Issuu on Google+

00_Pagine_iniziali_73:Pagine_iniziali_73_CD

28-05-2012

15:57

Pagina 1

Atti congressuali • Comunicazioni brevi • Poster Congress proceedings • Short communications • Poster Organizzato da

EV Soc Cons ARL è una Società con sistema qualità certificato ISO 9001:2008

in collaborazione con


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 303

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Critical care in avian patients Angela M. Lennox DVM, Dipl ABVP-Avian, Indianapolis, USA

Birds typically hide signs of illness, and many conditions produce very similar clinical pictures. Common signs of illness include lethargy, anorexia, a “fluffed” appearance, increased respiratory rate or effort, and abnormal stool production. Signs of illness in reptiles are even more limited, as reptiles have a limited behavioral repertory. The most common signs of illness in reptiles are anorexia and lethargy.

Before beginning restraint, be mindful of indications the bird should be released at once and the examination postponed. Dr. Teresa Lightfoot developed a helpful guide she calls the “Put It Down” list: (Note in this case “Put It Down” does not mean “euthanize”): Pronounced dyspnea, prolonged panting or gasping for air, inability to grasp with feet, weakness, inability to bite, closing the eyes during examination, lack of normal response to stimuli and incoordination, and marked abdominal swelling. Observation of any of the above should lead the practitioner to strongly consider releasing the bird immediately and begin planning emergency stabilization.

IDENTIFICATION OF THE CRITICAL PATIENT Staff must be trained to recognize the potentially severely ill patient over the phone, and to instruct owners to bring it in for immediate care. Staff must also recognize the appearance of an ill bird when it arrives in the clinic, so that the bird can be immediately transferred to the hospital.

The Next Step: In general, birds can be classified as follows: Bright and Responsive: birds are bright, alert, and resist handling to some degree. Patients may be quiet, but clinical condition does not appear to have worsened after handling. There is no appearance or worsening of respiratory symptoms after handling. For these patients, sample collection can most likely proceed immediately Quiet but Responsive: birds are quiet but alert, and resist handling to a lesser degree than normal. Clinical condition and/or respiratory symptoms worsen after handling. It is clear the stress of handling is producing a detrimental effect. For this class of patients, sample collection may need to be delayed, or may proceed after administration of fluids, followed by low dose sedation (midazolam 0.25 mg/kg and butorphanol 1-2 mg/kg IM). At these dosages, these drugs are unlikely to worsen clinical disease, but are very likely to reduce stress enough to allow sample collection to proceed. While some practitioners may prefer brief general anesthesia for the same purpose, it should be kept in mind that the risk of general anesthesia is much higher than the risk of sedation in every class of patient for which survival data has been generated. Sedation is a viable alternative that has been used in the author’s practice for many years with extremely satisfying results. Depressed and Minimally Responsive: birds appear depressed and uninterested in surroundings. Birds may exhibit respiratory symptoms, or exhibit ataxia. For these patients, sample collection is delayed until after 2-4 hours of stabilization, which generally includes warmth and fluids administered subcutaneously. (Note: attempts to place IV or

THOROUGH HISTORY OF THE CRITICAL PATIENT History must be thorough and include signalment, past medical history, source of the pet, complete diet history, caging history including whether or not the pet is always supervised, and exposure to other pets. Other important information includes recent illness and/or deaths of any other pets in the household.

PRE-HANDLING EXAMINATION: BIRDS It is important to observe the patient at rest prior to restraint in order to identify those critical patients who may worsen with handling. Observe the bird at rest at a distance, and look for visual clues, such as a slight tail bob indicating dyspnea, or decreased attention to novel surroundings. With experience, one can begin to develop a “gut feeling” for those birds who are sicker than they are appear, based on the collection of subtle clues. Frequent observation of normal birds in the clinical setting helps to quickly identify birds not completely “in tune” to their surroundings.

303


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 304

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

IO catheters in these birds often results in stress and death. An exception is the patient who is not responding at all to handling.)

Use of IO catheters in pet birds is mostly anecdotal. Studies in human patients and some animal models indicate IO vascular access can be considered equivalent to IV access in terms of onset of action of therapeutic agents, and time to establishment of peak drug levels. Recommendations for physicians include maintenance of the catheter no more than 72 hours. Complications in humans are rare (less than 1%) and include local cellulitis and infection, fracture, and leakage of administered drugs/fluids into adjacent soft tissues. The authors are unaware of a single severe complication in an avian patient after nearly 10 years of use of this technique in clinical practice. It should be noted that placement of an IO catheter in female birds with hormone-induced hyperostosis of long bones is difficult to impossible due to accumulation of mineral in the marrow space.

