Issuu on Google+


ABOUT
EWB‐USA
 
 EWB‐USA
works
to
achieve
a
vision
of
a
world
in
which
all
communities
have
the
capacity
to
 meet
their
basic
human
needs.
This
vision
is
actively
pursued
by
engaging
in
community‐driven
 development
 programs
 through
 the
 design
 and
 implementation
 of
 sustainable
 engineering
 projects.
The
organization
is
at
the
forefront
of
a
movement
in
which
university
students
and
 skilled
 engineers,
 often
 teaming
 with
 public
 health
 professionals,
 educators,
 business
 leaders
 and
 others,
 address
 some
 of
 the
 most
 prevalent
 challenges
 facing
 the
 world
 today,
 including
 water
 purification
 and
 delivery,
 sanitation,
 transportation
 and
 infrastructure
 projects,
 and
 sustainable
and
renewable
energy
systems.



BRIEF


EWB‐NY
LEADERSHIP


EWB­NY
Leadership
2011
 President
 
 Iana
Aranda
 
 president@ewbny.org


ATDT
 
 Stefano
Braganti
 
 atdt@ewbny.org


Vice
President
 
 Stephen
Morse
 
 vp@ewbny.org


Education
Committee
 
 Sara
Schultzer 
 education@ewbny.org


Secretary
 
 Monica
Louie
 
 secretary@ewbny.org


Fundraising
Committee
 
 Kerwin
Julien
 
 Ron
Weissbard
 
 fundraising@ewbny.org


Treasurer
 
 Alia
Nagm
 
 treasurer@ewbny.org
 


Marketing
Committee
 
 Solkem
Gottingar
 
 Segen
Tilahun
 
 marketing@ewbny.org
 Web
Manager
 
 Solkem
Gottingar
 
 administrator@ewbny.org


Emeritus
Board
 Matt
Sisul,
President,
2006
–
2009
 Matthew
Barber,
Vice
President,
2006
–
2008
 Jason
Kass,
Vice
Prsident,
2008
–
2010
 Scott
Snelling,
Treasurer,
2006
–
2008
 Kerwin
Julien,
Treasurer,
2008
–
2010
 Victor
Shey,
Secretary,
2007
‐
2007



BRIEF


Belén Clinic Project Belén,
Peru


PROGRAMS
AND
PROJECTS



 Initially
 started
 as
 a
 joint
 EWB‐USA
 Binghamton
 University
 and
 Brown
 University
 Student
 Chapter
 project,
 the
 Belén
project
proposed
to
design
a
clinic
in
 Belén,
 Peru,
 which
 would
 provide
 basic
 health
 care
 services
 for
 the
 area’s
 74,000
 residents.
 EWB‐NY
 in
 collaboration
 with
 Amazon
 Promise
 have
 been
 leading
 the
 project
since
2007.
Developments
since
the
 project’s
 adoption
 have
 changed
 the
 scope.
 The
 Belén
 project
 is
 now
 tasked
 with
 building
 an
 off‐grid
 drinking
 water
 purification
 system
 and
 a
 composting
 toilet
 system
for
the
community.
 EWB‐NY,
 in
 collaboration
 with
 Amazon
 Promise,
 The
 Peruvian
 Ministry
 of
 Health,
 and
 the
 local
 Peruvian
 architects,
 developed
 a
 revised
 conceptual
 design
 of
 the
 clinic.
 The
 project
 team
 split
 into
 several
 working
 groups
 comprised
 of
 Structural,
 Geotechnical,
 Water/Sanitation,
 Electrical,
 Mechanical,
 Construction,
 Sustainability
 and
Architecture,
and
Fundraising/Marketing
disciplines.


Matunda
Water
Project
 The
 Matunda
 Health
 Center
 is
 situated
 in
 the
 Matunda
 Market
 area
 in
 the
 Lugari
 District
 of
 Kenya.
 The
 Matunda
 Market
 is
 an
 active
commercial
area
with
many
 small‐scale
 traders
 and
 hawkers
 with
 a
 large
 population
 of
 about
 20,000
 people.
 Overall,
 water
 supply
and
sanitation
are



lacking
 in
 this
 community.
 The
 Matunda
 Health
 Centre
 is
 the
 only
 medical
 facility
 in
 the
 area.
 It
 was
 opened
 in
 1999
 in
 a
 rented
 house
 and
 currently
includes
a
maternity
ward
and
an
outpatient
clinic.
 THE NEED Currently,
 the
 Matunda
 Health
 Centre
 (MHC)
 is
 the
 sole
 fully
 accessible
 Health
 Facility
servicing
the
town
of
Matunda.
Their
operation
had
been
compromised
by
a
 lack
of
access
to
a
clean
water
source.
Prior
to
start
of
this
project,
the
MHC
relied
 on
 contaminated
 water
 sources;
 a
hand
 dug
 well
 and
 the
 Nzoia
 River
 2
 km
 away.
 The
main
 objective
 of
 this
 project
 has
 been
 to
design
 and
 implement
 a
 potable
 water
system
that
is
efficient
and
sustainable.



