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safetynewsletter WINTER 2017


EXCEL'S SAFETY CULTURE

DAVE ROBERTS CEO

EXCEL’s safety culture is built on the premise that all accidents and injuries are preventable. Our behavioral-based philosophy on safety promotes individual responsibility and accountability as well as team participation. We consistently reinforce our principles with safety education, training, and recognition for achievement. We set high expectations. All employees are empowered without fear of reprimand or retaliation: to immediately stop any work activity that presents danger and to get involved, question, rectify, and report any unsafe conditions or acts that do not comply with our safety and health policies to supervisors.

E XCEL LENCE IN ACTION

EXCEL WINS AWARD OF MERIT FROM GBRIA

EXCEL SENDS AID TO HURRICANE VICTIMS

EXCEL was awarded an Award of Merit for workforce development in the large contractor construction division from the Greater Baton Rouge Industry Alliance (GBRIA) at its 10th Annual Craft Workforce Development Awards Banquet held on September 14, 2017. Two of EXCEL's sponsored high schools were also recognized with an Award of Merit for their Industrial Arts programs. Congratulations to Springfield High School and Holden High on their achievements!

In the wake of recent hurricanes, EXCEL sent critically needed supplies to victims in Houston and the U.S. Virgin Islands. EXCEL collected an entire trailer full of necessities and sent to our Freeport, Texas, location. EXCEL also chartered a plane to send supplies to the U.S. Virgin Islands. In addition to these efforts, EXCEL also collaborated with Humble High School, located near Houston, Texas, regarding school supplies needed by the students after the school took in over eight feet of water during Hurricane Harvey. EXCEL is thankful to all of the employees who assisted in making these relief efforts such an incredible success!

Above, from left: Chad Pierce; Kendra Keen (Springfield High School); Richard Beemer; and Boo Ragan. Above: EXCEL employees load supplies on plane to be sent to US Virgin Islands.

Above, from left: Chad Pierce; Richard Beemer; Cody St. Amaud; and Boo Ragan.

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excel safety newsletter winter 2017

Above: Steve Gautreau and Guillermo Torres prepare supplies for Humble High School in Texas.


E XCEL LENCE IN ACTION

EXCEL SUPERVISORS SHOW SUPPORT When supervisor Shawn Mahlorin's son Anthony was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma, fellow supervisors on the Orascom job in Beaumont, Texas, showed their support. Pictured on the right are supervisors who shaved their heads in an act of solidarity with Shaun, as Anthony underwent treatment. EXCEL also took up a collection from employees to defray the family's medical expenses. Safety Supervisor Tilo Abraham is also planning a charitable event to continue raising funds for the family. These acts of kindness are true representations of what our EXCEL culture is all about. Above, from left: Pete Simpson; Tilo Abraham; Dwayne Bradley; Aquilino Donato; Shawn Malhorin; Todd Hawk; Matt Horn; Lewis Drigo; and Che King.

GONZALES FABRICATION SHOP REACHES SAFETY MILESTONE Our EXCEL fabrication shop in Gonzales celebrated employee safety appreciation with a jambalaya lunch on Friday, November 3. A special shout-out to Benny Yander for preparing and cooking the lunch for the shop. Hats off to the team on their commitment to maintain #EXCELlence in safety!

Above, from left: Brad Varnado and Chad Cahoon. Left: members of the fab shop team receive their jambalaya lunch.

Do you have #EXCELlent news to share? Email your story and photos to Katherine Carver at kcarver@excelusa.com to be featured in the next issue of EXCEL's safety newsletter and Facebook and LinkedIn pages.