ROUTES OF FLUID ADMINISTRATION IN ILL BIRDS Placement of IV or IO catheters in avian patients is well described. Ideally, oral or subcutaneous fluids should be reserved for stable, standing patients that are suspected to be less than 5% dehydrated. In reality, risk of catheter placement in some patients may outweigh benefits. Therefore, it may be beneficial to administer subcutaneous fluids along with other stabilization measures prior to catheterization. Oral fluids should not be administered if there is significant risk of aspiration, or evidence of marked gastrointestinal dysfunction. Vascular access in birds can be performed via two routes: intravenous and intraosseous; choice depends on patient size and condition, and personal preference. Catheters may sometimes be placed successfully using manual restraint and local anesthetic only in very calm or minimally responsive patients. Patients judged to be at risk due to struggling during the procedure benefit from low dose sedation (midazolam 0.25 mg/kg with or without butorphanol at 1 mg/kg) with infusion of local lidocaine at 1 mg/kg at the catheterization site. General anesthesia is seldom required for catheterization. IV catheters are routinely placed in cockatiel and larger sized birds, using 24-26 g catheters. Choices of site include the right jugular, basilic and medial metatarsal veins. Sites other than the jugular vein are only useful for larger birds. The smallest IV catheters the authors routinely place are 2526 g catheters into the jugular vein of a cockatiel or small conure. The medial metatarsal catheter can be secured using tape only. Basilic and jugular catheters are commonly sutured in place. No bird should be left unattended with an IV catheter in place due to the risk of fatal hemorrhage should the bird disrupt the catheter. Intraosseous catheterization is well described in birds, and can be performed in patients as small as a finch. Sites include the proximal tibiotarsus at the tibial crest, and the distal ulna. The relatively soft bone cortex of most birds allows the use of standard injection needles as intraosseous catheters, and size in pet birds ranges from 22 to 27 g. Correct placement is best confirmed with a radiograph is two views (single views are notoriously misleading). As the needle can pass in and out of both bone cortices, firm seating of the needle is not always indicative of success. Fluids injected into an incorrectly placed catheter often can be detected accumulating into soft tissue spaces. However, it should be kept in mind that too much “wobble” during placement may result in a large entrance point from which fluids may leak during infusion. Proper placement of an ulnar catheter may result in blanching of the basilic vein during fluid administration. The IO catheter can be capped with a standard IV injection cap and and secured by taping to the limb.

FLUID TYPES AND CHOICES Fluid choices include crystalloids and colloids. Individual characteristics of fluids influence type and volume of fluid administered. Crystalloids include lactated Ringer’s solution, normal saline, and hypertonic saline (7.2-7.5%). Hypertonic saline rapidly draws fluid into the intravascular space from all body compartments quickly, and can be extremely useful in selected cases of hypotension. Natural colloids are blood, plasma, or albumin. Synthetic colloids include Hetastarch (HES) (Hespan, Jorgensen Labs, Loveland, CO). Isotonic crystalloid solutions are commonly used together with colloids in the resuscitation phase of shock. Warm all fluids to body temperature, regardless of the route of administration. Fluids can be warmed to 100-103°F (38-39°C) without affecting composition. Dextrose has traditionally been added to crystalloid solutions for the treatment of hypoglycemia confirmed via blood glucose measurement; however, use is currently in question (see below). Other fluid types include albumin and whole blood, and are discussed in more detail below.

