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An ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

Inside this issue: • 1,000-YEAR LEGACY • ELEVCON 2018 • GRENFELL REPORT • LIFT INDUSTRY KART DAY

2018/03 Issue 96

A view of the UK Lift Industry


SUMMER 2018

E L E V A T I O N

ELEVATION MAGAZINE Published by Elevator World, Inc 354 Morgan Ave Mobile, AL 36606 USA UK Tel: +44 (0)7484 371712

ISSN 1366-2783 EDITOR: Dave Cooper -

COVER STORY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 50

1,000-YEAR LEGACY By Darren Papani

FEATURES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 14

LIFTEX 2019 - THREE YEARS IN THE MAKING

16

ELEVCON 2018 By Dr. Lee Gray, EW Correspondent

24

TALKING TALL - PLANNING FOR A TALLER LONDON WITH JULES PIPE By Daniel Sararik

28

MOVING FORWARD By Sarah Dixon, Managing Director, Express Lift Co.

30

GRENFELL TOWER INQUIRY - DR BARBARA LANE'S EXPERT REPORT

40

TRAFFIC ANALYSIS FOR HIGH RISE BUILDINGS TO BE MODERNIZED By Darren Batey and Mikko Kontturi

46

26TH LIFT INDUSTRY KART CHALLENGE

54

MY STORY OF LIFT TRAFFIC ANALYSIS, DESIGN AND CONTROL 1960 – 2020 (PART 1) By Gina Barney

66

MAKING SAFETY STANDARDS FOR LIFTS “GLOBAL”

REGULARS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 2

COMMENT ELEVATION - THANK YOU AND FAREWELL By Ish Buckingham

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GRAPEVINE - AROUND THE INDUSTRY

22

CONTRACT MATTERS - CONSTRUCTION LAW UPDATE - CONTRACTOR’S LIABILITY FOR DESIGN By Jonathan Hawkswell

MANAGEMENT MATTERS - RE-THINKING MANAGEMENT THINKING – MANAGEMENT REACTIONS TO VARIATIONS By Mark Woods

64

SAFETY MATTERS - FATAL ACCIDENT By Eur Ing David Cooper

68

CONSULTANTS VOICE - ONTARIO’S RELIABLE ELEVATORS ACT 2017 AND WHAT IT MEANS By Colin J. Craney

34

editorial@elevation.co.uk

72 LETTERS

SALES AND GENERAL INQUIRIES:

74

DIARY DATES

Within the U.K.:

76

EMAIL & INTERNET DIRECTORY

82

PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS

86

PROPERTY MANAGERS GUIDE TO LIFT MAINTENANCE COMPANIES

96

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

Suzanne McCoy -

+44 (0)7484 371712 suzanne@elevation.co.uk International:

T. Bruce MacKinnon -

tbruce@elevatorworld.com

EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS AND INQUIRIES: Within the U.K.:

Dave Cooper -

editorial@elevation.co.uk International:

Angie Baldwin -

editorial@elevatorworld.com

www.elevation.co.uk

Any articles published are not necessarily the views of the Publisher. The Publisher will not accept any liability whatsoever in respect of any article produced by a contributor. The Editor reserves the right to edit or alter any article before publication. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information, storage and retrieval system, without the publishers written permission.

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BY ISH BUCKINGHAM

Comment Elevation

THANK YOU AND FAREWELL

Many Elevation readers may not yet realise I am no longer the owner of Elevation magazine, which I started almost 25 years ago. But, yes, it’s true! After producing almost 100 issues of Elevation magazine, I have decided to take the first step in retiring from the lift Industry by selling the magazine to the industry trade publication leader, Elevator World, Inc. The idea for starting a UK lift trade publication was the result of an after-dinner conversation with my wife one spring evening way back in 1994. She was working for a small publishing company that published a magazine titled, ‘Potato World,’ and I was intrigued as to why anyone would want to read about potatoes. I knew that well-respected Elevator World founder and editor, the late Bill Sturgeon, had visited the UK some years earlier, and his visit had generated a great deal of interest from UK companies such as Express Lifts, Pickering Lifts and Guideline Lifts. The experiences of Potato World and Elevator World led me to the conclusion that maybe a UK lift publication could work.  Whilst I thought the concept was good, I needed to know it was something the industry wanted; so, I started talking to industry friends and acquaintances to get an independent view on the matter. Feedback was very positive, and this triggered similar conversations with lift companies and equipment suppliers, many of whom echoed the sentiment that a UK trade publication was long overdue.   During the numerous telephone conversations that formed part of my market research, I became aware that a trade exhibition (LIFT 94) was about to be staged in Brussels. This was at a time when the British Lift Association (they are now part of the Lift and Escalator Industry Association) was being heralded as ‘leading lights’ on the European industry exhibitions scene, because of their history of organising regular London-based lift industry exhibitions.  I decided my attendance at LIFT 94 was a vital step in establishing the concept of a UK trade publication. One of the main objectives for attending the exhibition was to meet and hopefully gain advice from Bill Sturgeon; this objective was soon realized when he literally crossed my path in the exhibition centre. I can clearly remember back-tracking and following him until I could capture his attention and introduce myself. Bill took me into a small meeting room and listened to my plans with great interest. His advice and offer of moral support were instrumental

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in my decision to develop the plans further. I travelled back to the UK the following day having made the conscious decision to proceed. It, therefore, seems appropriate that 25 years later Elevator World, Inc., should become the new owners of Elevation magazine.   Once home from Brussels, I set about the task of trying to muster support from various elements of the ‘lift establishment’. I was determined that Elevation would be based upon a balanced mix of good technical editorial content and advertising. One of the first offers of technical support came from a young industry specialist named David Cooper, who was keen to share some of his experiences with the readers of my planned publication. David wrote his first Safety Matters article in Issue 1 and has continued to do so in the subsequent 96 issues. It is, therefore, justifiable that he has been appointed by Elevator World, Inc., to take on the role of editor for Elevation magazine going forward. Congratulations to Elevator World, Inc., for making such a good choice, and thanks to David for his support and continued commitment.   Another offer of technical support for Issue 1 came from Mark Woods of Statius Management; Mark has also provided content for every issue, and my thanks are extended to him for his continued support.   Elevation’s first issue also included editorial contributions from the British Lift Industry Association (BLA); Joe Kavanagh of Capital Control Systems; the late Alan Bennett of British Lift Services; the late Alan Digby; Keith England of Major Lift Services; and Roger Howkins of Arup. Their early support helped Elevation become a reality. Several of Elevation’s current advertisers were also present in the magazine’s first issue and have continued their support throughout the lifetime of the publication; my gratitude is, therefore, extended to International Lift Equipment, Kapok and CE Electronics.  So, as Elevation magazine continues under the stewardship of its new owners, I will be spending more time with my family, whilst staying involved with my other businesses within the lift industry. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you all for supporting me during my period as owner and editor of Elevation magazine and wish you every success for your future. ... Ish Buckingham

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Dave Cooper received his City & Guilds of London Institute Fellowship

ELA announces 2019 Conference for London

Dave Cooper, managing director of Lift Consultancy Practice LECS (UK) Ltd, attended Imperial College on June 15 where he was presented with his Fellowship. The presentation was made by Sir John Armitt, chairman of the City & Guilds Council and former chairman of the Olympic Delivery Authority. The Fellowship, which requires nomination by at least two existing Fellows, was awarded to Cooper for his “unswerving commitment to the training of young engineers and his work for the UK lift industry.”

The European Lift Association (ELA) has set its General Assembly and Annual Conference for London on May 13-14, 2019. The event, which attracts more than 100 senior industry representatives, is a forum for the European industry to discuss common challenges and celebrate achievements. It will be co-organized and hosted by the Lift and Escalator Industry Association (LEIA) of the U.K. and precede LEIA’s triennial trade show, LIFTEX, being held on May 15-16, 2019. LEIA and the ELA said they both “firmly believe that no matter what post-Brexit uncertainties there may be, the lifts sector in both the U.K. and Europe as a whole will remain committed to preserving safety for installers and users under the application of common standards.” This will be the first time ELA’s assembly and conference is held in the U.K. LEIA President Warren Jenchner added: “I am delighted that LEIA has received the backing of our European colleagues to host the 2019 ELA General Assembly and Annual Conference in London. 2019 will see increasing focus on the U.K. as its relationship with the EU moves into a new era. By hosting the ELA General Assembly and Annual Conference and LIFTEX, LEIA is taking this opportunity to showcase the industry’s strength, resilience and innovation. 2019 is going to be a busy year!”

New Design Revealed for Site Near London’s Waterloo Station

Alimak’s Norwegian Operation Lands Oilfield Orders Heis-Tek AS, the Norwegian operation of Alimak Group, has won a US$1.9-million order from Singapore-based Semcorp Marine to provide three traction lifts for the Johan Castberg floating production storage and offloading vessel (FPSO) in the Barents Sea. This follows a US$1.38-million order for an industrial traction lift from Statoil ASA through Aker Solutions for use in the same oilfield. Set for delivery in the second quarter of 2019, the latest order is for lifts that will serve the hull and living quarters of the FPSO, under construction in Singapore. “Over the last months, we have seen increased activity in the oil and gas segment and are pleased to deliver these three lifts to the Johan Castberg field,” Alimak Group CEO Tormod Gunleiksrud said.

A new design by a new architect for Elizabeth House, an approximately 30-story mixed-use building near Waterloo Station in London, has been revealed, showing greater consideration for how it will interact with its surroundings, Architects’ Journal reported. Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM) was chosen over several other big architecture firms to rework the contentious original plan by David Chipperfield Architects. Aimed at improving access to Waterloo Station, the office-led new plan includes a pedestrian walkway lined with shops and restaurants. It was designed for developer HB Reavis of Slovakia and went out for public comment in July.

AHMM’s proposal for a site near Waterloo Station in London

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Leading Scots lift firm acquiring competitor to pass milestone scale Scotland’s leading independent lift company, Caltech Lifts, is acquiring respected competitor Scotlifts Scotland Ltd in a deal set to grow it to £1.9m turnover and more than 1,000 lifts maintained across the UK. The family firm, founded in Dundee in 1978 by engineer Howard Renwick and now run by his sons Andrew and Fraser, formally takes over Coupar Angus-based Scotlifts Scotland Ltd in a cash deal on Friday for an undisclosed sum. It’s the company’s first acquisition and continues its growth trajectory started when Andrew Renwick took over as Managing Director in June 2013. Scotlifts Scotland owner, Scott Murray, will join the management team as Caltech’s new Installations Manager and his employee and company assets will transfer over, too. Scotlifts Scotland’s 50 contract clients across Dundee, Perthshire and the Highlands will also move to Caltech.

and has recently gained his NVQ Level 3 in Lift Installations. “Having Scott on our management team will also assist us with our growth aspirations.” Scott Murray said: “I’m very pleased to join Caltech Lifts, as its reputation for excellent work and service is well known in the UK industry, and this is an exciting time to be joining it. I’m looking forward to helping Caltech continue its growth path.” Caltech Limited is one of the UK’s leading suppliers and maintainers of lifting equipment, including passenger lifts, goods lifts, disabled access lifts and stairlifts to the Public and Private Sectors.

Abbey Liftcare Expands Service Footprint in London Abbey Liftcare, a subsidiary of Express Lift Co., has been awarded lift maintenance contracts in London from commercial and educational customers. A three-year contract with TeamQ will see Abbey Liftcare look after 19 passenger lifts across the sites of Bloomsbury and Moorgate in London, and Guildford in southern England for the University of Law. The company will work with TeamQ (a facilitiesmanagement company that runs all the sites) on a portfolio with passenger, goods and platform lifts for wheelchair users. Additionally, LondonEnergy, which operates the second-largest waste contract in the U.K., has extended its service agreement with Abbey Liftcare for another two years.

Caltech Lifts Managing Director Andrew Renwick (right) welcomes Scott Murray to the company.

Speaking about the deal, Andrew Renwick said: “We’re delighted to have successfully acquired Scotlifts Scotland Ltd and have Scott join us because he’s built it over 15 years into a highly regarded company with a loyal service contract base in our key operational area. “Scott is one of the most talented lift engineers in Scotland and has built an enviable reputation across the UK for the quality of his work. As a result, it’s very hard to secure him as a sub-contractor because he has a huge waiting list of multinational lift companies wanting to use him to install their lifts across the UK. “To have Scott on our installation and repairs team full time will significantly strengthen our engineering capability, as he will be heavily involved in both a hands-on role, as well as supervising other engineers and training apprentices. “Scott’s employee is also an excellent engineer, thanks to having Scott as his mentor for five years,

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Showcasing Babbacombe Cliff Railway's Engineering The historic, popular attraction Babbacombe Cliff Railway was visited on July 26 by Stephen Lisk, president of the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers. Lisk had been invited by the Cliff Railway's technical director, and chairman of the Institution's Career Panel, Dave Cooper. Cooper has been involved with Babbacombe Cliff Railway since 2003, overseeing the complete rebuild in 2006-2007. Cooper is also a fellow of the Institution and was keen to show Lisk around. "I knew Stephen was interested in visiting us at Babbacombe, so it's been a case of getting the diaries together to make it happen," Cooper said, adding, "It was good for Stephen to see the operation that we have in Babbacombe, both in terms of the engineering of the railway and its popularity. On a sunny day in July, at the beginning of the school holidays, it was extremely busy."

Lydia Crossan, Stephen Lisk, Dave Cooper, Mark O'Brien. Lydia and Mark are two of Babbacombe Cliff Railway's team of staff.

Cooper gave Lisk a tour of the subterranean machine room and track, and they discussed the need for apprenticeships so that continuity of skills can be achieved in a bid to be able to adequately maintain the cliff railway, which is approaching 100 years old. According to Cooper, "Babbacombe Cliff Railway is in great condition and a thriving business. This success is what enables us to keep it well maintained and safeguard its future. However, as well as being financially secure, we also need the practical skills required. A new era of apprenticeships means that maybe that is a way forward for us. And, as always, chatting to others in the industry and sharing information and ideas is always a positive plan." Babbacombe Cliff Railway is a twin-car design originally installed in 1926 that is a variation on lift technology used in buildings. It is owned and run by a Community Interest Company. The company

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is managed by a board of voluntary directors with a paid team of staff running the day-to-day business and volunteers working in the Visitor Centre on Oddicombe Beach. The railway now runs seven days a week for most of the year, with a period of closure for maintenance each January. It transports more than 120,000 people each year. For more information on the railway, its history, special events and news, visit the website at www. babbacombecliffrailway.co.uk.

Haven House Hospice If you could ever imagine a project with huge demands and a client so deserving, this was it. Haven House Hospice is based in Woodford, East London, and its beautiful garden surrounds and tranquil setting hide its raison d’etre, which is to help terminally ill children. The mission was to take their existing lift, that was some 30 years old, out, increase the shaft size and replace it with a larger car. All sounds fairly routine until you mix it with the need for compliance with headroom and pit depth requirements with an old lift that was installed pre the Regulations, and then add in a complicated rafter structure in the roof space; the pit being built over vaults; a rather wet environment; and the need for a through car arrangement. The major challenge was finding a lift that could fit an Ambulance Trolley inside with the existing depth of the lift well constraint. It took coordination between LECS (UK) Ltd and the structural engineers to establish the minimum shaft width increase versus the result of such a change on the building. The compromise was moving a toilet that was located on the 1st floor. LECS (UK) were appointed as the consultants for the project and, given the charitable status of the client, kept fees down to a minimum. Given the complex structural alterations required, the consultants, contractors and builders had to work closely together to achieve the desired result. After a tendering process, Griffin Elevators were appointed as the contractor and, working hand in hand with their builder, Elevate Building Services, worked tirelessly at achieving the aim. Daniel Griffin, along with Operations Director James Edge, worked closely with the professional team made up of Dave Cooper and Lee Dean of LECS (UK) Ltd and the Structural Engineer, David Buchanan. It transpired to be the perfect team, as a combination of technical skill and charitable ethos came together to provide the client with what was needed, on budget and on time.

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The lift engineers involved in the project are all Trustees of The Lift Industry Charity, so the charitable seed was already engrained into the team. On top of that, you do not have to move far in any family to find those touched by cancer, and we were not different. The client was provided with a lift that met their main aim of being able to transport an ambulance trolley and also to be an evacuation lift. The lift was supplied by Global Lift Equipment S.L. Daniel Griffin, Sales Director of Griffin Elevators, said: “Our involvement and successful delivery of this project shows that hard work pays off. It was our absolute pleasure to be able to improve the day-to-day running of the hospice, and we feel very humbled and grateful that we were chosen for this project.” Mike Palfreman, Chief Executive at Haven House, said: “We are so grateful to the team at Griffin Elevators and LECS (UK) who worked tirelessly to install our new lift, which will make a big difference to families and staff using our hospice. The new lift is so much larger and modern compared to our old lift, and means it will be easier for our Care staff to transport children and families between floors.” The new lift makes it easier for Care staff to transport children and families between floors.

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CABE Applies for Engineering Council License

Design Unveiled for Residential Tower in Greater Manchester

The Chartered Association of Building Engineers (CABE) announced it will apply to become a licensed member of the Engineering Council following a membership vote. CABE said the status would pave the way for its members (including those across the U.S.) to be formally eligible for Chartered Engineer status on equal terms with other engineering professional bodies.

Simpson Haugh Architects has submitted a proposal for Clippers Quay, a 34-story tower on the waterfront in the Salford area of Manchester, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) reported in March. The plan, created for Forshaw Land & Property Group, would replace a low-rise 1980s office development across the water from Media City U.K. Simpson Haugh said the structure would be taller than Salford Quays’ current tallest building, the Blue Tower, and also taller than a 94-m-tall office block designed by Sheppard Robson that won approval in 2016 but is not yet under construction.

The decision follows four years of development and consultation and includes plans to offer the Chartered Engineer (CEng) qualification. Dr. Gavin Dunn, CEO of CABE, explained: “This clear mandate for change puts CABE within touching distance of the industry top table and gives recognition of building engineering as a defined engineering discipline in its own right, both in the U.K. and internationally.” It will enable the association to maintain the existing title “Chartered Building Engineer” and also enable members to pursue the additional “CEng” qualification if they wish. EW U.K. Correspondent David Cooper explained that the Engineering Council registers engineers in the U.K. The professional engineering institutes have an arrangement in which some are licensed to register engineers on behalf of the Engineering Council subject to the rigorous UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence conditions. As CABE has not previously been an approved body and with a 40% growth in membership over the past five years (with notable increases in student and international members), it has made gaining that status a goal. Organizations currently licensed in such a way include the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers, Institution of Mechanical Engineers and Institution of Engineering and Technology.

Clippers Quay, earmarked for a 0.17-ha triangular site, would deliver 216 new homes plus ground-floor commercial space and a rooftop terrace. Documents submitted in support of the application said the building would have a glass façade that would reflect the adjacent water and sky. “Each surface will catch the light in a different manner and ensure a constantly changing appearance in response to the time of day, weather conditions and the viewers’ perspective,” a planning statement from consultant Lichfields said.

The proposed 34-story Clippers Quay would be the tallest building in Salford.

LECS (UK) On The Move Leading lift and escalator consultants LECS (UK) Ltd are pleased to announce that they have moved to bigger offices in Manchester. The new address is:

(l-r) Dr. Gavin Dunn, incoming CEO of CABE; Alasdair Coates, CEO of The Engineering Council; Dr. John Hooper, retiring CEO of CABE; and Paul Bailey, Deputy CEO and Operations Director of The Engineering Council

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LECS (UK) Ltd 111 Piccadilly Manchester M1 2HY Tel: 0161 638 0984

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Schindler Israel Awarded Mass-Transit Contract Schindler Israel has been awarded a contract to provide 106 escalators, 61 elevators and 24/7 maintenance to the Red Line, the first main line of the Tel Aviv Metropolitan Area Mass-Transit system under construction in Tel Aviv, Israel. Eng. S. Lustig Consulting Engineers, Ltd. (ESL), of Tel Aviv designed the vertical-transportation system.

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The Red Line is the backbone of the mass-transit system, to pass through the most congested areas of the metropolitan area and serve the greatest number of passengers compared with other lines. It will span 24 km, 11 through an underground tunnel. The line will include 34 stations, including 10 underground. The distance between the aboveground stations will be 500 m, and between underground stations, 1 km. During peak hours, the frequency of trains will be every 1.5 min. Along the above-ground route, there will be a train every 3 min. Approximately 70 million annual passengers are expected. It is scheduled for completion in 2021. Reported by Ami Lustig, CEO of ESL and ELEVATOR WORLD correspondent.

The order for Changsha Metro Line 5 includes 105 TransitMaster™ escalators, 26 MonoSpace® elevators, and five MiniSpace® elevators. These will serve people traveling on the new north-south route in the capital of Hunan Province. Line 2 of the Xiamen Metro is an east-west line connecting Xiamen Island with the Haicang District on the mainland and with other Xiamen Metro Lines. KONE will equip the line with 199 heavy-load TransitMaster 140 escalators. For Line 3 of the Nanning Metro, KONE will provide 150 TransitMaster 140 escalators and 28 MonoSpace elevators. The traffic handling capacity for equipment at each of the sites is estimated at some 7,000 people per hr. All three of the new metro lines are due to begin trial operations in 2019. “As cities grow, the need for sustainable and efficient ways to help people move around them also grows,” said William B. Johnson, executive vice president, KONE Greater China. “We have a solid record of supporting the development of infrastructure in China with our people flow expertise and are proud to have been selected to contribute to these projects.”

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Alimak Wins Order for Nordic Region’s Future Tallest Building Developer Serneke has ordered five construction hoists able to handle winds of up to 25 mps from Alimak Group for construction of the Nordic region’s future tallest building, Karlatornet in Gothenburg, Sweden, designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (ELEVATOR WORLD, April 2018). Delivery is scheduled for March to October 2019, ahead of the building’s completion in 2021. The order includes a MammothTM hoist with a payload of up to 5,500 kg. This is the first time the Mammoth will be used in Sweden. “Karlatornet will be a landmark building, and we are pleased to deliver the vertical-access solutions needed for the special requirements posed by the height and wind,” Alimak Group CEO Tormod Gunsleiksrud said.

Leicester care home fined in worker lift shaft fall The management of a private care home in Leicester has been fined £14,000 after a worker fell down a lift shaft. The unnamed man, 72, suffered head injuries in the accident at Sutton in the Elms care home in September 2016. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that a door-locking mechanism was broken for a month before the fall. Sutton in the Elms Care Limited admitted safety breaches and was ordered to pay £2,535 costs by magistrates in Northampton. The website of the private care home, on Sutton Lane, Leicester, said it provided round-the-clock nursing care to about 40 elderly male and female residents. Magistrates were told the lift involved was used to convey breakfast meals from the kitchen to the dining room on a different floor. An interlock system - which meant the lift door could only be opened when the platform was at the right floor - was broken, the court was told. The HSE said management “failed to deal with the known issue of employees overriding the door safety locking mechanism with a screwdriver,” and that the lift had not been properly checked. ‘Head injuries’ The worker fell 1.5m (4.9ft) down the shaft because the platform was at a lower level, the court heard. He sustained head injuries and broken vertebrae in the fall, the HSE confirmed. The company pleaded guilty to breaching Section

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2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, as well as lift operation regulations. HSE inspector Michelle Morrison said: “This incident could so easily have been avoided, had the management at the care home ensured that employees were not manually overriding safety features on this platform lift.” The care home has been approached for comment.

Centre Island chooses Otis UK & Ireland to service 32 elevators at top hotels Otis UK & Ireland has won a three-year contract to service elevators at hotels in Birmingham, Merseyside, Manchester and Preston (Lancashire) commencing in July. Otis, the world’s leading manufacturer and maintainer of people-moving products, including elevators, escalators and moving walks, is a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX). The contract covers hotels in the Crowne Plaza, Holiday Inn and Holiday Inn Express brands.  The hotels included are: • • • • • • • • • •

Holiday Inn, Preston (Lancashire) Holiday Inn, Ellesmere Port (Merseyside) Holiday Inn, Liverpool Lime Street Express by Holiday Inn, Liverpool Crowne Plaza, Liverpool Crowne Plaza, Birmingham NEC Crowne Plaza, Manchester  Express by Holiday Inn, Manchester  Express by Holiday Inn, Birmingham  Sixty-two Castle St Hotel, Liverpool 

The lift engineers will use the company’s proprietary apps and Service Customer Relationship Management System to access information about the lifts’ service history on site and order spare parts instantly, with the aim of restoring lifts to service as soon as possible. The technology also allows the engineers to work with the Otis Customer Care Centre to prioritise the most urgent calls and quickly send the nearest engineer to site. “We’re delighted that Centre Island has chosen Otis as their service contractor based on the quality of service that we can offer,” said Hemant Jolly, Otis UK & Ireland Vice President and Managing Director. “Guests expect to move around the hotels with ease and comfort in the elevators to enjoy their holidays or business trips. We will work hand in hand with Centre Island to provide the best customer experience and enjoyable memories of their visits. We will focus on making sure the equipment they have meets their needs both today and in the future.”

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On the 15-16 May 2019, LIFTEX will once again throw open its doors to welcome thousands of visitors and exhibitors from the UK and abroad. Now in its 31st year, LIFTEX 2019, organised by the UK’s Lift and Escalator Industry Association (LEIA), is the UK’s only dedicated exhibition for the lift, escalator and access industry.

to engage with new customers whilst continuing to strengthen our relationships with existing customers. The two day

The last event, held in 2016, smashed all records with a 20% increase in exhibitors and a 15% increase in visitors.

Known as the place to do business and network, for over a quarter of a century LIFTEX has formed a core part of the sales and marketing strategy for its many exhibitors and visitors. Featuring over 100 exhibitors, it also provides a showcase of the latest products and services from around the world.

On the back of this huge success, demand for space at in 2019 is higher than ever with 70% of exhibition space already taken. Most of the 2016 exhibitors have already confirmed, some with a much larger presence than before and many of the new companies joining the event for the first time include international exhibitors from Croatia, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the USA. Gary Smith, Director of first time exhibitor, Reeley Ltd: “Reeley Ltd have chosen to exhibit at LIFTEX2019 for the first time as we feel the event presents a unique opportunity

exhibition enables us to showcase our growing range of products and celebrate 30 years of supporting the lift & escalator industry within the UK & overseas.”

Long-time supporter, Global Lift Equipment will be returning for 4th time. Managing Director, Helen Roberts, who is on the event’s Steering Group: “We never miss a LIFTEX event. Not only does it offer the chance to network and attract new clients, but it gives us the rare opportunity to meet with all our existing clients in one place at the same time. The buzz at the show is fantastic, and I would certainly recommend it to everyone in our industry – you can’t afford to miss it.”

The excitement around this eagerly anticipated show is already building and it is certain that it will be the place to be in May 2019 for anyone involved in the lift, escalator and access industries.

SEMINAR PROGRAMME A hugely popular feature of the event is always the free seminar sessions. In 2019, the stellar line up of speakers will deliver thoughtprovoking and professionally focussed series of talks and presentations on topics such as BREXIT, connectivity, careers, evacuation, modernisation and safety, as well as the latest on new standards and regulations. The 2019 seminar line-up will be announced in the autumn.

For more information: visit

www.liftex2019.com

BOOK YOUR STAND TODAY! LIFTEX 2019 is supported by:

Call Stephen Ingram on

+44 (0)1963 44 1234 or email stephen.ingram@liftex2019.com


ELEVCON 2018

Berlin hosts 22nd IAEE Congress on Elevator Technology.

by Dr. Lee Gray, EW Correspondent photos by Bülent Yılmaz

Several companies exhibited in an intimate expo.