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ON THE JOB SAFETY

PREVENTING COLD STRESS OSHA

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t is important for employers to know the wind chill temperature so that they can gauge workers’ exposure risk better and plan how to safely do the work. It is also important to monitor workers’ physical condition during tasks, especially new workers who may not be used to working in the cold, or workers returning after spending some time away from work. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio is a nationwide network of radio stations broadcasting continuous weather information from the nearest NWS office. It will give information when wind chill conditions reach critical thresholds. A Wind Chill Warning is issued when wind chill temperatures are life threatening. A Wind Chill Advisory is issued when wind chill temperatures are potentially hazardous. Environmental cold can affect any worker exposed to cold air temperatures and puts workers at risk of cold stress. As wind speed increases, it causes the cold air temperature to feel even colder, increasing the risk of cold stress to exposed workers, especially those working outdoors, such as recreational workers, snow cleanup crews, construction workers, police officers and firefighters. Other workers who may be affected by exposure to environmental cold

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conditions include those in transit, baggage handlers, water transportation, landscaping services, and support activities for oil and gas operations. What constitutes cold stress and its effects can vary across different areas of the country. In regions that are not used to winter weather, near freezing temperatures are considered factors for "cold stress." Increased wind speed also causes heat to leave the body more rapidly (wind chill effect). Wetness or dampness, even from body sweat, also facilitates heat loss from the body. Cold stress occurs by driving down the skin temperature, and eventually the internal body temperature. When the body is unable to warm itself, serious cold-related illnesses and injuries may occur, and permanent tissue damage and death may result. Types of cold stress include: trench foot, frostbite, and hypothermia. Although OSHA does not have a specific standard that covers working in cold environments, under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA Act) of 1970, employers have a duty to protect workers from recognized hazards, including cold stress hazards, that are causing or likely to cause death or serious physical harm in the workplace.

excel safety newsletter winter 2017

RISK FACTORS FOR COLD STRESS INCLUDE: • Wetness/dampness • Dressing improperly • Exhaustion • Predisposing health conditions, such as: hypertension, hypothyroidism, diabetes • Poor physical conditioning

EMPLOYEE TRAINING SHOULD INCLUDE: • How to recognize the environmental and workplace conditions that can lead to cold stress • The symptoms of cold stress, how to prevent cold stress, and what to do to help those affected • How to select proper clothing for cold, wet, and windy conditions

EMPLOYERS SHOULD ALSO: • Monitor workers physical condition • Schedule frequent short breaks • Schedule work during the warmest part of the day • Work in pairs • Provide warm, sweet beverages • Provide engineering controls such as radiant heaters


SAFETY AT HOME

ENJOYING A SAFE HOLIDAY SEASON AT HOME National Safety Council

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oliday safety is an issue that burns brightest from late November to mid-January, when families gather, parties are scheduled and travel spikes. Take some basic precautions to ensure your family remains safe and injuryfree throughout the season.

DECORATIONS

Putting up decorations is one of the best ways to get in a holiday mood, but about 15,000 injuries involving holiday decorating were seen in emergency rooms during the 2012 season. • Spraying artificial snow can irritate your lungs if inhaled; follow directions carefully; • Decorate the tree with your kids in mind; move ornaments that are breakable or have metal hooks toward the top; • Always use the proper step ladder; don't stand on chairs or other furniture; • Lights are among the best parts of holiday decorating; make sure there are no exposed or frayed wires, loose connections or broken sockets; • Plants can spruce up your holiday decorating, but keep those that may be poisonous (including

some Poinsettias) out of reach of children or pets; the national Poison Control Center can be reached at (800) 222-1222.

WATCH OUT FOR FIRE-STARTERS

Thousands of deaths are caused by fires, burns and other fire-related injuries every year, and 12 percent of home candle fires occur in December, the National Fire Protection Association reports. Increased use of candles and fireplaces, combined with an increase in the amount of combustible, seasonal decorations present in many homes means more risk for fire. • Never leave burning candles unattended or sleep in a room with a lit candle; • Keep candles out of reach of children; • Make sure candles are on stable surfaces; • Don't burn candles near trees, curtains or any other flammable items; • Don't burn trees, wreaths or wrapping paper in the fireplace; • Check and clean the chimney and fireplace area at least once a year.