Usalama
Water
Project


BRIEF



 Usalama,
Kenya
 Usalama
 is
 a
 small
 community
 in
 Kenya
 with
 a
 population
 of
 1500.
 
 The
 one
 six‐classroom
 building
 was
 run
 by
 its
 passionate
administration
and
faculty
determined
to
meet
the
 education
needs
of
the
children
in
the
community.

Enrollment
 in
 2005
 was
 176
 and
 grew
 276%
 to
 486
 in
 2008.
 
 This
 classroom
 building,
 along
 with
 supporting
 kitchen
 and
 latrines,
 were
 in
 a
 deteriorated
 stated
 and
 needed
 much
 repairs.


PROGRAMS
AND
PROJECTS


THE NEED


One
 of
 the
 most
 pertinent
 was
 the
 deteriorated
 and
 overcrowded
 state
 of
 the
 village
 primary
 school.
 Between
 1993
 and
 1997,
 one
 six‐classroom
 building,
 one
 three‐ classroom
 building,
 an
 administrative
 building,
 kitchen,
 and
 several
 pit
 latrines
 were
 constructed
 by
 the
 parents
 with
 outside
 aid.
 Constructed
 with
 minimal
 funds
 the
 buildings
 quickly
deteriorated.
Despite
the
building
quality,
the
passion
 and
 energy
 of
 the
 teachers
 and
 administrators,
 and
 the
 commitment
 of
 the
 parents,
 attracted
 more
 and
 more
 local
 children.



Yamabal
Health
&
Sanitation
Project
 Yamabal,
El
Salvador
 Yamabal
 is
 a
 mainly
 rural
 municipality
 in
 Morazán,
 the
 poorest
 and
 most
 war‐torn
 department
 of
 El
 Salvador.
 The
effects
of
the
 12‐year
civil
 war
 are
 still
 very
evident,
even
nearly
two
decades
after
the
peace
 accords
 were
 signed
 in
 1992.
 In
 addition,
 the
 community
 has
 been
 impacted
 by
 several
 natural
 disasters
 in
 recent
 years,
 including
 a
 category
 5
 Hurricane
 Mitch
 in
 1998,
 a
 7.7
 and
 a
 6.6
 magnitude
 earthquakes
 in
 January
 and
 February
 2001
 respectively.
 Education
 opportunities
 are
 limited,
 as
 most
communities
currently
only
have
direct
access
to
 primary
 education,
 with
 a
 few
 high
 schools
 scattered
 throughout
 the
 municipality
 and
 very
 limited
 higher
 education
 opportunities.
 
 The
 area
 has
 several
 hundred
persons
who
will
be
impacted
by
the
project:
 30
–
60
families
will
be
directly
impacted.



BRIEF


FINANCIAL
PERFORMANCE


Financial
Performance
 Revenue


Expenditure


EWB‐NY
 raised
 $10,305
 in
 2011.
 
 Support
 came
 mainly
 from
 contributions
 from
 corporations
 and
 individuals.
 
 Although
 individual
contributions
was
up
68%
over
last
 year,
 total
 revenue
 was
 86%
 less
 than
 the
 previous
 year
 mainly
 due
 to
 two
 projects
 coming
to
a
close
and
a
third
in
transition.


Expenses
 for
 2011
 total
 $49,773.
 
 This
 amount
 supported
 travel,
 labour,
 materials
 and
chapter
expenses
among
others.



Project
activity
by
The
Matunda
Water
Project
 and
Yamabal
Project
together
accounted
for
a
 37%
 and
 33%
 increase
 in
 Travel,
 and
 Materials
and
Supplies
expenses
respectively.


The
 expense
 needs
 of
 2011
 were
 managed
 because
of
successful
fundraising
activities
of
 2010.





 


Graph
showing
Revenue
for
2011
 Graph
showing
Expenditure
for
2011



Helping
out
with
digging
the
ditch.
 Usalama
Project,
Kenya
 
 Photo:
Charles
Newman



BRIEF


ACTIVITIES
AND
ACCOMPLISHMENTS


EWB‐NY
 Education
 Committee
 speaks
at
Career
 Day
at
M.S.301
 in
the
Bronx


EWB‐NY
Talk
at
 Brooklyn
 Technical
High
 School



EWB‐USA
 International
 Conference
 2011,
Louisville,
 KY


EWB‐NY
team
 successfully
 delivering
clean
 water
to
the
 Matunda
Health
 Center



PARTNER
&
SPONSOR
RECOGNITION


BRIEF


The
 work
 and
 accomplishments
 of
 EWB‐NY
 would
 not
 have
 been
 made
 possible
 without
 the
 help
 of
 our
donors,
sponsors,
partners
and
 many
individual
contributors.
 
 EWB‐NY
 is
 extremely
 grateful
 for
 the
 support
 over
 the
 past
 year
 and
 look
 forward
 to
 their
 continued
 support
in
2012
and
beyond.


For
more
information
visit
http://www.ewbny.org



BRIEF - Annual Report 2011