; the appointment of auditors (should a vacancy occur) subject to Article 117; the transaction of such other business as may be transacted at an Annual General Meeting as special business in accordance with these Articles and not being business which is required by law to be transacted at an Extraordinary General Meeting. Any member entitled to attend and vote at a General Meeting may submit motions for a resolution by it provided that when a special notice is required by the Code such notice is lodged with the secretary not less than twenty eight (28) days prior to the date of the meetings and when the motion is intended to be moved as a special resolution not less than twenty-one (21) days prior to such date. Concerning motions involving special business a prior notice of not less than ten (10) days shall be adequate. All notices as above shall be signed by the proposer of same. Copies of intended motions lodged with the Secretary under Article 42 shall be given to each member entitled to attend and vote at the relevant meeting in the case of an ordinary resolution not less than fourteen (14) days prior to the date of such meeting and in the case of a Special Resolution not less than 21 days prior to the date of such meeting. Subject to the provisions of the Code relating to special resolutions and agreements for shorter notice, fourteen (14) days notice at least (exclusive of the day on which notice is served or deemed to be served and exclusive of the day on which notice is given) specifying the place the day and the hour of the meeting and in the case of special business, the general nature of that business shall be given to such persons as are entitled to receive such notice from the Club. The Commodore or in his absence the next in seniority Flag Officer shall preside at the General Meetings. If within fifteen (15) minutes from the time appointed for the meeting there is no Flag Officer present or being present is unwilling to preside there at the immediate predecessor of the incumbent Commodore or in his absence any former Commodore or former Flag Officer may be appointed by the meeting as the Chairman thereof.


46.

47.

(a) (b)

48.

49.

50.

51.

No member shall be entitled to vote at any General Meeting if any debts of whatsoever nature owing by him to the Club remain unpaid after the date upon which same were payable in accordance with the provisions of Article 24 hereinbefore. A resolution put to vote of a General Meeting shall be decided on show of hands unless a poll is (before or on the declaration of the result of the show of hands) demanded: by the Chairman, or by at least three members of the Meeting having the right to vote. Unless a poll is so demanded a declaration by the Chairman that a resolution has on show of hands been carried or carried unanimously or by any particular majority or lost in an entry to that effect in the book containing the minutes of the proceedings of the Club shall be conclusive evidence of such fact without proof of the number or of the proportion of the votes recorded in favour or against the resolution.The demand for a poll may be withdrawn. If a poll is duly demanded it shall be taken in such manner and either at once or after an interval or adjournment or otherwise as the Chairman directs and the result of the poll shall be a resolution of the Meeting at which the poll was demanded; but a poll demanded on the question of adjournment shall be taken forthwith. The demand for a poll shall not prevent the continuance of a meeting for the transaction of any business other than the question on which a poll has been demanded. In the case of equality of votes whether on a show of hands or on a poll the Chairman of the Meeting at which the show of hands takes place or at which the poll is demanded shall be entitled to a second or casting vote. Accurate minutes of the proceedings and of the resolutions passed at any General Meeting shall be kept by the Secretary and shall be signed by the Chairman of the next succeeding General Meeting and if purporting to be so signed shall be receivable as prima facie evidence of the matters stated in such minutes.

Board of Directors – its Office Bearers and their Eligibility 52.

53. (a) (b)

(c)

(d)

The Board of Directors shall consist of the Commodore, Vice Commodore, Rear Commodore and Honorary Treasurer as the Office Bearers thereof and of five (5) other members of whom three (3) shall be boatowner members and two (2) shall be general members. The qualifications for eligibility of the Office Bearers and of the other members of the Board shall be as follows: A candidate for Directorship must be a member of the Club for not less than five (5) years standing. A candidate for an Office Bearer Director with the exception of treasurer in addition to the qualification of paragraph (a) must have served on the Board for a full two (2) terms of office; and A candidate for the office of Flag Officer in addition to the qualifications of paragraphs(a) and (b) must be the sole owner of a vessel on the Register of Vessels. No Office Bearer of the Board or of any Committee appointed or ratified by the Board who served in the same office for a continuous period of five (5) years shall be eligible for re-election to the same office at the elections immediately following the completion of the same period of five (5) years.

Election of Board of Directors (including Office Bearers) 54.

55.

At every Annual General Meeting the Board of Directors and its Office Bearers shall be held.The resigning members of the Board shall be eligible for re-election. The Board may resolve for the voting to take place within not less than four (4) hours immediately preceding the time appointed for the commencement of the Annual General Meeting provided always that voting shall cease at

56.

57.

58.

59. 60.

61.

62.

63.

64.

65.

the time so appointed. Nominations shall close on a date and at a time to be fixed by the Board and all nominations shall be in the hands of the Secretary not later than such date and time. The Board shall, within seven (7) days from the date of fixing the date and time for the closing of nominations, appoint an Election Committee consisting of three (3) members, none of whom shall be a member of the Board or a candidate for election to the Board and one of whom shall be nominated by it as the Presiding Officer thereof. Such Committee shall be empowered to conduct the elections under its sole control and supervision including the right to determine the eligibility of the candidates in accordance with these Articles. Every candidate for election, provided he is eligible under these Articles must be nominated by two members having the right to vote at the elections as at the time of the nomination. No member shall be nominated as a candidate for more than one position on the Board. Every nomination must be submitted in writing, must be signed by the nominators and the candidate and must be accompanied by a short biography of the candidate of no more than thirty (30) words. The Secretary shall within forty-eight (48) hours from the nominations being closed caused to be posted on the Club’s Notice Board the names of the candidates, the positions to which they have been nominated and the names of their nominators. Such notice shall remain so posted until the conclusion of the elections. A similar notice together with each candidates biography, as above shall also be sent by the Secretary within seven (7) days from the closing date of nominations, to every member of the Club having the right to vote. If the number of candidates is equal to the number required to fill a position or positions the Chairman of the General Meeting shall declare the candidates nominated as duly elected for the respective positions. If the number of candidates is less than the number of the positions to be filled, the Chairman of the General Meeting shall declare as elected the candidates nominated for any particular position or positions and shall call upon the General Meeting to nominate and forthwith elect by show of hands or by a ballot (as the Meeting may determine) a member or members from those present and qualified for the position or positions to be filled. In the event of there being more candidates than are required for the number of the positions to be filled, elections shall be conducted by ballot for the position or positions as the case may be, which are contested by more than one candidate.The Secretary shall, if so requested by a candidate, appoint an independent facilitator to conduct the ballot. When a ballot is necessary the Secretary shall seven (7) days prior to the election date prepare or cause to be prepared ballot papers covering any or all contested positions which shall be defined in three (3) sections as follows: Office Bearer Candidates This section shall contain the positions of the Office Bearers to be filled and the names of the candidates for each position. Boatowner candidates This section shall contain the names of the boat-owning candidates General Member candidates This section shall contain the names of the General Member candidates. The names of the candidates in each section shall be set out in alphabetical order and those of the candidates who are members of the Board seeking re-election shall be marked with an asterisk. In front of each name shall be a square for voting purposes and at the top of the second and third section shall be stipulated the number of the RMYC YEARBOOK 97


66.

67.

68.

69.

70.

71.

72.

73.

74.

88 RMYC YEARBOOK 98

positions to be filled for that particular section. At the bottom of the ballot paper there shall be a note explaining the meaning of the asterisk and directing the members to record their votes by placing a cross or a tick in the square in front of the name of the candidate for whom they wish to vote and cautioning them that more or less votes than the number of positions to be filled shall render their ballot paper as regards the section to which it relates, informal. On or before the election time the Secretary shall furnish the Election Committee with a complete list in alphabetical order in triplicate of all the members who are entitled to attend and vote and with adequate ballot papers each of which the Secretary has initialed. In compiling the said list, the Secretary shall comply with the provisions of Article 46 concerning the members who have become disentitled to vote at a General Meeting. If for any reason a member is unable to be present in person to vote at the times provided for in Article 55 that member may make written application to the Secretary for an initialed ballot paper to the member and it shall be the responsibility of the member to return the ballot paper with his vote recorded on it to the Secretary prior to the time that voting shall cease in accordance with Article 55. Upon receipt of the ballot paper the Secretary shall hand it to the Presiding Officer of the Election Committee who will deposit it in the ballot box.The non receipt of a ballot paper by a member who has requested one to be sent to him or the non receipt by the Secretary of any ballot paper returned by any member shall not invalidate the election. The Presiding Officer shall counter-initial each ballot paper and he and his Committeemen shall hand one ballot paper to each of the members contained in the Secretary’s list of members entitled to vote. The completed ballot papers shall be placed by the members, in a sealed ballot box which shall remain under the control and supervision of the Election Committee until the time for the counting of the votes. As soon as practicable after the opening of the General Meeting the Chairman thereof shall have elected three scrutineers to assist the Election Committee in the counting of the votes ad upon the ballot box being opened by the Presiding Officer in the presence and sight of the Election committee and the scrutineers the counting of the votes shall commence. A ballot paper which contains more or less votes than the number of the positions to be filled for any particular section shall be regarded as informal only as regards that particular section. The decision of the Election Committee regarding any ambiguity or doubt as to the validity of the ballot paper or any section thereof shall be final. The results of the counting shall be reported by the Presiding Officer to the Chairman of the General Meeting who shall forthwith declare as elected the candidates who received the greater number of votes for each position to be filled. Any candidate or candidates who failed to be elected to a certain position by less than six (6) votes may demand a recounting of votes in which event the candidate or candidates who are deemed to have been elected to such position by receiving no more than five (5) votes over the number of votes received by the unsuccessful candidates, shall each have the right to appoint a scrutineer to attend at the recounting of votes by the Election Committee.The results of the recounting shall be reported by the Presiding Officer to the Chairman of the General Meeting who shall forthwith declare as elected the candidate or candidates as the case may be, who have received the larger number of votes for the position to be filled. In the event of two or more candidates receiving an equal number of votes entitling them to be elected to the same position or positions and the number of candidates required to fill such position or positions is less than the

75.

number of candidates who had received equal numbers of votes, the Election Committee shall conduct a second ballot in respect of such candidates. If the second ballot results again in an equality of votes or fails to determine the candidate or candidates to be elected for the position or positions the matter shall be determined by a draw of lots. At the conclusion of the elections the Election Committee shall place the ballot papers in a properly sealed envelope, and shall hand such envelope to the Secretary for safekeeping until he is otherwise directed by the Board.The Board may at any time after the expiration of one month from the date of the elections instruct the Secretary to destroy the ballot papers.

Vacancies in the Board of Directors 76. (a) (b)

(c) (d) (e)

(f) (g)

(h) (i)

77.

78.

79.

The position of any member of the Board shall become vacant if the member: resigns from the Board on his own accord by a notice in writing to the Secretary of his intention to do so. ceases to be a member of the Club on his own volition or by a termination or suspension of his membership pursuant to these Articles; being a Flag Officer is no longer qualified to retain such office become prohibited to be a Director of a company of Section 226 of the Code or by an order made under the Code; absents himself from the meetings of the Board for more than six (6) months during the term of his office, without the Board’s permission; becomes bankrupt or makes any arrangement or composition with his creditors generally becomes of unsound mind or a person whose person or estate is liable to be dealt with in any way under the Law relating to mental health; holds any office of profit under the Club, or; is directly or indirectly interested in any contract or proposed contract with the Club and does not disclose his interest to the Board as soon as practicable after the relevant facts have come to the Director’s knowledge. PROVIDED always that nothing in this paragraph shall effect the operation of Clause 3 of the Memorandum of Association of the Club. The Club in General Meeting may by an ordinary resolution of which special notice has been given remove any Office Bearer or other member of the Board before the expiration of the term of office and may by resolution appoint a qualified person in his stead; the person so appointed shall hold office until the next Annual General Meeting. Any vacancy created by virtue of the provisions of the foregoing Articles may be filled by the remaining members of the Board calling upon any member of the Club qualified for the position vacated to fill the same for the unexpired period of the then current term of office. The Board may continue to act although its number is reduced for any reason whatsoever provided that if at any time its number is reduced to below the majority of the total number of the Board, the continuing members shall only act for the purpose of filling up vacancies until the aforesaid majority is attained.