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The 22nd biennial congress of the International Association of Elevator Engineers (IAEE) took place in Berlin on May 22-24. The congress steering committee was composed of IAEE President and Elevcon 2018 Chairman Ami Lustig (Eng. S. Lustig, Consulting Engineers Ltd., Israel), President Emeritus John Inglis (OAM, Australia), John Antona (Vertical Transport Technology Corp., U.S.), Robert Nicholson (Architectural Elevator Consulting, U.S.), Dr. Albert So (IAEE Hong Kong-China Branch), IAEE Administrative Board Chairman Joseph Stier (Belgium), and Sefa Targit (president of the Turkish Elevator and Escalator Industry Association). The program featured 31 paper presentations and one workshop; the papers were published in Elevator Technology 22: Proceedings of Elevcon 2018. The congress had 138 registrants from 25 countries representing approximately 90 different companies and organizations from North America, Europe, the Middle East and Asia. The companies and organizations included elevator system manufacturers, component manufacturers, consultants, trade organizations, media, standards associations, research groups and universities. Elevcon exhibiters included Elevator World, Inc.; Elevatori; Lift-Report; ELFIN GmbH; Giovenzana International B.V.; Langer & Laumann Ing.-Büro GmbH; Magnetek; Chr. Mayr GmbH + Co. KG; NeXt group e.V.; Pizzato Elettrica S.r.l.; Schwartz GmbH Technical Plastics; SICOR S.P.A.; and Warner Electric Europe.

ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

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The congress opened with three welcoming addresses: one from Lustig and two from representatives of Germany. Gunther Adler, state secretary at the Federal Ministry of the Interior, Building and Community, welcomed congress attendees to Germany and Berlin, and Thomas Pfaff, chairman of the German Committee for Lifts, offered an industry welcome. Lustig’s welcoming remarks included a brief overview of the challenges represented by the industry’s increasing reliance on web-based products and systems. His comments focused on the dangers of computer hacking and the need to balance innovation with appropriate safety measures. The topics identified by Lustig included digital technologies, innovation and safety. Perhaps not surprisingly, these also served as the focus of many of the papers later presented.

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Baygur

Ana Gómez receives the Elevatori High Tech Award. from Guido Bruschi.

Pfaff

Adler

So

Lustig

Digital topics addressed included predictive maintenance, custom elevator manufacturing, door sensor systems, car/passenger communications systems and traffic analysis. Ana Gómez (Control and Monitoring Area, IK4-Ikerlan, Spain) was the lead author on “A Virtual Sensing Approach for Predictive Maintenance in Elevators.” Her coauthors were Oscar Salgado (IK4-Ikerlan), Ekaitz Estaben (Mechanical and Industrial Production Department, Mondragón University, Spain), and Inge Isasa and Xabier Hernández (Mechanical Engineering Department, Orona EIC S. Coop., Spain). The paper described the use of “virtual sensors” to detect electrical and mechanical faults and the validation of this methodology through a lab-scaled elevator test bench designed to simulate the operational characteristics of a 1:1 traction elevator. Gómez’s paper was selected as the recipient of the Elevatori High Tech Award. Two other papers also addressed this topic: Rami Aro (Weidmüller Schweiz AG, Switzerland) and Carlos Paiz Gatica (Weidmüller Interface GmbH & Co. KG, Germany)’s “Predictive Maintenance — Smart Services Enabled by Industrial Analytics” and Krishna Mohan Mishra, Tomi R. Krogerus and Kalevi J. Huhtala (Tampere University of Technology, Finland)’s “Fault Detection of Elevator Systems Using Automated Feature Extraction and Classification.”

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Louis Bialy asks a question from the floor.

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Fabio Liberali (LU-VE Group) coauthored a paper with Alessandro Cremaschi (TGD s.p.a.) titled “Gateway, the Magic Mirror: IoT Application for Lift Cars.” The authors’ reference to the Internet of Things (IoT) was one of several made during the congress to this important contemporary intellectual concept and digital reality. Liberali and Cremaschi presented a web-linked interactive-mirror display system for use in elevator cars. The mirrored surface acts as a touchscreen that allows a wide range of functions, from providing general information to facilitating realtime emergency support for passengers.

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Sorsa

Digital technologies (both hardware and software) have been critical aspects of traffic-analysis strategies throughout the 21st century, and papers on traffic analysis have been a normative component

Hatori

Thöny

Noda

Two papers addressed the replacement of traditional elevator door light curtains with digital solutions. Shuhei Noda (Toshiba) was the lead author on “Door Safety Function for Elevators Using Video Analysis,” which was coauthored with Kentaro Yokoi, Hiroshi Sukegawa, Teh Kok Long and Sayumi Kimura (Toshiba). Noda, et al. proposed a door safety system that employs a camera-based photoelectric sensor utilizing video-analysis technology to detect movement and prevent door closure (SMART DOOR™). The system features included a wider detection area and precise movement detection.

Christian-Erik Thöny (CEDES) offered a different solution in his paper “Historic Change in Elevator Door Sensors — Light Curtains Are Set to Become History, Replaced by Intelligent TOF Technology.” Time-of-flight (TOF) refers to the length of time between the emission of a signal from a sensor, the signal striking an object and its reflection back to the sensor. Thöny described the “TOFgard” sensor, which extends the sensor field across the entire door front and provides improved entrance monitoring and passenger counting, while preventing unintended car movement.

Liberali

Ali Baygur (Geta Asansör San. Tic. A.Ş.) discussed the manufacture of elevator systems utilizing parametric design software accessed via a web interface. This approach was described as particularly useful in fabricating systems in a timely manner for nonstandard settings. Baygur’s paper, in many ways, described a 21st-century version of a 19th-century process. In the 1800s, many elevator catalogs included a template and list of the basic information required to build an elevator for a given installation (shaft size, floor-to-floor heights, length of run, etc.). Prospective customers would send the requested data via mail, and the manufacturer would provide a quote in return mail. The use of a web interface to submit a client’s data both updates – and improves on – this older process, as well as linking it to modern computerized manufacturing techniques.

www.elevation.co.uk


of past Elevcon congresses. However, somewhat surprisingly, only two papers presented in Berlin (compared to a typical average of six to seven papers) addressed this topic. Janna Sorsa (KONE) presented “Fulfilling the Potential of Double-Deck Destination Control System,” and Takahiro Hatori (Building Systems Business Unit, Hitachi, Ltd.) presented “Development of People Flow Simulator for Smooth Movement of People in a Building,” coauthored with Fujiwara Masayasu (R&D Group, Hitachi) and Toriyabe Satoru (Building Systems Business Unit, Hitachi). The latter paper addressed the application of Hitachi’s people-flow simulator to both traditional hall-call and destination-floor reservation systems. Papers on the development of safety standards and codes have also been a mainstay of past Elevcon congresses, and, in this case, Berlin was no exception. Four papers address this topic. Louis Bialy (Louis Bialy and Associates) presented “Towards Greater Uniformity of Worldwide Elevator Standards,” which addressed increased participation in International Organization for Standardization activities by industry members from the Asia-Pacific Area (APA). Tijmen M.J. Molema (Liftinstituut) presented “Safety in 2028, Predicting the Safety Level of Future Standards.” His paper included a call for more thorough and comprehensive accident data collection. Ada Y.S. Fung (Construction Industry Council of Hong Kong) discussed the development of safety standards in Hong Kong between 2010 and 2016. The result of this initiative was the publication of a four-volume work titled Guidelines on Safety of Lift Shaft Works. The volumes offer an interesting safety standard model and are available as PDF downloads. They are titled as followed:

1. During Construction Stage and Before Handing Over to Lift Installation Contractor 2. During Lift Installation Stage until Issue of Occupation 3. Throughout the Occupation Stage of Building 4. Builders’ Lift Within Lift Shaft The congress also featured papers and a workshop that highlighted topics that may, perhaps, be considered under the heading “everything old is new again.” The first of these was a session on hydraulic elevators, which included two papers and a workshop/ panel discussion. Thomas Birnbaum (MQuattrolifts GmbH) presented “The Comeback of the Hydraulic Lift,” which discussed the results of a study conducted by the European Lift and Lift Component Association (ELCA) and the Technological Institute of Aragon. The study examined the lifecycle energy costs and environmental impact of hydraulic elevators. The goal was to dispel myths about these systems that, according to Birnbaum, had resulted in a dramatic decline in the use of hydraulic elevators in Europe. Kjell Johansson (Hydroware AB) and Magnus Landberg (SAAB AB) expanded on this topic in “HILA – A New Compact MRL Hydraulic Lift for Mid-Rise Buildings.” Their paper described a new approach to hydraulic elevator design using a “hydraulic infinite linear actuator” (HILA). The operation of this system was depicted in a video available at bit.ly/2JNp5Os. Johansson and Landberg were runners-up for the Elevatori High Tech Award. The session concluded with a workshop/panel discussion: “The Return of the Hydraulic Lift” chaired by Luc Rivet (ELCA) that included Johansson, Birnbaum and Ferhat Çelik (Blain Hydraulics GmbH).

Attendees at the Reichstag Building

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Wolfram Vogel (publicly certified expert for elevator, rope, and lifting technologies) and Klaus Sautter (Sautter Lift Components GmbH & Co. KG) coauthored the second paper on “old” technology. Titled “Innovative Drum Elevators — Minimal Drum Dimensions — Small Ropes,” the paper discussed the potential return of drum elevator machines. The new machines, designed to be lightweight, energy efficient and occupy minimal shaft space, could easily be placed in buildings that might not accommodate a typical machine-room-less (MRL) system. This proposed utility echoes the rationale behind the initial development of the electric drum machine in the 1890s. These machines were designed for use in older buildings that did not have sufficient space to accommodate late 19th-century hydraulic machines. In contrast to these “old” technologies, the congress included a paper that presented a “new” vision for vertical transportation. Lars Hesselgren (PLP/ Architecture) was the lead author of “The Future of Integrated Transport in the Digital Age,” coauthored with Doguscan Aladag (PLP/Architecture) and Rubert Cruise (Linear Motion Technologies Ltd.). The proposed design employed linear motors to drive “SkyPods” along a “digitally controlled transportation system.” The operational metaphor was an urban transportation system, with the Skypods moving in both directions along straight and curving tracks. This idea was also the subject of a paper presented in 2014 at Elevcon 20 (“The Articulated Funiculator”). And, it should be noted, it represents the revisioning of an over-100-year-old industry goal — the development of a continuous elevator system that flows seamlessly through a building.

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Hesselgren

Vogel

Birnbaum

Molema

An attractive installation on the streets of Berlin

Johansson

There were, of course, many other papers and presentations worthy of comment; however, it is not possible in a brief article to touch on all of the highlights of Elevcon 22. It is, however, important to note that the congress successfully fulfilled, as it has in the past, the critical goal of providing an excellent venue for conversations, networking and renewing old and making new friendships. Among the activities that facilitated these interactions were various social events, which included a late afternoon bus tour of Berlin, followed by dinner featuring excellent German food and, of course, good beer. Be sure to check www.elevcon.com for details on Elevcon 2020. E

www.elevation.co.uk


PRO

R EA

PROJECT OF THE YEAR – 2019

OF THE Y T C JE

Submit your vertical, horizontal or inclined transportation system of an innovative design, special application or approach that has solved a major problem or overcome a unique challenge to the ELEVATOR WORLD 21st Annual Project of the Year Awards. PROJECTS WILL BE JUDGED ON: • Innovation • Originality and creativity • Challenges overcome • Installation methods and techniques • Use of advanced technology and overall quality of presentation CATEGORIES: • Elevators – New Construction • Elevators – Modernization • Escalators – New Construction • Escalators – Modernization

• Inclined Elevators • Platform Lifts + Stairway Chairlifts • Private-Residence Elevators • Special-Purpose Lifts

• Moving Walks All entries will be judged and categorized as received by an impartial panel of experienced industry experts and professionals. Winning entries will be published in the January 2019 issue of ELEVATOR WORLD. Winners in each category will be acknowledged with an award of recognition.

Deadline for entries

SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

For contest rules & requirements, visit –

elevatorworld.com/poy


CONTRACTOR’S LIABILITY FOR DESIGN

BY JONATHAN HAWKSWELL

Contract Matters

CONSTRUCTION LAW UPDATE -

E

In SSE Generation Ltd (“SSE”) v Hochtief Solutions AG (“Hochtief”), the Inner House of the Court of Session in Scotland considered the liability arising out of the collapse of a tunnel at a hydro-electric scheme. Although this decision is not binding in the courts of England and Wales, it is likely to be persuasive and has the potential for an appeal to the Supreme Court. This case re-considers the issues of liability for design and the ambit of exclusions under NEC2.

discovered that the works did not have a design life of 75 years, the works would not have been in accordance with the Works Information, and there would have been a defect. The Court found that the collapse of the tunnel after less than six months was conclusive evidence that the works, as built, did not have a design life of 75 years, and this was a defect under the first limb.

Background

The design documents accepted by the project manager provided that erodible rock encountered in the tunnel was to be shotcreted if not already covered/protected by steel rib support. The absence of shotcreting in areas of erodible rock meant that that part of the works was not in accordance with the design accepted by the project manager and was, therefore, a defect under the contract.

SSE engaged Hochtief to design and build a hydroelectric scheme at Fort Augustus in Scotland under an amended form of NEC2 Option A. The scheme included a tunnel extending over 8km from a reservoir formed at the head of Glen Tarff to Loch Ness. The works were taken over by SSE in December 2008, and by April 2009, a catastrophic collapse had occurred in a substantial section of the tunnel resulting in the closure of the power station. Hochtief declined to carry out the remedial works without being paid. Therefore, SSE instructed another contractor to carry out those works at a cost of around £137 million. Where in the contract did the risk for collapse lie? Clause 80.1 of the contract provided that the risk of loss or damage to the works after takeover rested with SSE, unless that loss or damage occurred before the issue of the Defects Certificate and was due to a defect that existed at takeover. Therefore, if the collapse was not due to a defect, the risk remained with SSE. However, if it was caused by a defect, the risk lay with Hochtief. The contract defined a defect as either a part of the works that is not in accordance with the Works Information, or a part of the works designed by the contractor that is not in accordance with the contractor’s design accepted by the project manager. Limb one: 75-year design life The Works Information required a design life of 75 years. Applying the decision in Mt Hojgaard v E.ON, the Court concluded that this did not amount to a warranty that the works would have a lifetime of 75 years, but rather that they had been designed to last for 75 years. The majority of the judges hearing the case held that SSE had the whole of the two-year defects period to determine if the works did indeed have that design life. If, during that period, SSE Page 22 - i96

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Limb two: the contractor’s accepted design

Did Option M protect Hochtief? Option M of the contract provided: “The contractor’s liability for defects due to his design that are not listed on the defects certificate is limited so far as he proves he used reasonable skill and care to ensure it complied with the works information.” Having established that the collapse resulted from a defect existing at takeover, the question was whether Hochtief could rely on Option M of the contract to escape liability. The Court held that the collapse of the tunnel was due to the failure to shotcrete areas of erodible rock. However, that was a failure in the implementation of the design, not in the design itself. Option M, therefore, did not engage, and Hochtief was liable for the cost of repairs. The Court held: “The Defect was not one of design but rather implementation of design. It was that failure in implementation of the design which resulted in the fact that the tunnel on hand over did not have a design life of 75 years. Option M therefore does not come in to play at all. It does not relieve the defenders from liability.” Accordingly, Hochtief was found liable for the cost of repairing the collapsed section of tunnel in the sum of £107m.

ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

www.elevation.co.uk


BY JONATHAN HAWKSWELL

E

CONSTRUCTION LAW UPDATE CONTRACTOR’S LIABILITY FOR DESIGN

Analysis

CONTACT DETAILS

The contractual definition of defect was crucial to this case and shows how detailed drafting allows the parties to allocate risk and apportion liability as they see fit. However, the judgment touches on a difficult distinction between design and workmanship and arguably adds further complexity to that issue with the introduction of the concept of “implementing the design”. The fact that Hochtief had exercised reasonable skill and care in implementing the design was irrelevant as it was not covered by Option M. NEC3 Option X15 and NEC4 Option X15.1 provide similar exclusions to Option M, and this decision clearly raises questions about the scope of protection they afford to contractors.

Hawkswell Kilvington Limited 17 Navigation Court 28 Queen Street Calder Park London Wakefield EC4R 1BB WF2 7BJ

It is anticipated that, given the £107million liability that follows this judgment, Hochtief will seek to appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

T: 01924 258719 W: www.hklegal.co.uk E: enquiries@hklegal.co.uk This article contains information of general interest about current legal issues, but does not provide legal advice. It is prepared for the general information of our clients and other interested parties. This article should not be relied upon in any specific situation without appropriate legal advice. If you require legal advice on any of the issues raised in this article, please contact one of our specialist construction lawyers. © Hawkswell Kilvington Limited 2018

Your first port of call for legal advice and solutions involving Contract procurement, Adjudication, Mediation, Conciliation, Arbitration or Litigation. We have built an enviable reputation in providing legal advice to the construction industry. Hawkswell Kilvington LLP 17 Navigation Court Calder Park Wakefield WF2 7BJ Tel: 01924 258719 Fax: 01924 257666 Email: enquiries@thkp.co.uk

www.thkp.co.uk www.elevation.co.uk

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Talking Tall

Planning for a Taller London with Jules Pipe By Daniel Sararik In the past decade, London has grappled with growing pains and critical questions about how its urban landscape should be developed. More than 200 buildings of 20 stories or greater were approved or under construction by the end of the Boris Johnson mayoralty. This provoked a strong reaction from a broad spectrum of the community, which founded the Skyline Campaign in 2014 to call for a sensible, managed approach to development that would balance priorities of development, preservation, equity and urban character. In May 2016, Sadiq Khan became the new Mayor of London, and made the review of the London Plan, the strategic document directing the city’s development, a key objective of his administration, with impact on many of these issues. The New London Plan is out for public consultation through autumn 2018, and scheduled to be in force by 2019, until 2046. Your author interviewed Jules Pipe, London’s Deputy Mayor for Planning, Regeneration and Skills, the lead person in the new administration responsible for the revision of the London Plan.

Jules Pipe, London’s Deputy Mayor of Planning

What do you think of the Skyline Campaign (a multi-party lobbying campaign against “badly designed buildings in inappropriate locations”)? Has it helped or hurt London economically, culturally, etc.? Here at City Hall, we welcome the debate generated by the Skyline Campaign. While it is important to remember that this was launched during the previous Mayoralty, there is no doubt that it has stimulated some very interesting debate about tall buildings in London. Do you think tall buildings are important to London’s global competitiveness? Where should they be located? London’s skyline has been transformed beyond recognition in recent decades, and now many

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global corporations operate their businesses out of tall buildings. The Mayor and I believe that the city should continue to welcome such investment, showing that London is open to international business, trade and talent. We must, however, make sure that they are only built in suitable areas, contribute positively to the skyline and their locality, and if they are residential developments they should contribute to easing the capital’s housing crisis. A draft version of the London Plan was made available in November 2017, which will include stronger policies to ensure new tall buildings respect the character of existing neighborhoods.

Manhattan Loft Gardens, London.

What do you make of recent objections to buildings, that now rise behind, as well as in front of, landmarks such as St. Paul’s Cathedral? The Mayor is strongly in favor of development where it delivers the homes Londoners need, but this must be balanced with respect for the capital’s heritage. The [United Kingdom’s National] Government is devolving powers to the Mayor over consultation on buildings which appear in designated views. Under these new powers, Mayor Khan will ensure The Friends of Richmond Park, St. Paul’s and Historic England are consulted if any further developments could impact on this view of the cathedral in the future. As part of this process, he will review the London View Management Framework more widely to avoid situations like this in the future. How can London bridge the gap between its substantial shortfall in affordable housing and its restrictions on tall buildings? The Mayor has been clear that solving London’s housing crisis will be a marathon and not a sprint. Affordable home delivery was at near-standstill when Mr. Khan took office. In 2016, the previous mayor delivered the lowest number of new affordable homes since current records began back in 1991 – just 4,880 – and left a legacy of just 13% affordable homes coming forward through planning permissions granted under his watch. Since then, the Mayor has been working hard to put the foundations in place towards delivering the affordable housing London

ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

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Talking Tall Planning for a Taller London with Jules Pipe needs. He recently secured a record US$3.96 billion deal from Government to deliver 90,000 genuinely affordable homes over the next five years. He has also released new planning guidance, which sets out how affordable housing will be boosted through the planning system towards Mr. Khan’s long-term goal of half of new homes being affordable. The London Plan has never contained a presumption against tall buildings, but has always set out that tall building projects needed to be not only well designed, but also in the right place. How do you feel about the argument that the many tall luxury residential buildings are “safe deposit boxes in the sky” and represent an antisocial visitation of global capitalism upon the city? Should there be more regulation of these types of buildings, or stronger requirements for affordable housing/mixed-income projects? London is open to people and investment from around the world. We welcome people from all countries who want to make the capital their home, and we welcome international investment that can be crucial in kick-starting the building of new homes. At the same time, many Londoners have real concerns about new homes being left empty and the fact that this may be linked to those which are bought off-plan by overseas investors. It’s time we took a closer look at the issues surrounding overseas investment and found out the true impact on London’s housing crisis. We are pleased that the London School of Economics has agreed to lead on this important research, which

Manhattan Loft Gardens has been criticized for marring background views of St. Paul’s Cathedral.

is set to be the most thorough investigation of its kind in the country and will provide a much clearer understanding of this complex issue. Tall social housing in the UK has been stigmatized for a variety of reasons, most starkly in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster. Is there opportunity for a new kind of social housing that better reflects contemporary needs? Estate regeneration has an important role to play in London, offering the chance to improve the quality of homes, including those in tall buildings, together with open space, and to increase the number of new and genuinely affordable homes. The Mayor has been clear that local residents must be at the heart of estate regeneration in the capital, and that is one of the core principles of his good practice guide, which he is consulting Londoners on. Should there be a pan-London tall buildings strategy, as proposed by the Skyline Campaign, including a 3D interactive model? Who should pay for and maintain it?

London housing completions five-year forecast for 2017-2021.

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The Mayor is determined to work closer than ever before with the London boroughs to ensure a strategic approach to the positioning of tall buildings in London. A 3D model has already been developed for large parts of London, which we have used to assess tall building policy in key Opportunity Areas. This has provided a useful tool for engaging with local communities on the potential impacts of tall buildings, as well as proving a useful tool for negotiating with developers.

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Talking Tall Planning for a Taller London with Jules Pipe Broadly, how do you think tall buildings can or will fit into your vision for the new London Plan? There is no doubt that tall buildings that are welldesigned and in keeping with their local settings do have a role in London. The new London Plan, will include stronger policies to ensure new tall buildings respect the character of existing neighborhoods and explores how we can increase density to build more homes for Londoners. In the current London Plan draft out for review, there are quite a few controlling descriptions of buildings that are qualitative rather than quantitative. How will words like “attractive” or “interesting” be enforceable when future applications come before the Mayor? Planning decisions have always involved assessing the qualitative as well as the quantitative aspects of a development. However, the new London Plan places greater importance on design quality than the current Plan. Policy D2 details how good design can be delivered, and this will help the implementation of other policies, including on tall buildings. Do you expect that the Fire Safety policy guidelines will be updated or changed pending the outcome of the Grenfell Tower inquiry? Would the deadline for consideration of the London Plan be pushed back if new information should emerge from the Grenfell case? No, the London Plan timetable will not be pushed back, as this would risk the whole Plan not being adopted in this Mayoralty. There is always a changing landscape of Government policy and other factors, and we can deal with these changes through an Examination in Public or an alteration to the adopted plan, if necessary.

But please be assured that Policy D11 requires that development proposals must meet the absolute highest standards of fire safety. They do not state how this should be achieved or specify construction methods, products or materials. But developers would be expected to justify their choices and how their proposals satisfy the very highest standards. Proposals should therefore take into account information which may emerge following the public inquiry or the independent review of the building regulations, or any future changes to standards or regulations. It seems that final discretion on tall building height and location is devolved to individual boroughs. Is this a change of practice? How does the issue of one local borough making a decision that affects a city-wide dimension, such as view corridors, get resolved? The current policies require boroughs to determine where tall buildings may be appropriate. The new policy is clearer that boroughs need to identify areas where tall buildings are acceptable in principle through the plan-making process. When identifying these locations, boroughs will need to assess the impact of other policies in the Plan – such as those on strategic views – and ensure there is no conflict.E Daniel Safarik is Senior Editor at the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. This article is printed with permission from CTBUH. It originally appeared in the CTBUH Journal 2018 Issue II.

London skyline from City Hall

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Improve safety with Alimak Hek Retrofit an Alimak Hek rack & pinion lift on your industrial facility to improve safety. Other benefits include reduced plant downtime, improved productivity, greater worker satisfaction, faster movement of personnel & materials, reduced manual handling, easier access for inspections, and a permanent lift will eliminate the need for a temporary construction hoist during outage periods. An example of just some of the industries Alimak lifts are used in:

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Moving Forward “What are you doing here?” It’s a question that Stephanie, one of our engineering apprentices, is often asked when she turns up on construction sites to work on lift installations. “People’s jaws drop when they see me as there are hardly any women,” she said. “If I had a pound for every person who has commented, I wouldn’t have to work!” Women constitute just 13% of construction workers in the UK, and it’s vital to increase their numbers to address the skills shortage the sector is facing. This requires a change in culture and behaviours to make people from different backgrounds feel welcome and accepted into engineering and other technical roles in the lift industry. There’s still a lot of work to be done in closing the gender perception gap on engineering. Women make up just 12% of the engineering workforce. Only 60% of girls ages 11 to 14 think about becoming an engineer, compared to 72% of boys, according to a recent report by EngineeringUK.

By Sarah Dixon Managing Director Express Lift Co.

Studies on gender disparity in engineering show it is linked to several factors, including poor knowledge of what an engineering career is; lack of visible role models; self-efficacy and identity; and girls dropping out of the educational pipeline at every decision point, despite generally performing better than boys in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) subjects at school. The leaky pipeline as female engineers climb the career ladder does not help either. What can we do as an industry to position ourselves as diverse and inclusive enough to attract talent, allowing us to reverse this trend? The business case for diversity and inclusion is clear. According to research from McKinsey, gender diverse companies are 15% more likely to outperform their peers, and ethnically diverse companies are 35% more likely to do the same. It’s also a prominent theme in the analysis from Forbes that workforce diversity and inclusion are key drivers of internal innovation and business growth. With the UK population projected to increase from an estimated 65.6 million in mid-2016 to 69.2 million in mid-2026, infrastructure and housing will be the Female field employees are working together under FORWARD to encourage more women into the lift industry Picture: Otis UK & Ireland

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biggest growth drivers of the construction industry. The sector is facing a skills shortage to deliver the output and the talent pipeline that will be pioneering in its approach to creating the infrastructure needed. Developing talent Tall buildings are going to be a vital part of the future landscape. Developers are looking to build upwards to provide new places to work, play and live in; these buildings will require lifts and escalators. According to the New London Architecture, there are 510 buildings in the pipeline for the capital. These will require substantial improvements in the user experience – digitally driven and innovative buildings – that have their own unique maintenance challenges. The lift is the spine of the building – bringing together communities that must flourish to make social and economic contributions within their environments. Who will put in the lifts and escalators and maintain them? Productivity remains a key challenge on any lift installation or maintenance job. Retaining employees is a business must considering the difficulties and cost to attract talent in a highly competitive market. Developing, sponsoring and advancing employees within field operations is the mission of FORWARD, Otis’ new employee network. The field workforce is the face of our company to the customer. As the general population becomes more diverse, so too, do our customers. We must reflect the customers that we serve and better understand their needs. Our first initiative is focusing on fostering female talent through a series of internal and external outreach programs. Across Express Lift Co. and our parent company, Otis, our female employees are in field roles spanning from engineering apprentices, to new equipment and service engineers, from design engineers to project managers and safety managers.