INDICATIONS FOR FLUID THERAPY Shock Shock is defined as poor tissue perfusion from one of two mechanisms: low blood flow or unevenly distributed flow. This results in inadequate delivery of oxygen to tissues. Hypovolemic shock is caused by absolute or relative inadequate blood volume. Absolute hypovolemia occurs with actual loss of blood, for example, arterial bleeding, gastrointestinal ulcers, or coagulopathies. Relative hypovolemia is not the result of direct blood loss (hemorrhage) from the intravascular space. Examples of causes of relative hypovolemia include severe dehydration from gastrointestinal tract loss, significant loss of plasma (burns), or extensive loss of intravascular fluids into a body space such as the abdominal cavity (celomic cavity in birds). In all cases, there is decreased blood volume and venous return to the right side of the heart. This causes a reduction in return to the left

304


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 305

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

tion. Clinical markers important to determine response to therapy and endpoint in traditional pet species include restoration of normal mentation, mucous membrane color, and CRT, and establishment of normothermia, normovolemia, normal heart rate and urine output. Many of these appear to apply to the avian patient as well. Earlier recommendations for shock therapy included crystalloids administered quickly in volumes equivalent to patient blood volume. However, it should be kept in mind that resuscitation with crystalloids alone can result in significant pulmonary and pleural fluid accumulation, worsening patient condition. The authors have found success with the following procedures for treatment of hypovolemic shock in birds: initially administer a bolus infusion of 7.2-7.5% hypertonic saline (3 mL/kg IV/IO as a slow bolus over 10 minutes). The rapid effects of hypertonic saline are maintained with the addition of the Hetastarch, which is given at 3 mL/kg IV or IO over 5 to 10 minutes. Indirect systolic blood pressure should be checked frequently. While exact target goals for shock endpoint indirect systolic blood pressure in birds have not been determined, the authors have found certain guidelines useful. Isotonic crystalloids (10 ml/kg) with HES at 3-5 mL/kg increments can be repeated over 15 minutes until the systolic blood pressure rises above 90 mm Hg, and/or there is improvement in clinical markers (mentation, CRT, mucus membrane color). When the systolic blood pressure is >90 mm Hg, the rehydration phase of fluid resuscitation begins. If the patient is known to be hypoproteinemic, administer a constant rate infusion (CRI) of HES at 0.8 mL/kg/hr during rehydration, which will help maintain oncotic pressures in the intravascular space. If improvement is not seen after 3 to 4 boluses of HES and crystalloids as outlined above, the patient is evaluated and treated for causes of non-responsive shock (i.e., excessive vasodilation or vasoconstriction, hypoglycemia, electrolyte imbalances, acid-base disorder, cardiac dysfunction, hypoxemia). If cardiac function is normal, and glucose, acid-base, and electrolyte abnormalities have been corrected, continue treatment for non-responsive shock. If packed cell volume (PCV) and total protein are low, whole blood may be required.

side of the heart and reduced cardiac output. The goal of correction is restoration of blood pressure, increased cardiac performance, and maximal venous return. In humans and some animal species, three distinct phases of shock are recognized: Early or compensatory; early decompensatory; and decompensatory. While it is unclear if the mechanism of shock is identical in avian species, some similarities have been observed, and the following descriptions are useful:

Early or Compensatory Phase The early or compensatory stage of shock occurs due to baroreceptor-mediated release of catecholamines. Blood pressure increases because of the increase in cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance. This stage is documented to occur in dogs with blood loss less than 20% of their total blood volume, and was observed in ducks with blood loss less than of 25-30% of blood volume. Documented clinical signs in dogs include increased heart rate, normal or increased blood pressure, and normal or increased flow (bounding pulses and capillary refill less than 1 second). In the authors’ experience, birds commonly present in this stage of shock. An increased heart rate and normal or increased blood pressure is the key indicator of compensatory shock. Volume replacement at this stage is usually associated with a good outcome.

Early Decompensatory Phase This stage occurs when fluid losses continue (estimated greater than 25-30% in birds). In studied species there is a reduction in the blood flow to the kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, skin, and muscles. There is an uneven distribution of blood flow. Clinical signs may include hypothermia, cool limbs and skin, tachycardia, normal or decreased blood pressure, pale mucous membranes, prolonged capillary refill time (CRT), and mental depression. Aggressive fluid therapy using crystalloids and colloids to support blood pressure and heart rate is required in this stage.