Proceedings of the Board of Directors 80.

81.

82.

The Board shall meet together at least once in each month for the dispatch of business adjourn or regulate its meeting as it thinks fit. A member of the Board may at any time, and the Secretary shall on the requisition of such member summon a meeting of the Board. The meetings of the Board shall be held at the Club’s premises and due notice of not less than two clear days specifying the day and the time of the meeting shall be given to each member thereof. The quorum at every meeting of the Board shall be the majority of the total Board as provided by Article 52 or such greater number as the Board may fix and unless such


83. 84.

85. (a) (b) (c)

86.

quorum of members is present no business shall be transacted at such meeting. The Commodore or in his absence the Flag Officer next in seniority shall be the Chairman of the Meeting. Subject to these Articles, questions arising at any meeting of the Board shall be decided by a majority of votes and a determination by a majority of the members of the Board present at the meeting shall for all purposes be deemed to be a determination of the Board. In the case of equality of votes the Chairman of the Meeting shall have a second or a casting vote. The Board shall cause minutes to be entered in the books provided for that purpose; of all appointments of officers and servants; of the names of the members of the Board present at the meeting; of all proceedings and resolutions passed at the meeting. Such minutes shall be signed by the Chairman of the meeting or by the Chairman of the next succeeding meeting and if purporting to be so signed shall be receivable as prima facie evidence of the matters started therein. A resolution signed by all the members of the Board shall be valid and effectual as if it has been passed at a meeting of the Board duly called and constituted. A telegram cablegram or facsimile message addressed to and received by the Club and purporting to be signed by a member of the Board shall for the purpose of this Article be deemed to be writing signed by such member. All acts done by any Meeting of the Board or of a Committee or by any person acting as a member of the Board or of a Committee shall, notwithstanding that it is afterwards discovered that there was some defect in the appointment of any such member of the Board or of a Committee or a person acting as aforesaid, or that the members of the Board or of a Committee or any of them were disqualified, be as valid as if every such person had been duly appointed and was qualified to be a member of the Board of Committee.

Just relax and enjoy the water

Powers and Duties of the Board of Directors 87.

88.

89. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) 90.

The business of the Club shall be managed by the Board of Directors which shall be the governing body of the Club.The Board shall have full power to do all things and acts as the Club could itself do which are not required or directly by the Memorandum and Articles or the Code or by any Statute to be done or exercised by the Club in General Meeting and which are not inconsistent with the Memorandum and Articles or with the provisions of the Code or those of any Statute or with any resolution or rule made from time to time by the Club in General Meeting, provided that any rule regulation or by-law of the Club made by the Board may be disallowed by the Club in General Meeting and provided further that no resolution or rule so made shall invalidate any prior act of the Board which would have been valid if such resolution or rule had not been passed or made. The Board unless so authorised by a special resolution of an Extraordinary General Meeting convened for that purpose shall have no power to purchase any real property or to sell lease mortgage or in any way or for any purpose whatsoever encumber or dispose of the Club’s real property or invest the Club’s funds with the exception of leasing of the Club’s facilities to members or investing the Club’s funds not immediately required for any other purpose on interest bearing deposits with Banking or Government guaranteed institutions. The duties of the Board shall be to ensure that: the affairs of the Club are properly and efficiently conducted the assets and interests of the Club are adequately protected. the financial position of the Club is maintained at a reasonably sound and stable level. the good name and reputation of the Club remains unsullied the resolutions and regulations passed by a General Meeting are promptly put into effect. the provisions of the Code and of any Statute applicable to Registered Clubs and those of the Memorandum and Articles of Association are strictly observed. For the more effective exercise of its power and performance of its duties the Board shall, without in any way limiting the generality of Articles 87 and 89 have the rights and powers more specifically set out hereunder.

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91.

92.

The Board may delegate any of its powers and duties (not being powers and duties required by the Code or by any Statute to be exercised or performed by the Directors of a Company) to any Committee or to any Member appointed by it or by a group of members under its authority as it considers fit but it shall in any event appoint or authorize and ratify the appointment of such Committees and delegate to them such powers and duties as it has been at all times heretofore the accepted practice of the Club to have appointed and delegated for the more effective conduct of its activities and the better attainment of its objects. Such mandatory appointments or ratification of appointments of Committees and delegation to them of powers and duties shall be made by the Board as its first

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RMYC YEARBOOK 99


(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

meeting following upon its election and shall be the following. THE MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE which shall consist of three members of the Board two of which shall be Flag Officers and the senior of which officers shall be the Chairman thereof.The functions of the Committee shall be such as are set out in Article 30 hereinbefore. THE HOUSE COMMITTEE which shall consist of the Vice Commodore as the Chairman thereof and a minimum of two (2) other members of the Board.The powers and duties of this Committee shall be to manage the affairs of the Clubhouse to keep the premises thereof and furniture, furnishings, plant and equipment therein in good condition and state of repair, to ensure that the services supplied to the members, their guests and the guests of the Club are of high standard and efficiency, to control the staff engaged for such services and make recommendations designed to improve the said services as it considers fit. THE MARINE COMMITTEE which shall consist of the Rear Commodore as the Chairman thereof and a minimum of two (2) other members of the Board.This Committee shall be in charge of the affairs of the Marina and its functions shall be to ensure that such premises and the equipment thereof or therein are adequately protected and maintained; that the services to the members who use same are efficiently conducted by the staff employed thereof and make such recommendations to the Board as it considers appropriate. THE FINANCE COMMITTEE which shall consist of the Treasurer as the Chairman thereof and a minimum of two (2) other members of the Board.The functions of this Committee shall be to devote its constant attention to the Club’s financial state and keep the Board at all times informed of same: to recommend to the board measures which in its opinion should be taken to enhance the Club’s finances; to submit to the Board every three (3) months an itemised statement of profit or loss of each section of the Club’s activities for the preceding three (3) months and cause such statement together with any resolutions which the Board may pass in relation thereto to be exhibited for a period of fourteen (14) days in a conspicuous position in the Club’s premises. THE SAFETY COMMITTEE which shall consist of the Rear Commodore as the Chairman thereof and three (3) other members, one of whom shall be appointed as the Chief Safety Officer.The duties of this Committee shall be to concentrate its attention to and ensure that all safety rules and regulations of the Maritime Services Board and those of every competent authority for the prevention of fires or other hazards are strictly adhered to at the Marina, or on board any vessel berthed or housed thereat or therein. In the performance of their duties as above the Committee members shall have the right to board and inspect any vessel berthed or housed thereat or therein. In the performance of their duties as above the Committee members shall have the right to board and inspect any vessel using the subject facilities without being responsible for trespassing.The Committee shall make to the Board whatever recommendations considered appropriate for the better protection of the Club’s or its members’ property and the safety of the members and that of their invitees. SOCIAL COMMITTEE.The Social Committee shall consist of two Board Members, the senior of which shall be the Chairman thereof and such number of other members as the Board may determine from time to time.

the provision contained in these Articles for regulating the meetings and the proceedings of the Board of Directors or the General Meetings of the Club so far as same are applicable thereto. Powers of the Board to Determine Charges and Other Obligations 95.

(a)

(b)

(c)

Disciplinary Powers of the Board 96.

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

General Provisions Concerning Committees 93.

94.

88 RMYC 100 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

All the aforementioned Committees or any committee which the Board may think fit to appoint shall be answerable to it at all times and shall strictly conform with any directions or conditions which the Board may give to or impose on them. The elections, the meetings and the proceedings of all Committees appointed by the Board or by its authority or by the Club in General Meeting shall be governed by

The Board in the performance of its duty to maintain the financial soundness and stability of the Club shall have the powers, from time to time, as the requirements of the Club may warrant – to determine or increase the license fees and rents of facilities licensed or rented to the members and/or impose charges in conjunction with such license fees or rents. to impose charges on services supplied to members in order to defray the expenses of or incidental to such services; and to levy per capita contributions from each member as may be required for the purposes of the Club provided that the total amount of such contributions shall not in any financial year exceed the amount of the annual subscription payable by members for that financial year. For the purpose of this paragraph, the levy payable by life members shall be proportionate to the annual subscription of the class to which they belonged prior to being conferred Life Membership and likewise the levy payable by the members whose annual subscription has been reduced by virtue of Article 18 shall be proportionate to that which is applicable to the Class to which they belong.The Board making such levy may exclude any class of members therefrom.

The Board for the purpose of ensuring the strict adherence by the members to the provisions of the Memorandum and Articles of Association or any rules, by-laws or regulations prescribed thereunder and for the purpose of preserving the good name and reputation of the Club and ensuring the smooth and unobstructed executing of its duties shall have disciplinary powers exercisable in the circumstances and in the manner following: On receiving a complaint or on becoming otherwise aware that a member: willfully infringes the provisions of the Memorandum and Articles of Association or any rules, by-laws or regulations made thereunder; or acts in a manner prejudicial or detrimental to the interests of the Club or in a manner obstructing the progress or effectiveness of the Board’s work; or conducts himself on the premises of the Club or in the precincts thereof or in functions or gatherings of people to which he attends on behalf of the Club or by virtue of his being a member of the Club, in the manner which reflects discredit to the Club or which is objectionable to other members or their guests or to his hosts; or ignores or defies any reasonable direction of the Board or its duly authorised officers or Committeemen or employees in the execution of their duties; or being a member of the Board of if a Committee is guilty of gross negligence of duty or of breach of confidence; may summon such member to appear before it in order to give an explanation, if any, of what is alleged against him, and if such explanation is unsatisfactory and not less than seven (7) of its members consider that the allegations against the member concerned are well founded, may in case of a minor offence, reprimand such member or reprimand and also fine him for an amount not exceeding that of his annual subscription as provided in Article 95(c) concerning the determination of levies or suspend the privileges of membership for such period as it thinks fit but not more than six (6) months. If however the aforesaid seven (7) members of the Board are of the opinion that the offence committed is of such gravity as to deserve a severe punishment involving his expulsion from the Club it shall adjourn the meeting


97.

98.

99.

dealing with the subject matter for a period of not less than fourteen (14) days in order to afford the member a further opportunity to explain or defend his conduct before a final decision is made. A notice in writing of at least seven (7) days shall thereupon be given to the member of the place, date and time of the meeting inviting him to attend thereat, if he so desired and once again either verbally or in writing offer an explanation in his defence. Such notice shall also state the intention of the Board to decide upon his punishment, shall reiterate the allegations made against him and shall draw his attention to his right to elect for his case to be dealt with by General Meeting of the Club instead of being dealt with by the Board. If the member fails to exercise his right of election as above by notice in writing delivered to the Secretary not less than twenty four (24) hours before the time appointed for the meeting and also fails to attend at the said meeting, a resolution of the Board carried unanimously at the meeting at which a quorum shall be not less than seven (7) members, of the guilt or innocence of the member and in the former case his expulsion from the Club shall be final and effective as from that date. In the event, however, of the accused member electing by a notice as aforesaid to have his case referred to a General Meeting of the Club for its decision, the Board shall at the earliest convenient time convene an Extraordinary General Meeting for that purpose. A resolution of such Extraordinary General Meeting carried by the vote of not less than three-fourths of the members present and having the right to vote shall be a final determination of the case, and if the member is found guilty, he shall be expelled from the Club. A member whose membership has been suspended by virtue of the provisions of the immediately preceding Article shall be deprived of all his rights, if any, he had and of all the benefits he theretofore enjoyed, shall be forbidden to enter the premises of the Club at any time during the period of the suspension of his membership but he shall however remain liable to fulfil all his financial obligations to the Club whether accrued or becoming owing during the said period. In either case of punishment the Secretary shall forthwith notify the member or the former member concerned of the decision of the Board or of the Extraordinary General Meeting, as the case may be, and of the date as from which same becomes effective. A member expelled from the Club under Article 96 or whose membership has been terminated under Article 31 shall not be entitled to a refund of his annual subscription or any other prepaid obligations, or any part thereof unless the Board or the Extraordinary General Meeting, as the case may be, shall otherwise decide.