I am a strong believer in the power of networks to mobilise employees, and provide sponsors, mentors, and ongoing support to enable them to understand the drivers of career acceleration and business outcomes. Ultimately, this is to provide exceptional customer service. Members of employee networks are two times less likely to leave the company and three times more likely to be engaged.   As the leader and co-sponsor of FORWARD in the UK and Ireland, it’s incredibly rewarding to experience the passion of our female field employees who want to become visible role models for potential entrants and each other. We have worked with STEMettes in Ireland, the organisation dedicated to encouraging girls to pursue STEM careers. Sabina, one of our service engineers, is an ambassador for the government apprenticeship scheme and is giving talks in schools and colleges about her path into the lift industry. We are creating mentoring and sponsorship connections to develop employees and provide sounding boards for ideas and innovation that shape the business. Senior male sponsors are also driving the diversity and inclusion agenda and learning from female colleagues about their experiences in the field and how to support them. Even for the requirements of the role, procuring female PPE wear is a step forward within our company in the advancement towards gender equality. We are in a new era where employees are asking: “What are we doing to bring in the next generation?” and “How do I progress?” It’s their feedback on the impact of FORWARD that is the most telling. “I’ll speak to colleagues and encourage going for opportunities that they otherwise may think that they may not be considered for,” wrote an employee after attending a FORWARD event. It’s that shift in selfbelief and identity that signals we’re moving in the right direction: Going up. E

Female field employees have launched the network FORWARD to improve diversity and inclusion in the talent pipeline. Picture: Otis UK & Ireland

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GRENFELL TOWER Inquiry Dr Barbara Lane's expert report Foreword by Dave Cooper Over the years, there have been many good papers on firefighting lifts, and I recall the papers given by both Roger Howkins and Peter Sumner on the subject. In my experience, confusion still reigns amongst various parties on the differences between a fireman’s lift and a firefighting lift. It is also regrettable that sometimes we see firefighting lifts being installed that are not fully compliant with the EN 81-72 standard. Such short cuts can make all the difference as to how the lift will perform when needed to do so in an emergency situation. We do also now have a standard for the modernisation of fireman’s lifts that does not appear to be widely known. Dr. Barbara Lane, at the Grenfell Inquiry, made mention of the lifts at Grenfell Tower and their failure to meet a firefighting standard. The building was, of course, constructed many years before the firefighting standards were written. In evidence, she said, “Whilst this did not in any way contribute to the fire, … it would have a direct influence on the eventual performance of the fire safety measures on the night of the fire.” We have included pages 66 to 74 of her statement for your consideration.

As a result of my understanding of the works carried out to Grenfell Tower since 1974, I provided in section 4 of my report the specific refurbishment works that I considered to be relevant to my investigation of the active and passive systems that existed in Grenfell Tower. This is due to their direct influence on the eventual performance of the fire safety measures on the night of the fire. These are: the lift replacement works in 2005; the tenant flat entrance door replacement in 2011; the refurbishment works between 2012 and 2016; and the new tenant gas supply, which was incomplete the night of the fire. I will deal with each of these in turn in the next series of presentations. The first of the relevant works is in relation to the lifts provided in Grenfell Tower and so the status of that lift provision the night of the fire. Works were undertaken in 2005, as I said, with further works undertaken during the primary refurbishment. Both works are relevant to the fire safety status of the lifts the night of the fire. I will, therefore, describe the works during both time-frames here. The original plan drawings for Grenfell Tower indicate three lifts were installed. As this image shows, this included a small lift connecting ground level to level 3. This small lift was located in the southeast corner of the building. It was ultimately removed as part of the primary refurbishment works and so I have not considered it any further. The remaining two lifts, as you can see, were located centrally in the building, opening out into the lobby between each flat and the single protected escape stair. Access to the two main original passenger lifts was provided from the original ground level lobby

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and at level 2. Access to these two lifts on upper floors was provided on every floor between level 4 and level 23. These central lifts did not serve level 1 and level 3. Therefore, these passenger lifts were for the purposes of accessing the floors in the tower with flats only. Before describing the works undertaken to the lifts in Grenfell Tower, I want to first describe the two types of lift for firefighting. There are two types in the context of Grenfell Tower because, since the tower was built, the requirements for lifts for firefighting has changed. This occurred in 1992. Therefore, understanding the lift requirements for firefighting before and after 1992 is relevant. For lifts to be suitable for firefighting, they require special features to allow the Fire Brigade to access them during a fire and for the lifts to be robust enough to continue operating in a fire scenario. Since 1971, prior to the construction of Grenfell Tower, there has been a requirement for the provision of a lift which may be used by the Fire Brigade within high-rise residential buildings. At that time, lifts with specific firefighting provisions were referred to as fire lifts. In 1992, the name used to describe these lifts changed to firefighting lifts, and the required safety provisions to enable lifts to be safely used by firefighters in a fire was changed also. This term, firefighting lift, and the associated requirements for such lifts are in general still in force today. To understand the fire safety features for a lift, it is useful to understand the basic components of a lift system and the terms used to describe it. These are illustrated in this image.

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Our Services Lift Modernisation to Client Specification and Design Architraves manufactured and re-skinned Doors manufactured and re-skinned On site and in-house paint spraying Safety guarding to all equiptment In-house engraving and etching 2D and 3D CAD drawing office with solidworks rendering Entrance protection rental including installation and removal Making good builders works Vinyl lettering and screen printing Cop, lop and pedestal manufacture Bespoke lift industry equipment fitted State of the art showroom with new lifts built in workshop* COSHH risk and methods at quotation stage D.D.A improvements to all lift equipment Scenic lifts and canopies

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GRENFELL TOWER Inquiry Dr Barbara Lane's expert report People or goods are transported within the lift car, which is suspended by cables directly affixed to the lift car. A lift machine, typically located in a machine room at the top of the lift, drives and stops the lifts. A counterweight is used for traction. The lift is housed within a vertical shaft. Openings in these shafts at each floor of the building allow people to access the lift. The lift landing doors positioned in each of these openings allow controlled access to the lift car and to the shaft itself. The original code of practice for fire safety as applied at the time of construction of Grenfell Tower is, again, CP3, dated 1971, and it describes the provisions to be made for a fire lift. I have illustrated the key features required for a fire lift at the time of construction of Grenfell Tower on this image. The requirements are that the fire lift should serve every residential floor, a fire switch should be provided whereby firefighters can obtain and control the use of a lift without interference from other persons, and the requirement of a maximum distance between the stair and lift of no more than 10 metres. The lift car should have a platform area of not less than 1.5 metres squared, a capacity of 550 kilograms and reach the top floor from ground level within one minute. Finally, the requirement that the electrical supply to any fire lift should be provided by a sub-main circuit exclusive to the lift, with the cable supplying current passing through routes of negligible fire risk. If we now consider the fire safety requirements for a firefighting lift, there is a clear difference in standard. As I have illustrated in this image, the number of features required in a firefighting lift as required from 1992 onwards is substantially greater. Of the 15 features required for the new firefighting lift, three of those provisions were also required for the historic fire lift shown here in blue. They relate to the size of the lift car, the minimum travel time for the lift to reach the top floor and the provision of a fire switch for the Fire Brigade. Four of the 15 required features for a firefighting lift were also required for a fire lift, but a higher standard is now required. I have shown those features in orange. For example, the lift is required to serve every floor, not just residential floors. The power supply is required to be fire protected, not routed through areas of negligible fire risk. The minimum capacity of the lift car has increased to 630 kilograms. Finally, there are eight additional fire safety features required for a firefighting lift compared to a fire lift, which I've shown in blue/grey here. These are more substantial features. For example, two independent power supplies for the lift in case of power failure to the

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main supply; water protection to the lift; the provision of an escape hatch to the lift car; fire-resisting landing doors; a two-way intercom communication device between access level, the lift car and the machinery room. This was the standard required for lifts used at the time of the lift replacement work in 2005 and, subsequently, in 2012 to 2016. The standard of lift for firefighting is also relevant to the use of lifts for evacuation. The current version of Approved Document B which was applicable at the time of the primary refurbishment permits the use of lifts which meet the standard of a firefighting lift to be used as an evacuation lift. This provision applies to firefighting lifts only and not to historic fire lifts. In general, this is because of the higher standard of protection now provided to firefighting lifts. I will now explain the lift replacement works. A complete replacement of the central lift system was undertaken in 2005. From reviewing the specification within the health and safety file prepared for the works, the standard of lifts specified then was consistent with the historic fire lift standard and not the firefighting standard applicable in 2005. Further modification works were also undertaken during the primary refurbishment. The scope of this modification was to increase the number of floors served by the two central lifts. During these works, the lifts were not upgraded either to the applicable firefighting standard. The scope of the lift refurbishment works in 2005 was substantial. It included replacing all associated equipment and machinery. New lift cars were installed, new lift landing doors were installed, call points and controls. The openings in the lift shaft were also increased in width. The lift was not at this time upgraded to serve level 1 and 3 and, therefore, continued not to serve every floor of the building, as is required for a firefighting lift. Later during the primary refurbishment, new openings in the lift shaft were created on levels 1 and 3 as a way to access the new residential flats on these levels. Therefore, after the primary refurbishment, both lifts could be used to access every floor, as is required for the firefighting lift standard. During 2005, the two lift cars were increased in size and capacity. The plan drawing on the left indicates the smaller, original lift car and, on the right, the larger, replacement lift car. The openings in the lift shaft on every floor were widened to increase the clear entrance of the doors from 800 to 880 millimetres. The new capacity of 900 kilograms did meet the minimum standard for a firefighting lift.

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GRENFELL TOWER Inquiry Dr Barbara Lane's expert report The specification for the 2005 works also required a firefighter control switch to be installed. A firefighter control switch is required for both a fire lift and a firefighting lift. I observed two firefighter control switches in Grenfell Tower, photographs of which you can see here, one at ground level, where it is required, as this is the firefighter entry point to the building. I observed a second switch at level 2. This is not the firefighter entry point to the building. The 2016 fire risk assessment states that the control switch should then be changed from level 2 to ground level, indicating that, prior to 2016, the fire control switch at level 2 was operational. The 2005 specification also included an emergency intercom system which is required for a firefighting lift only; however, I've not yet been able to observe whether this system was installed on site. Therefore, following the 2005 and 2012 to 2016 works, the lifts specified for Grenfell Tower contained a number of fire safety features which I have highlighted in green in this illustration. These provisions satisfied the requirements for a historic fire lift; they did not satisfy all of the requirements for a firefighting lift as existed at the time of the 2005 and the 2012 to 2016 refurbishment works. Key features that were required to meet the standard but which were not specified are: a secondary power supply was not specified; electrical schematics showed it had an independent power supply, the exact cable routing is not known; the lift landing doors were not specified as requiring any fire resistance when they were required to have 60 minutes' fire resistance; no water protection measures were specified for electrical equipment within the lift car and well; an escape hatch was not specified for the replacement lift car. As the lifts were not specified to meet the standard of a firefighting lift, they could not, therefore, also be relied upon for evacuation because, as it states in Approved Document B, where a firefighting lift has been provided to satisfy requirement B5, this can be utilised as part of a management plan for evacuating disabled people. Any such plan should include a contingency for when the fire and rescue services arrive.

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That ends my lift talk. A full copy of the transcript can be found at https:// www.grenfelltowerinquiry.org.uk/hearings/expert-witnesspresentations A full copy of her report can be downloaded at https:// www.grenfelltowerinquiry.org.uk/evidence/dr-barbaralanes-expert-report.

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BY MARK WOODS

Management Matters

RE-THINKING MANAGEMENT THINKING – MANAGEMENT REACTIONS TO VARIATION

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Are you able to properly identify real “signals” from “noise” in your results and performance data? The quest to understand the differences in variation, to be able to differentiate “signals” from “noise” is based on Dr Shewhart’s desire to understand when it would be economic (read profitable) to investigate the results from his processes and, conversely, when it was not economic to spend time investigating results. Essentially, he wanted to be more productive with his time! And what he established nearly one hundred years ago still applies today. And, unless this approach to managing results is applied, and it is all too often not, you will be wasting time, effort and money, and you will be chasing your tail and taking knee jerk reactions to results that have absolutely no business being investigated. As was shown in the last article, many results are simply the product of chance. As a result of this quest, over the last few articles, we have introduced the concept of common cause and special cause variation. • Common cause requires us to look at the whole of the result set, over a longer period of time, to eliminate “common” problems and issues that occur throughout, in order to improve results • Special cause requires us to look at a single result to determine what is special about it The performance prediction chart is the tool that highlights the difference between the two causes of variation and ensures we don’t confuse the two…if we do …we’re highly likely to make things worse! Let’s now apply some of this thinking to the installation of lifts. Installations As we know, installations are the one-off project; they have a beginning, middle and an end, and key performance indicators are likely to include things like project profitability and on time delivery, both of which are problematic, as clients often change their minds, particularly with start dates, which can have a knock-on effect on all sorts of issues, including the profitability of the job …and the end date! However, when looking at key performance indicators, it is not uncommon to see the following types of “policies” in place: • “To control profitability all supervisors shall report on the profitability of all projects that are more than +/- 3% of the 10% profit target” What are your reactions to this type of policy? Does your organisation have policies like this? What are some of the effects? It would, therefore, be useful to have some data. If the profit target is 10%, investigations will be required for all projects returning less than 7% and all projects returning more than 13% (10 +/- 3%). So now, let’s look at the table below, which shows real data for 24 different installation projects:

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RE-THINKING MANAGEMENT THINKING – MANAGEMENT REACTIONS TO VARIATION

Using the +/- 3% rule, we can see that: • Projects 1, 2, 6, 9, 18, 19, 21 need to be investigated for performing at less than 7% and • Projects 8, 10, 14, 15, 17, 23 need to be investigated for performing at more than 13% That’s more than half the projects …and that’s a lot of work …no wonder people are busy! But, let’s look at this from a rethinking management thinking perspective. If we plot the data on a performance prediction chart, we can see the following: Project Profitability

The performance prediction chart gives us a much wider degree of variation than the +/- 3%. The degree of variation runs from -20.7% to +39%. Probably not what we wanted to see or hear! But, if we take out the obvious special causes, projects 15 and 21, we can see from the updated chart below that the range of variation is reduced to -7% to 26%! A bit better but still far too wide. It also makes a mockery of the completely arbitrary +/- 3% rule. It would not much matter if the target was 10% +/- 10% (that is, 0% to 20%). But, no one in their right mind is going to propose a target like that, are they …but the variation in the results is even wider than that! Project Profitability

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RE-THINKING MANAGEMENT THINKING – MANAGEMENT REACTIONS TO VARIATION

The starting point for improving the process would be to undertake investigations for only the special projects; now 15, 17 and 21 … a bit less work. So, instead of spending time investigating half the projects undertaken (as if they are all special), investigate the three that actually are special and re-direct attention and effort on all the others, looking to make small (or large) improvements across a range of processes that are “common”. This might include: • The prestart meeting activities • Site clearance • Management of design • The project management processes • Programme management • The purchasing activities • Health and safety arrangements • Progress and variations • Final account and close out It would be typical to review all existing processes; find out what people think works well and what works less well; share the stuff that works well; and “change” the activities that work less well for all future projects. Then, continue to plot the data to see if the “changes” made lead to an “improvement”. …but, another question to ask is, “Should we be happy with the average 9.5% return?” …does that mean we do nothing to ramp up the average profitability? Certainly not. This is where we need to employ other common cause improvement strategies. We need to dig deeper into the data looking into it from different perspectives. That is attempting to identify average project profitability for different sub sets of the work. This is called stratifying the data, and potential subsets include the size of the installation project (Are big projects more profitable than small?); the location of the project (Are closer projects more profitable than those further away?); whether the project manager / supervisor had certain training or experience (Are some people more profitable than others?); and the number of design changes during the project, etc., etc. I’m sure you can think of many, many sub sets. In this case, experience tells us that the most common relationship is between the size of the project and the variance of profitability. There are often smaller percentage variances in larger projects, even though the project value is higher. It may also be that the results ought to be stratified by the type of customers. It is often found that for some companies one type of customer group is considerably more profitable than others. Knowing this (rather than suspecting it), the sales and marketing efforts can then be more precisely targeted at these higher value customers. So, at this point, given we know the variation in profit is likely to be much wider than we might like, a “killer question” emerges! Should we manage to budget? Do we want people to manage to budget? Most managers unhesitatingly say “YES!” And, for some very good reasons. Managing to a budget: • Forces constraint • Facilitates the allocation of resources • Provides a basis for charging the customer • Helps to ensure a profit is made But these benefits can carry a heavy price. Suppose a supervisor advised that the project was headed for a 30-35% overrun. Would you still want them to manage to budget?

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RE-THINKING MANAGEMENT THINKING – MANAGEMENT REACTIONS TO VARIATION

Some managers say, “I don’t want them to stick to the original budget. I want the early warning, and we’ll adjust the budget.” This begs the question, “What does managing to a budget mean?” Other managers would say, “Yes, they still need to come in on budget. You can’t overspend your monthly pay packet without incurring some serious implications, can you?” So, what happens in these cases? Effort is focused on one (or more) of three potential options: • Improving the system • Distorting the data (figures) – costs are not declared or are charged to other projects • Distorting the system – work is not done, and items are left out of the build Which do you think happens most frequently? I’d put money on the fact that it’s not improving the system! The behaviour it drives produces a sub-standard output of either the product delivered to the customer or the numbers delivered to the top team; either way, it keeps the senior team from seeing the reality of things; things are carefully camouflaged, which results in a situation analogous to ships sailing in fog; it is difficult to see the iceberg ahead! So, the disadvantages of managing to budgets are numerous: • It promotes short-term business decisions – it optimises the cost of the individual project at the expense of the relationship with the client • Customer, quality and perhaps even safety are compromised • It stifles creativity (except in encouraging people to find creative ways to meet the numbers) • People spend whether they need to or not • It leads to tampering Conclusion It you • • • • •

want to properly improve your processes, you will need to: Stop using arbitrary targets Properly identify “signals” from “noise” For which you’ll need the performance prediction chart Take different actions for “signals” from “noise” Continue to use the performance prediction chart to see if the actions taken have led to an improvement

In summary, for almost everyone the performance prediction chart does a much better job of facilitating the impact of variation than that that can be manged by a simple table or list. However, as the above results show, you might not like the answers! But, more positively, the performance prediction chart provides the thinking and tools to make changes that reduce the variation; it separates “signals” from “noise”. For additional information please feel free to call me directly on 07976 426 286 or email me on mwoods@statius.co.uk References: Brian L Joiner, Fourth Generation Management (McGraw-Hill Inc). Dr W. Edwards Deming, Out of the Crisis (The MIT Press)

MARK WOODS Mark Woods has a background in engineering. After completing an award winning apprenticeship he completed a degree in Mechanical and Production Engineering. He also has an MBA from Bradford University where he studied with Professor J.S. Oakland, the world’s first Professor of Total Quality Management. During the time he spent in industry he gained extensive experience of both implementing new technology and strategic appraisal. Mark is now a managing partner of Statius Management Services, a management consultancy specialising in performance improvement a subject on which Mark has published a number of papers and articles.

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The Next Generation Lift Control System


Product Spotlight

Traffic Analysis for High Rise Buildings to Be Modernized New KONE product improves analysis for projects during and after modernization. By Darren Batey and Mikko Kontturi This paper was presented at Madrid 2016, the International Congress on Vertical Transportation Technologies, and first published in IAEE book Elevator Technology 21, edited by A. Lustig. It is a reprint with permission from the International Association of Elevator Engineers (website: www.elevcon.com). In modernization, the measurement of existing traffic in a building is a difficult, time-consuming and costly affair, since old control systems often do not provide performance statistics. General traffic profiles with estimated population assumptions are, therefore, frequently used in traffic analysis. However, they do not provide sufficient accuracy. Using 3D camera technology, KONE has developed the Elevator Performance Analyzer (EPA) to accurately measure the people flow and elevatorsystem performance in an existing building. The results can then be used to estimate the performance improvements with a new product. KONE EPA will improve analysis not only for completed modernization projects, but also of the effects during the modernization. This approach offers a unique and more accurate method than any current practice available in the market. Introduction The number of existing buildings requiring modernization is continuing to grow. Forecasts suggest that the global elevator stock will increase from 14,260,000 units in 2014 to 22,710,000 units in 2024, and, during this same period, the modernization and repair market will grow from US$34 billion to US$49 billion.[1] New high-rise buildings are often being constructed around existing buildings. Therefore, it becomes challenging for building owners to keep the property competitive to maintain existing tenants and/or attract new tenants. The typical reason for buildings requiring modernization is due to poor aspects of people flow caused by: • Growth of building population compared to that originally planned, thus requiring more efficient use of the building • Change of use of the building

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• Overall reliability of elevators • Other reasons may include: • Running costs (high energy consumption, need for frequent small upgrades and maintenance, etc.) • Building image: new building(s) being built with the latest technological innovations • Return on investment: normally, it is cheaper to modernize an existing building than demolish it and rebuild a new one. Destination control systems (DCSes) have become the new norm for modernizing existing buildings. Some analysts and researchers are forecasting that up to 48% of all DCS/“smart elevator” deliveries in 2020 will be for the modernization of existing elevators.[2] The challenge in making accurate traffic analysis is to acquire the correct input data to make the simulations that match what is happening in the building, then propose a people-flow solution that will minimize or eliminate any existing problems. One of the key input data items for the simulation is the population in the building and the movement of people throughout the building. The people-flow profile used in the analysis is also very important. Different building types have different profiles: e.g., residential buildings have a completely different profile than a single-tenant office building. Companies like KONE, which have extensive experience with elevator monitoring systems, have very good understanding of the typical people-flow profiles for different segments and can use that knowledge when making analyses. The traffic analysis obtained using estimated populations and typical segment profile data may cause confusion between traffic experts and building owners or facility managers, as the analysis often does not match what is happening in the building. The analysis can be done in two ways. For cases where the building is fully refurbished, the performance approach from the new building segment can be used. For cases where the building is kept fully occupied with existing tenants throughout and after

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Traffic Analysis for High Rise Buildings to Be Modernized the modernization period, more accurate information is needed to confirm the impact of the modernization. With an accurate people-flow detection tool, it is possible to provide information about the current situation in an existing building and create a more comprehensive understanding for the whole modernization approach, from beginning to end. Understanding the building population, as well the population flow at peak periods accurately while working under the conditions of an occupied building, is important. It creates opportunities in advance to provide counter measurements for elevators to maintain an acceptable service level. Advanced planning can be used to define: • How many elevators can be modernized simultaneously • How to adjust the working hours for different tenants/departments to ease morning and lunch peaks Accurate planning and communication toward building users can reduce unnecessary complaints from tenants. Parameters Needed for Modeling The traffic analysis or simulation is often the basis for the investment decisions for the modernization, as well as how to plan and carry out the modernization project. It gives answers to questions such as: • At the end of the modernization, can I get rid of the morning crowd in the lobby? • How can I reduce the time people need to wait for an elevator? • What will happen to the people flow if one or two elevators are out of service due to the modernization work? The “before modernization/during modernization/ after modernization” analysis is very important and should be based on the real understanding of the building and its people flow. Therefore, when modeling an existing building, the most challenging aspects are defining the existing population and elevator usage, or the buildings’ traffic patterns. The different ways to estimate potential users in the building currently are: • Facility manager/building owner input • Population estimates based on floor area, as in new construction buildings • Manual counting • Access-control data from turnstiles • Existing elevator monitoring systems • Connecting external logging devices to the control system Not all facility managers and building owners are necessarily aware of headcounts of tenants, as floors are rented based on area. While an area-

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based approach is valid for new construction (e.g., 12 m2 per person), using the same assumptions and traffic profiles for existing buildings can lead to inaccurate traffic analysis results when compared to the actual performance during or after modernization when the modernization is evaluated. Manual counting can be conducted in multiple ways: • Only at the main lobby • In the elevator car • Using closed-circuit television and elevator monitoring systems Manual counting can provide more accurate information on people movements in the building, but taking measurements is time consuming and expensive, and, naturally, there is the possibility of human error. Not only is it costly, but combining available data into profiles that are usable in traffic analysis takes time and is usually missing the interfloor traffic angle, which is also applicable to the data provided through turnstile accesses. Existing elevator monitoring systems or external data loggers can often provide statistics from previous usage of elevators. However, with conventional controls, which form the majority of today’s modernization projects, it is challenging to get any data other than the number of calls per floor. Without accurate statistics on population, this data cannot be used as a standalone source of information to provide accurate traffic profiles for analysis. In real-world situations, there are multiple variables that affect human behavior and are not necessarily easily identified: for example, cases where the lobby layout has affected the usage of elevators and, thus, the results of traffic analysis. Depending on the case, using only theoretical values can be misleading if elevator usage cannot be fully understood. Without KONE EPA, heavy investments would be necessary to obtain reliable profiles for analyzing traffic in existing buildings with sufficient accuracy to provide the magnitude of improvement in terms of elevator performance. In the future, with DCSes, where each passenger is assumed to give a call from landing to landing, more accurate information can be obtained through elevator monitoring systems, compared to today’s solutions. Even then, people-flow measurements are not without value, as the KONE EPA can be used to count the number of “ghost” passengers who did not give a call by themselves. In addition to building population and traffic patterns, the performance of the existing elevators forms the basis of analysis for modernization, and the following parameters should be known: • Door times • Flight times • Speed and acceleration

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Traffic Analysis for High Rise Buildings to Be Modernized EPA KONE, along with its technology partners, understands it is extremely difficult to obtain accurate information about actual elevator use of existing buildings from the building owner, facility managers or tenants. Therefore, different measurement methods have been investigated, and the KONE EPA was developed. The key criteria considered while developing the device were: • To be independent of the elevator control system • The device learns the building floors automatically. • To be independent of the lift power supply • Quick and easy to install • Accuracy greater than 95% • The privacy of elevator users must be respected. The required specification and understanding for the input data necessary for making accurate traffic analysis of the people flow in a building determines the equipment needed. An example of the type of question asked was, “Do we need to track a person through the building, or is it enough just knowing that a person has entered an elevator at a certain floor, and a passenger has left the elevator at another floor for accurate traffic analysis?” The KONE EPA system is patented and consists of both hardware and software. The hardware is installed in the elevator cabin independent of any lift systems. It uses various sensors to count the number of users entering and leaving an elevator and the floors at which they enter and leave. The hardware is divided into two parts: • A 3D sensor mounted to the elevator cabin side wall • A data-recording box (which consists of a minicomputer, accelerometer, magnetometer and battery) mounted to the front wall of the elevator cabin • There are 3 subsystems in the device: • Floor detection unit (FDU) • Door detection unit (DDU) • People counter Each of these subsystems saves raw data to the minicomputer for later analysis. The FDU uses the magnetometer to map the served floors and their respective heights in a building. Every floor has a different magnetic fingerprint. The DDU uses 3D images to determine the door status, and door opening and closing times per floor. The people counter uses 3D images converted into a plan view of the elevator entrance and counts the people entering and leaving the elevator.

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Figure 1: The equipment and how it is set up in an elevator.

An essential element of the system is the standalone analysis software. The software combines the various raw data files and the counting of people movement from the 3D sensor files into one event log. The analysis software converts the 3D sensor video into a two-dimensional plan view, in which users are not recognizable. The analysis software can detect direction using two virtual lines created at the door entrance. If an object moves through the red line and then through the green line, the object is entering the elevator. An object is identified as exiting if it first moves through the green and then the red line.

Figure 2: Analysis software showing people counter and event log being created.