Decompensatory Phase When significant blood volume is lost, neuroendocrine responses to hypovolemia are ineffective and irreversible organ failure begins. This appears to be the final common pathway of all forms of shock in all species. It has been observed in ducks after acute loss of 60% of blood volume (it should be noted this stage occurs at loss of 40% blood volume in dogs). Clinical signs are bradycardia with low cardiac output, severe hypotension, pale or cyanotic mucous membranes, absent capillary refill time, weak or absent pulses, hypothermia, oliguria to anuric renal failure, pulmonary edema, and a stuporous to comatose state. Cardiopulmonary arrest commonly occurs at this stage. Goals for fluid therapy include resuscitation (correction of perfusion deficits), rehydration (correction of interstitial deficits), and maintenance. It is important to administer the least amount of fluids necessary to reach the desired endpoints of resuscita-

DEHYDRATION Parameters used to estimate dehydration in mammals, including decreased skin turgor and dry mucus membranes, are less useful in birds. Severely dehydrated birds are often lethargic with a sunken eye appearance. The rate of isotonic replacement fluid administration depends primarily on the rate of fluid losses and clinical status of the patient, as indicated by the physical examination and laboratory parameters. For patients that are dehydrated but clinically stable, replace interstitial fluid deficit over 12-24 hours. If the interstitial volume was lost rapidly, replace the interstitial fluid deficit rapidly (4-6 hours). Fluid requirements for dehydration are calculated as: % dehydration x kg x 1000 mL= fluid deficit (mL).

305


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 306

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

The formula has been found extremely useful for correction of dehydration in birds.

It should be kept in mind that blood products do not promote blood flow as well as acellular fluids (e.g. HES, crystalloids). Therefore, blood is rarely used for initial resuscitation unless the patient is exsanguinating or there is a coagulopathy. The density of erythrocytes impedes the ability of blood products to promote blood flow (a viscosity effect). As in other species, continued blood loss, nonregenerative anemia with PCV 12% to 15% or below, and clotting disorders (such as rodenticide toxicosis) are indicators used to determine the potential need for a whole blood transfusion. Whole blood can be administered at 10-20 mL/kg intravenously or intraosseously. Blood donors can be homologous or heterologous species. Limited studies in selected species suggests that the lifespan of red cells transfused between homologous species is greater than that between heterologous species, for example, 1 day for homologous transfusion between pigeons, but 12 hours for pigeon to red tailed hawk. The authors maintain a relationship with a local bird rescue, and keep a list of clients willing to bring in patients for blood donation in exchange for clinic credit. Blood collection is performed in the carefully restrained or sedated healthy donor via the jugular vein, using a needle

Maintenance Maintenance fluids replace ongoing losses (vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria), meet metabolic demands, and restore intracellular water balance until the patient is eating and drinking on its own. Maintenance requirements are estimated to be higher in birds due to higher metabolic rate; therefore, the authors use a maintenance rate of 3-4 mL/kg/hr. While urinary catheterization and measurement of urine can be used to objectively determine urinary output in traditional species, this is not practical in birds.

SPECIAL FLUID CONSIDERATIONS Whole Blood Whole blood is indicated when albumin, antithrombin, coagulation factors, platelets, or red blood cells are required.

TABLE 1 - Suggestions for correction of perfusion deficits in avian patients Decompensatory phase of shock (bradycardia, hypotension, hypothermia) Slow IV or IO bolus over 10 minutes hypertonic saline 7.2-7.5% (3 mL/kg) + hetastarch (3 mL/kg) ↓ Begin external and core body temperature warming over 1-2 hr Begin crystalloids at maintenance rate (3-4 mL/kg/hr) ↓ When patient is warmed to 98°F (36.6°C), begin correction of hypovolemia to indirect systolic blood pressure > 90 mm Hg (recheck pressure after each bolus) Repeat boluses 3-4 times until blood pressure is normal: 1. Crystalloids (LRS, Normasol, Plasmalyte) at 10 mL/kg 2. Hetastarch at 3-5 mL/kg ↓ Positive response: indirect systolic blood pressure > 90 mm Hg: Crystalloids to correct dehydration plus ongoing losses (Table 38-4) ↓ Add maintenance fluids (3-4 mL/kg/hr) Negative response: indirect systolic blood pressure < 90 mm Hg: Repeat as above ↓ No response: Check blood glucose, electrolytes, PCV and total protein, ECG ↓ If hypoglycemic: Give 5% dextrose IV If PCV < 20% and low total protein: Consider whole blood transfusion If abnormal cardiac function: Correct contractility (nitroglycerin 1/8 inch/2.5 kg) ↓ No response: Consider vasopressor at small animal dose Reprinted in part from the conference of the Association of Avian Veterinarians, 2011.