Limitation of Appeals and Actions 100. No appeal whatsoever shall lie from the decision of the Board or from that of the Extraordinary General Meeting under Article 96, nor shall any member whose membership was terminated or suspended or who was expelled have any right of action or other remedy whatsoever against the Club, the Board or any member therefore or any officer or employee of the Club by reason of such suspension or expulsion or by reason of any act done or notice given or complaint made or caused to be done given or made resulting in or incidental to such termination, suspension or expulsion. Registration of Vessels 101. The Board shall maintain the Register of Vessels which shall show alongside the name of each vessel, a description of the vessel and the name in full of the owner or where there is more than one owner the name of each owner and the percentage of equity held in the vessel by each owner. For the Purposes of Article 53(c) a vessel shall be a power boat not less than seven (7) metres in length. 102. The Board shall have the power to remove from the Register of Vessels the name of the member or members

and the name of the vessel and have the latter removed from the berth, or mooring of the Club, if: (a) the exterior of the vessel has been allowed to deteriorate to such an extent as to present an unsightly appearance and render the vessel unworthy to wear or fly the insignia of the Club, provided however that the owner of same has been previously directed by the Marine Committee to rectify such condition and he has neglected to do so within a reasonable time. (b) the owner of the vessel who uses same for commercial purposes or as a means to derive personal gain or benefit and fails to give prior notification to the Secretary of the circumstances in which he proposes to use the vessel for commercial purposes or as a means to derive personal gain or benefit and provided that the boating facilities of the Club will not be used for commercial purposes of any nature and provided further that the Board may in its absolute discretion consider that such commercial use as is notified to the Secretary is detrimental to the Club or the rights and enjoyment of the facilities of the Club by any member and the Board may require such member to cease using the vessel in the manner notified. (c) the vessel fails to comply with the safety regulations of the Club. Guests of Members or of the Club 103. Any member can invite guests to the club provided they are not persons whose membership has been suspended or who have been expelled from the Club or persons who have been forbidden by the Board to enter the premises of the Club. 104. All guests of members must enter their names in full or their surnames and the initials of given names, their address and the date of that day in the guests book to be kept by the Club as required by the provisions of Section 30 (i) of the Registered Clubs Act 1976 (as amended).The Member who has invited the guest must also sign in the appropriate place of the said book. 105. The guests shall comply with any conditions or restrictions which the Board may from time to time impose concerning guests and the members on whose invitation they are allowed into the Club’s premises shall be responsible for the conduct of his guest whilst he remains on the premises or on the precincts thereof. Observance of the Liquor Act And Registered Clubs Act (as amended) 106. No alcoholic or spiritous liquors shall be supplied or sold on the premises of the Club to any person who is under the age of eighteen years nor to any guest unless he has complied with the provisions of article 104 and he is in the company of the member who has invited him to the Club. 107. No person under the age of eighteen years shall use or operate or be allowed to use and operate the Club’s poker machines nor shall enter or be allowed to enter into areas of the Club’s premises where liquor is supplied or sold, disposed or consumed or where poker machines are located except in the former case into such areas which are not ‘restricted areas’ within the meaning of Section 43 of the Registered Clubs Act. 108. The Board may make reciprocal arrangements with approved Clubs having objects altogether or partly similar to those of the Club and subject to any condition which the Board may impose in that respect the members of such Clubs shall be entitled to all the facilities and amenties of the Club without being required to be the guest or in the company of any particular member. Liquor shall not be sold, supplied or disposed of on the premises of the Club to any person other than a member except on the invitation and in the company of a member provided that this Article shall not apply in respect of the sale, supply or disposal of liquor to any person at a function in respect of which authority is granted to the Club under Section 23 (1)(b) of the Registered Clubs Act. 109. The Secretary of the Club shall furnish the Clerk of the RMYC YEARBOOK 101


Licensing and the District Licensing Inspector with copies of any amendments or alterations to the Memorandum and Articles of Association or to the By-laws of the Club duly certified by him as to their correctness with fourteen (14) days of such alterations or amendments being duly passed. Accounts and Audit 110. The Board shall cause correct accounts and books to be kept showing the financial affairs of the Club and the particulars usually shown in books of account of a like nature and without limiting the generality of this Article showing: (a) All sums of money received and expended by the Club and the matters in respect of which the receipt and expenditure takes place. (b) All sales and purchases of goods by the Club. (c) The assets and liabilities of the Club 111. The Books of Accounts shall be kept at the Registered Office of the Club or at such other place as the Board thinks fit and shall always be open to the inspection of the members of the board, or any other person authorised or permitted to do so by and under the Code. 112. The Board shall from time to time determine whether and to what extent and at what times and places and under what conditions the acounts and Books of the Club or any of them shall be open for the inspection of the members and no member not being a member of the Board shall have any right of inspecting any account or book or document of the Club except as conferred by the Code or authorised by the Board or by a resolution of General Meeting. 113. The financial year of the Club shall commence on the first day of December and end on the last day of November in each year. 114. The Board shall comply with the provisions of Part VI Division 2 of the Code and once every three (3) months cause to be prepared a Balance sheet and at the end of the Club’s financial year cause to be prepared an annual balance sheet and income and expenditure accounts made up to the end of the financial year which shall together with the report of the Board and the Auditor’s report be tabled before the Annual General Meeting of the Club as provided for in Article 119(c) hereinafter. 115. The aforesaid report of the Board shall include statements showing: (i) the amount written off for depreciation; (ii) the amount if any which the Board proposed to transfer to the reserve fund or funds of the Club: (iii) the number of members of each class registered in the Register of Members at the date of the preparation of the report; (iv) the names of the Members of the Board. 116. A copy of the Balance Sheet, Auditor’s Report and Income and Expenditure account accompanied by a copy of the report of the Board shall be posted to every member other than Honorary Members at least fourteen (14) clear days before the date of the General Meeting at which the said accounts and reports are to be presented. 117. Auditors shall be appointed and their duties regulated in accordance with the provisions of Part VI Division 3 of the Code. 118. Every account of the Board that is audited and approved by a General Meeting shall be conclusive except as regards any error discovered therein within three (3) months next after approval therof. Whenever any such error is discovered within that period, the account shall forthwith be corrected and thenceforth shall be conclusive. Honorary Treasurer 119. The Honorary Treasurer shall be elected to the Board of Directors as an office bearer thereof at the Annual General Meeting of the Club as hereinbefore provided and his duties shall be: (a) to promptly pay all accounts authorised by the Board; (b) to keep proper records and books of accounts showing the financial state of the Club and all particulars usually

88 RMYC 102 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

(c) (d)

shown in records and books of accounts of like nature or required to be shown therein by the Auditors or the General Meeting of the Club; to present to the Annual General Meeting of the club a duly audited Balance Sheet and Accounts; and in his capacity as the Chairman of the Finance Committee promptly comply with his duties – set out in Articles 92 (d).

Secretary 120. The Secretary or Secretary Manager shall in accordance with the Code be appointed by the Board for such term and at such remuneration and upon such conditions as it thinks fit and any Secretary so appointed may be removed by the Board. No person shall be appointed Secretary unless he is an ‘approved secretary’ or an ‘acting secretary’ within the meaning of sections 33 and 34 of the Registered Club’s Act 1976 as amended. Seal 121. The Board shall provide for the safe custody of the Seal which shall only be used by the authority of the Board or of a Committee authorised by the Board in that behalf, and every instrument to which the seal is affixed shall be signed by a member of the Board and shall be countersigned by the Secretary Manager or by a second member of the Board or by some other person appointed by the Board for the purpose. Notices 122. A Notice may be given by the Club to any member either personally or by sending it by post to him at his registered address or, if he has no registered address within the State, to the address if any, within the State supplied by him to the Club for the giving of notices to him. Where a notice is sent by post, service of the notice shall be deemed to be effected by properly addressing, prepaying and posting a letter containing the notice and to have been effected in the case of a notice of a meeting on the day after the date of its posting, and in any other case at the time at which the letter would be delivered in the ordinary course of post provided always that non-receipt of notice by or the accidental omission to give any notice to any of the members entitled thereto shall not invalidate any resolution passed by any meeting. Winding-up 123. The provision of Clause 8 of the Memorandum of Association relating to the winding-up or dissolution of the Club shall have effect and be observed as if the same were repeated in the Articles. Exoneration from Liability 124. No member of the Board or of a Committee or any any loss or damage to the Club occasioned by an oversight or by an error in judgement in the course of the execution of his duties, nor shall be held liable for any loss or damage to the Club occasioned by the wrongful or negligent acts of another such member or officer by reason of having in bona fide and for mere conformity with the provisions of these Articles joined with the latter in the receipt or payment of the Club’s funds or in the signing of any documents on behalf of or concerning the Club unless he himself is guilty of patent negligence or breach of duty or breach of trust. Indemnity 125. Every member of the Board, or of a Committee or the Secretary, or other officers of the Club or any person (whether an officer of the Club or not) shall be indemnified by the Club against any liability arising out of the execution of the duties of his office which is incurred by him in defending any proceedings whether civil or criminal in which judgment is given in his favour of which he is acquitted or in connection with any application under Section 535 of the Code in which relief is granted by the Court.


Member’s List Royal Motor Yacht Club Life Members The Hon Derek Freeman Kenneth Gresham

Robert Mirrington William Roche AM

Honorary Members Cpt. Jay Bannister Commodore Daryl Bates Ambassador Jeffrey Bleich Nicholas Christodoulidis Father Milton Chryssavgis Monsignor Anthony Doherty William Gain Rear Admiral Stephen Gilmore Jeffrey Goedecke Hon. Robert J. Hawke AC

Rabbi Mendel Kastel Captain Raymond Leggatt Commander RAC Macdonald AM RAN Niels Marquardt Jodi Marquardt Rear Admiral Rowan Moffitt Cr. Isabelle Shapiro Guido Stock Rear Admiral Davyd Thomas Vassilios Tolios

Boatowner Members Bruce Anderson Peter Bakaric John Barbouttis Peter Beswick Richard Blair John Brickwood Edward Cadry Peter Calligeros Paul Carr Michael Clarkson Nigel Corne Michael Courtney Bart Cummings Ian Dale Robert Danckert Steve David John David Henry Dawson-Damer Maryo Derofe Greg Duncan Larry Emdur Robert Fiani Michael Finkelstein Stephen Geissler Henry Gelbart Ken Gresham Matt Griffin Michael Hannan

George Harris Warren Hartman Cherie Hayes Keith Hills Spiro Isak Paul L’Estrange David Ledger Gary Levin Marcus Levy Richard Longes Kenneth Lowe Andrew Lyall David Maloney Michael Malouf Robbie Mayer James Mason Christopher Mitzi Joseph Jnr Morris Ron Murray AM John C Murray Jnr Mark Ninio Max Nottley Rory O’Moore Denis O’Neil Ashely Oates Harley Paroulakis Michael Pitt Adam Poche