The KONE EPA Analysis software also generates many other reports than just people entering and leaving a floor. Other available reports include: • Door opening times • Door closing times • Door open duration • Accrued population in building shown in 5- and 15-min. increments • Number of starts (in total per elevator and by floor) • People flow profiles

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Traffic Analysis for High Rise Buildings to Be Modernized • • • • •

Device Accuracy

Floor-to-floor times Floor heights Acceleration and deceleration rates Round-trip times Elevator speed

During the design phase of the KONE EPA, the target was set to a minimum 95% accuracy. This precision can be achieved with the current specification. KONE EPA can recognize both crowded situations and large groups accurately during normal usage.

People Flow Profile 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Interfloor Leaving 10:40 - 10:45 10:50 - 10:55 11:00 - 11:05 11:10 - 11:15 11:20 - 11:25 11:30 - 11:35 11:40 - 11:45 11:50 - 11:55 12:00 - 12:05 12:10 - 12:15 12:20 - 12:25 12:30 - 12:35 12:40 - 12:45 12:50 - 12:55 13:00 - 13:05 13:10 - 13:15 13:20 - 13:25 13:30 - 13:35 13:40 - 13:45 13:50 - 13:55 14:00 - 14:05 14:10 - 14:15 14:20 - 14:25 14:30 - 14:35 14:40 - 14:45 14:50 - 14:55

Entering

Figure 3: Daily profile from an office building in Espoo, Finland.

The reports can be shown either for group or individual elevators, making it also possible to understand how individual lifts are being used and how elevator arrangements are affecting elevator usage. The KONE EPA has been rigorously tested during the development period through: • Comparing results with traditional manual counting • Verifying that the people counter is counting correctly

People Flow by Floor 15

The most challenging situation in detecting passengers with advanced computer programs and logic is when passengers are staying in the car entrance for extended periods and hold the door open for the next passengers or some other reason. Such situations affect the results when compared to manual counting but are not frequent when considering typical office buildings, and, in extreme cases, can be detected from long door times. Occasionally, KONE EPA does miss passengers entering or leaving the car, but the test results suggest that the error level is less than 5%. Manual counting was done by monitoring sensor data for each elevator in the group and a group of four elevators, which were measured at the same time, and counting the number of persons using elevators. In the studied data, there was one occurrence where a passenger held the door open by standing in the car entrance blocking the doors, which explains an additional two persons compared to manual counting. Office Building

EPA (persons)

Manual Counting (persons)

Difference (%)

Morning 15 min period

70

68

2.9%

Table 1 Persons using elevators – accuracy.

13 11 9

Leaving:

7

Entering:

5 3 1 0

100

200

300

400

Figure 4: People flow per floor from an office building in Espoo, Finland.

The KONE EPA has major advantages over traditional manual counting: • Accuracy of data: during busy periods, it can be difficult to count all passengers entering and leaving an elevator at a floor. • Time: with manual counting, all the handrecorded data needs to be consolidated into one data set to allow analysis. • Cost: only one person is needed to set up equipment. • Automatically generated reports

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Figure 4: People flow per floor from an office building in Espoo, Finland.

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Traffic Analysis for High Rise Buildings to Be Modernized When considering the accuracy of the traffic profile in terms of traffic by the three components (incoming/ outgoing/interfloor), comparisons have been carried out in an office Building in Espoo, Finland, equipped with a DCS, by comparing KONE EPA results to the KONE Traffic Forecaster data (Figure 5). The profiles from EPA and Traffic Forecaster are close to each other. As these devices did not measure traffic at the same time, some passengers are registered at different timeframes, which causes variance in the results when comparing EPA and Traffic Forecaster. Profiles from EPA can be used for simulation of existing buildings, and, when compared to the current methods, this detailed data is hard to achieve. Verification of the people moving into and out of the elevator was carried out by comparing the automatically counted values against the manually observed count. Over several hours, the “object at the door area” was manually observed and compared against the associated automatic counter values (Figure 2) to determine the accuracy of detecting objects. The automatic-to-visual comparison gave a good understanding of the accuracy of the system, achieving better than the set 95% requirement. Modernization Analysis Sequencing Understanding how the existing population is moving around the building allows us to simulate how the existing elevators are performing and allows analysis of how the proposed changes will affect the operation of the elevators, including during the modernization period, when some lifts will not be available for use. Traffic analysis for modernization requires many simulations to be completed: • As is: the situation now, with existing population and elevator parameters • How the elevators will perform after modernization with the existing population • How the elevators will perform during modernization with some lifts not available for use: this may require more than one analysis, depending on how the upgrades are being scheduled and if an overlay is used to combine both new and old elevators under one group controller or not. • How the elevators will perform after modernization using established industry norms for number of users in the building, based on available floor space

Summary The KONE Elevator Performance Analyzer is a major innovation for measuring the traffic patterns in an existing building. The device allows a costeffective, easy-to-use and accurate alternative to the existing methods of measuring building population and vertical movement in a building. The information available from the KONE EPA reports allows accurate simulation of the existing situation. Being based on the real movement of people in a building, it permits study of the effects any proposed upgrades will have on the people flow in the building. Acknowledgements Your authors thank Dr. Marja-Liisa Siikonen and Risto Kontturi for their guidance and support during the writing and research of this article. References [1] (News Article) “Smart Elevator Market Will Reach $23.16 Billion, Global, by 2020.” IoT Business News, December 2, 2014 (iotbusinessnews.com/2014/12/02/31626smart-elevator-market-will-reach-23-16-billionusdglobal-by-2020/smart-elevators). [2] (Report) Industry Study #3324 World Elevators – October 2015 - Freedonia.

www.kone.com

Darren Batey has been employed by KONE since 1998 in various technical and sales support roles. He has worked in the elevator industry since 1986 and received an associate diploma with honors in Mechanical Engineering from the Sydney Institute of Technology in 1997. Mikko Kontturi works as senior traffic calculation specialist in KONE Elevators’ Major Projects organization. He has been with KONE for more than a decade, and, during the last eight years, has been responsible for people-flow analysis and solutions for high-rise buildings around the globe. He studied Computer Science at Tampere University of Technology in Finland.

When all the different analyses have been completed, it is possible to suggest a modernization sequence for the building that will impact the end users the least. The sequence will be different for each building, depending on the people flow in the building and agreed contract period.

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PRODUCT SUPPLY AND TECHNICAL SERVICES PRODUCSUPPLY T SUPPLY TECHNICAL SERVICES PRODUCT ANDAND TECHNICAL SERVICES

STEM S.r.l. is a market leading manufacturer of lift components established for over 25 years. The product range STEM istime a market leading manufacturer of liftestablished components established for product over 25range years. The product range S.r.l.S.r.l. is athe market leading manufacturer of of liftthe components forisover 25 years. The issolutions, evolving allbased the time isSTEM evolving all to meet the needs market and STEM constantly developing new is evolving themarket time to the needs of the marketnew andsolutions, STEMbased is constantly developing new solutions, based meet the needsall ofof the andmeet STEM constantly developing on the experience of its engineers, as well as in ontothe experience its engineers, as is well as in response to technological innovation. on the experience of its engineers, as well as in response to technological innovation. response to technological innovation. 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NC80: 24VDC power supply, 2outputs, safety outputs, 1 relay NC auxiliary auxiliary output. 2 NC80: 24VDC power supply, 2 safety 1 relay NC auxiliary output. outputs, NC81: 24VDC power supply, 2 safety outputs, 2 transistor NC NC81: 24VDC power supply, 2 safety outputs, 2 transistor NC auxiliary NC81: 24VDCinpower supply, 2cables, safety protection outputs, 2 against transistor NC auxiliary wire 2 wire saving the travelling voltage dip. outputs, 2outputs, wire saving in the travelling cables, protection against voltage dip. saving in the travelling cables, protection against voltage dip. Generic Generic magnetic sensors and control unit formagnetic elevatorssensors and control unit for elevators Generic magnetic sensors and control unit for elevators STEMisisaaleader leaderininthe therealization realizationofof magnetic sensors (reed, hall, MR technologies) used all over the world thanks to their STEM magnetic sensors (reed, hall, MRhall, technologies) for for lifts,lifts, usedlifts, all over the world thanks to thanks their great is a and leader the realization of magnetic sensors MR technologies) for overa the world to their greatSTEM reliability theinlarge range of geometric shapes and (reed, typologies of internal contacts; nobodyused canall boast similar assortment. reliability and the large range of geometric shapes and typologies of internal contacts; nobody can boast a similar assortment. Special fitgreat reliability and the large range of geometric shapes and typologies of internal contacts; nobody can boast a similar assortment. Special fittings for a fast and easy application and different type of magnets are available. STEM is a manufacturer of components tings a fast and easy different type of magnets aretype available. STEM is aavailable. manufacturer of components used in the control Special fittings forapplication a fast easy application and different magnets are STEM is a manufacturer usedfor in the control cabinet, suchand asand temperature control relays, speed andofdirection devices, phase control relays, electronic IPof 67components safety used in the control cabinet, such as temperature control relays, speed and direction devices, phase control relays, electronic IP 67 safety cabinet, such as temperature control relays, speed and direction devices, phase control relays, electronic IP 67 safety door control systems, door control systems, light curtains and more. Visit the website for details. door control systems, curtainsfor anddetails. more. Visit the website for details. light curtains and more. 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www.taylorlifts.co.uk Taylor Lifts 3 Main Street, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5AA UK sales enquiries: sales@taylorlifts.co.uk www.taylorlifts.co.uk www.stemsrl.it Taylor Lifts 3 Main Street, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5AA UK sales enquiries: sales@taylorlifts.co.uk Via della Meccanica 2 Cura Carpignano (Italy) www.stemsrl.it Via della Meccanica 2 Cura Carpignano (Italy)


Lift industry kart challenge Saturday 30th June 2018 The 26th Annual 4-hour team endurance Buckmore Park kart circuit with 24 teams challenging for the A & A Electrical Lift Industry Kart Challenge Trophy. Some regulars were missing, and new teams were there to take on the challenge!

After signing on, team photos were taken by Simon Burchett, https://simonburchettphotography. shootproof.com/gallery/6957460/. All photos of the day have been uploaded and can be bought directly from his website.

Using the full International circuit, the teams were using the New Sodi RT8 karts capable of 80mph. The idea is to complete the most laps in the 4 hours, making tactical pit stops for driver changes and fuel stops on the way.

After the welcome and introduction by Phil Rudd, Nancy Lycett (ILE) spoke about the company and its future plans. Alan Warren talked briefly about the Lift Industry Charity, of which he is the chairman.

For the 2nd time, we welcome International Lift Equipment (ILE) as the main sponsors of the Lift Industry Kart Challenge 2018 and also supporters of the Lift Industry Charity.

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After driver briefing, the 24 teams all began the 30-minute qualifying and practice session, which would give the teams their starting-grid position for the 4-hour race.

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The trophies, with Nancy Lycett (ILE).

Race start

Qualifying Pos

Team

Pole

Bridgestone Indians

50.540

2

Sassi Toros

50.585

3

Apex 1

50.885

4

Bridgestone Cowboys

50.916

5

LSL1

51.110

6

Band of Bodgers

51.116

7

Target Lifts

51.297

8

Team Go Fer

51.463

9

Summit Skidmarks

51.467

10

Bluecoat Burnouts

51.985

11

Incredibly Low Expectations

52.038

12

Steel Runners

52.317

13

Saffer Arrows

52.351

14

Horsler Hornets 1

52.433

15

Hamilton Lifts

52.574

16

Life is Lifting

52.578

17

Team Dewhurst

52.654

18

Titan Hairy

52.729

19

Summit Scuderia

52.854

20

Drive Fault

53.041

21

BR Elevators

53.218

22

Bees

53.321

23

Cockney Romanians

53.677

24

Horsler Hornets 2

53.857

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Lap time

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Apex 1 got a good start and into the lead by the first corner, followed by Bridgestone Indians now 2nd, Bridgestone Cowboys 3rd, Sassi Toros 4th, Team Go Fer 5th, LSL 1 6th, Target Lifts 7th, Horsler Hornets 1 8th, Team Dewhurst 9th, Incredibly Low Expectations 10th, Life is Lifting 11th, Drive Fault 12th, Hamilton Lifts 13th, Summit Skidmarks 14th, Summit Scuderia 15th, Titan Hairy 16th, Band of Bodgers 17th, Steel Runners 18th, Bluecoat Burnouts 19th, Horsler Hornets 2 20th, Cockney Romanians 21st, Bees 22nd, Saffer Arrows 23rd and BR Elevators 24th. There were lots of little battles throughout the grid, with the regular teams trying to get their personal best times or improve on their positions. The new teams were learning the circuit. As we reached the final hour, things got exciting, as Apex seemed to have the race tied up, but then Bridgestone Cowboys, who had always been the “bridesmaids” and it seemed would be again, battled on. But, fate would intervene on the final lap of the race!! After 4 hours and 273 laps, Bridgestone Cowboys take the chequered 2.030 ahead of Apex, who spun on the last laps.

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(Left) Nancy Lycett (ILE) with the winning team Bridgestone Cowboys. (Below) The Challenge Trophy was awarded to Sassi Toros for being 5th and not winning the trophy in the past.

Final results Pos

Team

1

Bridgestone Cowboys

Lap time 273

2

Apex 1

273

3

Bridgestone Indians

272

4

LSL1

271

5

Sassi Toros

271

6

Summit Skidmarks

269

7

Target Lifts

266

8

Team Dewhurst

264

9

Incredibly Low Expectations

263

10

Drive Fault

263

11

Horsler Hornets 1

263

12

Team Go Fer

262

13

Band of Bodgers

261

14

Saffer Arrows

259

15

Bluecoat Burnouts

259

16

Titan Hairy

257

17

Hamilton Lifts

254

tel or fax

01634 719791

18

Life is Lifting

254

19

BR Elevators

254

20

Steel Runners

253

email visit

laura@liftkartchallenge.co.uk laura@djmotorsport.co.uk www.liftkartchallenge.co.uk

21

Summit Scuderia

251

22

Horsler Hornets 2

249

or contact

23

Cockney Romanians

248

24

Bees

248

The presentation Lycett and Rudd presented the trophies to the top four teams and the Challenge Trophy to Sassi Toros for being 5th and not winning the trophy in the past.

We thank everyone for their donations to the Lift Industry Charity and to all those who bought raffle tickets, which totalled £1200.00 A great day was had by all, with good competitive, fun racing by all the teams. We look forward to seeing you all next year. Next Year The 27th Annual Lift Industry Kart Challenge will again be at Buckmore Park, date to be confirmed. Please see dedicated website www.liftkartchallenge or Facebook Lift Industry Karting. Teams wishing to enter the race should contact Laura as early as possible on:

Philip Rudd Jackson Lift Group 3/19 Ropery Business Park Anchor & Hope Lane London, SE7 7RX tel 020 8293 4176 email prudd@jacksonlifts.com

The winner’s trophies and A & A Lift Industry Perpetual Trophy was handed to Bridgestone Cowboys, and ILE provided a trophy for the winning team to keep as a memento of their win. All teams were presented with a team photograph and computerised lap by lap printout of their race, for complete race analysis in the clubhouse bar afterwards!

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Project Spotlight

By Darren Papani

Accessibility lifts are designed to be unobtrusive in historic cathedral that served as a backdrop in the Harry Potter movies.

The cathedral was used as the location of Hogwarts for three Harry Potter movies, and the cathedral welcomes many visitors who want to walk in Harry’s own wizarding footsteps. The entire building truly is magical in many ways.

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ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

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The nearly 1,000-yearold Gloucester Cathedral is a landmark in western England.

Gloucester Cathedral, a magnificent architectural icon dating back to 1089, took more than 500 years to complete, and is an excellent example of an English cathedral built in the Romanesque and Gothic styles. The cathedral, sitting in the west of England near the border with Wales, has undergone many changes in its nearly 1,000-year history and has unique features that might be described as incredible: a stained-glass window with some of the earliest known images of golf (dating back to 1350) and a carving believed to depict medieval soccer. Many dignitaries have shrines here, including King Edward II of England and Osric, King of the Hwicce. More recently, the cathedral was used as the location of Hogwarts for three Harry Potter movies, and the cathedral welcomes many visitors who want to walk in Harry’s own wizarding footsteps. The entire building truly is magical in many ways. As part of a major refurbishment and conservation program, a new creative direction for the cathedral’s disability access was agreed upon. It called for a bold approach that would be honest to the building’s stunning architecture and reflect the centuries of innovative design seen in every vista. The plan called for two platform lifts that would enhance the built environment in brave and contemporary ways. Bespoke platform lift designer and manufacturer Lyfthaus of Cambridge, U.K., was contracted as the supplier for the new platform lift. Lyfthaus specializes in tailor-made open-aspect lifts for the prestige marketplace, in particular for listed properties and properties of historic importance. Lyfthaus was presented with the client’s outline design sketches and tasked with meeting the architects’ creative vision. One lift with a raised height of 750 mm was to be located adjacent to stone steps in the north ambulatory, with the second to access the north transept via a Lyfthaus-built bridging link and having 1,050 mm of lift travel.

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This Lyfthaus accessibility lift in the cathedral’s north ambulatory has a 750-mm rise and 500-kg operating capacity (2000-kg actual capacity). A section of the steps was removed to accommodate the lift, but will be preserved and reused when other steps need replacing.

The second lift has 1,050 mm of travel and a 500-kg operating capacity (1500-kg actual capacity), and takes visitors to the north transept.

Lift One, Mylyft Cube Model TCL2000 • 170-mm lowered height, including tray to accommodate stone floor • 750-mm raised height • 1,450 mm-x-1,100 mm platform size • Polished safety glass and stainless-steel enclosure • 500-kg operating capacity (2000-kg actual capacity) • Twin-cylinder hydraulic scissor mechanism in plate steel • Three sets of push-to-run controls with halo illumination • Remote power pack located in basement crypt Lift Two, Mylyft Cube Model TM1500 • 280-mm lowered height, including tray to accommodate stone floor • 1,050-mm raised height • 1,850-mm-X-1,200-mm platform size • Bridging link with glass balustrade • Polished safety glass and stainless-steel enclosure • Reflective scissor guards in stainless-steel chainmail • 500-kg operating capacity (1500-kg actual capacity) • Twin-cylinder hydraulic mechanism in box-section steel profile • Three sets of push-to-run controls with halo illumination • Remote power pack located in basement crypt

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The north ambulatory lift seen from the upper side; the cathedral portrayed the Hogwarts School of Wizardry in three of the Harry Potter movies. London skyline from City Hall

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An architect’s original design intent sketch of the north ambulatory lift

A design rendering of the north transept lift and bridging link.

The north transept lift is seen in the down position, revealing the Lyfthausconstructed bridging link that was installed over the existing steps.

To remain faithful to the original architecture, the scissor-lift platforms were set inside enclosures constructed of stainless steel and frameless glass, discreet cube designs that wouldn’t distract from their surroundings but would fully protect the platforms for the entirety of their travel. Each of the largest glass side panels weighed in excess of 200 kg (440 lb.) and had to be transported through the cathedral by hand — quite a delicate process. Lyfthaus, as designer and manufacturer of the two lifts, worked in close cooperation with the builders and heritage specialists to preserve the abundance of archaeological finds uncovered during the pit excavation and four-month installation period. In the

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words of the project manager, “The time and effort [were] certainly worthwhile, [and] we are thrilled with the results.” Darren Papani has worked in the platform-lift industry for more than 25 years, having started in industrial lift sales in 1991 with Edmolift U.K. He progressed to director of sales and marketing in 2000, managing director in 2008 and principal shareholder in 2016. Lyfthaus Ltd. is an associated company formed in 2014 to deal specifically with architectural applications in the accessibility lift sector, with special-propertyrelated platform-lift solutions.

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This paper was first presented at the 7th Symposium on Lift & Escalator Technologies, www.liftsymposium.org

My Story of Lift Traffic Analysis, Design and Control 1960 – 2020 (Part 1) By Gina Barney Gina Barney Associates, PO Box 7, SEDBERGH, LA10 5GE. www.liftconsulting.org This paper, relying on the first 60 years1 of lift traffic design, provides an objective view of the developments in lift traffic design since 1960. The paper will look at the contributions of, amongst others: Alexandris, Barney, Beebe, Closs, Dos Santos, Godwin, Lim, Peters, Port, Schroeder and Strakosch. Lift traffic developments are of necessity intertwined with lift traffic control algorithms and technology, including call allocation and interactive lift system simulation during the same period. A view ahead will be indicated. Footnotes indicate sources for their easy reference by readers rather than being in-line text. Elevation Magazine will be serialising this paper over two issues. INTRODUCTION This story is my story and will be told in a narrative style in the first person as I was, and am still, there. Rather than run a timeline, I will tell this story based on the people who made it, as evidenced by material in the public domain and by personal contact. There will be material in the archives of lift manufacturers and elsewhere missing from this story (unknown-knowns). Most of the people mentioned are still alive today, some I know personally, others only by reputation. Inevitably, there will be people and events left out of this story. Additions/ corrections to the story are welcome. As an example, during the writing of this story, a colleague reminded me of a citation in an article to a paper Dos Santos and I published in 19742. GINA (née GEORGE) BARNEY My first encounter with the lift industry was in January 1968, when Michael Godwin (Adrian Godwin’s father) came to the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST), where I was a lecturer, seeking help with the stopping and levelling of Ward-Leonard drives. This was a technical problem. David Closs, a student at UMIST, was looking for an MSc project. He resolved this technical problem in September 1968. His work pump primed my interest and my near-50-years’ work in lift traffic analysis, design and control. Subsequently, I was fortunate to work with many clever people, as you will see, who sometimes had eureka moments and were gone, but some have become equally enthused for lift traffic analysis, design and control. The work at UMIST continued to 1993, when I retired, and since then I have carried on the work independently. There are four books and a landmark paper that I have authored/co-authored, which objectively report my work and the work of others in the field where it is known. They are: Landmark Books Book (1) Barney, G.C. and Dos Santos, S.M., 1977, “Lift traffic analysis design and control”, Peter Pereginus. Book (2) Barney, G.C. and Dos Santos, S.M., 1985, “Elevator traffic analysis design and control”, Peter Pereginus. Book (3) Barney, Gina, 2003, “Elevator Traffic Handbook”, Taylor & Francis. Book (4) Barney, Gina and Al-Sharif, Lutfi, 2016,” Elevator Traffic Handbook”, Routledge.3 Landmark Paper Barney, G.C. and Dos Santos, S.M., 1975, “Improved traffic design methods for lift systems”, Bldg. Sci. 1 Gray, L., 2017, Lift Traffic Analysis 1890-1960, 7th Symposium on Lift and Escalator, Northampton, 2017 2 Green, M.F and Stafford-Smith, B., 1977, A survey and analysis of lift performance in an office building, Building and Environment, Vol. 12, pp. 65-72, Pergamon Press 3 Records 283 references and 32 bibliographic entries of all the people and publications we could find in the field.

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INTERNATIONAL ELEVATOR & ESCALATOR SYMPOSIUM

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Safety and New Technologies

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My Story of Lift Traffic Analysis, Design and Control 1960 – 2020

BACKGROUND Traffic Analysis and Design In the beginning, from 1890 to 1960, there were many people, who laid the foundations of modern lift traffic analysis and design4. This list, compiled by Dr Lee Gray for his paper, included: Root (1890), Hill (1893), Darrach (1901), Kidder (1904, 1916), Pelham Bolton (1908), Tweedy (1912-13), Ehrlich (1914), Cook (1916 1932), Gumpel (1916), Gillette and Dana (1918), Jones (1923 -1926) Grierson (1923), Marryat (1924), Kinnard (1930), Annett (1935, 1960), Phillips (1939, 1951), Molloy (1941). In 1968, I was blissfully unaware of this work. My foundations were built on George Strakosch’s landmark book published in 1967, which did inform me at least of Bassett Jones. Traffic Control Six “Eras” of traffic control can be identified: Era

Dates

Traffic Control Type

I

1850–1890

Attendant simple mechanical control

II

1890–1920

Attendant and electrical car switch control

III

1920–1950

Attendant/dispatcher and pushbutton control

IV

1950–1975

Automatic group control: IVa scheduled traffic control to 1960 IVb demand traffic control from 1960

V

1975–1990

Computer-based group control

VI

1990 –

Call allocation group control

The transition from a human pulling a rope to a computer making decisions took nearly 150 years. This story starts in Era IVb. Traffic Simulation The early traffic simulations used batch-based processing, where paper tape, cards or magnetic tape drives provided the input method, and line printers produced reams of paper for the output. In between, the algorithms were coded, possibly in Fortran, but often in assembly language. Interactive computing is relatively recent dating from the late 1960s/early 1970s. Today, “apps” are everywhere. Interactive traffic design only became possible when time-sharing computer video display units became available. THE BEGINNING – MY FOUNDATIONS – MY MENTORS BASSETT JONES Jones, when working for the General Electric Company, was interested in sizing lift motors for the duty they had to meet,5 so he wanted to know the number of stops.6 He was also interested in drive dynamics7. He was not a lift industry member. 4 Gray, Lee, 2017, Lift Traffic Analysis 1890-1960, 7th Symposium on Lift & Escalator Technologies, September 2017 5 https://archive.org/details/generalelectricr26gene 6 Jones, Bassett 1923, The probable number of stops made by an elevator, GE Rev., 26, (8) 7 Bassett Jones, 1924, Time-velocity Characteristics of the High-speed Passenger Elevator. General Electric Review, Vol. 27, February 1924

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My Story of Lift Traffic Analysis, Design and Control 1960 – 2020

GEORGE STRAKOSCH He worked for Otis and later became a consultant. In 1967, he wrote a landmark book8 that updated the work of R.S. Phillips’ 1939 book.9 He gave a traffic design method. This was the first significant attempt to bring traffic analysis into one place. He defined and used the concepts of five-minute peaks, handling capacity and interval, and established a lift’s cycle time as the round trip time. Strakosch’s method was very pragmatic – basically a recipe system – and not at all formulaic. He added the times to open and shut the doors; the time that passengers take to get in and out; and the time to move up and down to provide a value for a round-trip time. MICHAEL GODWIN Godwin is very important to my history. When we met, he was technical director of William Wadsworth, Bolton. Very innovative and intuitive, he was very much in advance of his time. It was he who suggested putting the call buttons on the landing. I do not know if he had heard of Leo Port (see Port), but sometimes great minds are separated by 12,000 miles. Godwin and I set up Lift Design Partnership in 1974, which became Lerch Bates Europe in 1990, when he retired. I remained chairman/chairman emeritus until 2002. Besides producing a radically new standardised specification for public housing lifts,10 his main technical innovation was Bush House11 (see Beebe and Lim). To this day, Godwin is interested in linear motor driven lifts. And this is how he met and employed Haider Al-Abadi, currently Prime Minister of Iraq, 12 for 19 years. JORIS SCHROEDER Joris Schroeder, when reading for his doctorate in 1955, derived a formula for the highest reversal floor H

13.

