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Entertainment

The Excalibur

Section Editor • Carly Estrada

November 12, 2009 • Volume 20, Issue 3

15

Disney goes digital with remastered movies Carly Estrada

Section Editor

Digital 3-D is a brand used by the Walt Disney Company to describe three-dimensional films made by Disney and shown exclusively using digital projection. The first movie using this brand for advertising was Chicken Little, released in North America on Nov. 4, 2005. For the release, Disney collaborated with Dolby Laboratories to install Dolby’s digital cinema systems in approximately 100 U.S. theatres. The computer-animated Chicken Little was followed by a re-release of The Nightmare Before Christmas on October 20, 2006. “I’ve seen all the remastered Disney movies, but I don’t own any; I do think the color and sound and the fact that it is 3-D make the movie experience much better,” senior Derek Haas said. “Nightmare,” a 1993 stop motion movie, was originally shot in 2-D on 35-mm-film; the 3-D version was generated by Industrial Light and Magic from this source using computer technology. In 2007, Disney re-released “Working for Peanuts,” a 1953 animated film shot in 3-D. It preceded the theatrical release of the 3-D version of “Meet the Robinsons.” The first liveaction material recorded in digital 3-D by Disney was “Hannah Montana & Miley Cyrus: Best of Both Worlds Concert,” released in 2008. In 2009, “G-Force” followed, marking the first scripted live-action 3-D movie under the Disney Digital 3-D brand. “The Disney 3-D experience has made me love Disney even more,” junior Alix Collaro said. “I would always watch the classic Disney movies.” Disney Digital 3-D is not a presentation nor a production format or technology. Films advertised as Disney Digital 3-D come from a number of sources, film, digital camera as well as animation software, and can all be presented using any digital 3-D technology, including Real-D, Dolby 3-D, Xpan-D and Master Image. There is no specific handling involved. Despite this, Disney always advertises Disney Digital 3-D films as if it would be a format of Digital 3-D, leading to some confusion among the audience. “I think the quality of remastered movies are better, but it does take away from the traditional and classical feeling of the film,” senior Kayla Fonger said. In the following years, the release numbers increased. The newest Disney remastered movies include: “XGames 3-D,” “Toy Story,” “Toy Story 2,” “A Christmas Carol.” The Disney remastered movies soon to hit theaters include: “Alice In Wonderland,” “Toy Story 3,” “Step UP” and “Rapunzel.”

…to be scared out of your wits Sami Edge Section Editor

What started out as a low-budget film never intended for theaters has turned into a nationwide movie phenomenon. “Paranormal Activity,” a documentary-style thriller created by novice director Oren Peli as a hobby, turned into a movie and became popular. It sold out in 12 of the first 13 theaters where it premiered. In September 2009 the first midnight screenings of “Paranormal Activity” were shown in 13 “college towns” across the country. After the show the audience was asked to log onto Paranormalactivity.com and request the movie be played in theaters around the country. Paramount Pictures, the producers of “Paranormal Activity,” hoped to advertise the movie by letting the fans decide where and when the movie would be seen. Paramount vowed that when one million people had “demanded” the movie online it would open in local theaters. Within two weeks of the first midnight screenings, over a million fans demanded the movie be played in their city. Prompting

its release in cities nationwide, including Reno on Oct. 16. In only its first week in the theaters, “Paranormal Activity” earned $22 million and acquired the terrified reviews that Paramount was hoping for. “Throughout the whole movie you’re jumping,” said junior Ali Leathers. “It’s terrifying. It is so scary.” Peli, an Israeli-born video game designer with no previous film making experience shot “Paranormal Activity” at his own home in 2006, spending only $15,000 and using a hand-held video camera. The cast includes only four people, including actress Amber Armstrong who studied acting at University of Nevada Reno. “Paranormal Activity” follows the story of a young couple battling with an unseen force in their suburban home. Created as a documentary to emphasize the reality of the situation, the movie struck close to home. “The movie made me think about what really happens when I’m sleeping,” said senior Leo Gumabo. “The fact that the movie is based inside [the character’s house] is what scared me the most.” With great reviews from movie critics from Time Magazine to the New York Times, “Paranormal Activity” is a must-see for horror fanatics.

‘New Moon’ to hit theaters soon Caitlin Faulds Reporter

“New Moon,” a movie based on the second book in the popular “Twilight “ series, will open on Nov. 20, exactly one year

‘New Moon’ Fast Facts • The original idea for “Twilight” came to Stephanie Meyer in a dream in 2003. • There are 37 translated versions of the “Twilight” series. • The title “New Moon” refers to the phase opposite of a full moon, signifying the dark period in Bella’s life. • The flower petals on the cover of “New Moon” are from a ruffled tulip. • Before auditioning for a part in the movie, stars Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart had never heard of the book “Twilight.” • “Twilight” made around $70 million in its first week. “New Moon” is expected to make about 10% more than that. • “Twilight” was rejected 14 times before being published in 2005. • In other languages, “Twilight” is named “Fascination,” “Until Dawn,” “Temptation,” and “The Boy Whom I Love is a Vampire” among others. Sources: http://blog.seattlepi.com/overtheshoulder/archives/154965.asp http://www.stepheniemeyer.com/index.html

after the opening of the first movie, “Twilight.” After recovering from a vampire attack occurring in the first movie, the main character Bella Swan will have to overcome the sudden departure of her vampire boyfriend Edward Cullen, making friends and enemies along the way. The Twilight phenomenon has reached fame rather quickly and its ficional characters have become recognizable nationwide. Over 25 million copies of the series, written by Stephanie Meyer, have been sold worldwide. “One of my friends was reading [“Twilight”] and seemed really into it so I decided to read it,” senior Melanie Hovda said. “I love the books. I [even] read ‘Eclipse’ twice.” The love for the written series has carried over to the movie, adding to the fans and generating over 350 fan sites around the world. The film adaptation

of “Twilight” made around $70 million in its first week alone. “Twilight” paraphernalia can be found in many stores and on numerous web sites. “[The main character] is hot, and it’s just a really good story,” sophomore Skylar Corbitt said. “I like all of the actors used in the movie. They fill out their characters well.” Hopes for “New Moon” have been building since the release of “Twilight”, adding pressure to new director Chris Weitz (“About a Boy,” “The Golden Compass”), who replaced the previous director of “Twilight,” Catherine Hardwicke. Kristen Stewart (Bella Swan), Robert Pattinson (Edward Cullen), and Taylor Lautner (Jacob Black) will all return for recurring roles as the three main characters. “I’ll probably see ‘New Moon’ about four times--midnight show and opening day,” Corbitt said.


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