Rick Poole Sheldon Pozniak Laurence Rodny Peter Satouris Richard Scarf Paul Scharrer Fritz Schroeder George Senes Tzion Shaoni Derek Simons Alan Slade Richard Spanos Michael Spartalis Jonathan Stretch Neil Sutton Jim Sweeny Michael Tess Bevan Towning Malcolm Turnbull Frank Venturi Peter Wadsworth Michael Warczak OAM Eric Wegman Peter Wiltshire Andrew Wily Adrian Yates Scott Young Michael Zammit

RMYC YEARBOOK 103


General Members Sophie Abbott Richard Abbott Russell Aboud Lucinda Aboud Stephen Aboud Nikki Abrahams Rick Abrahams Ian Adair John Adair Elaine Adair Tony Adam Edwin Adamek George Adler Rodney Adler Jessica Adler Francesca Agostini Patricia Akopiantz Anthony Alafaci Christopher Alcott Keith J. Aldridge Kate J. Aldridge Tracy Alexakis Lisa Allen Dianne Allen Matt Allen Ronald Allen Gillian Altman Angelique Andrews Mary-Anne Andrews Nick Andriotakis John Antico AM Garth Armstrong Mr.Warwick Armstrong Jim Aroney Theo Aroney Spiros Arvanitakis Michael Aspros Nicholas Assef Ronald Auswild Barbara Auswild Caroline Auswild Kim Auswild James Auswild James Auswild Danny Avidan Peter Bablis Maggie Bablis Marina Baillieu Alan Baines Nicole Bakaric Mitchell Baker Gary Baker Andrea Banks Mathew Banks Nicole Banks Melissa Banks Michael Barakat Lisa Barakat Antoinette Barbouttis Karen Barbouttis

88 RMYC 104 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

Angelo Barbouttis Lily Barbouttis Maria Barbouttis George Barbouttis OAM Thomas Barlow Lucinda Barlow Scott Barlow Joanna Barlow Alina Barlow Janet Barlow Jeremy Barlow Philip Bart Cleopatra Barta Steven Barta Tracey Bartholomew Sean Bartholomew Robin Barton Jonathan Bates Charles Bates Janette Beavis Leonie Bebington Gillian Becker Karl Beckman Larry Behrmann Emmanuel Bekiaris Marie Bekiaris Sarah-Eleni Bekiaris Anthony Bell Alan Bell Christopher Bell Cheryle Bell Melinda Bell Donald Bell Patricia Bellanto Marie-Louisa Belz Cely Benchoam Geraldine Bergmuller Joy Bernasconi Christopher Betar Peter Bettini Sally Betts Robert Biancardi Harvey Bierman Leah Bischoff Stacey Bishop Joseph Bitar Daniela Bitlan Mal Blackadder Steven Blake Pamela Blake Adam Blake Robert Blann Daniel Bloom Patty Bloom Michelle Blum Adrian Bo Joe Bongiorno Elizabeth Bongiorno Martin Border Victoria Bouchard

George Boukatos Mark Bouris John Bourne Judith Bourne Jeanette Bourne Alex Boyarsky Andrew Boyarsky Taryn Boyarsky Vera Boyarsky John Boyce John Boyd Zoe Boyd Jackie Boyer Marianne Boyer Adrian Boyer Simon Boyer David Boyer John Boyer Michael Boyer A.M. William Bracey Margaret Bracken Steve Bracken Marguerite Brady Peter Breed Joy Breed Colin Brenchley Peter Brent Anthony Breuer David Brickwood Sir Ronald Brierley Neil Broekhuizen Michelle Broinowski Catherine Brown Catherine Brown Darren Brown Charlie Brown-Avidan Aylie Brutman Cathryn Bryson Carole Buckeridge Melissa Burcher Stephen Burcher Deborah Burdett Graham Burdett Peter H. Burger Mark Burgess Wayne Burt George Buschman John Bush Joseph Butta Elizabeth Buttrose Edward Byrne Nicole Cadry Ari Cadry Helene Cadry Robert Cadry Eva Cadry Mark Cadry Jared Cadry Marly Calladine Simon Calleia


General Members Anna Calligeros Sacha Calligeros Robert Cameron Elizabeth Campbell Berry Campbell Joyce Campbell Marisa Campion Kate Cannon John Cannon Tomas Cannon-Murray Pamela Cannon-Murray Dennis Cardakaris John Caridad Matthew Carolan Eleni Carolan David Carr Elizabeth Carr Kim Carr India Carr Andrew Carr Clive Carroll Timothy Casey Anne Marie Casey Paul Castaldi Fabio Caviglia Pacifico Caviglia Perla Caviglia Daniel Challis Sarah Challis Shannon Chandler Niall Chang Mark Chapman Corinne Chareton-Schmidt Vittoria Cheung Rebecca Chin-Amies Fiona Christianakis Margot Christie Paul Christie Judith Chryssochoides Cindy Clark Gavin Clark Jane Clark David Clarke Claudine Clarke Lucy Clarke Timothy Clarke Katherine Clarkson Pierce Cody Toni Cody Michael Cole Matthew Coleman Mary Collakides Graham Collins Celine Collins Gillian Collins Victor Comino Chrissy Comino Dyan Comino Peter Comino Nicholas Confos

George Confos Irene Confos Bruce Connell Ron Conrad Stephen Conrad Peter Coombes Arthur Coorey Sheila Corne Julia Corne James Corne Shauna Corne Janet Correy Norman Correy Oliver Correy David Corrick Thomas Cosgrove Anna Cotroneo Christopher Coudounaris Antonia Coudounaris David Coulter Bryce Courtenay Bobbie Courtney Gregory Cowan Sandra Cowan Jack Cowin John Cox Robin Crawford Judith Crawford Joe Cross Robert Crossman Michael Cunningham Frank Currenti Oliver Curtis Greg Cusack Alexander Dahdah Kirsty Dahdah Kirsten Dale Grant Dale Brad Dale Saccha Dale Brett Dale Emma Dale Mark Dalgleish Terence Dalton Tanya Damianakis Theo Damianakis Andreas Dammann Patricia Danckert Jennifer Danckert Clive Daniels Kathryn Danza Stewart D’Arrietta Jo-Ann Davey Bruce Davey Donna Davey Braedon David John David Karen David Benjamin David Archie Davies

Cameron Davis Jennifer Davis Michele Davison Alexandra Dawson-Damer Edward DawsonDamer Michael Day Frank De Angeli Kazuko De Angeli Sonya Deale Dennis Deane Chris Dedes Michael Delaney Barry Dempsey Veronica Dempsey Daniel Derofe Alyssa Derofe Sally Devlin Darryn Devlin Sandra Di Bella Marilyn Di Bella Gillian Dibble David Dinte Judy Dinte Denise Dinte Michael Dinte Bart Doff Danny Doff Robert Drake Robert Drury OAM Marie Duchen Paul Duchen Glenda Duncan Julia Duncan Mathew Duncan Don Dunn Michael Dunn Robert Dussol Vicki Dwyer Stuart Eaton Udo Edlinger Rainer Ehrhardt Diana Eilert Zein El Hassan Nasser Elkordi Roy Ellis Robert Ellis Sylvie Emdur Julian Emery Judy Emery Gillian Evans Peter Evans Timothy Every-Burns Warwick Every-Burns Eugene Evgenikos Nicholas Falloon Donna Farkas George Farkas Tony Farrugia Sonia Fattal Amelia Fay RMYC YEARBOOK 105


General Members John Feitelson Philippa Fell Gordon Fell Ben Feller David Feller Christopher Fennell Neil Fergus Colin Fermanis Rosaline Fermanis Tess Fernan Trudy Fernan Grace Fernan John Fernan Simone Ferry Leila Fiedler Garry Filler Michael Finger Lauren Fink Bruce Fink Jacky Finkelstein Jessica Finkelstein Bernice Finkelstein Judah Finkelstein Charles Finkelstein Geoffrey Fisher Amanda Fisher Joanna Fisher Paul Fishlock Mark Fishwick Erin Flaherty Angela Fleming Donald Fletcher Pauline Fletcher Mark Flitcroft Craig Fogarty John Formosa Krystalla Foundas Jacqueline Frank Peter Frazis George Frazis Phyllis Freeman Roger Freeman Michael Fricker Michele Fricker Susan Fuller Irene Gaffney Basil Gariano Helen Gazal David Gazal Michael Gazal Jacklyn Gazal Nicholas Gazal Nabil Jnr. Gazal Richard Gazal Maud Gazal Nora Gazal Christine Gee Peter Geissler Mark Geissler Jordan Gelbart

88 RMYC 106 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

Ryan Oliver Gelbart Kim Gelbart Ann Genner Damian George JoAnne George Jane George Harrison George Philip George John Gleeson Alexia Gleeson Karen Glover Paul Gobits Eli Gold David Gold Charlotte Gold Ian Gold Jeffrey Gold Harold Gold Jill Gold Anton Goldman Barry Goldman Joanne Goldman Astrid Goncharoff David Gonski AO David Gooch Charles Goodman Patrick Goodman Barbara Goodman Manfred Gorshek John Gowing Malcolm Gracie Roberta Grand Umberto Grand Richard Granger Stephen Grant Joanne Grant Fabio Grassia Ventry Gray Alicia Gray Felicity Gray Louise Green Ruth Green Phillip Green Vivien Green Angela Greig Mark Greig Sara Gresham John Griffin Reg Grinberg Hessie Grossberg Manuel Guerrero Maria Guerrero Nihal Gupta Monica Gupta Michael Gutman Lachlan Gyde James Hall Daniel Hamieri James Hannan Deidre Hannan

David Hannan Angus Hannan Benjamin Hannan John Hannan Stephen Hannes Mary Harding Steve Haritos Tal Harpaz Peter Harris Emmanuel Harris Sophia Harris Ray Harris Therese Harris Angelique Harris Paul Harris Karen Harris Brian Harrisberg Jennifer Harrison Gai Hart-Hughes Rhonda Hartman Michael Hatsatouris Angelo Hatsatouris Peter Hatsatouris George Hatsatouris John Hatsatouris Tina Hatsatouris Christopher Hatzidis Alan Hawes Maribi Hay Donald Hay Amie Hayes Greg Hayes Evelyn Hegyesi Alexandra Hegyesi Gary Hendler Michael Hendler Chris Herbert Belinda Herbert Sally Herman Allan Heron Marcus Heron Nikola Heron Paul Heron Lisa Hickson Christel Higgins Cara Higgins Robert Hill Kylie Hilliar-Hayes Grant Hilliar-Hayes Martin Hills Narelle Hills Norman Hing Roy Hirschowitz Rachelle Hofbauer Daniel Hofbauer Lin Holland Rabbit Holland Dolores Holland Ivan Holland Alex Holland


General Members Fraser Hopkins RADM Anthony Horton Mark Howard Wayne Howse Gwendoline Hudson Lady Bonnie Humphreys Jan Hupfau William Hurley Leslie Hutchinson Anna Maria Hynes Julia Ingall Diane Ipkendanz Ruby Irani Ian Irvine Sue Irvine Theo Isak Faye Isak Connie Isakidis James Isakidis Georgia Isakidis Clive Isenberg Peter Ivany Anthony Jackson Gordon Jackson Teresa Jackson Ashok Jacob Dudley Jacobs Andre Jaku Anthea James Con James Maria James Jennifer James William Jamieson Jennifer Jamieson Hayley Jamieson William (jnr) Jamieson Norman Jamieson Verna Jamieson Steven Jarvin Alex Jarvis Maureen Jeanes Annie Jeffrey-Heron Joy Jenkins Samantha Jenkins Ashley Johnson Gregory Johnston Gregory Jones Kim Jones Eugenia Jonson John Jonson David Joseph Janine Joseph Tom Joseph Jack Joseph Daniel Joseph Christopher Joye Margaret Joye Stanley Kahn Raphael Kahn James Kaklamanis