Schroeder was also very brave to produce the first implementation of call allocation at Schindler’s Ebikon offices in December 1989. This was against strong company opposition and significant industry derision at the time, all the usual ill informed, “No one will use it”, etc. He used the technical specification that Dos Santos and I published in our 1977 book (Book 1). He did not fully implement the specification, such as penalty functions, dynamic up-peak subzoning, adaptive algorithm, etc. Today, the industry derision has disappeared to be replaced by over enthusiastic adoption of what is (commercially) called “destination control”, see David Closs below. Schroeder sadly passed away before he saw the fruits of his endeavours – a badly missed interlocutor. Schroeder also published equations for H and S to adapt the RTT equation so that an up-peak calculation could be performed for call allocation. The variable k is the famous look ahead. THE MIDDLE 1960-2017 DAVID CLOSS In my autobiographical note, I mention David Closs as my first MSc student in 1968 and my first PhD student. After completing his MSc, Closs registered for a PhD to research the behaviour of traffic control algorithms14. His first analysis considered the best method for a lift to answer a set of landing calls (the “travelling salesman” problem). He concluded the best method was directional collective and elaborated four rules:

8 Strakosch, G.R., 1967, Elevators and escalators, 1/ed, Wiley 9 Phillips, R.S., 1939, Electric lifts, Pitman 10 Godwin, M.,1973, Formulating the specification, Lift, 15, pp141-146 11 Godwin, M., 1986, Bush House: Lifts of the World 12 Al-Abadi , H. J, 1980, Disc and linear forms of electronically controlled permanent-magnet claw machines, PhD thesis, University of Manchester, 1980 13 Schroeder, J., 1955, Personenaufzuege (passenger lifts), Foerden und Heben, 1 (in German) 14 Closs, G.D., 1970, The computer control of passenger traffic in large lift system, PhD thesis, UMIST

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My Story of Lift Traffic Analysis, Design and Control 1960 – 2020

Rule 1 A car may not stop at a floor where no passenger enters or leaves a car. Rule 2 A car may not pass a floor at which a passenger wishes to alight. Rule 3 A passenger may not enter a car travelling in the reverse direction to the passengers required direction of travel. Rule 4 A car may not reverse direction of travel while carrying passengers. To which can be added a pragmatic rule: Rule 5 Car calls take precedence over landing calls. There are some workers15 today who suggest that Rules 2 and 4 can be violated for the convenience of the traffic algorithm. This defies Closs. Closs went on to analyse what he called “call allocation”16, ie: to give the control algorithm a passenger’s destination and not just their direction. This meant putting the destination call buttons on the landing not in the car. His analysis showed the promise of this idea. After graduating in 1970, Closs did not stay in the industry. SERGIO dos SANTOS Sergio dos Santos is responsible for the major developments of the derivation of the RTT equation; interactive simulation; the analysis of various traffic conditions and control algorithms; and, most importantly, a full definition of the call allocation traffic control algorithm in two forms: hall call allocation and adaptive call allocation. Sergio dos Santos took Closs’ work further on. Interactive Simulation In May 1972, dos Santos registered for an MSc with me. At that time, it was obvious we would not get anywhere unless we could emulate or model a lift system in some way. I had defined a basic simulation program comprising an input module, a control and simulation module and an output module. I gave Dos Santos this specification and went to Argentina for three months. When I got back, he had done it, and also coded a simple full collective algorithm as Closs had defined it into a fully interactive program17. We had the LSD (Lift Simulation and Design)18 program! Dos Santos agreed to read for a PhD on this topic. Round Trip Time Formula In the course of programming the LSD program, it was obvious that the Strakosch “recipe” method of sizing could better be described mathematically. We defined the now classical RTT equation in the period of Dos Santos’ work and published the first version of it in our 1975 paper as:

RTT = 2H t1 + (S+1) t2 + 2Pt3 This is the basic equation and obeys Closs’ rules. It can be adapted for other conditions than up-peak (not given here). The equation presentation has changed little over the last 42 years, except to make it more understandable to the mathematically challenged and now looks like:

RTT = 2Htv + (S+1)(T-tv)+ 2Pt p 15 Gerstenmeyer S., Peters R. D., 2014, Reverse Journeys and Destination Control, Proceedings of the 4th Symposium on Lift & Escalator Technology 16 Sometimes called “Destination Control”, which is ambiguous, it is the user that determines the destination not the traffic control algorithm! Destination Control is the commercial name for Call Allocation. 17 In the 1970s must computers operated in batch mode. 18 Dos Santos, S.M., 1972, Lift simulation, MSc dissertation, University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology.

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My Story of Lift Traffic Analysis, Design and Control 1960 – 2020

This equation is simple in concept, and it is worth explaining. Three independent variables (tv, ts, tp) and three dependent variables (H, S, P). The first term is for the time a lift is moving, ie: a travel distance of H floors with a time between floors of tv. The second term is S times (+1) the time consumed in stopping, ie: for door operations, drive control. The third term is what the passengers do, ie: get in and out of cars taking a time of tp. The middle term is the most significant, as a second added here may reduce the handling capacity by 5-10%. The variables H, and S are dependent on the number of passengers (P) in the car, when it leaves the main terminal and the number of floors above the main terminal (N). So, there is really only one independent variable and two dependent variables! And these are evaluated by Bassett Jones (1923) for S and Joris Schroder for H (1955). In his paper, Dr Lee Gray highlights George Hill’s search for a “uniform law” for lift traffic analysis19. The two equations above (the only two in this paper) might do it – 82 years later? Call Allocation Traffic Control Algorithm Working with Closs’ skeleton derivation of the call allocation traffic control algorithm, Dos Santos developed a full specification of the two variations of the algorithm. The first was hall call allocation (HCA). The second was adaptive call allocation (ACA). There were many features: penalty functions, dynamic up-peak subzoning, adaptive algorithm, etc., all described in his thesis20 and in our jointly authored book, Lift Traffic Analysis Design and Control in 1977 (Book 1). By putting this specification into the public domain by prior publication of Closs’ and Dos Santos’s PhD theses in 1972 and 1974, it prevented it being patented by a manufacturer (one tried and failed) and could be offered to all. The specification has never been fully implemented by any manufacturer, although Schroeder was close to it. And Peters has a closer representation of HCA, but not ACA in Elevate. Analysis of Traffic Conditions Dos Santos and I realised that having an interactive program (LSD) meant we had a powerful tool to analyse all traffic patterns and any control systems. At the time LSD was being developed, the traffic control systems were based on relays and some electronics. They were not simple. The main ones were fixed bidirectional sectors, eg Otis VIP 260, fixed time-based sectors, eg: Express Mark 4 and dynamic sectors, eg: Schindler Aconic. The question is how do they affect actual performance? Dos Santos programmed these algorithms into LSD and ran more than 2,000 simulations and produced a series of graphs for up peak, down peak and interfloor traffic. To do this, he invented traffic profiles, which you can see today as “templates”. This work enabled some rules of thumb to be developed, and these fed back into the design process. Alongside this work, Dos Santos also programmed the HCA algorithm and analysed it. During this work, he developed ACA, which switched the cost function (aka performance index) from journey time to waiting time for low loads. Dos Santos did not stay in the lift industry but went on to be the rector of the Universidade do Minho, Portugal from 1985-1998. LEO PORT Port proposed taking the pushbuttons out of the car and putting them in the hallway/lobby/foyer/landing, something we all accept now. It was the first proposal for call allocation, which is what Closs called it. Port patented21 it as PORT–El in 1961, which he let expire in 1977. He had two implementations, one in the law school at the University of Sydney22 and the other in the Australian Milk Marketing Board offices. Both installations were low rise and had only two or three lifts. Port did not have any computing power, so he programmed the lifts to always go to the same floors using simple fixed logic. He became Lord Mayor of Sydney in 1975 and died in office in 1978. 19 Hill, George Hill, 1893, Some Practical Limiting Conditions in the Design of the Modern Office Building, The Architectural Record, Vol 5, 445-468 (April-June 1893) 20 Dos Santos, S.M., 1974, The design, evaluation and control of lift systems, PhD thesis, UMIST 21 Port, L.W., 1961, Australian patent specification 255218, 1961 22 Port, L.W., 1968, The Port elevator system, University of Sydney, June, 1968

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PART NO.

DESCRIPTION

EXTENDED DESCRIPTION

D011-001

Rope load sensor combined

Lck/ng multirope load weighing device (up to 7 ropes)

D011-002

Rope load sensor remote

Multirope load weighing device (up to 7 ropes) with remote controller.

D011-003

Crown bar sensor combined

Sv-3000/ng beam load weighing device.

D011-004

Hyd load sensor combined

Chd/ng hydraulic load weighing device

D011-005

Rope sensor controller

D011-006

Under cabin sensor 4act

D011-007

Under cabin sensor 2act

Underfloor cabin sensor including: Vk 30c unit controller 2 Active tca-800 sensors 2 Passive dummies

D011-008

Remote load sensor control

Vk30c unit controller

D011-009

Remote programming dongle Remote programming dongle

D011-010

Sw sensor tool

Sw sensor tool for installation. Recommended from 12-16mm Ropes

D011-011

Usb interface (6ports)

None

Omega individual rope sensor controller (4Relays + 6 channels) Underfloor cabin sensor including: Vk 30c unit controller 4 Active tca-800 sensors

PART NO.

DESCRIPTION

EXTENDED DESCRIPTION

D011-005-1

Individual rope sensor

Individual rope sensor

D011-005-2

Individual rope sensor kit

D011-005-3

Individual rope sensor kit

D011-005-4

Individual rope sensor kit

D011-005-5

Individual rope sensor kit

D011-005-6

Individual rope sensor kit

Individual rope sensor kit including: 1 X omega rope sensor controller 2 X individual rope sensors Individual rope sensor kit including: 1 X omega rope sensor controller 3 X individual rope sensors Individual rope sensor kit including: 1 X omega rope sensor controller 4 X individual rope sensors Individual rope sensor kit including: 1 X omega rope sensor controller 5 X individual rope sensors Individual rope sensor kit including: 1 X omega rope sensor controller 6 X individual rope sensors

Unit 2, Faraday Close, Drayton Fields Industrial Estate, Daventry, Northamptonshire NN11 t: +44 (0) 1327 879334 • e: enquiries@digital-advanced-control.co.uk

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My Story of Lift Traffic Analysis, Design and Control 1960 – 2020

In retrospect, call allocation traffic control systems should be called Port-El systems to honour someone who changed the whole scene of lift traffic control. PETER TREGENZA The formula derived by Jones and Schroeder used the simple probability distribution function (pdf), often known as a rectangular or constant pdf. What this represents is people arriving with a constant interval between them. But, do people arrive like that? It is thought that a Poisson pdf was more likely, see Alexandris. Tregenza in 1972 accepted this and developed relationships23 for the variables S and H. Dos Santos was subsequently able to show that a Poisson pdf gave smaller values for S and H and, hence, a more optimistic design than the constant pdf. This allowed the simpler formulae and processes to be the chosen procedure. NICOS ALEXANDRIS Alexandris was a mathematician and registered for a PhD24 with me. Out of intellectual curiosity he was set the task to prove mathematically what had been discovered by the Dos Santos simulations, hence the title “Statistical models in lift systems”. His first task was to survey buildings to determine the arrival process. He found it to be (probably) Poisson. By queuing theory, he was able to show the 80% loading factor to be the interface between a good system and a poor system. Along the way he developed a general analysis25. BRUCE POWELL The story of random behaviour would not be complete without mentioning Bruce Powell. Powell is a long-time contributor in the application of mathematical modelling to lift design and control systems. I first came across his work around 1972,26 and it might well have influenced Alexandris and Dos Santos. He shaped some of the theory we use today. After university, his career was in the lift industry, initially at Westinghouse, where he was involved in coding simulation software ca.1967. He later moved to Otis, and in 2002 reached the inevitable destination of becoming a consultant. In 2005, he was one of the “Four Doctors”. RICHARD PETERS I have known Richard Peters since he was an undergraduate (1986), and I and Lutfi al-Sharif were pleased to examine him for his doctorate27 in 1997. Amongst other things (the list is long), working from first principles, he derived the Generalised Analysis method,28 which improves on Alexandris’ work by providing a more extensive method of analysing any peak traffic flow, not just up peak. However, his most significant contribution to lift traffic analysis, design and control, by far, is the implementation of interactive computer simulation programs. His interest in lift traffic simulation began whilst employed at Ove Arup, and when he set up his own company in 1997, Elevate was born. I worked with Peters for five years from 2002 to develop simulation technology. That is why many of the graphs and tables resemble LSD and PC-LSD 29. Peters’ simulation has done what I never achieved by becoming a worldwide industry standard, applied by more lift professionals than any other traffic design software. LSD only achieved 20 sales – but it was programmed in FORTRAN 4, and ran on machines the size of a transit van. It could be said LSD lives on in a different guise. I and my students have used simulation as a powerful research tool. Peters has followed this route and developed a number of dispatching concepts and design ideas in a similar manner to Dos Santos when using LSD. As an adjunct to this work, Peters has carried out surveys on lift traffic and lift performance for research, and as a basis for making decisions about the benefits of modernisation. This work has proved that the areabased traffic design method is the correct approach and validated my work. 23 Tregenza, P.R., 1972, The prediction of passenger lift performance, Archit. Sci. Rev 24 Alexandris, N.A., 1977, Statistical models in lift systems, PhD thesis, UMIST 25 Alexandris, N.A., Barney, G.C., Harris, C.J., 1979b, Derivation of the mean highest reversal floor and expected number of stops in lift systems, Applied Mathematical Modelling, Volume 3, August 1979 26 Gaver, D.P. and Powell, B.A., 1971, Variability in round trip times for an elevator car during uppeak, Transpn. Res. 27 Peters, R.D., 1997, Vertical transportation planning in buildings, Eng.D. thesis, Brunel University 28 Peters, R., 1990, Lift traffic analysis: Formulae for the general case, Building Services Engineering Research & Technology, 11(2), 1990 29 These can be seen in Book 3.

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His many contributions can be seen in the CIBSE and BCO guidance. In the former, he has published a number of traffic templates based on buildings surveyed. Peters has always been a friendly, but robust, challenger of my work - the why’s and the where fore’s in many a profound debate, in particular, my concept of sizing a lift by area and not mass. He was a sceptic until his surveys showed design by area was the more realistic scientific approach. Area-based design has been in his software since 2010 and now is used by the vast majority of designers worldwide for lift selection. See Gina Barney (encore) . My Story of Lift Traffic Analysis, Design and Control 1960 – 2020 by Dr. Gina Barney will continue next issue. AUTOBIOGRAPHY Born 1935, Dr Barney left school at 16. She has the technician qualifications of ONC (1954) and HNC with distinction (1956); the graduate qualifications of BSc with honours (1959), MSc by research (1962) and PhD (1965). She has the professional qualifications of CEng, FIEE and HonFCIBSE (for exceptional services to the Institution). Following the award of her doctorate, she moved to connecting particle physics, analysing equipment to IBM computers, and after joining UMIST, designing and creating a hybrid computer for control research. Dr Barney founded a research group at UMIST into all aspects of lift systems in January 1968, whilst a lecturer and senior lecturer in the Control Systems Centre, University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST). From 1985 – 1990, she was Director of (computer) Networking at Manchester University, retiring fully from academic life in 1993 to work full time as a consultant. Dr Barney has authored, co-authored or edited more than 20 books and over 100 reviewed papers. Notable of these are Books 1-4 indicated in the Introduction. Dr. Barney is Technical Editor and Contributor to CIBSE Guide D: 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015. She is a member of BSI – MHE/4 Committees, delegate to ISO/TC178 WG6 and WG10 working groups, BRE associate, member of CIBSE Lifts Group and CIBSE Professional Conduct Committee, English editor of Elevatori, Freeman of the City of London, Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Engineers, expert witness. Currently, she is Principal of Gina Barney Associates. She still finds time for ballroom, Latin, sequence and Scottish Country dancing, gardening and driving a fast car. Trustee of several Sedbergh Town charities.

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BY DAVID COOPER

Safety Matters

FATAL ACCIDENT

E

It seems like only yesterday that I was writing the article for my column about an accident where a technician was fatally injured whilst working in a lift pit in Southwark. I am afraid to say it has happened again. This time the accident didn’t involve the failure to use a pit stop switch but strangely was one where the technician was fitting one when the lift descended on him, trapping him across the landing sill. The inquest sat this month (July 2018) to hear how the technician died while carrying out the work at a furniture store in Reading in October 2016.

happen, and awareness of your environment and circumstances are a must.

Human error was a "significant factor" in his death, the inquest heard. Independent expert witnesses from Allianz and LECS (UK) Ltd came to the same conclusion, having investigated the accident and viewed harrowing CCTV footage that captured the accident in its entirety. The lift was "not faulty," and the technician had "not checked and approved" that he had control of it, Reading Coroners Court was told. Abi Stinson, from West Berkshire Council, said the technician should not have entered the lift "without considering with his colleague or by any other means that the lift car was under control".

ACTIVITY 1 (ACCESSING THE PIT)

At the time of the accident, there were two operatives undertaking separate tasks. The expert witness giving evidence said the engineers had not taken control of it (the lift) "in a manner that would ensure their own safety" and "electrically isolating the lift at the mains" would have made it safer. A post-mortem examination found the technician died of traumatic asphyxiation as a result of his chest being crushed by a large object. The inquest jury also heard the "experienced" engineer from Seville had signed a health and safety risk assessment before starting the work. The court heard how the technician was working on the lift with his colleague, who said he was picking up tools to disable the lift on the first floor when it descended. He then heard a "shout" from the technician and realised he had been trapped down the shaft. Experts agreed it was "perfectly credible" the technician may have not "necessarily" heard the hydraulic lift lowering down due to background noise. I, therefore, make no apologies for repeating the requirements of BS7255 yet again and ask you to draw attention to these with your staff. It takes a minor lapse in concentration for an accident to

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As this was a hydraulic lift, I am going to run through the recommendations in table G.1 of BS7255 (Safe working on lifts). This is laid out detailing various different tasks and the safety procedures recommended that go with those tasks. There are separate recommendations for traction lifts, and there are also some further specific task recommendations.

Trained lift personnel conducting non-invasive activities, e.g. general maintenance, cleaning, lubrication, visual inspection (from well floor), surveys, retrieval of lost items, etc. SAFETY PROCEDURE SP1 FOR ACTIVITY 1 Before entering the pit area, the integrity of the safety devices should be proved by the operation of the landing interlock (DOOR LOCK) and the pit stopping device (STOP SWITCH) independently of each other. Observe that the DOOR LOCK stops the car while it is in motion. Observe that the STOP SWITCH prevents the lift being set in motion. When the above devices are proved, the car should be secured against movement before accessing the pit by the following procedure: a) operate stopping device before entering pit; and b) blocking the landing door with a blocking device once inside lift well; and c) where an easily deployable mechanical restraint is available, it should be positioned under the car. ACTIVITY 2 (ISOLATE AND LOCKING/TAGGING OFF) Trained lift personnel conducting invasive activities, e.g. repair activities, adjusting, modifying or repositioning equipment, installing or replacing existing equipment, installing new equipment, etc. SAFETY PROCEDURE SP2 FOR ACTIVITY 2 Carry out procedure SP1 and turn power off at the main isolator and lock off/tag off and in addition SP3 (mechanically restrain the car against downward movement).

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DAVID COOPER

BY

E

FATAL ACCIDENT

ACTIVITY 3 (MECHANICALLY RESTRAINING THE CAR) Trained lift personnel conducting extended invasive activities, e.g. repairing, replacing/adjusting suspension, ropes or chains, sheaves, compensating chains, brake or accessing equipment located up the outside of the car or counterweight. SAFETY PROCEDURE SP3 FOR ACTIVITY 3 Carry out procedure SP1 and procedure SP2 and in addition mechanically restrain the car against downward movement. ACTIVITY 4 (UNTRAINED PERSONS) Untrained lift personnel and trained tradespersons (painter, electricians, plumbers, cleaners, etc.) conducting an activity in the lift pit. These activities are to be treated as extended invasive activities. SAFETY PROCEDURE SP4 FOR ACTIVITY 4 Either: • a trained lift person is present at all times while the work is undertaken and carry out procedures SP1 and SP2 to make the lift safe; or • if the trained lift person is not in attendance all the time, the lift can be made safe by applying procedures SP1, SP2 and SP3, as appropriate. ACTIVITY 5 (OTHERS WORKING ABOVE) Trained and untrained lift personnel and trained tradespersons (painters, electricians, plumbers, etc.) performing any activity in the pit area while repair activities are being conducted elsewhere above them, e.g. on the suspension or drive system. This combines invasive work with persons being exposed to falling or falling objects and is an AT4 activity, which needs to be avoided whenever possible. SAFETY PROCEDURE SP5 FOR ACTIVITY 5 Where the work activity is unavoidable, a detailed risk assessment should be carried out to develop suitable provisions and working procedures. Such provisions should involve scheduling work to avoid simultaneous working, crash decking, debris netting, fall protection, etc., but should include procedures SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4, as appropriate. As a minimum, you should include pit working in your toolbox talks programme. David Cooper can be contacted at dave.cooper@ lecsuk.co.uk E

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Eur Ing David Cooper BSc(Hons), MSc, MPhil, CEng, FIET, FCIBSE, FRSA, FCGI David Cooper is the Managing Director of UK based lift consultants LECS (UK) Ltd. He has been in the lift & escalator industry since 1980 and is a well-known author and speaker. He holds a Master of Philosophy Degree following a 5-year research project into accidents on escalators, a Master of Science Degree in Lift Engineering as well as a Bachelor of Science Honours degree, Higher National Certificate and a Continuing Education Certificate in lift and escalator engineering. He is a co-author of “The Elevator & Escalator Micropedia” (1997) and “Elevator & Escalator Accident Investigation & Litigation”. (2002 & 2005) as well as being a contributor to a number of other books including CIBSE Guide D. He is a regular columnist in trade journals worldwide including Elevation, Elevator World and Elevatori. In 2007 he appeared on the BBC3 TV programme “Emergency Measures” with respect to accidents involving lifts. He has presented at a number of industry seminars worldwide including 2008 Elevcon (Thessaloniki), 2008 NAVTP (San Francisco),1999 LESA (Melbourne), 1999 CIBSE (Hong Kong), 1999 IAEE (London), 1998 (Zurich), 1997 CIBSE (Hong Kong), 1996 (Barcelona) and 1993 (Vienna) as well as numerous presentations within the UK. He is also the founder of the ELEVATOR ACADEMY which provides free training for apprentices and trainees and is a trustee of the UK’s Lift Industry Charity which assists industry members and/or their families after an accident at work. In 2012 David was awarded the silver medal by CIBSE for services to the Institution and in 2017 he was made a Fellow of the City & Guilds of London Institute.

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Making Safety Standards for Lifts “Global”

www.sbs-sme.eu

On May 31 in Brussels, the European Federation for Elevator Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (EFESME) organised the SBS Seminar Making Safety Standards for Lifts “Global”. The audience, consisting of officers and entrepreneurs, learned about the process of converging safety standards for lifts, thanks to presentations from the chairmen of the two technical committees involved in the process: Esfandiar Gharibaan for the CEN TC 10 and Gero Gschwendtner for ISO TC 178. As mentioned by SBS President Gunilla Almgren in her welcome speech, and by EFESME Secretary General Luciano Faletto in his closing remarks, the seminar offered a sufficient basis to understand the opportunities and challenges of the lift sector not only at the European level, but also at international level, to which lift SMEs are also subject.

amendment of the EN 81-20/50, he underlined that the proposal submitted by SBS is still on the table of the WG1; this was confirmed by the SBS expert attending that WG. Moreover, Gharibaan presented the milestones of the roadmap to the convergence of CEN and ISO standards, approved by both standardisation bodies. The roadmap is developing in three main phases: the identical adoption of the EN 81-20/50 as ISO 8100-1/2 with the necessary regional differences; the adoption of a unique ‘EN ISO standard’; and regular revision of the latter, aimed at gradually reducing regional differences. According to the roadmap, the two standards are supposed to coexist in a first period. The EN ISO 8100-1/2 will then enter into force in July 2021, and the EN 81-20/50 will be withdrawn in July 2023. ISO

In his presentation, Gharibaan highlighted the work of the CEN TC 10 on improving safety for lift users and operators. It took almost 10 years to finalise the amended version of the two former European standards, EN 81-1 (for electric lifts) and EN 81-2 (for hydraulic lifts). This work ended with the two new standards EN 81-20 (Requirements for complete passenger or goods passenger lift installations independent of the driving system) and EN 81-50 (Description of the examinations, calculations and tests of lift components used in any type of lift (passenger, goods passenger, goods only lift, etc.)).

During his presentation, Gschwendtner introduced the audience to the ISO world, and in particular the TC 178, established in 1979. He pointed out that the number of codes has been drastically reduced, from the original 27 to the current three (the NorthAmerican A17.1/B44, the European EN 81 and the Japanese JIS). This value eventually will decrease to one, after the convergence has been completed. Gschwendtner also explained the dual safety paths currently existing: the ‘performance-based’ approach supported by a conformity assessment with reference to the Global Essential Safety Requirements, and the ‘prescriptive- based’ approach built on the presumption of conformity given by the harmonised standards.

Gharibaan also explained all the major modifications introduced to improve the level of safety for lift users and service operators. For the currently developed

Turning to convergence, Gschwendtner provided a clear, concise and very detailed explanation of the complicated roadmap in place now. This roadmap

CEN

Small Business Standards (SBS) is the European association representing and supporting small and medium-sized companies (SMEs) in the standardisation process, both at European and international levels.

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will allow coordination of all the necessary activities, which are required to monitor the progressive definition of all the details leading to the expected convergence of three international standards into the final one. The presenter’s explanation brought some much-needed clarity about a very complicated and time-consuming matter. In the question-and-answers session, the numerous requests from the audience underlined that SMEs have only recently started paying attention to standardisation, especially at the international level, after the growing expansion of their businesses outside national borders. Focusing on the specific issue of the globalisation of lift safety standards, those enterprises taking part in this convergence process are increasingly keen to understand the timetable, the objectives and the expected impact on their businesses. They also want to be the main players of their sector. In his conclusions, Faletto mentioned the opportunities and challenges of this convergence process. It is evident that the unification of codes brings advantages in the wider international market. This unification will facilitate not only our lift businesses, but also an improvement in the safety of lift users and operators. Nevertheless, the use of international standards to support European regulations is neither simple nor automatic, as the European and international systems have different bases. Recognising the need to align regional standards, SBS and EFESME are ready to act as “facilitators”, to quote Almgren, in this convergence process. However, to fulfil the task, SBS and EFESME are calling for a transparent, open and honest dialogue among the different actors.

The NEW ELEVATOR WORLD app is here. Download it

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Mandated and co-financed by the European Commission & EFTA Member States

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BY COLIN J. CRANEY

Consultants Voice

ONTARIO’S RELIABLE ELEVATORS ACT 2017 AND WHAT IT MEANS

The Legislature of the Canadian Province of Ontario has recently given approval to Bill 109, the Reliable Elevators Act 2017, by way of the Access to Consumer Credit Reports and Elevator Availability Act. Whilst the detail of the associated regulation is yet to be finalised, the report underlying the Act includes a number of farreaching provisions, with 19 recommendations that the legislature plans to address. The Act is far reaching to the extent the Ontario Legislature acknowledges that Ontario would be the first jurisdiction in the world to legislate for elevator availability. The main recommendations include: a definition of elevator availability; provisions for public accountability in relation to availability, with publicly accessibly building data on elevator performance/ reliability; minimum standards for preventative maintenance; compulsory reporting of outages exceeding 48 hours or whenever 50% of elevators are down (with subsequent financial penalties incurred by contractors); response to passenger entrapments; availability enforcement through the Safety Authority; increasing consumer awareness and competition in relation to maintenance contracts; and provisions for maintenance and modernisation to be included in long-term capital planning. Add to these requirement additional provisions requiring compulsory traffic analysis for all new residential buildings over seven floors; provisions to increase the number of trained elevator mechanics; and enhanced provisions for use by emergency services, and we have a scenario that may prove disruptive for the industry, and in relation to which the industry will be required to develop structures and responses. The underlying report, produced by Deloitte for Justice Douglas Cunningham and the Ontario Technical Standards and Safety Authority, takes a wide view of the sector, certain stakeholder interests, and the underlying industry structures, as well as a consideration of provisions applied in other jurisdictions, together with the socioeconomic factors underlying changes in the market. Ontario provides a precise summary of the intent of the legislation, which is designed with a view to reduce elevator outages and improve access to elevators through enhanced enforcement of maintenance requirements, to ensure information relating to elevator performance is published and is readily available in order to assist consumers

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E

in making better decisions before they rent or buy property, and to create new standards for new high-rise buildings to ensure these have sufficient elevators to adequately serve residents. The more general provisions of the Act, in terms of traffic analysis and enhanced facilities for emergency services, may be considered a natural evolutionary development of existing provisions. The intervention in the labour market to address the shortage of elevator mechanics may be considered a straightforward state intervention reflective of a need to address a deficiency in the market, albeit that this may reflect somewhat negatively on the industry. However, the provisions relating to availability, downtime penalties, maintenance contracts and sector competition, public access to reliability data, and long-term capital planning in terms of maintenance and modernisation/replacement are radical and potentially disruptive, and will no doubt give rise to plenty of lobbying and press comment. Whilst the introduction of downtime penalties and the publishing of reliability data may improve transparency and structural performance within the industry (in terms of training, and labour and component supply availability), it is the inclusion in the legislation of requirements relating to maintenance and long-term capital planning that I find of particular interest, in that this is a potential game-changer in relation to the maintenance and modernisation sectors. The report notes disparities between the reported availability figures between different stakeholders with the industry reporting average annual availability in excess of 99%, and building owners reporting levels as low as 93% and 95% against a generally accepted target annual availability of 98%. If a 20/25-year lifecycle for a lift installation is generally accepted, the question arises as to how availability and downtime criteria are to be addressed throughout the lifecycle? One may adopt a robust PPM strategy, with limited capital investment during the lifecycle, followed by replacement or major modernisation. Alternatively, one may adopt a phased modernisation approach, upgrading elements of equipment through the period. It is interesting to note that the Ontario Report identified no observable patterns relating to the age of an installation, which may be indicative, and which the report identifies to be reflective, of issues relating to the quality and/or effectiveness of maintenance programmes.