TRAVELING

Many people choose to travel

during the holidays by automobile, with the highest fatality rate of any major form of transportation. In 2013, 343 people died on New Year's Day, 360 on Thanksgiving Day and 88 on Christmas Day, according to Injury Facts 2015. Alcohol-impaired fatalities represented 31 percent of the totals. • Use a designated driver to ensure guests make it home safely after a holiday party; alcohol, over-thecounter or illegal drugs all cause impairment; • Make sure every person in the vehicle is properly buckled up no matter how long or short the distance being traveled; • Put that cell phone away; distracted driving causes one-quarter of all crashes; • Properly maintain the vehicle and keep an emergency kit with you; • Be prepared for heavy traffic. Remember, when guests are staying in your home, make sure areas have night lights or easy-to-reach lamps in case they need to get up during the night. And, whether you are visiting someone else's home or you have guests in your home, make sure all medications are kept up and away and out of sight from young children.

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EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION

EMPLOYEES OF THE MONTH K-Bin, Freeport | Third Quarter

JULY 2017

Jamey Stratton, Operator

AUGUST 2017

Kimberly McAda, Operator

SEPTEMBER 2017

Chelsea Jennings, Lab Tech

SUPERVISOR OF THE MONTH K-Bin, Freeport | Third Quarter

Do you have outstanding employees to recognize? Email your photos to Katherine Carver at kcarver@excelusa.com to be featured in the next issue of EXCEL's safety newsletter and Facebook and LinkedIn pages. THIRD QUARTER 2017

Joshua Stratton, Foreman

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EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION

GOOD CATCH EMPLOYEES K-Bin, Freeport | Third Quarter

1ST PLACE

Emilio Martinez, Head Operator

2ND PLACE

3RD PLACE

Eric Woods, Operator

Sunshine Trainer, Lab Tech

MATERIAL HANDLING GOOD CATCH EMPLOYEES K-Bin, Freeport | Third Quarter

1ST PLACE

Matt Therrien, Crane Operator

2ND PLACE

Fred Harris, Maintenance POC

3RD PLACE

Brandon McKnight, Maintenance POC

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EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION

MANAGEMENT TEAMS SHAPE UP AT ANNUAL SAFETY BOOT CAMP The EXCEL site and corporate management teams attended the Annual Safety Boot Camp conducted by our captive insurance partners, IRM, McGriff, and ARCH, on July 27. The boot camp agenda included presentations regarding: a historical loss analysis; walking and working surfaces; crisis management; and the effects of turnover. Thanks to our partners and management team for their participation!

FORKLIFT TRAINING COURSE Navigation of the forklift training course, pictured in this section, is required for all material handlers to obtain hands-on certification prior to reporting on-site to operate. Kudos to all of our employees who completed the course!

UNCOMMON LEADERS AT EXCEL Four EXCEL employees completed the ABC Pelican Uncommon Leadership course in November. The sevenweek intensive course is designed to challenge individuals to become better, more uncommon leaders. The course focuses on a wide range of areas, including understanding diverse personalities and behavioral styles, managing conflict, enhancing presentation skills, and achieving organization growth as a team. Congratulations to Sam Carney, Katie Burk, Drew Collins, and Josh LaFleur (pictured right, from left) on their graduation from the course!

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EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION

EMPLOYEES EARN KNOWLEDGE-BASED CERTIFICATES Mechanical Maintenance employees received their certificates for passing the knowledge-based testing in their respective crafts at Shintech in Freeport, Texas. Pictured on the top row, from the left: Bill Pfisterer, Bob Pate, Brian Browning, Brandon McKnight, Darrel Hutchins, Kenneth Bravenec, and John Bledsoe. Pictured on the bottom row, from the left: Allen Sova, Joel Lara, Jay Mack, and Tony Solis.

Wishing you and your family a warm and happy holiday season! from winter 2017 excel safety newsletter

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Safety Newsletter Winter 2017  

Safety Newsletter Winter 2017  

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