Nicole Kallinicos Jenna Kallinicos Angela Kallinicos Brian Kandakji John Kannane Lynette Kannane Irene Karageorge George Karageorge Gregory Karedis Marguerite Kass Martin Kass Antoinette Katehos Robert Kaye Adam Kaye Michelle Kearney John Keith John Keith Vicki Kekatos Jerry Kekatos Arthur Kekatos Roxanne Kekatos Kate Kelly Lisa Kelly Fiona Kennedy Peter Kennedy Alana Kennedy Martha Kennedy John Kennedy Debra Kennedy John Kennerley Zoltan Keri Shahnaaz Kerslake Michael Kerslake Martin Khun Lucinda Khun Amanda Kiel James King Sean King Jeff King Murray King Leanne King Aileen King Duncan Kinnon Katelyn Kirwan Helen Kitas Anthony Knight Binda Knight Julian Knights Christopher Knoblanche Milenka Kolenda Constantine Kotis Madeline Koureas Chris Kourtis Stephen Kovacs Kathy Krits Nicholas Laletin Jnr John Lambros Lina Lamens Richard Lamport Ferne Lander

Michelle Landerer Leslie Landerer John Landerer Scott Lane Desmond Last Caroline Laws John Laws Judy Lazarus Kirk Lazarus Michael Lazarus David Leach John Leaver Paul Lederer Eva Lederer Alison Ledger Phillip Leigh Garry Lendich Pam Leon Sam Leon Garry Leonard Zoe Leonard John Levas Lewis Levi David Levin Roz Levin Jules Levin Philip Levinson Geoffrey Levy Brett Levy David Levy Elizabeth Lewin Walter Lewin Toni Lewis Marnie Lewis-Millar Elton Li Scott Lockley John Lockley Norma Lockley Elizabeth Longes Joanna Love Nathan Lowe Maree Lowe Justin Lowe David Lowinger Jodie Lowinger Steven Lowy Susan Lyall David Lyons Stuart Macdougall Skye Mackay James Mackay Kate Maclaren Grahame MacRae Ross MacRae Katherine Macrae Diane Maloney Kim Maloney William Malouf David W. Malouf Larissa Malouf

RMYC YEARBOOK 107


General Members Christine Malouf Ian Malouf Raelynn Malouf Amanda Malouf Brooke Malouf Greg Malouf Stephanie Malouf Gina Malouf Michelle Malouf James Malouf Jamie Malouf Sharon Malouf Craig Malouf Stella Mamasioulas Frank Mamasioulas George Manettas Susan Manfred John Mangos Michel Manietta Rick Manietta Mary Manning Christopher Manning Kerry Manolas Ian Mansell Yasmin Manttan Michael Manttan Jonathon Marchant Melinda Marish Steven Mark Allan Marmot John Marshall James Marshall Julie Martin Lewis Marton Simon Masnick Samantha Masnick Keith Masnick Lyn Matheson Jane Mathews Simone Mayer Darlene Mayer Ian Mayer Emma Maynard Murray McArdle Nicole McCann Michael McCann Mary McCarthy Stephen McCarthy Jacqueline McCormack Madaleine McCowan James McCowan Sylvia McCoy Sarah McDonnell Robert McGhee Andrew McGill Catherine McGill Gerry McGowan Adrian McGrath Peter McGrath Susan McGrath

88 RMYC 108 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

David McGrath Paul McGreal Margaret McGreal Angela McHugh Mark McInnes Kim Mckendrick Peter McKeon Raina McKeon Kate McKillop Abbey McKinnon Andrew McKinnon Bryan McMahon Michael McMahon John McNiven Sandra McPhee Karl McPhee Kent McPhee Maurice McPherson Bruce McWilliam Adam Medich Christopher Meehan Michaela Meehan Mathew Meerkin Nancy Melick OAM Joanna Mercurio Ellen Merer Enza Messina Mark Meyer Gary Mezei Peter Mezei Agnes Mezei Bambi Michael Andrew Michael Jan Michael Judd Michel Maree Middlemass Mark Mikolaitis Pascale Mikolaitis Adrian Miller Robert Miller Michael Miller Leonard Milner Augustus Minett Henry Minter Valerie Mirrington Kristy Mirzikinian Deke Miskin Stephen Mistilis John Mitakos John Mitchell Claudia Mitchell Kate Mitchell-Innes Dimity Mitsis George Mitsis Edwin Mok Fiona Moller-Spratt Kym Montgomery Mark Moran Mark Moreland Katherine Moreland

Victoria Moreland Robert Moreland Alexander Moreland Christina Mormanis Con Mormanis Lorraine Moroney Ronnie Morris Emmanuel Morris Asher Morris Kevin Moses Margaret Moses Alfred Moufarrige OAM Matthew Moy Susan Moy Denis Muddle David Mulham Clare Mulham Sarah Jane Mullan William Munday Vince Muriti Colleen Murphy Timothy Murphy Kerry Murray Iain Murray John Murray John W Murray Wendy Murray Kenneth Musgrove Jenny Muston Andrew Muston Lawrence Myers Loretta Nasa Lorna Nawran Deborah Neal Irena Nebenzahl Peter Neustadt Neville Newton Peter Newton Robert Nielson Leon Nikolaidis Alexander Nikolaidis Christopher Nikolaidis Doreen Nikolaidis Beryl Nimmo Conrad Nixon Neisha Noble David Nolan Christopher North Lois Notley Maurice Nowytarger Leon Nowytarger Jason M. Nowytarger Ariane Oates Barbara O’Brien Kim O’Connor Thomas O’Connor Jane O’Connor Adrian O’Connor Richard O’Connor Irene ODouard


General Members Philippe ODouard William O’Keeffe Charlotte O’Neil Rodney O’Neil Ned O’Neil Nicole O’Neil Colin O’Neil Garry O’Neil Janette O’Neil Theo Onisforou Bernadette O’Regan John O’Reilly Ricardo Orellana Peter Ortner Kevin O’Shea Chio Kiat Ow Patricia Owen Maria Pace Richard Page Robert Page Corina Paino May Pak Phil Paraggio Melinda Paridis Adriana Paridis Robert Paridis Michael Paroulakis Michael Parras Colin Michael Parras Tina Parras Colin Peter Parras Mahesh Patel Simon Paterson Amanda Paull Ross Paull James Peach The Hon Andrew Peacock Cyril Peel Kate Perkins Michelle Perry Samantha Perry Myrna Perry Edwina Petrie Harry Petropoulos Kathryn Petropoulos Alex Petropoulos Renee Petropoulos Charles Phillips Daniel Pitt Debra Pitt Anna Pitt Nicholas Pitt Anthony Pitt Timothy Pitt Patricia Pizem Wolfie Pizem OAM Peter Placek Melissa Poche Andrew Pointing Danielle Poli

Leslie Pongrass Tom Pongrass Leigh Pongrass Nicolas Pongrass Joanna Pongrass Craig Pontey Brendan Poole Amanda Poole Amanda Poole Nicholas Porter Ron Porter Brent Potts Catherine Poulden Teresa Pourpouras Brian Clifford Powell Corin Powell Jason Powell Carolyn Powell-Luciano Elizabeth Pozniak Debbie Pratt Martin Pratt Charles Pratten Kim Preece Valerie Preketes Angelo Preketes Andrew Price Jane Prout Terry Pullinger Adrian Purdie Janelle Quinnell Anne Radford Silvana Raftos James Raissis Bruce Rathie Barry Raymond Damien Rayner Bella Read Paul Reading Peter Redford Damien Reed Victoria Rees Daniel Regan Jonathon Regan Toni Regan Anne-Louise Reilly-Akers Peter Reismann Charalambos Revelas Joseph Ricci Umberta Ricci John Ricci John Richardson Judith Richardson Andrew Richardson Angus Richardson Martha Richardson George Riedel David Ritchie Diana Ritchie Stephen Roberts Amanda Jane Roberts

Robyn Roberts Andrew Roberts Andrea Roberts Peter Robinson Peter W R Robinson Evette Robinson-Moran Damian Roche Dominic Roche Robert Roden Margaret Roden Stan Rodgers Brad Rodgers Sara Roney William Roney Colin Rooke Jan Rooke Stuart Rose Bryan Rose Rachelle Rose Sean Rose Irina Rose Robert Rose AM Margaret Rose AM Pauline Rosenberg Justin Rosenberg Lance Rosenberg Nicoletta Rovis- Harrisson Roger Rowe Trevor Rowe Penny Rowland Robert Rowland The Hon. A Rowlands AO Toni Rozen Elliot Rusanow Brian Russell Robyn Russell Danni Russo Brett Ruth Lee Ruth Bryan Rutter Patrick Ryan Michael Ryan Louise Ryan Sally Ryan Peter Ryba Alan Rydge Lynne Rydge Richard Sackelariou Lance Sacks Gary Sadler Koula Salakas Peter Salakas Elizabeth Salakas Maurie Sallick John Sample Gillian Samuels William Sanderson Aja Marie Sandoval Chris Sanford Aldo Santamaria RMYC YEARBOOK 109


Christa Satouris Paul Satouris Maryanne Satouris Tiana Saunders Daphne Sauvage Nick Savas Elizabeth Savas Nick Scali Anthony J. Scali Yvonne Scali Donna Louise Scali Charles Scarf Thomas Scarf Andrew Scarf Katina Scarf Madelaine Scarf Vanessa Scarf Genevieve Scarf Simon Scarf Matthew Scarf Emily Scarf Damien Scarf David Scarf A.M. Pam Scharrer Nicole Scharrer Jonathan Scharrer Rachael Scharrer Victoria Scharrer Marjorie Scharrer Margit Schlag Tracey Schofield Fiona Schroeder Jerry Schwartz Debbie Schwartz Daniel Schwartz Laurence Schwartz Janine Schwartz Raymond Schwartz David Seargeant Peter Seargeant Christopher Seargeant Maria Sechos Barry Sechos Raymond Seidler Benita Senes Aaron Senes Inge Senes Georgina Senes Ben Senes Kane Senes Greg Shand Briar Shaoni Charles Shaw Karen Shaw Mark Sheldon Jessica Shepherd Maxwell Shepherd Lorraine Shine Valerie Shor Raymond Shorrocks Sandra Short James Shoulder Brett Shoulder

88 RMYC 110 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

Gideon Silverman Jacob Silverman Robert Simons Aidre Sinclair Gregory Sinclair Paul Sinclair Resham Singh Lanoma Singh Pradeep Singh Arthur Sinodinos Terri Sissian Angelo Sklavos Fiona Sklavos Anne Slade Lawrence Small Stephen Smart Rod Smart Donna Smith Hilarie Smith Anna Smith Kevin Smith Ian Smith Kate Smith Richard Smith Sandra Smorgan Barry Smorgon OAM Sabrina Snow Gavin Solomon David Solomon Jacqueline Solomon Harry Solomon Bruce Solomon Greg Solomon Gavin Solsky Rochelle Solsky Kate Sorrenti Vince Sorrenti Maria Spartalis Karen Spartalis Maxwell Spartalis Chloe Spartalis Marie Spies Henry Spira Jacques Spira OAM Assoc. Phillip Spratt Grace Spyrou Fionna Stack Paul Stack Justice Conrad Staff Karen Staines Daniel Stang Marc Stang Maurie Stang Vivien Stang Jonathan Stanley Rachael Starr Phillip Staub Sarina Stavrides Emma Steel Robert Steel Lee Steel Timothy Steel Wendy Steffensen