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BY COLIN J. CRANEY

ONTARIO’S RELIABLE ELEVATORS ACT 2017 AND WHAT IT MEANS

E

Over its lifetime a lift installation may be considered to generate a series of cash flows that relate to the upkeep and operation of the lift. Schindler advocated a 30-year model (Schindler, 2002) of the lift lifecycle, which is shown in Figure 1, based upon fixed capital allocation and adjusted maintenance costs for a given time period. However, a shortfall in the model lies in its failure to accommodate increasing levels of technological and regulatory change, which may be forced upon the customer either directly through regulation, or indirectly through raised user expectations.

upon what may be practically achievable in relation to future technological and regulatory change may render the lift redundant within the same 20/25-year period denoted in the Schindler model, but whilst continuing to incur the increased cost of phased upgrade during the period. Given that we are unable to accurately predict future development, it is likely that a balance of the two models may provide an optimum approach, which may be formulated to accommodate levels of equipment usage. The integration of the lift product and after-sales service now appears more critical than ever. Reductions in design life, considered to be 40 years back in the 1970s when I entered the industry, and which was considered reasonable in terms of a relatively low rate of technological change and therefore relatively fixed user expectations, inevitably reduce the income generated from the average lift during its lifecycle. In addition, the higher relative value in materials, labour and the manufacturing process are exacerbated by a reduction in the

Otis advocated a model based upon more regular phased upgrading (Otis, 1995), which is shown in Figure 2, that may provide a better overall fit with the increasing pace of modern customer demands and technological and regulatory change. Whilst the Otis model aims to maintain the asset value of the lift through continuous phased upgrading, such an approach may not readily facilitate the use of UK Capital Allowance provisions. In addition, limitations

Service over the entire lifetime of the elevator Average distribution of work over 30 - years in % terms 33%

Replacement

Planning

Modernisation

Order Processing

66%

Repair

Production

Maintenance

Installation

Figure 1. Schindler Model of Elevator Service Life (Schindler Holdings AG, 2002).

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BY COLIN J. CRANEY

E

ONTARIO’S RELIABLE ELEVATORS ACT 2017 AND WHAT IT MEANS

Figure 2. Otis Model of the Asset Value of the Elevator (Otis Plc, 1995).

time available in relation to return on investment. The current lift lifecycle of around 20/25 years is gradually diminishing, with some light-duty designs having a lifecycle of 15 years. The reduction in the lifecycle is compounded by increasing regulatory requirements and shorter building life, requiring earlier modernisation and replacement. Whilst this trend could be considered beneficial to the lift manufacturers, it must eventually affect industry structure, in that a single lift sold at cost previously provided 40 years of maintenance, modernisation and support income, whilst a single model lift sold at cost now produces only 15 years of income. Lift manufacturer maintenance contract offerings are highly standardised providing for little or no customisation of services to meet the requirements of the customer. Previously, manufacturers offered a range of maintenance contracts, often targeted towards sector specific requirements, including those of offices, hospitals, care homes, apartments, hotels and retail. These contracts accommodated the particular requirements known to be specific to these market sectors, and offered customers a wider range of optional services and components on an option price basis. The major shortfall of course lies in an increased complexity of management due to an increasingly diverse range of services offered to different customers. However, developments in IT and handheld communications devices are such that it is readily possible to provide service engineers with a real-time schedule of work and scope of contract services.

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On a more contentious note, the Ontario Technical Standards and Safety Authority recently rescinded an order, dating from 2014, which required that all single-speed elevators should be modernised by the end of 2021. As one might imagine, this gave rise to some consternation on the part of the contractors, albeit that the Authority cited new data, which it asserts fails to support mandatory upgrading with the indication being that these lifts do not pose an unacceptable risk to users, although compulsory provisions for two-monthly maintenance tasks and annual brake examination are retained. The Ontario Report cites an increase in high-rise construction and city living as a factor underlying some of the problems currently experienced. Given that this is a widespread socioeconomic trend in developed societies, and is readily observable here in the UK, with a trend towards an increasing number of high-rise buildings, exemplified in recent growth in central London and in other large UK cities, which was initiated back in the 1990s by the Labour Government, similar issues may emerge in the UK. Indeed, recent economic reports relating to the decline in city centre retail indicates that the unused property capacity is likely to be taken up by housing and commercial offices. In terms of regulation, such as is proposed in Ontario, the relationship between lift lifecycle models, planned preventative maintenance strategies, service charge structure, and capital investment and capital allowances becomes increasingly critical,

ELEVĂĽTOR WĂ…RLD Publication

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BY COLIN J. CRANEY

E

ONTARIO’S RELIABLE ELEVATORS ACT 2017 AND WHAT IT MEANS

as traditional tenant claims against landlords and/ or agents move from the civil arena into a more regulated and prescriptive regulatory structure. The Ontario Report, associated legislation, and stakeholder responses are available on the internet and make interest reading for anyone with an interest in the development of the industry. It will be interesting to observe how the debate evolves, in that this is already being cited as a possible model for application in other jurisdictions. E Eur Ing Colin J Craney BA (Hons) BSc (Hons) LLB (Hons) MSc LLM MBA CEng CMgr FCIBSE FCMI FCIArb CMIOSH Colin Craney has 41-years industry experience, initially with Otis Elevator Co. and more recently with Dunbar & Boardman. Colin is a UK Chartered Engineer and Fellow of CIBSE, European Engineer, Chartered Safety and Health Practitioner, Accredited Consultant on the HSE Occupational Safety and Health Consultants Register (OSHCR) and is a Member of the Chartered Institution of Occupational Safety and

Health (IOSH). Colin is a Barrister, having been called to the Bar by the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple. Colin is a Fellow of the Charted Institute of Arbitrators, an Accredited Mediator, and is a Chartered Manager and Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute. In a long career Colin has been appointed in relation to hundreds of failure investigations, regulatory enforcement prosecutions, commercial claims and disputes. Areas of interest and expertise include the EC Directives, law and regulatory compliance applicable to the lift industry, management, health and safety in the lift industry, CDM 2015 Principal Designer, Authorising Engineer under NHS HTM 08-02, lift and escalator related dilapidations and Landlord & Tenant disputes, competition and intellectual property law, incident and failure investigation, alternative dispute resolution and Expert Witness. Colin Craney is a Forensic and Consultant Engineer, Accredited Mediator, Management Consultant and Chartered Safety & Health Practitioner with Tuv Sud Dunbar Boardman, the UK’s largest and foremost vertical transportation consultancy, and may be contacted at colin.craney@tuv-sud.co.uk

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The Royal Institution Passenger LiftNew life for an old Lift -Rumour has it!!! Just to say, we asked if the Royal Institution could request that their Insurance Companies Plant inspector attend the site when we were finalising our work on the main and micro machine and brakes. Tests weights were ordered to coincide with his visit. He was also going to inspect the other lifts in the building, including the “Lantern Lift,” the other Waygood Otis machine that raises the lantern dome in the roof of the auditorium, installed at the same time as our passenger lift. You may remember it was the first machine in our long project to reinstate both of the original 90- yearold Waygood Otis machines.

Messages of Encouragement We have been overwhelmed by the positive response we have received following the purchase of Elevation by Elevator World. It is very encouraging to see the news received so well by the Lift community. Below are a selection of the messages we have received. Congrats! Well done: the empire is growing! Fabio Liberali Chief Communications Officer LU-VE S.p.A. f.liberali@tin.it Early this morning I read the news. It is absolutely wonderful! I immediately thought of Elevator World founder William C. Sturgeon: he must be very proud of the evolution that his magazine and company are undergoing. Personally, I am very happy to have been part of Elevator World for more than 20 years and see its growth. Carmen Maldacena ELEVATOR WORLD Correspondent Director, Subir y Bajar cmaldacena@gmail.com Many congratulations on your continued plans for world domination! A great acquisition! (It must be catching. . . .) John Curzon GAL Manufacturing Corp. John.Curzon@GAL.com

We understand the Royal Institution is sending out letters to all those who have contributed to these projects over the past six years, asking them to attend a presentation and final handover of the passenger lift on the 25th July. Which is too late to be included in this issue? In addition, the RI is writing something called a “Blog” not one of our specialties, but perhaps it could be part of another article. So, we will leave our final chapter of the saga till next time. “It’s not over till the Fat Lady Sings.”

I’m just catching up with news and learned about Ish’s retirement, EW buying Elevation, and you being the new Editor!! I’m sure you have access to plenty of UK editorial, but if EW / you wanted to spread farther afield, I might be able to offer something from down here if it was of interest. Congratulations. John Carroll CEng MCIBSE MSc Senior Associate - Manager Vertical Transportation NORMAN DISNEY & YOUNG

In the meantime, Go Well!

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John Nichols

ELEVATION : An

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9TH SYMPOSIUM ON LIFT & ESCALATOR TECHNOLOGIES Highgate House, Northampton, UK 19 & 20 September 2018 www.liftsymposium.org


7TH SEPTEMBER 2018 CHARITY CLAY SHOOT Venue: West Kent Shooting School, Brenchley, Kent, TN12 7DG Website: www.liftsymposium.org 19TH-20TH SEPTEMBER 2018 9TH SYMPOSIUM ON LIFT & ESCALATOR TECHNOLOGIES Venue: Highgate House, Northampton, UK Website: www.liftsymposium.org The Lift & Escalator Symposium brings together experts from the field of vertical transportation, offering opportunities for speakers to present peer reviewed papers on the subject of their research. Speakers include industry experts, academics and post graduate students. For more information and to register visit www.liftsymposium.org

4TH - 6TH OCTOBER 2018 IEE Expo 2018 Venue: Dhaka, Bangladesh Website:

www.gleexpo.com

16TH - 17TH OCTOBER 2019 EUROPEAN LIFT CONGRESS HEILBRONN Venue: Technical Academy of Heilbronn e.V., Villingen, Germany Website: www.tah.hs-heilbronn.de 15TH - 16TH NOVEMBER 2018 INTERNATIONAL ELEVATOR & ESCALATOR SYMPOSIUM Venue: Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel, Istanbul, Turkey Website: www.elevatorsymposium.org/ 13TH - 16TH MARCH 2019 MADE Expo 2019 Venue: Milan Fairgrounds, Rho Website: http://www.madeexpo.it/en/ 15TH-16TH MAY 2019 LIFTEX 2019 Venue: ExCeL London Website: www.liftex2019.com LIFTEX 2019, which takes place from 15-16 May 2019 at ExCeL London. LIFTEX is the ONLY dedicated exhibition for the lift, escalator and access industry to be held in the UK. It is organised by the Lift and Escalator Industry Association (LEIA) for the industry and is held every three years at London’s ExCeL centre.

21ST - 24TH MARCH 2019 ASANSOR INSTANBUL 2019 Venue: Tüyap Bylikdüzü Fair & Congress Center, Istanbul, Turkey Website: www.asansoristanbul.com/ 27TH - 29TH FEBRUARY 2020 INTERNATIONAL ELEVATOR & ESCALATOR EXPO Venue: Bombay Convention & Exhibition Centre, Mumbai, India Website: ieeexpo.in.messefrankfurt.com/mumbai/en.html

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THE WORLD IS A SQUARE

r m av a ti o n f o

ailable

no w

e erlift.d t n i . w ww

A p p l ic

interlift 2019 – The World of Elevators 15 - 18 October | Messe Augsburg | Germany

Organiser: AFAG Messen und Ausstellungen GmbH Am Messezentrum 5, 86159 Augsburg I www.interlift.de

Technical sponsor: VFA-Interlift e.V. Süderstraße 282, 20537 Hamburg I www.vfa-interlift.de


EMAIL ADDRESSES 21ST CENTURY LIFTS LTD sales@21stcenturylifts.co.uk A&A ELECTRICAL LTD sales@aa-electrical.com ACE LIFTS LTD charles@ace-lifts.com AITKEN, STEVE steve.aitken@tuv-sud.co.uk AL-SHARIF, LUTFI vtc@al-sharif.co.uk ALIMAK HEK LTD info.uk@alimakhek.com AMALGAMATED LIFTS LTD info@al-lifts.co.uk ANNABLE, RICHARD B Kapok 1988 Ltd rich@kapok88.com ANSA ELEVATORS LTD info@ansaelevators.co.uk APEX LIFT & ESCALATORS LTD derekc@apexlifts.com ARITCO UK LTD peter.claringbold@aritco.com ATWELL INTERNATIONAL LTD info@atwellinternational.com AXEL DIRECT axellifts@btconnect.com AXESS 2 LTD sales@axess2.co.uk BENTLEY, JOHN LECS (UK) LTD john.bentley@lecsuk.co.uk BETTERIDGE, MARTIN Aurora Lifts Ltd info@aurora-lifts.co.uk BRENTLEY, BOB Propbrook Ltd. bob.brentley@propbrook.co.uk BULL, LESTER Omron Electronics lester.bull@eu.omron.com BRITTON PRICE LTD info@brittonprice.co.uk BROOKSBANK, TOM Global Lift Equipment tom@gle.com.es CANTWELL, STEPHEN stephencantwell@lecs.co.uk CHAMP, Louise The Swift Lift Co Uk Ltd louise@swiftlift-uk.com CLARKE, JOHN Jackson Lift Group jclarke@jacksonlifts.com

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COMMEND UK sales@commend.co.uk COOPER, DAVID LECS (UK) LTD david.cooper@lecsuk.co.uk CRANEY, COLIN J colin.craney@tuv-sud.co.uk CURTI LIFT SERVICES info@curtiliftsservices.co.uk DATWYLER (UK) LTD elevator@datwyler.co.uk DEAN, LEE LECS (UK) LTD lee.dean@lecsuk.co.uk DEBENHAM, RICHARD Elevation Lift Services Ltd rdebenham@elevationlifts.com DEWHURST PLC info@dewhurst.co.uk DIGITAL ADVANCED CONTROL LTD enquiries@digital-advanced-control.co.uk DORSET LIFTS LTD sales.dorsetlifts@virgin.net DRUCEGROVE LTD. sales@drucegrove.co.uk DUKES, HARRY LECS (UK) LTD harrydukes@lecs.co.uk EARLSWOOD INDUSTRIAL SERVICES LTD sales@earlswood.co.uk EDGE, JAMES Griffin Elevators Ltd james.edge@griffin-elevators.co.uk ELEVATOR WORLD editorial@elevatorworld.com ELEVATORI MAGAZINE elemail@elevatori.it ELEX LIFTS (UK) LTD info@elexlifts.com EMESSEM SOLENOID CO LTD sales@emessem-solenoid.co.uk EPECO LTD lifts@epeco.co.uk FOULDS LIFTS info@fouldslifts.co.uk FRANCIS, JOHN The Swift Lift Co Uk Ltd john@swiftlift-uk.com FRANCIS, KEVIN Sussex Lift Company kevin@sussexlifts.co.uk GB ENGINEERING pam@gbengineering.net GF LIFT HYDRAULICS LTD sales@gflifts.co.uk

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G-TEX STAINLESS Jamie Gilligan jsgilligan@g-tex.com GARCIA, JACINTO export@liftpromotion.com GARTEC LTD sales@gartec.com service@gartec.com spares@gartec.com GATHERER, M. S. Edward A. Pearce & Partners gatherer@eapearce.com GLOBAL LIFT EQUIPMENT sales@global-lift.com GORDGE, PHILIP Schmersal UK/IRL Ltd pgordge@schmersal.com GUIDELINE LIFT SERVICES LTD. lifts@guideline.co.uk HIGHER ELEVATION LTD info@higherelevation.co.uk HODGETTS, WAYNE Propbrook Ltd. w.hodgetts@propbrook.co.uk HORNER, PHYLLIS Statius Management phorner@statius.co.uk HORSLER LIFT SERVICES LTD kirstie@horslerliftservices.co.uk HOWKINS, ROGER Ove Arup & Partners roger.howkins@arup.com HORIZON LIFTS LTD info@horizonlifts.co.uk HYDROWARE UK LTD info@hydroware.co.uk ILE MANUFACTURING LTD sales@ilem.co.uk INTERNATIONAL LIFT EQUIPMENT LTD ilesales@interlift.co.uk ISASLIFT (TURKEY) isaslift@turk.net J&L ELEVATOR COMPONENTS info@jandlelevatorcomponents.com JACKSON LIFT GROUP sales@jacksonlifts.com JEFFERY, CONRAD con@s1lifts.com JEFFERY, KRIS kris@s1lifts.com JENKINS, MEL Lift Consultant, Caxton Facilities Management mel.jenkins@caxtonfm.co.uk

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JONES, DUNCAN E Lift Surveying Services dejlss@aol.com KEARNEY, PHIL KLA - Kearney Lift Associates Ltd liftconsultant@sky.com. KELLY, DARREN Drucegrove Ltd. darren.kelly@drucegrove.co.uk L.I.T.S. LTD enquiries@lits.org.uk LANDMARK LIFTS LTD info@landmarklifts.co.uk LEAR, MATT Statius Management mlear@statius.co.uk LEROY SOMER LTD. kevin.cullum@leroysomer.com LESTER CONTROL SYSTEMS LTD. info@lestercontrols.co.uk LIFT COMPONENTS LTD. sales@liftcomponents.co.uk LIFT OUT LTD. info@liftout.net LIFTTEST info@lifttest.co.uk LION LIFT CONTROLS LTD. sales@lionliftcontrols.co.uk LUSTIG, AMI ESL - Eng.S. Lustig Consulting Engineers Ltd. esl@netvision.net.il MACPUARSA (UK) LTD mpuk@macpuarsa.es MALTBY, ANGELA Bridon Group maltbya@bridon.com MANTEY, PHILIP Dunbar & Boardman philmantey@dunbarboardman.com MELLOR, NICK Managing Director, LEIA enquiries@leia.co.uk MILLER, JOHN I.L.E. Manufacturing Ltd. jmiller@ilem.co.uk MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V. paul.johnson@meuk.mee.com MOVVÉO LTD info@movveo.com MULHOUSE LTD info@mulhouseltd.com MURPHY, GEOFF geoff@gtmliftservices.co.uk NLC NOVA LIFT CO. LTD mail@novalift.co.uk

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NATIONAL LIFT TOWER enquiries@nationallifttower.co.uk ORR, ROBERT L.I.T.S. Ltd enquiries@lits.org.uk P H JACKSON & SON (BUILDING) LTD info@phjlifts.co.uk PIP LIFTS LTD sales@piplifts.co.uk PATEL, RAJ Windcrest (UK) Ltd. raj@windcrest.co.uk PERCIVAL, OLIVER Draka Elevator Products depukinfo@draka.com PETERS, RICHARD Peters Research richard.peters@peters-research.com PICKERING, DAVID ilecs Ltd david.pickering@liftconsultants.com PRECISION LIFTS LTD info@precisionlifts.co.uk PRESTON, BRIAN eurosales@magnetek.com PROPBROOK LTD. info@propbrook.co.uk QUANTUM SERVICES engineers@qlift.co.uk R. J. LIFT & TESTING SERVICES LTD mail@rjliftandtestingservices.co.uk RATCLIFFE, TONY Epeco lifts@epeco.co.uk READ, JOHN Oakham Lift Services john@oakhamliftservices.co.uk REID, IAN Ian Reid & Associates Lift Consultant i.reid296@virginmedia.com ROBINSON, DEAN Propbrook Ltd. dean.robinson@propbrook.co.uk RUDD, PHILIP Jackson LIft Group prudd@jacksonlifts.com RUSSETT, SIMON Hoare Lea simonrussett@london.hoarelea.com SALTER, CHARLES Ace Lifts charles@ace-lifts.com

SCHINDLER LTD info@gbschindler.com SEMATIC SPA info@sematic.com SHERWOOD, Graham grahamsherwood@elevtec.com SHORTS LIFTS info@shorts-lifts.co.uk SMITH, RALPH ralph@vertica-consulting.co.uk SPRATT, PETER Datwyler (UK) Ltd. peters@datwyler.co.uk SPECIALIST LIFT SERVICES LTD john.gorin@specialistlifts.com STANNAH LIFTS liftsales@stannah.co.uk liftservices@stannah.co.uk SUMMIT ELEVATORS LTD enquiries@summitelevators.co.uk SWIFT LIFT CO UK LTD sales@swiftlift-uk.com TCC PRIMA sales@tcc-prima.co.uk TALINOR UK LTD. info@talinor.co.uk TAYLOR, RICHARD Taylor Lifts enquiries@taylorlifts.co.uk TEMPLE LIFTS sales@templelifts.ltd.uk THAMES VALLEY CONTROLS LTD info@tvcl.co.uk THE BRITANNIC LIFT COMPANY PLC. info@lifts.co.uk THOMPSON, DEBBIE Debbie@liftrefurb.com TRETT, JOHN CE Electronics j.trett@ceelectronics.co.uk VERTICA CONSULTING LTD info@vertica-consulting.co.uk WARREN, PETER Statius Management pwarren@statius.co.uk WINDCREST (UK) LTD info@windcrest.co.uk WOODS, MARK Statius Management mwoods@statius.co.uk YOUNG, TONY tony.young@cpaltd.net

SASSI LIFT SYSTEMS LTD sales@sls-ltd.co.uk

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DEWHURST PLC www.dewhurst.co.uk

WEBSITES 21ST LIFTS LTD www.21stcenturylifts.com

DIGIPARA (DIGIPARA LIFTDESIGNER) www.digipara.com

A&A ELECTRICAL LTD www.aa-electrical.com

DIGITAL ADVANCED CONTROL LTD www.digital-advanced-control.co.uk

ACE LIFTS www.ace-lifts.com

DORSET LIFTS LTD www.dorsetlifts.com

ACRE LIFTS LTD www.acrelifts.com

DRAKA ELEVATOR PRODUCTS www.draka-ep.com

AL-SHARIF VTC LTD www.al-sharif.co.uk

DRUCEGROVE www.drucegrove.co.uk

ALIMAK HEK LTD www.alimakhek.co.uk

EARLSWOOD INDUSTRIAL SERVICES LTD www.earlswood.co.uk

AMALGAMATED LIFTS LTD www.al-lifts.co.uk

ELEVATOR WORLD www.elevatorworld.com

ANSA ELEVATORS LTD www.ansaelevators.co.uk APEX LIFT & ESCALATORS LTD www.apexlifts.com

ELEVATORI MAGAZINE www.elevatori.it ELEVTEC LTD www.elevtec.com

ARITCO UK LTD www.aritco.com

ELEX LIFTS (UK) LTD www.elexlifts.com

ATWELL INTERNATIONAL LTD www.atwellinternational.com

EMESSEM SOLENOID CO LTD www.emessem-solenoid.co.uk

AURORA LIFTS LTD www.aurora-lifts.co.uk AXEL DIRECT www.axelsrl.com

FS COOPER LTD www.fscooper.com

AXESS 2 LTD axess2.co.uk

GB ENGINEERING www.gbengineering.net

FOULDS LIFTS www.fouldslifts.co.uk

BRIDON GROUP www.bridon.com

GF LIFT HYDRAULICS LTD www.gflifts.co.uk

BRITTON PRICE LTD www.brittonprice.co.uk

GTM LIFT SERVICES www.gtmliftservices.co.uk

BUCHER HYDRAULICS LTD www.bucherhydraulics.com

G-TEX STAINLESS www.g-tex.com

CIBSE LIFTS GROUP www.cibseliftsgroup.org

GARTEC LTD www.gartec.com

CE ELECTRONICS www.ceelectronics.co.uk

GENERAL LIFT COMPANY LTD www.general-lift.co.uk

CLASSIC LIFTS LTD www.lift-engineers.co.uk

GINA BARNEY www.liftconsulting.org

COMMEND UK www.commend.co.uk

GLOBAL LIFT EQUIPMENT www.global-lift.com

CP AUTOMATION LTD www.cpaltd.net

GLOBAL LIFT EQUIPMENT (GLE) www.gle-lifts.com

CROWN LIFTS LTD www.crownlifts.co.uk

GRIFFIN ELEVATORS LTD www.griffin-elevators.co.uk

CURTI LIFT SERVICES www.curtiliftsservices.co.uk

GUIDELINE LIFT SERVICES LTD www.guideline.co.uk

DATWYLER (UK) www.datwyler.com

HEALTH AND SAFETY EXECUTIVE www.hse.gov.uk

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HIGHER ELEVATION LTD www.higherelevation.co.uk

PIP LIFTS LTD www.piplifts.co.uk

HORIZON LIFTS LTD www.horizonlifts.com

PEELLE DOOR COMPANY LTD www.peelledoor.com

HYDROWARE UK LTD www.hydroware.co.uk

PETERS RESEARCH www.peters-research.com

INTERNATIONAL LIFT EQUIPMENT www.ileweb.com

PHYSICAL MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGIES INC. www.pmtvib.com

J&L ELEVATOR COMPONENTS www.jandlelevatorcomponents.com JACKSON LIFT GROUP www.jacksonlifts.com

PROPBROOK LTD www.propbrook.co.uk QUANTUM SERVICES www.qlift.co.uk

KAPOK 1988 LTD www.kapok88.com

R. J. LIFT & TESTING SERVICES LTD www.rjliftandtestingservices.co.uk

L.I.T.S. LTD www.lits.org.uk

RIMEX METALS www.rimexmetals.com

LANDMARK LIFTS LTD www.landmarklifts.co.uk

SASSI LIFT SYSTEMS LTD. www.sls-ltd.co.uk

LANGHAM LIFTS LTD www.langham-lifts.co.uk

SCHINDLER LTD www.schindlerlifts.co.uk

LECS (UK) LTD. www.lecsuk.co.uk

SEMATIC SPA www.sematic.com

LEROY SOMER LTD. www.leroy-somer.co.uk LESTER CONTROL SYSTEMS LTD www.lestercontrols.co.uk LIFT OUT LTD www.liftout.net

SHORTS LIFTS www.shorts-lifts.co.uk STANNAH LIFTS LTD www.stannahlifts.co.uk STATIUS MANAGEMENT SERVICES www.statius.uk.com

LIFT REFURBISHMENTS LTD www.liftrefurb.com

SUMMIT ELEVATORS LTD www.summitelevators.co.uk

LIFTEC www.liftec.co.uk

SWIFT LIFT COMPANY UK LTD www.swiftlift-uk.com

LIFTWISE LTD www.liftwise.co.uk

TALINOR UK LTD. www.talinor.co.uk

LION LIFT CONTROLS LTD www.lionliftcontrols.co.uk

TAYLOR LIFTS www.taylorlifts.co.uk

NATIONAL LIFT TOWER www.nationallifttower.co.uk

TEMPLE LIFTS www.templelifts.com

MACPUARSA (UK) LTD www.mplifts.com

THAMES VALLEY CONTROLS LTD www.tvcl.co.uk

MAGNETEK UK LTD www.elevatordrives.com

TITAN ELEVATORS LTD www.titanelevators.co.uk

MITSUBISHI www.mitsubishi-elevator.com

TUV SUD DUNBAR BOARDMAN www.tuv-sud.co.uk/dunbarboardman

MOVVÉO LTD. www.movveo.com

VERTICA CONSULTING vertica-consulting.co.uk

NLC NOVA LIFT CO. LTD www.novalift.co.uk

WINDCREST (UK) LTD www.windcrest.co.uk

OAKHAM LIFT SERVICES www.oakhamliftservices.co.uk

www.elevation.co.uk

PRECISION LIFTS LTD www.precisionlifts.co.uk

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PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS

A&A ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTORS LTD

ARITCO UK LTD

COMPUTERGUARD LTD

234-262 Maybank Road, South Woodford, London, E18 1ET Phone: 020 8559 7000

The New Boathouse, Mill Lane, Taplow, Berkshire, SL6 0AA Phone: 0203 740 7401

Hazelwell House, Graffham, Petworth, West Sussex, GU28 0QA Phone: 01798 867133

Email: sales@aa-electrical.com Website: www.aa-electrical.com

Email: peter.claringbold@aritco.com Website: www.aritco.com

Email: info@computerguard.co.uk Website: www.computerguard.co.uk

ADEPT ELEVATOR STORAGE & DISTRIBUTION A D E PT

AXEL LTD

DELMARK LIFTING EQUIPMENT LTD

12 Vicarage Fields, Worthing, Sussex, BN13 3SF Phone: 01903 690400

Unit 44, Acorn Industrial Park, Crayford Road, Crayford, Kent, DA1 4AL Phone: 020 8305 1919

Email: adepttech@btconnect.com Website: www.adeptesd.co.uk

Email: paul@axeldirect.co.uk Website: www.axelsrl.com

Email: lifting@delmark.co.uk Website: www.delmark.co.uk

ADEPT PUBLICATIONS LTD

BLACKBURNS METALS LTD

DEWHURST UK MANUFACTURING LTD

Unit 6, Butterly Avenue, Questor, Dartford, Kent, DA1 1JG Phone: 01322 626551

Parkway House, Unit 6, Parkway Ind. Estate, Pacific Ave, Wednesbury, West Midlands WS10 7WP

Unit 9 Hampton Business Park, Hampton Road West, Feltham, TW13 6DB Phone: 0208 744 8200

Email: nikki@elevation.co.uk

Email: info@blackburnsmetals.co.uk Website: www.blackburnsmetals.co.uk

Email: PThienel@dewhurst.co.uk Website: www.dewhurst.co.uk

AFFERO LTD

BOLTON GATE COMPANY LTD

DIRECT LIFT COMPANY

2A Maple Court, Ash Lane, Collingtree, Northamptonshire, NN4 0NB Phone: 01604 858850

Waterloo Street, Bolton, Lancs, BL1 2SP Phone: 01204 871037

Unit 1a, Grange Farm Road, Colchester, Essex, C02 8JW Phone: 01206 861686

Email: marie@affero.co.uk Website: www.affero.co.uk

Email: ds@boltongate.co.uk Website: www.boltongate.co.uk

Email: dave@directliftco.co.uk Website: www.directliftco.co.uk

ALIMAK HEK LIMITED

BROWNINGS ELECTRIC CO LTD

DIRECT LIFT REMOVAL LTD

Northampton Road, Rushden, Northamptonshire, NN10 6BW Phone: 01933 354700

11 Thames Road, Barking, Essex, IG11 0HG Phone: 020 8591 3030

Unit 7, Manor Road Garage, Manor Road. Caddington, Luton, Bedfordshire, LU1 4ED Phone: 01582 481404

Email: info.uk@alimakhek.com Website: www.alimakhek.co.uk

Email: enquiries@browningselectric.co.uk Website: www.browningselectric.co.uk

Email: jasonperry10@hotmail.co.uk Website: www.directliftremovalLtd.co.uk

APEX LIFT & ESCALATOR ENGINEERS LIMITED

BULLET LIFT SERVICES LIMITED

EARLSWOOD INDUSTRIAL SERVICES LTD

Unit 17, Crown Road, Kings Norton Business Centre, Birmingham, West Midlands, B30 3HY Phone: 0121 258 2214

Units 7/8, Mirravale Trading Estate, Selinas Lane, Dagenham, Essex, RM8 1QD Phone: 020 8595 3060

Email: info@bulletlifts.com Website: www.bulletlifts.com

Email: sales@earlswood.co.uk Website: www.earlswood.co.uk

Unit 6, Butterly Avenue, Questor, Dartford, Kent, DA1 1JG Phone: 01322 626551

AFFERO

ART’s House, Banks Lane, Bexleyheath, Kent, DA6 7BH Phone: 020 8300 2929 Email: info@apexlifts.com Website: www.apexlifts.com

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ELEVATOR SURVEY & DESIGN LTD

HORSLER LIFT SERVICES LIMITED

LECS (UK) LTD

17 Farm Crescent, Sittingbourne, Kent, ME10 4QD Phone: 07845 779413

Unit 1 & 3, Little Balmer, Buckingham Industrial Park, Buckinghamshire, MK18 1TF Phone: 01280 823626

52 Grosvenor Gardens, London, SW1W 0AU Phone: 0203 755 5233 HORSLER

LIFT SERVICES

Email: lift.design@yahoo.co.uk

Email: sales@horslerliftservices.co.uk Website: www.horslerliftservices.co.uk

Email: david.cooper@lecsuk.co.uk Website: www.lecsuk.co.uk

EUROGEARS LTD

HYDRATEC LIFT SERVICES LTD

LIFT OUT LTD

Unit D10, Laser Quay, Culpeper Close, Medway City Estate, Rochester, Kent, ME2 4HU Phone: 01634 297555

Unit 1B, Blackbushe Business Village, Yateley, Hampshire, GU46 6GA Phone: 01252 871664

9 Landau Way, Darent Industrial Park, Erith, Kent, DA8 2LF Phone: 01322 331122

Email: sales@eurogears.net Website: www.eurogears.com

Email: Rob@hydratec-lifts.co.uk Website: www.hydratec-lifts.co.uk

Email: B.Lidsey@liftout.net Website: www.liftout.net

GARTEC LTD

HYDROWARE (UK) LTD

LION LIFT CONTROLS LTD

Midshires Business Park, Smeaton Close, Aylesbury, Bucks, HP19 8HL Phone: 01296 397100

6a Ryder Court, Saxon Way East, Corby, Northamptonshire, NN18 9NX Phone: 07471 037582

Littleton Mills, Winford, Bristol, BS40 8HJ Phone: 01275 332515

Email: sales@gartec.com Website: www.gartec.com

Email: Matt.thompson@hydroware.co.uk Website: www.hydroware.co.uk

Email: sales@lionliftcontrols.co.uk Website: www.lionliftcontrols.co.uk

GINA BARNEY ASSOCIATES

ISCA ELEVATORS LTD

MOVVEO LTD

PO Box 7, Sedbergh, Cumbria, LA10 5GE Phone: 015396 20790

4 Woodlands Enterprise Centre, Pathfields Business Park, South Molton, Devon, EX36 3BY Phone: 01769 574782

Woking Eight, Forsyth Road, Woking, Surrey, GU21 5SB Phone: 01483 215215

Website: www.liftconsulting.org

Email: info@isca-elevators.com Website: www.isca-elevators.com

Email: info@movveo.com Website: www.movveo.com

GLOBAL LIFT EQUIPMENT

KAPOK (1988) LTD

MULHOUSE LTD

Units H42 / 43, Ashmount Enterprise Park, Flint, Flintshire, CH6 5YL Phone: 01352 735400

Newton House, Long Bennington Business Park, Main Road, Long Bennington, Nottinghamshire, NG23 5DJ Phone: 01949 843020

Unit 36, Nobel Square, Burnt Mills Industrial Estate, Basildon, Essex, SS13 1LT Phone: 01268 726222

Email: susan.terry@global-lift.com Website: www.global-lift.com

Email: info@kapok88.com Website: www.kapok88.com

Email: info@mulhouseLtd.com Website: www.mulhouseLtd.com

GUIDELINE LIFT SERVICES LTD

KLEENEZE KOTI LIMITED

White Oak Technology Park, London Road, Swanley, Kent, BR8 7AG Phone: 01322 665665

Ansteys Road, Hanham, Bristol, BS15 3SS Phone: 0117 958 2450

P H JACKSON & SON (BUILDING) LTD

Email: martin.oliver@guideline.co.uk Website: www.guideline.co.uk

Email: paulduffett@ksl.uk.com Website: www.ksLtd.com

www.elevation.co.uk

ELEVATION : An

Post Office Buildings, Freestone Yard, Park Street, Colnbrook, Berks, SL3 0HT Phone: 01753 682480 Email: info@phjlifts.co.uk Website:

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PFEIFER DRAKO LTD

SCHMERSAL UK/IRL LTD

VERTICA CONSULTING LIMITED

Marshfield Bank, Woolstanwood, Crewe, Cheshire, CW2 8UY Phone: 01270 587728

Sparrowhawk Close, Enigma Business Park, Malvern, Worcestershire, WR14 1GL Phone: 01684 571980

2A Maple Court, Ash Lane, Collingtree, Northamptonshire, NN4 0NB Phone: 01604 858850

Email: sales@pfeiferdrako.co.uk Website: www.drako.de

Email: pgordge@schmersal.com Website:

Email: marie@vertica-consulting.co.uk Website: www.vertica-consulting.co.uk

PIP LIFT SERVICE LIMITED

SHORTS

WITTUR LIMITED

Melville Court, Spilsby Road, Harold Hill, Essex, RM3 8SB Phone: 01708 373999

15 Kings Gate, Bradford Business Park, Canal Road, Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD1 4SJ Phone: 01274 305066

11 Broncoed Business Park, Wrexham Road, Mold, Flintshire, CH7 1HP Phone: 01352 707470

Email: sales@piplifts.co.uk Website: www.piplifts.co.uk

Email: michael.craddock@shorts-lifts.co.uk Website: www.shorts-lifts.co.uk

Email: sales.uk@wittur.com Website: www.wittur.com

PYE LONDON LTD

STATIUS MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Unit 7 Hookers Road, Walthamstow, London, E17 6DP Phone: 020 8531 3334

Harlequin House, Bickley Crescent, Bickley, Kent, BR1 2DW Phone: 020 8460 3345

Email: pye-london@btconnect.com Website: www.pyelondon.com

Email: mwoods@statius.co.uk Website: www.statius.co.uk

RE-ROPES LTD (PART OF THE GUSTAV WOLF GROUP

STENTORGATE LTD

Unit 15, Mellish Industrial Estate, Ruston Road, Woolwich, London, SE18 5QZ Phone: 0207 476 0793

Beech Grove, Off Otley Road, Eldwick, Bingley, West Yorkshire, BD16 3EG Phone: 01274 560600

Email: info@reropes.co.uk Website: www.reropes.co.uk

Email: Richard@stentorgate.co.uk Website: www.stentorgate.co.uk

SAFELINE ELEVATOR PARTS

TERRY LIFTS LTD

3 Evegate Park Barn, Station Road, Smeeth, Ashford, Kent, TN25 6SX Phone: 01303 813414

1-3 Longridge Trading Estate, Knutsford, Cheshire, WA16 8PR Phone: 0345 365 5366

Email: Dave.obrien@safeline.uk.com Website: www.safeline.uk.com

Email: sales@terrylifts.co.uk Website: www.terrylifts.co.uk

SASSI LIFT SYSTEMS LTD

THE PLATFORM LIFT COMPANY LTD

5 Blackwell Drive, Springwood Industrial Estate, Braintree, Essex, CM7 2QJ Phone: 01376 550666

Millside House, Anton Mill Trading Estate, Andover, Hampshire, SP10 2RW Phone: 01256 896000

Email: sales@sls-Ltd.co.uk Website: www.sls-Ltd.co.uk

Email: info@platformliftco.co.uk Website: www.platformliftco.co.uk

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Linked to our yearly Products & Services Directory, these entries are FREE to all companies appearing in the Directory. You can appear here for as little as £48 a year (4 issues). If you would like to discuss how your company can be featured, please contact Suzanne McCoy on 07484 371712 or email suzanne@elevation.co.uk.

ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

www.elevation.co.uk


Independent Lift, Escalator and Façade Access Equipment Consulting Engineers

AREAS OF EXPERTISE:

LECS uk Ltd. London Tel: | 0203 755 5233 Manchester Tel: | 0161 638 0984 Web: | www.lecsuk.co.uk

‣ PASSENGER & GOODS LIFTS ‣ ACCESSIBLE PLATFORMS ‣ ESCALATORS AND MOVING WALKS ‣ FAÇADE ACCESS EQUIPMENT ‣ CABLEWAYS & CABLE CARS ‣ FUNICULARS

SERVICES OFFERED: ‣ SURVEYS ‣ RISK ASSESSMENTS ‣ DDA COMPLIANCE AUDITS ‣ MAINTENANCE AUDITS ‣ TRAINING ‣ PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT ‣ STATUTORY INSPECTIONS

‣ TRAFFIC ANALYSIS ‣ NEW INSTALLATION SPECIFICATIONS ‣ MODERNISATION SPECIFICATIONS ‣ PROJECT MANAGEMENT ‣ WITNESSING OF COMMISSIONING ‣ EXPERT WITNESS ‣ MAINTENANCE SPECIFICATIONS

LONDON OFFICE: 52 Grosvenor Gardens, London, SW1W 0AU | 0203 755 5233 | lee.dean@lecsuk.co.uk MANCHESTER OFFICE: 111 Piccadilly, Manchester, M1 2HY | 0161 638 0984 | john.bentley@lecsuk.co.uk EASTBOURNE OFFICE: Archer House, Northbourne Road, Eastbourne, BN22 8PW | 07717 832426 | dave.cooper@lecsuk.co.uk


The following pages provide information on a range of companies involved in the Lift Maintenance market. COMPANY NAME:

ANSA ELEVATORS LTD

ADDRESS:

21 Broadgate, Broadway Business Park, Chadderton, Oldham OL9 9XA

TELEPHONE:

0161 688 6500

EMAIL: info@ansaelevators.co.uk WEBSITE: www.ansaelevators.co.uk

• • • •

New Installations including Design and Build Projects Condition Reporting and budget planning overviews Compliance Surveying, reporting and budgeting including all requirements to meet The Equality Act 2010 Traffic analysis and people movement studies

GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE: Scottish Borders to the Midlands region and from the West to East Coast. COMPANY NAME:

APEX LIFT & ESCALATOR ENGINEERS LIMITED

COMPANY PROFILE: ANSA Elevators Ltd are an independent lift maintenance and installation company operating in the UK. We currently have offices in Manchester and Rugby facilitating a comprehensive service coverage throughout the Midlands, North of England and Wales.

ADDRESS:

ART’s House, Banks Lane, Bexleyheath, Kent, DA6 7BH

TELEPHONE:

020 8300 2929

Since our inception in 1999 we have achieved a wide reputation for excellent quality of workmanship, technical ability and excellent value for money. This is bolstered by full compliance with the globally recognised standards ISO9001:2000 (Quality Assurance), ISO14001(Environmental), OHSAS18001 (Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series), The Lift Regulations 1997 (Schedule 12) along with accreditations with Constructionline, Safe Contractor and CHAS.

FACSIMILE:

020 8300 6868

EMAIL:

info@apexlifts.com

ENQUIRIES:

Gary Kennedy, John Taylor & Alex Greenhalgh

ANSA are active members of LEIA, CIBSE Lift Group and The Lift Academy (sponsors). We possess a wealth of engineering experience and an immense fund of lift knowledge. All ANSA staff are 'Lift People' and can offer a wide range of skills and advice across a breadth of equipment. We can ensure the highest standards of service and guarantee you will always be able to speak to a member of staff who is both knowledgeable and keen to help. Our field engineers and technicians are fully experienced on all makes and manufacture of lifts; this together with our task based maintenance regime ensures our customers lifts operate safely with optimum performance and reliability. All ANSA vehicles are fitted with NAVMAN vehicle tracking systems which enable our administration department to manage calls and breakdowns with optimum efficiency and minimum impact to customers.

WEBSITE: www.apexlifts.com ENQUIRIES:

Steve Thomas, Service Director

COMPANY PROFILE: Apex Lifts is London’s largest independent lift manufacturing and elevator servicing company. With over four decades of trading excellence, Apex maintains, repairs, refurbishes, installs and manufactures quality bespoke lifts throughout London and Southern England. Apex Lift’s philosophy has remained unchanged for 44 years: Our commitment to excellence will always be demonstrated in the service we provide. The first company within the UK lift industry to be awarded all three major quality management accreditations, over the years Apex has secured some of the most prestigious lift contracts, including for the Royal Households. Delivered from our in-house facilities Apex Lifts provides flexible out of hours amenities and lift services, and whilst no installation or service contract is ever the same, every one conforms to stringent European and British Standards. Apex Lifts is dedicated to providing a standard of product and service that will not just meet your needs, but exceed your expectations.

In summary ANSA Elevators has a reputation for excellent quality, value and safety; ANSA are committed to meeting and exceeding our customer's needs and expectations.

SCOPE OF SERVICES: • Proactive maintenance and repairs; • Customer service help desk (24/7/365); • Installation, refurbishment and modernisation; • Manufacturing; • Escalator service; • Stair lift service; and • Apex Training Academy.

SCOPE OF SERVICES: • Planned Preventative Maintenance bespoke to your requirements and budget • 24 hour/365 day fully manned response teams • Live call logging and instant digital documentation • GPS vehicle and engineer monitoring • Thorough Examination Report Management • Stabilisation of troublesome and erratic lift service • Programmed and reactive repair work • Major modernisation and refurbishment from design to handover

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE: London, Greater London, Home Counties and South East England.

Our bespoke PDA system provides immediate data transfer and ensures information from site including engineers reports, part requisitions and where required, image files. All are managed and actioned with optimum efficiency.

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INNOVATION AND ADDED VALUE: • Excellent health & safety; • Real-time reporting of lift service, maintenance and repairs; • Continuous quality improvement and service levels; and • Environmental efficiencies; • Collaborative working; • Effective stakeholder communication; • Royal Warrant holders.

ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

www.elevation.co.uk


COMPANY NAME:

ARITCO UK LTD

ADDRESS:

8 Cheyne Walk, Northampton, NN1 5PT.

TELEPHONE:

01604 808809

EMAIL: enquiries@aritcouk.com WEBSITE: www.aritco.com COMPANY PROFILE : Aritco is an award winning manufacturer of platform lifts and home lifts. We supply lifts for both public and private market all over the world. It began in 1995 with a simple idea: lifts to improve mobility, anywhere. Aritco was formed by lift industry veterans who had taken accessibility to a new level. With unshakeable dedication to the highest quality standards and long experience in the field combined with unique technological know-how and a strong emphasis on design, Aritco rapidly became the leading platform lifts manufacturer in Europe. Today you will find Aritco in more than 30,000 buildings and private homes around the world. Since 1995 Aritco Platform lifts add efficiency and aesthetic value to schools, offices and retail stores. In 2012 Aritco made future proofing and modern living possible for everyone with the comfortable and elegant Aritco Home lifts. Through the years we have kept close collaboration with architects, builders, accessibility consultants, property owners and end users. This has allowed us to gain valuable knowledge that we incorporate into our lift solutions. The result: Lifts that get you where you want to go. AWARDS AAA – Highest creditworthiness This award may be given to limited liability companies with sales of more than 2 million SEK that have been in business more than 10 years and whose key ratios are significantly higher than average for the industrial sector concerned. Gazelle award The Gazelle award is awarded to the fastest growing companies in Sweden. Aritco has won this award 6 years in a row. Aritco has also been appointed Super Gazelle. GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE: UK & Ireland COMPANY NAME:

AURORA LIFTS LIMITED

ADDRESS: Main office Unit 1 West Yoke, Michaels Lane, Ash, Sevenoaks, Kent, TN15 7EP TELEPHONE: 01474 879858 FAX: 01474 874143 WEBSITE: www.aurora-lifts.co.uk ENQUIRIES: Gary McLachlan Mobile 07887453151 John Faithfull Mobile 07971203933 COMPANY PROFILE : Aurora Lifts Ltd. is the result of a successful merger of two well-known companies – Apollo Lifts Ltd. and Accord Lift Services Ltd. both having a long history and their own areas of specialisation: Apollo Lifts Ltd. providing extensive maintenance services and Accord Lifts Ltd. providing bespoke construction and modernisation solutions. We as Aurora Lifts Ltd. want to build on this history and reputation; and improve the strong attributes and areas of specialisation those two

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companies have brought in. With particular attention to this and with our intention to build upon these attributes, we have selected a name and logo, the latter incorporating elements of the two former companies, which represents all this. Aurora shall represent the beginning of a new era and our logo shall provide a visual interpretation of a company with a clear intention to rise, be focused and be customer centric. We are sure that we can offer you any services and solutions you need, covering the entire lifecycle of your equipment, no matter if you have a single piece of equipment that requires attention, or a nationwide bulk contract you would like us to maintain and co-manage. We want to be your first point of call in the elevator market. Scope of Services: At Aurora Lifts Ltd. we want to be your partner throughout the entire lifecycle of your product. We believe that our skilled and motivated employees can assist you with any requirement, acting as your consultant and first point of call. We believe that lift maintenance is not only about technical issues but about reliability and safety. It is our intention to offer you solutions which make your life easier, building a long-term relationship, for your convenience. Service: Service is all about prevention rather than cure. Aurora Lifts Ltd.›s maintenance schedules are designed to try to reduce the incidence of lift failure. A lift that is well looked after will be far less likely to break down or suffer a major, expensive, fault. However, even in the best regulated situations, lifts do break down. That is why Aurora Lifts Ltd. operates a 24 hours 7 days a week 365 days a year calldesk in order for our customers to have access to a network of highly experienced engineers. Urgent action is met with an urgent response, with fast reaction times ensuring that you never have to suffer too much downtime and inconvenience as a result of a lift being out of action. You are reassuringly never more than a call away from assistance. Repairs: In an industry where systems are constantly evolving, Aurora Lifts Ltd. is able to repair any type of lift, regardless of manufacturer. We continually re-invest in our staff to ensure that technical knowledge and expertise remains at the highest level. We have a dedicated team of experienced repair engineers, who cover the full spectrum of repair work. From the smallest of jobs on a single lift to complex programs on multiple lifts over multiple sites, the team combines its expertise and professionalism with the latest tools and equipment to complete projects in a timely, efficient manner and to the highest standards. Aurora Lifts Ltd. appreciate the need to minimise costs wherever possible, as such, our design engineers and repairs fulfilment managers will ensure that all safely retainable parts are maintained and, wherever possible, new parts, sourced through major industry leading component manufacturers both in the UK and abroad, can be adapted to fit in with your existing machinery. This ensures you that your elevator system remains effective and sustainable. Modernisation: A refurbishment or a new lift is not only a capital investment, it also has a direct impact on both the efficiency of your business and the appearance of your building. At Aurora Lifts Ltd. we appreciate the importance of getting things right from the outset, which is why our highly experienced in-house design and CAD team, are dedicated to bringing you the best solutions and equipment from leading component manufacturers throughout the world. From access solutions to meet DDA requirements, through service and goods lifts, to complex multi-lift high rise passenger group installations, Aurora Lifts Ltd. has the experience, knowledge and technical expertise to give you the industry’s best available choices. Once we have assisted you in selecting the best solution, our dedicated professional fulfillment team will ensure that your project is delivered on time, to budget and to your total satisfaction.With a proven track

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record of profitable partnerships with architects, designers, specifiers, engineering consultants and contractors, Aurora Lifts Ltd. maintain close liaisons with site personnel and allied trades to ensure the smooth progress of any project. GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE: Nationwide COMPANY NAME:

CIBES LIFT UK LIMITED

ADDRESS:

Chapel House, Leicester Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 2AF

NORTH WEST OFFICE

Lakeside Court, 340 Haydock Lane, Haydock, St Helens, WA11 9UY

TELEPHONE :

0845 075 4021

YORKSHIRE OFFICE Unit 2, Fusion@Magna, Magna Way, Rotherham, S60 1FE TELEPHONE :

0845 075 4025

EMAIL: spares@axess4all.com

MIDLANDS OFFICE Alma Park, Woodway Lane, Claybrooke Parva, Lutterworth, LE17 5BE

WEBSITE: www.axess4all.com

TELEPHONE :

ENQUIRIES:

NORTH EAST OFFICE Derwent House, Unit 8, Greencroft Industrial Park, Annfield Plain, Stanley, Co Durham DH9 7YB

TELEPHONE:

01509 436030

Mo Sidat or Gemma Hodgkinson

CIBES LIFT GROUP: CIBES LIFT, KALEA LIFTS, NTD LIFTS, SLD, CAMA LIFT COMPANY PROFILE : Axess 4 All was formed in 1999 and specialise in providing a full range of access platform lifts for people with impaired mobility, helping building designers and owners to meet the requirements of “Part M” and BS8300 as well as helping to meet the legislative requirements of The Equality Act (formerly DDA). The Company was acquired by Cibes Lift Group in 2005. As a subsidiary to Cibes Lifts who manufacture a complete range of platform lifts in Sweden, Axess 4 All can supply spare parts, wiring diagrams, O & M manuals, technical support along with on-site installation advice to existing service and maintenance companies for the complete range of Cibes Group lifts which includes Cibes, Kalea, and NTD products. In addition Axess 4 All can also provide spare parts for any Cama incline stair lift already installed in the UK. Axess 4 All are a ISO 9001:2008 accredited company. We are also a founder member of EPSA (European Platform and Stair Lift Association) and a full member of LEIA. Axess 4 All are also CHAS accredited and Constructionline registered. Our installers and technical engineers are all factory trained on all the Cibes Group lift products and have regular training updates direct from the factory in Sweden. SCOPE OF SERVICES: • Spare parts and lift repairs for Cibes, Kalea, NTD and Cama products • Supply and installation of vertical screw and nut drive platform lifts, also • Vertical hydraulic platform lifts • 1000 kg stretcher platform lifts • Incline Platform Stair Lifts – Straight and Curved • Low Rise Step Lifts • Service lifts / Dumbwaiters / Goods lifts GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Nationwide

COMPANY NAME:

CLASSIC LIFTS LIMITED

ADDRESS:

2 Oxford Road, Sidcup, Kent, DA14 6LW

TELEPHONE:

020 3490 7100

EMAIL: info@classiclifts.co.uk WEBSITE: www.classiclifts.co.uk ENQUIRIES:

Ben Wright

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TELEPHONE :

0845 413 5666

01207 297416

COMPANY PROFILE: Classic Lifts is an Independent lift company specialising in the maintenance, repair, modernisation, design and installation of passenger and goods lifts. Formed in 1990 and with over 27 year's of experience in most makes and models of lift equipment, we offer a personal and highly professional service to both our new and established clients upon a national basis. We have offices in London, Sheffield, Haydock, Stanley and Leicester and work across all sectors including schools (Private & Government funded), Local Councils, Retail including leisure facilities, Hospitals, Premium office facilities and Facilities Management companies. We tailor our services to individual requirements, providing expert lift testers, technicians and engineers for all applications. Using the latest in lift data technology, we maintain an efficient staff-to-contract ratio and offer a fast response to emergency call-outs. As part of our ongoing commitment to customer excellence, we invest heavily in training, equipment, technology and telecommunications. All engineers are DBS checked and trained to NVQ3 standard and citb (Construction Industry training board) as required. SCOPE OF SERVICES: • 24 hour/365 dedicated customer support team • GPS vehicle tracking • Standardised & bespoke Planned Preventative Maintenance options • Programmed and reactive repair work • New installations including design/build projects • Planning overviews and Condition Reports • Surveying, budgeting and reporting • LOLER inspections • NVQ Level 3 & 4 engineers/technicians lead all works • Eco technology/projects • Safe Release Training — conducted by RoSPA accredited staff GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE: National coverage TRADE ASSOCIATIONS/MEMBERSHIP: • LEIA • CHAS, EXOR, Construction Line, Safe Contractor, Avetta • Fully Integrated Management System in accordance with ISO 9001, ISO 14001 & OHSAS 18001.