Peter Stepanek Helen Stevens Maria Stevens Gary Stevenson Gregory Stewart Georgia Stojanovic Francene Storie Phillip Stricker Zalman Strulovici Josephine Sukkar Antony Sukkar Joshua Susskind Warwick Susskind Angus Suttie Scott Sutton Ben Sutton Katherine Swain Charles Sweeney QC John Sweeny Brad Sweeny Jonathan Sweet Stephen Symond James Symond John Symond AM Sandi Szangolies John Szangolies Frank Tagg Sally Tagg Joanne Tait Joseph Talo Ann-Marie Tatham Grant Taylor Brett Tennant Michael Teplitsky Nanette Theakstone Steven Theakstone Trevor Thiele Clive Thomas Kathryn Thompson Graeme Thompson Joy Thompson Gabrielle Thompson Neil Thompson Andrew Thompson James Thompson Suellen Thompson Benadict Tilley Francesca Tilley Janelle Tilley Simon Tilley Warren Tisdale Colleen Tobias Justice Murray Tobias Ilana Tockar Robert Tockar Marshall Tockar Nicole Tockar Martin Tsang Valerie Tsoukaris Aidan Tudehope David Tudehope Robert Turbiarz Susan Turbiarz


321311A RHS_Adit Marine | 1738 HIGHRES.pdf

Ronald Tyley Sir. William Tyree Terry Tzaneros Arthur Tzaneros Peter Van Der Sleeson Peter Van Wyhe Katrina Vanstone Simon Vanstone Christopher Vass Sean Venturi James Vicars Jane Vicars Allan Boyd Vidor Ervin Hugo Vidor AM Peter Vogliotti Alexander von Kotze Theo Vourakis Sally Wade Anne Wadsworth Alicia Wadsworth Lucy Wadsworth Samantha Wagner Diana Wainstein Alain Waitsman Tetsuya Wakuda John Walker Langley Walker Bruce Wallis Beverley Walsh Robert Walton Victoria Walton Carlah Walton Jacqueline Warat Steve Warczak Paul Warren Trent Washington Mike Watanabe Ryan Watsford Riki Watsford Graham Watson Margaret Watson Peter Waud Kristen Webster Neil Webster Walter Wedderburn Aileen Wedderburn Fiona Wedderburn Philip Wedderburn Peter Weinert Anita Weinert Geoff Weir Brendon Whalan Andrew Wheeler Karel Wheen Lisa Whelan Christopher Whelan Glenda Whipps Lola Whipps Camilla White John Whitehead Robert M. Whyte Neil Wickenden Richard Wild

Meg Wild Rosemary Wilkinson Deborah Willett Gregory Willett Paul Williams Nicole Williams Leslie Williams Karen Williams Gai Williams Suzanne Williams Vanessa Williams Robert Wilson Brian Wilson Sue Wily Kerrie Winning John Winning Karen Winton Andrew Winton Aub Wise Eric Wohl Phillip Wolanski AM Albert Wong Wilson Wong Courtney Wong Scott Wotherspoon Susan Wynne Brenton Yates Matthew Yencken David Yiend Stewart Young Clovis Young Gibson Young MBE Wing Yuen Michael Zacharia Kim Zacharia Julie Zamel Daniel Zammit Gail Zammit Teresa Zamora Virginia Zanarini Jane Zarfati Fabio Zarfati Jean Ziade Derek Zillman Michelle Zillman Nick Zissis Phillip Zoldan David Zylstra Philip Zylstra Lisa Zylstra

1

24/08/11

8:52 AM

Fresh water flushing systems for inboard motor heat exchangers

For a small fraction of the value of your engine, you can install an Adit Marine fresh water inlet device to protect and extend the life of your inboard motor’s heat excahngers.

Save your $$$ and the environment – no harsh chemicals required for repeated cleaning;

– requirement for heat exchanger removal and cleaning greatly reduced – cost saving; – reduces the deterioration of zinc anodes, reducing zinc released to environment; – allows power plants to be test run while vessel is on hard stand;

– quality 316 stainless steel on salt side of the system and on external Inlet Basin.

For all enquiries contact Greg Phone: 0412 442 087 Email: greg@aditmarine.com.au

www.aditmarine.com.au RMYC YEARBOOK 111


Honour Roll of Flag Officers

88 RMYC 112 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

^ Denotes Life Member

* Denotes Foundation Member

Season

Commodore

Vice-Commodore

Rear-Commodore

1905-06

^* Phillip Mitchell

Geo. Read

Frank Albert

1906-07

^* Phillip Mitchell

Frank Albert

Fred Empson

1907-08

^* Phillip Mitchell

Frank Albert

Fred Empson

1908-09

^*Phillip Mitchell

Fred Empson

J.B. Holdsworth

1909

^* Phillip Mitchell

W.E. Adams

S. Arnott

1910

* S. Arnott

W.E. Adams

W.C. Crawford

1910-11

* S. Arnott

P.B. Reaney

J.A. Ingham

1911-12

* S. Arnott

L.J. Davies

Frank Saunders

1912-13

^* Frank Albert

J.A. Ingham

R. Louat

1913-14

^* Frank Albert

L.J. Davies

R. Louat

1914-15

^* Frank Albert

Frank Saunders

R. Louat

1915-16

^* Frank Albert

G.S. Purssey

C.P. Cohen

1916-17

^* Frank Albert

G.S. Purssey

C.P. Cohen

1917-18

^* Frank Albert

G.S. Purssey

C.P. Cohen

J. Milne (acting)

1918-19

^* Frank Albert

G.S. Purssey

J. Milne

1919-20

^* Frank Albert

G.S. Purssey

J. Milne

1920-21

* J. Milne

J. Spencer-Nolan

C.A. Copeland

1921-22

* J. Milne

C.A. Copeland

A.A. Allan

1922-23

C.A. Copeland

E.F. Wilks

C.E. McIntosh

1923-24

C.A. Copeland

E.F. Wilks

S.G. Littlejohn

1924-25

G. Weymouth

S.G. Littlejohn

P.A. McIntosh

1925-26

G. Weymouth

S.F. Doyle

P.A. McIntosh

1926-27

* S.F. Doyle

J.F. Jackson

R. Walder

1927-28

* S.F. Doyle

R. Walder

Bradford Potter

1928-29

* S.F. Doyle

R. Walder

C. Jacobs

1929-30

* S.F. Doyle

R. Walder

H. McEvoy

1930-31

* S.F. Doyle

C. Jacobs

Geo. Marner

1931-32

C. Jacobs

Geo. Marner

Alexis Albert

1932-33

C. Jacobs

S.F. Doyle

Alexis Albert

1933-34

S.F. Doyle

Bernard Bayley

Alexis Albert

1934-35

Bernard Bayley

Victor Heine

W.D. Lawson

Victor Heine

W.D. Lawson

C.P. White

1935-36

C.P. White

T.W. Green

E. Milburn

1936-37

C.P. White

F. Harris

R. Vaughan

1937-38

W.D. Lawson

J.S. Bruce

F. Pointing

1938-39

W.D. Lawson

E.G. Glass

H.C. Bowden

1939-40

A.S. McDonald

J.S. Bruce

S.L. Tyler

1940-41

A.S. McDonald

S.L. Tyler

W.G. Marshall

1941-42

A.S. McDonald

S.L. Tyler

W.G. Marshall

1942-43

A.S. McDonald

S.L. Tyler

W.G. Marshall


^ Denotes Life Member Season Commodore

* Denotes Foundation Member Vice-Commodore Rear-Commodore

1943-44

A.S. McDonald

S.L. Tyler

W.G. Marshall

1944-45

A.S. McDonald

S.L. Tyler

W.G. Marshall

1945-46

A.S. McDonald

S.L. Tyler

W.G. Marshall

1946-47

S.L. Tyler

F. Harris

N.J. Suckling

1947-48

F. Harris

N.J. Suckling

A.B. Pickering

1948-49

F. Harris

N.J. Suckling

A.B. Pickering

1949-50

N.J. Suckling

H.C. Vaughan

M. Herford

1950-51

N.J. Suckling

H.C. Vaughan

S. Oldfield

1950-51

N.J. Suckling (resigned)

H.C. Vaughan

1950-51

H.C. Vaughan

S. Oldfield

T.A. Field

1951-52

H.C. Vaughan

R. Allan

B. Bayley

1952-53

H.C. Vaughan

T.A. Field

L.A. Bartlett

E.M. Woods

1953-54

H.C. Vaughan

T.A. Field

F.G. Lender

1954-55

F.G. Lender

G.D. Elliott (resigned)

N.C. Hughes

1955-56

F.G. Lender

N.C. Hughes

S. Bussell

1956-57

F.G. Lender

G.D. Lawson

A. Cousins

1957-58

* G.D. Lawson

A. Cousins

Malcolm Campbell

1958-59

* F.G. Lender

A. Cousins

R.L. Wills

1959-60

* F.G. Lender

R.L. Wills (resigned)

F.G. Harvie

F.G. Harvie

A.F. Bluett

1960-61

* F.G. Harvie

D.E. Barwick

R. Cant

1961-62

* F.G. Harvie

A.J. Anderson

R.Cant

1963-64

* F.G. Harvie

A.J. Anderson

A.I. McRae

1963-64

* A.J. Anderson

A.I. McRae (resigned)

H.H. Barton

P.L. Maine

1964-65

* A.J. Anderson

P.L. Maine

H.C. Bowden

1965-66

* P.L. Maine

R.W. Auswild

H.C. Bowden

1965-66

* R.W. Auswild

M.F. Herford

H.C. Bowden

1966-67

* R.W. Auswild

M.F. Herford

H.C. Bowden

1966-67

* R.W. Auswild

E. Sunman

H.C. Bowden

1967-68

* R.W. Auswild

E. Sunman

H.C. Bowden

1968-69

* H.C. Bowden

P.H. Ports

H.E. Davis

1969-70

* H.C. Bowden

P.H. Ports (resigned)

R.J. Coshott

M.R. Murphy

1970-71

M.R. Murphy (resigned)

* A.J. Anderson

R.J. Coshott

A.W. Titterton

1971-72

R.J. Coshott

R.H. Barton

P.R. Gardiner

1972-73

R.J. Coshott

R.H. Barton

P.R. Gardiner

1972-73

* F.G. Harvie

R.W. Mirrington

P.J.T. Swain

1973-74

* F.G. Harvie

R.W. Mirrington

P.J.T. Swain

RMYC YEARBOOK 113


Honour Roll of Flag Officers (cont.)

88 RMYC 114 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

^ Denotes Life Member Season Commodore

* Denotes Foundation Member Vice-Commodore Rear-Commodore

1974-75

* R.W. Mirrington

M.G. Barbouttis

P.J.T. Swain

1975-76

* R.W. Mirrington

M.G. Barbouttis

P.J.T. Swain

1976-77

* M.G. Barbouttis

P.J.T. Swain

G.P. Calligeros

1977-78

* M.G. Barbouttis

P.J.T. Swain

G.P. Calligeros

1978-79

* R.W. Mirrington

G.P. Calligeros

G. Charlton

1979-80

* R.W. Mirrington

G.P. Calligeros

G. Charlton

1980-81

* G.P. Calligeros

W. Anderson

G. Charlton

1981-82

* G.P. Calligeros

R.W. Aston

J. Middlemass

1982-83

R.W. Aston

J. Middlemass

O.B. McGeachie

1983-84

R.W. Aston

D.F. Bell

O.B. McGeachie

1984-85

W. Anderson

R. Mirrington

O.B. McGeachie

1985-86

W. Anderson

R.T. King

O.B. McGeachie

1986-87

D.F. Bell

R.H. Roden

O.B. McGeachie

1987-88

R.T. King

M. Manchee

J. Baker

1988-89

R.T. King

M. Manchee

J. Baker

1989-90

J. Baker

P. Paraggio

E. Adamek

1990-91

J. Baker

P. Paraggio

J. Davis

1991-92

A. Dunn

P. Paraggio

J. Davis

1992-93

A. Dunn

J. Auswild

E. Adamek

1993-94

R. Roden

E. Adamek

J. Davis

1994-95

R. Roden

J. Barbouttis

D. Freeman

1995-96

J.M. Barbouttis

E. Adamek

D. Freeman

1996-97

J.M. Barbouttis

E. Adamek

D. Freeman

1997-98

J.M. Barbouttis

W.J. Hartman

D. Freeman

1998-99

J.M. Barbouttis

M. Tess

D. Freeman

1999-2000

J.M. Barbouttis

K. Gresham

M. Tess

2000-01

K. Gresham

M. Tess

N. Corne

2001-03

J.M. Barbouttis

N. Corne

M. Tess

2003-04

J.M. Barbouttis

N. Corne

S. Isakidis

2004-06

J.M. Barbouttis

M. Tess

S. Isakidis

2006-07

M. Tess

J.M. Barbouttis

S. Isakidis

2007-09

J.M. Barbouttis

M.J. Courtney

M. Tess

2009-11

J.M. Barbouttis

M.J. Courtney

M. Tess

2011-12

J.M. Barbouttis M.J. Courtney

I.W. Dale


Royal Motor Yacht Club Uniforms and Flags Club Crest

The crest of the Club shall be a badge formed to an oval around which shall be the words ‘ROYAL MOTOR YACHT CLUB OF NSW’ in the centre of which there shall be a fouled anchor, a propeller and the Club Pennant superimposed upon the inner oval. Surmounting the oval shall be the Royal Crown of the day. This crest shall be the Club’s Crest, seal and blazer pocket.