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COMPANY NAME:

DORSET LIFTS LTD

ADDRESS:

3 Arrowsmith Court, Station Approach, Broadstone, Dorset, BH18 8AX

TELEPHONE:

01202 650361

EMAIL: sales@dorsetlifts.com WEBSITE: www.dorsetlifts.com ENQUIRIES:

Roy Wing

COMPANY PROFILE: Dorset Lifts has over 30 years of experience of all types and makes of lift equipment, we can offer a safe and reliable service including New Lift installations, Service, Planned maintenance, Repairs, Refurbishments and upgrades to comply with current standards. Using a fully integrated data lift management system we are able to provide a full range of reports to enable data analysis and historical information to be reviewed. Many of our customers include Local Authorities, Housing Associations, Hospitals, Schools, Property Managers, Residents Associations, Hotels, and private companies. We are an ISO. 9001:2008 registered company and are full members of the Lift & Escalator Industry Association (LEIA). To help with qualification for Approved Contractors Lists Dorset Lifts are accredited within the Contractors Health and Safety Assessment Scheme (CHAS) SAFE contactor and are registered members of Constructionline. SCOPE OF SERVICES: •

Free site surveys /advice

New Lift installations

Car Lift installations

Parking lift installations

Platform Lift installations

Upgrade and modernisation of existing lift installations

Service/maintenance agreements tailored to our customers requirements

24 hour per day 365 days per year breakdown service

Repair service

Health and Safety inspections and works

QUALITY ASSURANCE ISO 9001:2008 Certification scope - Design, Installation, Test, Service and Refurbishment of lifts. LIFT REGULATIONS 1997 SCHEDULE 12 Certification Scope - Design, Installation, Final Test, Services and Refurbishment of New Passenger Lifts within the scope of EN-81:1998 Parts 1 & 2. GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE: London & South of England. COMPANY NAME:

ELEVATORS LTD

ADDRESS:

Unit D2 Chaucer Business Park, Kemsing, Sevenoaks TN15 6YU

TELEPHONE:

0203 657 9840

FAX:

0203 657 9841

EMAIL: info@elevatorsltd.co.uk WEBSITE: www.elevatorsltd.co.uk ENQUIRIES:

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COMPANY PROFILE: Over the years our highly skilled team have built a reputation as leaders in a customer focused service, committed to quality and safety. At Elevators Ltd we believe in an honest partnership with our clients, providing quality Lift engineering solutions from maintenance and refurb to major installation projects, Elevators Ltd consistently deliver. Following our steady growth since 2002 and recent move to larger premises, we remain passionate and committed to our loyal customers and look forward to our continued expansion. OUR SERVICES: • 24/7 breakdown cover • Planned preventative maintenance/repairs • Lift modernisation and refurbishment • Design and installation of new passenger and goods lifts • Platform lifts including vertical and inclined • Dumbwaiters • Car stacking systems • Thorough inspections, safety audits and testing Lift Regulations 1997 Schedule 12: The design, installation and test of new Passenger lifts within the scope of EN-81:1998 Quality Assurance ISO 9001:2008: Design, installation, refurbishment, test and service of lift/platform lifts Exor,Chas and Construction line accredited Elevators Ltd are full members of the Lift and Escalator Industry association. COMPANY NAME:

GARTEC LIMITED

HEAD OFFICE

Midshires Business Park, Smeaton Close, Aylesbury, Bucks. HP19 8HL 01296 397100 01296 397600 sales@gartec.com / service@gartec.com / spares@gartec.com

TELEPHONE: FACSIMILE: EMAIL:

WEBSITE: www.gartec.com COMPANY PROFILE: With the expertise to service and repair all makes of platform lift, make Gartec your first call. Since our foundation in 1994, Gartec has become one of the longest established platform lift specialists in the UK. With more than 22 years’ experience, we have installed more platform lifts than any other company. Our own platform lifts, designed and manufactured by our partner Aritco, embody all the characteristics traditionally associated with Scandinavian engineering: durability, reliability, quality and style. Being part of the Aritco Group, Gartec is also the natural choice for sales, service and repair of the entire range of Aritco platform lifts. We have built a reputation as the leaders of the platform lift industry, and we continue to lead it by pro-actively shaping the market via innovation. We offer a comprehensive range of lifts, lift accessories and maintenance options for a wide variety of commercial and domestic applications. To ensure the quality maintenance of over 8,000 Aritco platform lifts in the UK, Gartec directly employ a team of specifically trained service and maintenance engineers. Gartec is also renowned throughout the industry for our exceptionally high standards of after-sales care. SCOPE OF SERVICES: • New installations, consultancy and site surveys.

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ELEVATOR WORLD’S ONLINE BOOKSTORE

• Mobile-friendly • Chat live with representatives for assistance with your order • 100+ educational products available


Compliance – Offering assistance to building owners and designers to meet with obligations under building regulation Part M and the Equality Act (formerly the DDA).

Service packages – We offer a comprehensive range of service packages, with options to suit each individual customer’s circumstances.

LOLER Inspections – Platform lifts used by personnel as a part of their daily duties fall under LOLER guidelines and must be subject to a thorough examination every six months. Gartec now offer this service on request, as part of a routine Service Visit.

Spares – Gartec can supply Aritco platform lift spare parts with same/next day delivery. We have a dedicated Spares Service Team ensuring your order will be delivered on time. Ordering is quick and easy online via our website.

Emergency assistance – All customers have access to our 24-hour breakdown line.

CPD certified – we offer CPD certified presentations, half-day workshops and seminars.

QUALITY ASSURANCE: ISO 9001: 2008. Supply, Installation, Commissioning and Servicing of Platform Lifts (Moody International) GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE: Nationwide. TRADE ASSOCIATIONS: LEIA member

Founder member of EPSA

Chas accredited

Construction Line accredited

Company Name:

GUIDELINE LIFTS SERVICES LTD.

Address:

Unit C, White Oak Technology Park, London Road, Swanley Kent BR8 7AG

Telephone:

01322 665665

Facsimile:

01322 661036

E-Mail: lifts@guideline.co.uk INTERNET:

www.guideline .co.uk

Service Enquiries:

Gerry Medcalf or Rebecca Clitheroe

DDA/Repair Enquiries:

Chris Gurling

Projects Enquiries:

Steve White or Mark Denby

Coverage:

Most of Mainland UK

Company profile: Founded in 1972 and with over 45 years of experience Guideline Lift Services are one of the oldest and largest independent lift companies in the UK. We offer planned and reactive maintenance and repairs on all makes and types of lifts and consider ourselves specialists in lift modernisation and new installations.

COMPANY NAME:

HIGHER ELEVATION LTD

ADDRESS:

Bernard House, Granville Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 2BJ

TELEPHONE:

01622 682973

FACSIMILE:

01622 669833

EMAIL:

info@higherelevation.co.uk

WEBSITE:

www.higherelevation.co.uk

INSTALLATION ENQUIRES Sam Peglar or Sales@higherelevation.co.uk CALLOUTS, PARTS & Paula Lockyer or BREAKDOWN REPAIRS Repairs@higherelevation.co.uk SERVICING

Peter Walton or Info@higherelevation.co.uk

COMPANY PROFILE: Higher Elevation Limited can provide most leading brands of Stair Lifts, Wheelchair Platform Lifts, Home Lifts and Hoists available on today's market. Serving our customers since September 2000 in domestic and commercial applications, we pride ourselves as Kent’s Leading Mobility Lift Specialists. Our Fully Competent Engineers deliver 7-days a week assistance, a wide range of product and technical knowledge whilst maintaining 100% customer satisfaction. With our competitive pricing structure, abilities and work ethos, we at Higher Elevation strive to be more than a Company, we Help Change Lives focusing on giving people their independence back when it comes to multi-level access. Our unique Showroom based in Kent, available for demonstrations, highlights that we have no connection or preference to any single manufacturer, enabling us to help choose the best model for safety, economy and reliability for yourselves or clients. Ensuring we are at the highest level possible with our credentials, holding valid ISO 14001:2015, ISO 9001:2015, CHAS, ConstructionLine, SafeContractor, Exor, BHTA:TSI, CheckaTrade, TrustMark, CSCS and maintaining the Stannah Certificate of Excellence, proves that customer focus is at the forefront of our company. Local Authority Approved and working alongside multiple Passenger Lift companies, Higher Elevation Limited can provide services such as Emergency Breakdowns, Servicing, Repairs and Installations to any housing associations, trades and general public that are seeking Mobility Lift professionals. As the FlexStep authorised dealer in the South East of England, with only 6 dealers within the UK, we are proud to be able to promote this innovative solution to our customers. The FlexStep is an elegant combination of a regular staircase and a wheelchair platform lift, providing a 2-in-1 solution for wheelchair users and stair users with minimal disruption and without changing existing structural elements. SCOPE OF WORKS Higher Elevation Design, Sell, Install, Maintain and Repair all Mobility Lifts of;

Real time business information is provided through our industry leading portfolio management portal known as GEMS. This continually evolving platform delivers timely information on maintenance, reactive callouts and repairs. There also a wide ranging suite of reports and historical data analysis available online through our web portal and this all supported by named Account Managers delivering an accountable point of contact and the personal touch Guideline are renowned for.

Stairlifts – Straight or Curved, Indoor and Outdoor, Old and New Through Floor Lifts - Old and New Vertical Platform Lifts Inclined Platform Lifts Low Rise Lifts Flexstep by Liftup

Guideline offer a full range of lifts services 24 hours per day, 365 days of the year. We are full members of LEIA, CHAS, are SAFEcontractor and Altius accredited, Constructionline registered and members RoSPA. We hold numerous other accreditations including ISO 9001, 14001 and OHAS 18001 so you know you’re in safe and reliable hands.

BHTA, Chas, Construction line, Safe Contractor, Exor, Buy with Confidence, Trust Mark, CSCS, Local Authority Approved

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QUALITY ASSURANCE: ISO 9001, ISO 14001

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE: Kent, South East London, Central London, Essex, Surrey, East Sussex

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COMPANY NAME

JACKSON LIFT GROUP

WEBSITE www.jacksonlifts.com EMAIL sales@jacksonlifts.com OFFICES London and The Home Counties

3/19 Ropery Business Park, Anchor & Hope Lane, London, SE7 7RX

TELEPHONE :

020 8293 4176

CONTACT :

Philip Rudd, Mark Coupar, Matthew Rudd, Gary Plant, Alex West, James Austin, Matt McDonough, Lee Coghlan & Nik Liddiard

Midlands and North Wales (Birmingham Office)

Unit 16, Titan Way, Britannia Enterprise Park, Lichfield, Staffordshire, WS14 9TT

TELEPHONE :

01543 626850

CONTACT :

Jim Halford, Aiden Cahill & Micky Taylor

South West and South Wales (Bristol Office)

73 Station Road Workshops, Station Road, Kingswood, Bristol, BS15 4PJ

TELEPHONE : CONTACT :

0117 957 4601 Andy Doig

South (Bournemouth Office)

Unit 5, Aerial Park, Uddens Trading Estate, Wimborne, Dorset, BH21 7NL

TELEPHONE : CONTACT :

01202 871333 Warren Shelley

North (Manchester Office)

Unit B3, Hareshill Business Park, Hill Top Road, Heywood, OL10 2RQ

TELEPHONE : CONTACT :

01706 695610 David Hollis & Micky Taylor

North East (Newcastle Office)

Hoults Yard, Walker Road, Newcastle, NE6 2HL

TELEPHONE : CONTACT :

0191 406 0909 Scott Williamson & David Hollis

Supply and installation of new traction, hydraulic and MRL lifts. Supply and installation of new Eco-Escalators. Supply and installation of stair lifts, platforms, wheelchair lights and flex lift solutions. ACCREDITATIONS ISO9001 - ISO14000 - ISO 50001 - OHSAS 18001 – Lift Regulations Schedule 12 - CHAS - SAFEContractor – Exor – Constructionline COMPANY NAME:

LIFT SPECIALISTS LTD

ADDRESS:

Unit 14, Alpha Business Park, Travellers Close, Welham Green, Herts, AL9 7NT

TELEPHONE:

0870 224 7847

FACSIMILE:

0870 224 7846

EMAIL: sales@liftspecialists.co.uk ENQUIRIES:

Mark Lander

COMPANY PROFILE: Lift Specialists Ltd are an independent Lift Company that Designs, Installs and Services all types of Lifts for private and commercial clients. Our current client base includes: Local Authorities, Housing Associations, Hospitals, Schools, Property Managers, Residents Associations as well as a wealth of Private Companies. Lift Specialists Ltd employ some of the most experienced Lift Engineers in the country, allowing us to provide a dependable service, encompassing Installations, Modernisations, Repairs, Maintenance and a 24/7 Call Out Service. Lift Specialists Ltd are large enough to provide an efficient nationwide service, but unlike some of out larger competitors, we have the flexibility to respond to your individual needs without charging excessive premiums. SCOPE OF SERVICES: • New Lift Installations • Modernisations of Existing Installations • Lift Repairs • Proactive Maintenance Agreements • 24/7 Call Out Service • Health and Safety and Insurance Inspections QUALITY ASSURANCE: Quality assured to ISO 9001, ISO 14001, Lift Regs: Schedule 12 as well as full members of the Lift & Escalator Industry Association (LEIA). Other Accreditations include, CHAS, Constructionline, Exor and Safecontractor.

Scotland (Glasgow Office)

GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE: Nationwide

Pentagon Centre, 36/38 Washington Street, Glasgow, G3 8AZ

COMPANY NAME:

TELEPHONE : CONTACT :

0141 404 5458 Scott Williamson

PROFILE: The UK’s largest independent Lift, Escalator and Cradle maintenance organisation. We operate in every business sector throughout the UK with end users and all major vertical transportation consultants. Full details of our extensive services see www.jacksonlifts.com SCOPE: Maintenance and repair of all makes of lift, escalator, cradle and disabled access equipment. 24/7 Emergency callout service. Lift, escalator and cradle modernisation, upgrade and adaptation.

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PIP LIFT SERVICE LIMITED

ADDRESS:

Melville Court, Spilsby Road, Harold Hill, Essex, RM3 8SB TELEPHONE: 01708 373999 FACSIMILE: 01708 375660 WEBSITE: www.piplifts.co.uk ENQUIRIES: Paul Masterson or Clifford Smith COMPANY PROFILE: PIP Lift Service Limited was formed in 1992 to provide its clients with a unique and comprehensive range of tailored services to meet their individual requirements. Over the years, with large investments in personnel, training and technology, PIP Lift Service Ltd has grown steadily with the vast majority of its work coming from existing clients. Due to these investments, PIP Lift Services maintain lifts Nationwide.

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LIFT MAINTENANCE: We are able to maintain all types of lifts to the highest standard, bespoke service agreements can be offered as well as the standard levels which cover basic routine maintenance to fully comprehensive cover. PIP Lifts programmed maintenance cycles are designed to minimize breakdowns, ensure safety and to protect your capital investment. Our aim is to be the first choice lift service provider. Our service includes: • 24 hour / 365 day service. • Free no obligation estimates. • Legislative and safety advice. • Free annual surveys. • Planned maintenance system covering all makes of lift. • Fully Computerised management. • Dedicated Repair crews with fully stocked vans. MODERNISATION: This is another area of expertise for PIP, delivering efficient, effective solutions to architects, builders, developers and owners. Designed to minimize builder’s work and interface with all makes of lifts.

COMPANY PROFILE: Pickerings Lifts was founded in 1854 and has had an unbroken history of independent British ownership since that date. The wealth of knowledge we’ve gained since then, as well as the exceptional customer service we provide, has made us the UK’s largest independent lift service provider. We are available 24 hours a day, 365 years a year to provide support where our customers need it most. LIFT MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR: Our maintenance and repair team can work on all models of passenger and goods lifts, providing a variety of lift maintenance contracts to suit your needs with our UK-wide network of highly-skilled engineers. LIFT INSTALLATION: We will expertly design and install any new passenger, access or goods lifts, including hydraulic, traction and specialist lifts. Whatever the application or environment, we can create a unique solution from concept to completion. LIFT MODERNISATION: We offer a full turnkey solution to improve your lifts, all carried out by our experienced lift modernisation team. As well as improving aesthetics and reliability, we can also help make energy saving and environmentally friendly improvements.

Our range includes • Control panel replacement • Drive / performance improvements • Car interior upgrades. • Door equipment update • Health & Safety upgrades. • D.D.A. improvements. • Health & Safety works • All works in accordance with the latest British Standards.

MOBILITY AND ACCESS PRODUCTS: We help give people independence with the mobility services we provide. From platform lifts and step lifts to stair lifts and hoists, we install, service and maintain a range of products that give people freedom of movement.

NEW LIFTS: Design and build facilities for architects, developers and building owners in accordance with the latest legislative Standards, particularly where New Lifts are required in existing buildings.

Pickerings Lifts is a founding member of the Lift and Escalator Industry Association (LEIA) and a member of trade bodies including CHAS, Constructionline, Exor and SAFEContractor.

Our product range includes • Electric Passenger and Goods lifts to EN81 • Hydraulic Passenger and Goods lifts to EN82 • Firefighting lifts. • Evacuation lifts. • Part ‘M’ options. • ‘Machine roomless’ options. • Works designed in accordance with The Lifts Regulations 1997 and EN Standards. QUALITY ASSURANCE: BS EN ISO 9001:2008 BS EN ISO 14001:2004 PIP Lift Service quality policy provides our clients with an all encompassing professional service which is committed to quality delivering total peace of mind. We endeavour to meet customer requirements by continually monitoring customer satisfaction and perception through management review meetings. GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE: NATIONWIDE COMPANY NAME:

PICKERINGS LIFTS

ADDRESS:

Globe Elevator Works, PO Box 19, Stockton-On-Tees, Cleveland, TS20 2AD

TELEPHONE:

0800 085 3211

EMAIL: info@pickeringslifts.co.uk WEBSITE: www.pickeringslifts.co.uk GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE: Nationwide

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ESCALATORS: We provide installation, regeneration, servicing, maintenance and repair for escalators and travelators. LOADING SYSTEMS: We provide loading systems installation, regeneration, servicing, maintenance and repair. QUALITY ASSURANCE: ISO 9001, ISO 140001, OHSAS 18001.

COMPANY NAME:

STANNAH LIFT SERVICES LTD

ADDRESS:

Watt Close, East Portway, Andover, Hampshire SP10 3SD

TELEPHONE:

01264 364311

FACSIMILE:

01264 353713

ENQUIRIES:

Paul Baker

EMAIL:

contact@stannah.co.uk

WEBSITE: www.stannahlifts.co.uk QUALITY ASSURANCE: ISO 9001 certified by BVC. SCOPE OF SERVICES: Our priority is quite simply to meet the needs of our customers and support them as lift, escalators, moving walkways and loading bay equipment owners/users. Our aim is to provide service of the highest quality, quickly and efficiently. Our promise is to be ‘always true to our word’. To ensure we keep our promise we continually invest in our staff and operations. ELEVEN NATIONWIDE SERVICE BRANCHES - Providing 24/7 call-out via our own in-house call centre, 365 days a year, right across the UK. QUALIFIED ENGINEERS - All our engineers are highly trained to work on all types of lifts, escalators, moving walkways and loading bay equipment - our own and those from other manufacturers. MAJOR PROJECTS TEAM - We have a dedicated team of experts who manage every aspect of major projects such as installations in airports, railway stations, retail and heritage projects.

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NETWORK RAIL TEAM - Our extensive work for Network Rail is managed by a dedicated team who maintain current lift stock, plan and implement lift refurbishments, modernisations and new installations right across the UK rail network. NEW PRODUCTS – We supply install and maintain our own passenger and platform lifts, goods lifts, escalators, moving walkways, loading bay equipment, homelifts and stairlifts. HEALTH AND SAFETY - We take care in everything we do. Our in-house health and safety experts ensure we guarantee the safety of our passengers, our customers and our engineers. This care has been recognised with four RoSPA Occupational Health and Safety Gold Awards. We are certified to OHSAS 18001. OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE - Our customers are our priority. We are here to help whenever they need us, wherever they need us. FLEXIBILITY - As an independent company for over 150 years we delight in providing flexible solutions. We have a can-do attitude and are proud of our ability to provide bespoke services to suit all our customers’ needs. QUALITY - All our work is quality assured to ISO 9001. TAKING CARE OF THE ENVIRONMENT - We are certified to ISO 14001 and continue to improve our environmental management systems. Stannah is a full member of the Lift and Escalator Industry Association. COMPANY NAME:

THE GENERAL LIFT COMPANY LIMITED

ADDRESS:

Unit 4, Wested Farm, Eynsford Road, Crockenhill, Swanley, Kent BR8 8EJ

TELEPHONE:

01322 614426

FACSIMILE:

01322 615123

ENQUIRIES:

Derek Powis

COMPANY PROFILE: The General Lift Company was formed in 1986 and is committed to providing total quality and is naturally approved to EN ISO 9001 and through N.Q.A. have been awarded accreditation to Design, Supply, Install, Final Inspection and test of New Passenger lifts within the scope of EN81 : 1998 Parts 1- 2 Design level D2. Our continual success over the years has been due to our company’s approach of listening to what the customers require then acting on it. We pride ourselves in being able to undertake all types of work on all makes of lifts and escalators. We are full members of L.E.I.A. SCOPE OF SERVICES: Free Site Surveys, Free Advice, Design, Construction, Preventive Maintenance, Installation and Repair. We operate 24 hour a day throughout the year. GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE: Most of UK Mainland. COMPANY NAME:

THE SWIFT LIFT CO. (UK) LTD.

ADDRESS:

Unit 17, Mulberry Court, Bourne Industrial Estate, Bourne Road, Crayford, Kent, DA1 4BF

TELEPHONE:

01322 551379

FACSIMILE:

01322 551381

ENQUIRIES:

John Francis & Louise Champ

E-MAIL: sales@swiftlift-uk.com WEBSITE: www.swiftlift-uk.com

www.elevation.co.uk

ELEVATION : An

ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

i96 - Page 95


COMPANY PROFILE: At the Swift Lift Company, we provide a total comprehensive service from point of enquiry to completion of project. These projects range from maintenance to modernisation of existing occupied buildings. We specialise in full turnkey projects including builder’s work and associated trades. From point of enquiry we project manage each contract. As an ISO 9001:2000 registered company we are committed to quality control with our clients needs being paramount. We undertake the maintenance of all known makes and design of installation. Our range of service contracts being tailored to suit building requirements, term of occupancy and financial limitations. Our engineers are equipped with mobile workshops ensuring that the end user is not without service longer than necessary.

SCOPE OF SERVICES:

Installation of new CE marked Lifts Modernisation of existing lifts Repair of all types of lift Maintenance of all types of lifts and escalators All aspects of mobility work LG1 & insurance works Health & Safety and DDA compliance works

QUALITY ASSURANCE: ISO 9001,ISO 14001 & OHSAS 18001 GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

London & the home counties

AWARDS:

Current holders of the ‘British Lift Industry’s Best Lift Refurbishment Award under £100,000’

In addition to the engineering aspect we provide cosmetic upgrades including door re-skinning mirrors, ceilings, to prestige veneer panelled lift cars. We are full members of L.E.I.A. SCOPE OF SERVICES: Design of new and existing lifts. Maintenance, Repairs and Modernisation, 24 hour cover, 365 days per year. Tailored service contracts. Cosmetic upgrades.

Advertisers Index

QUALITY ASSURANCE: ISO 9001:2000 and The Lift Regulations 1997 Schedule 12

Alimak Hek

27

Blain Hyldraulics GmbH

11

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE: Nationwide.

C.E. Electronics Ltd

57 3, 61

COMPANY NAME:

TITAN ELEVATORS LTD

Digital Advanced Control

ADDRESS:

Innovation House, Cray Road, Sidcup, Kent, DA14 5DP

Elevator World Inc.

TELEPHONE:

020 8308 5000

Hydroware UK Ltd

5

IMEM Lifts

7

E-MAIL: sales@titanelevators.co.uk WEBSITE: www.titangroupuk.com ENQUIRIES:

Peter Fillery/Sue Chambers

COMPANY PROFILE: Established in 1997 in order to provide a bespoke service to clients and industry consultants.

33, 21, 63, 71, 91

Hawkswell Kilvington Partnership

23

75

interlift 2019

International Elevator & Escalator Symposium (Event) 55 International Lift Equipment Ltd

Rear Cover

Kapok (1988) Ltd

49

Kollmorgen UK Ltd

39

We use the latest technology and have a fully operational electronic data base that has been specially developed in order to increase our efficiency.

LECS UK Ltd

85

Liftex 2019 (Exhibition)

15

We have designated maintenance engineers with a realistic number of units on their routes. This guarantees that our lifts get maintained efficiently and in turn this reduces breakdowns.

Liftout Ltd

Since achieving the lift regulations 1997 schedule 12 status, we have opened a new lift department that can offer the supply, installation and test of all types of lift including ‘ motor roomless lifts’

Micropedia (Book)

95

Montanari Giulio & C Srl

13

Lift Industry Symposium (Event)

73

Statius Management Services Ltd

79

We have built a good reputation for our expertise and honesty. We have grown steadily in order to keep our standards high.

Also through ‘Titan Mobility’ we use our specialist engineers to deal with all our client’s Mobility needs.

LM Liftmaterial GmbH

Our clients include Industry consultants, Private residential clients, Universities and Colleges, Public and private office buildings, government controlled buildings, sports stadiums, housing associations, care homes, NHS and private Hospitals.

Syntium Lift Parts

We are full and active members of LEIA and are members of Constructionline.

Page 96 - i96

ELEVATION : An

9 Inside Rear Cover

Inside Front Cover

Taylor Lifts

45

Triple A

31

UK Lift Industry Charity

87

ELEVåTOR WÅRLD Publication

www.elevation.co.uk


LM Liftmaterial – your strategic partner for complete systems Whatever project you have, our international team of highly qualified specialists can support you. They are developing, designing and engineering innovative solutions for your complete lifts – finding always the right option for your needs in standard or custom products, passengers or goods lifts. Thanks to our global network, as part of the Wittur Group, we are close to you wherever you are – from Munich to New Zealand.

www.wittur.com

www.wittur.com

info.lm.de@wittur.com

a WITTUR brand


ILE TRENT RANGE MRL FINALLY, A U.K. MANUFACTURED MRL TRENT RANGE MRL 450KG - 1600KG EN81-20 COMPLIANT

FULL PACKAGE AVAILABLE INCLUDING CAR, SLING, GUIDE BRACKETS, DOORS, COUNTERWEIGHT, GEAR RAFT, ROPE TERMINATION ASSEMBLY & CONTROLLER

PLEASE GET IN TOUCH FOR FURTHER DETAILS

ELEVATION | 3Q 2018  

• 1,000-Year Legacy • Elevcon 2018 • Greenfell Report • Lift Industry Kart Day

ELEVATION | 3Q 2018  

• 1,000-Year Legacy • Elevcon 2018 • Greenfell Report • Lift Industry Kart Day