Uniforms Day Uniforms The uniform shall be a dark blue, double‑breasted coat (Reefer Jacket) which shall have four Club embossed (dark) buttons on each side, white shirt and black tie, long white or cream trousers, white shoes and socks, white cap cover. The dark uniform shall be a dark blue, double breasted coat (Reefer Jacket) which shall have four Club embossed (dark) buttons on each side, white shirt and black tie, mid‑grey trousers, black shoes and socks, black cap. White day uniform shall be white shirt (open neck and short sleeves) with shoulder epaulettes as elsewhere described, white shorts, long white socks and shoes, white cap, optional long white or cream trousers. Dress Uniform The Evening Dress Uniforms shall be either white, cream or black Mess jacket with black bow tie and black trousers, black shoes and socks. The white or cream mess jacket shall have two gilt RMYC buttons on either side and fastened centre with two jigger buttons, and epaulettes shall be worn on the shoulder, as provided elsewhere. The black mess jacket shall have no epaulettes, but gold braid shall be worn on the sleeves as elsewhere provided and three gilt RMYC buttons fastened centre with two jigger buttons. White cap cover to be worn. White or black vest or cummerbund optional. Lounge Uniform The Lounge Uniform shall be a dark navy, singlebreasted blazer, with pocket badge described elsewhere, mid‑grey trousers, black shoes and socks. Club Cap The Club Cap shall consist of a naval cap with Club badge. Club Cap Badge The Badge of the RMYC shall be a fouled anchor, with the letters RMYC across it, surrounded by a laurel wreath and surmounted by the Royal Crown of the day. The badge to be worked in gold. Club Pocket Badge The Badge of the RMYC shall not exceed 65mm x 40mm. The inner oval formed by two gold ropes (one large and one small) shall be embroidered “ROYAL MOTOR YACHT CLUB OF NSW” in blue on a white background. The inner oval shall be a gold background on which shall be a fouled anchor the full size of the inner oval and superimposed on the anchor shall be the Club’s pennant below which shall be a propeller. The Pennant shall be as described elsewhere, the anchor and propeller shall be in gold bullion. The

Royal Crown of the day shall be superimposed upon the oval at the top centre in bullion. Club Tie The official tie of the Club shall be a royal blue tie on which shall be the Crown of the day above the letters RMYC flanked by two diagonal stripes, red over gold. Officers’ Uniform The Flag Officers’ uniform shall differ only from the above in the following manner: • The Commodore of the parent Club shall have four 10mm black bands on each sleeve. The top band with a small loop. The Vice‑Commodore shall have two 10mm black bands. The top band with a small loop. • Rear Commodore shall have one 10mm black band. Such band shall have a small loop. • The Honorary Treasurer and Honorary Race Secretary shall have on 7mm black bands, with one rope band above it, with a small loop in rope band. • The Honorary Social Secretary shall wear one 7mm black band with one black rope band above it. No loop. Directors shall each wear one 7mm black band. • On dark uniforms, the black bands are to be worn on each sleeve, the bottom band to be worn 65mm from the sleeve end and to be placed 10mm apart. • The buttons to be worn on dark uniforms shall be black RMYC embossed buttons. • Past Commodores of the parent club shall wear four 10mm black bands. No loop. Epaulettes The epaulettes to be worn shall be: • The epaulette itself shall be 130mm x 50mm, to be cut to a point at the collar and fastened with a small gilt RMYC embossed button. The bands to be worn are 7mm gold, spaced 10mm apart, the first band to be 13mm from the shoulder end of the epaulette. • The gold bands and rope and loops are to be the same size for each Officer as worn on the sleeve of the dark uniform, the first band to be 13mm from the shoulder end of the epaulette. Uniforms for Branch Officers and Members The uniform shall be the same as that worn by the Parent Club Officers in each case, excepting that of the Branch Commodore, who shall have three black bands with a loop on the top band, and in addition the designation of such Branch shall be distinguished by a 13mm black letter worn on each sleeve within the loop. In the case of white uniforms, the letter is to be worn on each epaulette, 13mm in size below all other designations which must match in each case. The letter for the Toronto Branch is ‘T’, Broken Bay ‘B’, Port Hacking ‘H’. All Club Officials should wear their uniforms at all Club functions. Branch Members shall be distinguished by a 13mm black Branch designation letter 90mm up from the sleeve end. Branch Members shall at all times wear their designation. Past Commodores shall wear three black bands on sleeve of dark uniform and the same number on epaulettes, but with no loop.

RMYC YEARBOOK 115


Registered Cruiser and Power Boat Owners Registered Cruiser and Power Boat Owner Members of the Club shall be entitled to wear a small black fouled anchor on each lapel of the reefer jacket and black mess jacket and a gilt anchor on the epaulettes. Club Flags All small ships are now permitted to fly either the Australian blue or red ensign and for those RMYC vessels authorised by Admiralty Warrant prior to 1981 the Blue Ensign of Her Majesty’s Fleet duly defaced may still be flown until such time as the United Kingdom Parliament amends the Legislation withdrawing such warrants. Club Pennant (may be worn by all Members) The Club Pennant shall have a blue field with a Royal Crown in the centre of two gold stripes, one horizontal and one vertical. Such centre to be one‑third the length of the Pennant from the mast. The width of the gold stripes shall be one‑fifth of the width of the Pennant at the mast. The Pennant shall be worn at the masthead on cruisers or on forward jack staff. Club Burgee (to be worn by Flag Officers and Past Commodores ONLY) The Club Burgee shall be a square flag with a swallow tail. Such flag shall have a blue field with two gold stripes, one horizontal and one vertical crossing in the centre of the square and surmounted with a Royal Crown in the centre of the cross. The stripes to be one fifth the width of the Burgee. The Burgee shall be worn at the masthead or jackstaff in lieu of the Pennant where applicable. Flag Officers’ Flags The Commodore’s Flag shall be the Club Burgee. The Vice‑Commodore’s Flag, a similar Burgee, with one gold ball in the upper canton, nearest the mast. The Rear Commodore’s Flag, a similar Burgee, with two gold balls in the upper canton in the balls to be placed horizontally nearest the mast. Branch Flag Officers‘ Flags The Flag Officers’ flags of the Branch Club shall be the same as the Parent Flag, except that the Club letter shall be designated in the lower canton, nearest the mast. No Flag Officers’ flags shall be worn on any vessel unless such Officer or owner is on board. Flag Officers shall always fly their Flags when aboard their vessels. The Past Commodore’s Flag (Parent Club and all Branches) shall be the club Burgee. Parent Past Commodores with four horizontal straight bars in the upper canton nearest the mast and three horizontal straight bars in the upper canton in the case of the Branch Ex‑Commodore.

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By‑laws governing Marina and Moorings 1.

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88 RMYC 116 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

The licence shall be personal and may not be assigned by the Boatowner Member(s) and does not confer on the Boatowner Member(s) any interest in the marina berth or mooring. The legal possession control and custody of the Vessel shall at all times be in the Boatowner Member(s) and no bailment or assignment of the Vessel to the Club is hereby granted or created, subject however to the further specific provisions herein below. The Vessel is located at or on the berth or mooring entirely at the risk of the Boatowner Member(s) and at all times shall remain at the risk of the Boatowner Member(s) and the Club shall not either directly or vicariously nor shall any servant agent or employee of the Club be liable in negligence or otherwise for any damage to or theft or loss of the Vessel or any tackle, goods, gear, machinery or other property thereon no matter how or from what cause such loss or damage may arise or occur including (but without limiting the generality of the foregoing) loss or damage caused by

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the use or removal of the Vessel by any person not authorised by the Boatowner Member(s) to so use or remove it whether such use or removal shall be permitted by the Club or not. The Vessel shall comply with the safety requirements as may be prescribed from time to time by the Board of the Club and upon written notice being given in each year of the licence the Boatowner Member(s) agrees to present the Vessel to the Rear Commodore of the Club (or his duly appointed delegate) for inspection to confirm whether the Vessel complies with the said safety requirements. If the Vessel does not meet the safety requirements prescribed for it the Boatowner Member(s) shall have one (1) month to comply with such safety requirements and failure to comply with such notice shall render the Boatowner Member(s) in default of this Licence and this Licence brought to an end. The Club shall not either directly or vicariously nor shall any of its servants, agents, employees or invitees be liable in negligence or otherwise for any injury (other than the liability of the Club for provable negligence directly causing personal injury) loss or damage sustained or suffered by the Boatowner Member(s) or by the Boatowner Member(s)’s servants, agents or invitees at the berth or mooring whether on the Vessel or not, or on or adjacent to the marina no matter how or from what cause such loss or damage may arise or occur. The Boatowner Member(s) shall at all times steer manage and control the Vessel and property theron so as not to cause injury to any person and damage or cause to be damaged the property of the Club or its members, servants, agents or invitees or of any other persons and in particular shall avoid damage to the marina or any mooring or other equipment or any other vessel thereat or thereon. The Boatowner Member(s) shall at all times maintain and keep current for public and other legal liability an insurance policy in the Boatowner Member(s)’s own name(s) indemnifying and otherwise covering the Vessel and persons using the Vessel and the relevant facilities of the Club for, inter alia, third party property and personal damages for a sum of not less than $10,000,000.00 (ten million dollars) per category of risk and fully comprehensive insurance. Whilst at the berth or mooring no person shall stay overnight on board the Vessel for more than three (3) consecutive days nor more than six (6) days in any one month. The Boatowner Member(s) shall at all times comply with the requirements of the relevant authorities and in particular shall not dispose of sewage refuse or garbage into Sydney Harbour and the Boatowner Member(s) shall not carry or permit to be carried on any, business activity on the Vessel while at the berth or mooring or in the precincts of the marina or mooring except at the direction of or with the consent of the Board of the Club first hand and obtained in writing and no Vessel other than the Boatowner Member(s)’s Registered Vessel shall use the said berth or mooring so allocated. Only the Boatowner Member(s) and his/her duly signed in guests shall use and go upon the marina or mooring. Any other person shall obtain the prior authorisation of a proper officer of the Club. The Boatowner Member(s) shall be responsible for and shall pay for all ropes which shall be provided by the Club to moor the Vessel and shall be responsible for the adequacy, sufficiency and condition of same. The Boatowner Member(s) shall not bring onto and/or affix to the allocated berth any item of whatsoever nature or kind without the written authorisation of the Club. Any Boatowner Member(s) whose Vessel is absent from their allocated pen or mooring for a period longer than three (3) months without the Board of the Club’s


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written permission shall be obliged to give reasons why their berth or mooring should not be declared vacant and this Licence be at an end. The Vessel may only be moved or removed from the berth/mooring by the Boatowner Member(s) or persons authorised by the Boatowner Member(s); or by a servant agent or employee of the Club if the Club or such servant agent or employee of the Club in its or his absolute discretion decides. In the event of the Boatowner Member(s) requiring any servant agent or employee of the Club to move the Vessel or in the event of a servant agent or employee of the Club moving or removing the Vessel by virtue of the exercise of its or his absolute discretion as aforesaid or pursuant to Clause 14 or Clause 15 hereof such servant agent or employee shall for that purpose be the agent of the Boatowner Member(s) and the Club and such servant agent or employee shall not be liable in negligence or otherwise for any damage to or loss or theft of the vessel or property thereon occurring as a result of such moving or removing. The Boatowner Member(s) hereby indemnifies and will keep indemnified the Club against all actions suits claims demands debts obligations or other liabilities arising out of any act or omission of the Boatowner Member(s) or of the Boatowner Member(s)’s servants agents employees or invitees. On the termination of this Licence the Boatowner Member(s) shall promptly remove the Vessel and all related equipment, goods, chattels and other personal effects (“Goods”) from the marina/ mooring and shall remain liable for payment of license fees until the Vessel and Goods are so removed and in default of the Boatowner Member(s) so doing the Club shall be entitled to remove to any convenient place the Vessel and any Goods left by the Licensee at or on the Club’s property as a result of this Licence and the Club may contract for the safe keeping thereof and for payment of storage and insurance fees as agent for the Boatowner Member(s) and all expenses thereby incurred shall be payable by the Boatowner Member(s) and the Boatowner Member(s) hereby indemnifies and shall keep indemnified the Club against all liability, fees and expenses incurred in respect of such removal or storage or any matter arising thereout and whatsoever the Club shall do in good faith under this clause shall be deemed to be done as agent for and with the full authority and at the risk of the Boatowner Member(s). In the event of the Boatowner Member(s) being in default of Article 24 of the Club’s Articles of Association the Boatowner Member(s) hereby agrees that in such circumstances this Licence shall be at an end and Clause 14 shall apply and further the Club may take a lien over the Vessel and any such Goods thereon pending payment of all expenses fees and other liabilities incurred under this agreement whether under Clause 13 or for any unpaid license fees, although no such lien shall be created until such time as the Club gives written notice of such taking of a lien to the address provided by the Boatowner Member(s). In the event of a default by the Boatowner Member(s) as defined in Clause 15 and where the Club has taken the aforesaid lien, the Club may after giving to the Boatowner Member(s) forty five (45) days written notice of the Club’s intention to sell, exercise a right of sale over the Vessel and over any Goods which are held by the Club. Any such sale shall be by tender or public auction. The Club shall be under no duty to obtain the best price for the Vessel and/ or Goods when it auctions or sells by public tender the Vessel and/or Goods, but shall otherwise act reasonably and in good faith. Any proceeds obtained from any sale by the Club of the Vessel and/or Goods net of outstanding fees and expenses and net of all costs and expenses of sale shall be paid to the Boatowner Member(s) or shall be held in trust or paid to the appropriate place for Unclaimed Monies if the Boatowner Member(s) does not apply to the Club for the proceeds. The Boatowner Member(s) acknowledges that the berth/mooring is for usage of the Vessel of the Boatowner Member(s). No vessel is to remain in a berth or on a mooring unused by the Boatowner Member(s) and in the event that the Vessel is not used by the Boatowner Member(s) for the period of six (6) months without the written permission of the Board of the Club this Licence shall be at an end and Clause 14 hereof shall apply. The Boatowner Member(s) shall prior to or upon the making of this agreement provide to the Club all particulars of the Vessel and of the Boatowner Member(s) as might be reasonably required by the Club for the purpose of maintaining the Club Register of Vessels and otherwise and the Boatowner Member(s) shall in particular complete accurately and deliver to the Club any form set aside for this purpose. AND IT IS HEREBY AGREED AND DECLARED that this Licence may be terminated by either party giving to the other thirty (30) days notice or by the Boato\vner Member(s) paying to the Club thirty days licence fees in lieu of notice AND notwithstanding the foregoing this Licence may be terminated by the Board of the Club forthwith upon any substantial breach of any of the terms or conditions hereof by the Boatowner Member(s) or by his servants agents or invitees. RMYC YEARBOOK 117


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88 RMYC 118 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

The address for services of notices on the Boatowner Member(s) shall be the address given by the Boatowner Member(s) to the Club on his/her membership application unless the Club has received from the Boatowner Member(s) his/her written notification of change of address prior to sending the first mentioned notice. (The Boatowner Member(s) shall otherwise take all reasonable steps to promptly give notice to the Club however the Club shall not be obligated to undertake investigations or searches to locate the Boatowner Member(s)). If there is more than one Boatowner Member(s) hereunder, their individual liability in all respects in relation to this Agreement shall be joint and several, but notice to or from one of them shall bind them all and they shall nominate as between them the master of the Vessel who shall receive all notices referred to on this Licence. In the event of the Boatowner or joint Boatowner, as appears on the Club Register of Vessels, ceases to retain seventy five per cent (75%) share in the beneficial ownership of such Vessel, the Board of Directors of the Club may exercise its power to have such Vessel removed from its allocated pen or mooring. The provisions of Clauses 12 and 14 shall apply to such removal. The new owners or joint owners of the vessel so removed may apply in the usual manner to be placed on the waiting list for a berth/mooring. In the event of an owner or joint owner who has disposed of his or her interest in a Vessel then any berth/ mooring allocated shall be deemed vacant, however, if such Boatowner Member(s) intends to purchase another Vessel and advised the Board of the Club of such intention in writing then in order to retain the allocated berth/mooring he or she must apply in writing to the Board of the Club for permission to retain his or her pen, or mooring for a period of six (6) months at such fees as may be decided by the Board of the Club. If a further extension is required he or she must apply in writing stating the reasons for requesting such further extension. The Club reserves the right in its absolute discretion to extend or reject such period and upon such terms as it thinks fit. Notwithstanding anything herein contained the Boatowner Member(s) shall advise the Marina Manager if his berth or mooring is to be vacant for a period of longer than two (2) days during which vacancy the Club shall be at liberty to allocate such pen or mooring for the period of this vacancy to another Boatowner Member(s) at a fee to be decided at its absolute discretion and the Boatowner Member(s) shall continue to be obliged to pay the Licence Fee. Whilst the Vessel is moored at the berth, the Boatowner shall not carry out any material repairs or other material work to the vessel save for work which has been authorised by the Marina Manager. Notwithstanding anything herein contained the Marina Manager does not have the authority to authorise work to be carried out on any Vessel between the hours of midday on Saturdays until 8:00am on the following Monday. If goods and services tax (GST) or any similar tax is imposed and has application to any supply by the Club under this licence the Club may, in addition to any other amount payable under this licence, recover from the Boatowner Member and the Boatowner Member must pay the said amount in addition to the licence fee at such time as the Licence Fee is paid. Notwithstanding anything herein contained no sailing yacht shall be entitled to a permanent berth allocation on the marina. The Boatowner Member(s) recognises that the facilities of the Club are provided for use of Boatowners and undertakes to purchase food, fuel and beverages from the Club. Further, the Boatowner Member(s)

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acknowledges that the licence fee paid herein is lower than other comparable commercial marinas and has been so set on the basis that Boatowner Member(s) will avail himself/herself/themselves of the Club’s facilities. The Boatowner Member(s) further acknowledges if in the opinion of the Board of the Club the Boatowner Member(s) is not availing himself/herself/themselves of the Club facilities and in this regard availing of facilities means the purchase of food, fuel and beverage from the Club, then the Board of the Club shall be at liberty to write to the Boatowner Member(s) and advise that his/her/their continuing failure to utilise facilities will bring this licence to an end, if in the absolute discretion of the Board of the Club the Boatowner Member(s) fails to utilise such facilities thereafter then the Boatowner Member(s) will be deemed to be in default of this agreement entitling the Club to terminate the agreement. Notwithstanding anything herein contained all Boatowner Member(s)’ Vessels registered on the Club’s Register of Vessels must be predominantly used for leisure boating activities and participation in Club events. All vessels which are registered by the Waterways Authority as being in survey are deemed by the Board of the Club not to be used predominantly for leisure boating activities and, as such, application in writing by the Boatowner Member(s) of those Vessels must be delivered to the Board of the Club prior to entering into this agreement. Such application must commit the Boatowner Member(s) to use the vessel predominantly for leisure boating activities and not commercial activities. In view of the fact that such vessels are used at times for commercial purposes and to ensure that those Boatowner Members in respect of such Vessel are utilising the facilities of the Club each such Boatowner Member(s) will be charged in addition to the licence fee an amount to be decided by the Board of the Club from time to time but not less than $1,500.00 per quarter (+GST) (such quarter ending March 31, June 30, September 30 and December 31 in any year). Such amount may be used for credit as to $500.00 (+GST) for fuel purchases and as to $1,000.00 (+GST) for food and beverage per quarter such amount may be credited against fuel, beverage and food sales only during the quarter in which it is incurred and no carry forward to the next period will be allowed. No Vessel shall carry any advertising or “For Sale” sign whilst moored/berthed at the Club facilities and whilst flying the Club burgee. The Boatowner Member(s) acknowledges the Club does not permit the use of the Marina facilities for the sale of Vessels. The Boatowner Member(s) shall advise the Marina Manager if his/her/their Vessel is being offered for sale and the name of the boat broker appointed to sell the Vessel. The Marina facility will not be available for Vessels to be inspected for sale from midday on any Saturday until 8:00am the following Monday. All Vessels shall be moored and/or berthed in accordance with the directions of the Marina Manager. The Boatowner Member(s) acknowledges that all Vessels on the northern side of the main arm of the Marina shall be moored aft toward the Marina. Vessels on the southern side of the main arm of the Marina shall be moored aft towards the Marina. Vessels on the northern side of the second arm of the Marina shall be moored aft toward the Marina and vessels on the southern side of the second arm shall be moored bow toward the Marina. No Vessel is to moor at the fuel pen or at the eastern end of the Marina overnight without the consent of the Marina Manager. No Vessel is to berth at a vacant berth on the Marina or on a vacant mooring without the consent of the Marina Manager.


Keeping him on an even keel

For more information call 61 2 9327 9000 or email enrol@cranbrook.nsw.edu.au 5 Victoria Road Bellevue Hill NSW Australia 2023 www.cranbrook.nsw.edu.au


Royal Motor Yacht Club of New South Wales Ltd

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Commodore Past Commodore Vice-Commodore Rear Commodore Treasurer (Race Secretary also if a member of Board of Directors) 6. Secretary/Manager (Social Secretary also if a Member of Board of Directors) 7. Boat Owner/Director 8. Club Director 9. Race Secretary (if Board Member same as 5. Treasurer) 10. Marina Manager 11. Social Secretary (if Board Member same as 6. Secretary/Manager) 12. Spare 13. Boat Owner Member 14. General Member

Royal Motor Yacht Club Flags PENNANT To be flown by all members except Flag Officers and Past Commodores BURGEE To be flown by Flag Officers and Past Commodores only

Commodore

Rear Commodore

88 RMYC 120 RMYCYEARBOOK YEARBOOK

Vice-Commodore

Commodore Toronto

Commodore Broken Bay

Past Commodore Parent Club

Commodore Port Hacking Past Commodore All Branches


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Royal Motor Yacht Club Yearbook 2011  

Royal Motor Yacht Club Yearbook 2011