306


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 307

73째 Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

and syringe, or butterfly catheter. Collect blood into syringes with sodium citrate, at product recommended doses. The blood-administration set must include a filter to remove most of the aggregated debris. Administer donor blood by slow bolus or by infusion with a syringe pump into an IV or IO catheter. In cases of massive hemorrhage, administer blood more rapidly, within minutes. Administer blood transfusions within 4 hours of collection to prevent the growth of bacteria, according to standards set by the American Association of Blood Banks.

relatively expensive; last price check was approximately $85.00 for 50 ml. This product cannot be saved after opening. A new canine albumin produce has just recently been made available, but is even more expensive. Application for use in birds is currently unknown.

Dextrose Hypoglycemia is encountered in ill birds. The best correction is replacement of calories and nutrients per os. Recent trends in human and veterinary critical care have leaned away from supplementation of dextrose in IV fluids, with the exception of severe insulin overdose in humans and animals, and non-responsive insulinoma in ferrets. In a severely hypoglycemic bird unable to take oral dextrose, consider an infusion of up to 5% dextrose until blood glucose is determined to be within normal range.

Albumin Human and traditional pet species often benefit from administration of colloids, or in severe cases, albumin to help raise osmotic pressure, especially in patients with marked hypoalbuminemia unable to obtain nutrition per os. Administration of crystalloids alone in these patients may result in marked loss of fluids from the vascular space into the interstitial space, resulting in worsening hypovolemia, and in severe cases pulmonary or tissue edema. Human albumin has been used successfully by one author (Lichtenberger) for treatment of severe hypoalbuminemia in a bird with chronic regurgitation and diarrhea. Human albumin is

Address for correspondence: Angela M. Lennox Avian and Exotic Animal Clinic 9330 Waldemar Road Indianapolis IN 46268, United States www.exoticvetclinic.com

307


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 308

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Sedation, anesthesia and monitoring, and analgesia of the reptile patient Angela M. Lennox DVM, Dipl ABVP-Avian, Indianapolis, USA

INTRODUCTION

PRE-ANESTHETIC FASTING

Anesthesia in reptiles is well described in terms of anecdotal use in clinical practice; however there are few scientific studies for use in this extremely diverse group of patients. Complicating a uniform approach to anesthesia is markedly variable resting metabolic rate among species, and the effects of environmental temperature on metabolism, among other factors. A 2005 survey of reptile veterinarians showed that the most commonly utilized agents for anesthesia, sedation and/or analgesia were isoflurane, ketamine, propofol and butorphanol. These veterinarians agree that anesthesia is challenging, and respiratory depression, difficulty in measuring anesthetic depth, prolonged recovery and hypothermia were listed as the most common complications. A thorough discussion of reptilian physiology as it pertains to administration of anesthesia is beyond the scope of this paper. A number of points are helpful when considering anesthesia in reptiles: 1. Reptilian resting metabolic rate is lower than that of similarly sized mammals, and is markedly variable among reptilian species. 2. Reptile metabolism is highly dependant on environmental temperature. Therefore, environmental conditions influence anesthetic time of onset and recovery, and duration of effect. 3. Reptiles are considered “episodic breathers”, and breath holding complicates administration of inhalant induction agents. 4. Ventilation (respiratory rate and tidal volume) is reduced in an oxygen-rich environment.

Timing of pre-anesthetic fasting is difficult in reptiles, as so many factors influence gastrointestinal transit time. In general, avoid feeding the reptile 1-2 days prior to surgery.

ROUTES OF ADMINISTRATION Anesthetic and analgesic agents can be administered by routes commonly utilized in other species, including IM, IV or IO, and via the respiratory tract. Use of drugs designed for intravenous administration depends on the ability of the practitioner to competently perform venipuncture or secure vascular access. Even experienced reptile practitioners report IV access as challenging, and in many cases, stressful for the patient. Access sites for IV anesthetic administration depends on the anatomy of the species in question, and include the ventral coccygeal vein of snakes and lizards, jugular and coccygeal vein in tortoises, and abdominal vein of lizards.1,2 Intramuscular administration is common, and most practitioners avoid the use of the hindlimb musculature to avoid the first pass effect produced by the renal portal system. Although recent studies on portal circulation in selected reptile species downplay this feature, it is probably best to avoid administration of nephrotoxic drugs or those highly metabolized by the kidneys into the rear limb or epaxial musculature.2 Studies in humans and other mammals have shown that intraosseous administration of drugs is nearly identical to intravenous administration. A study examining renal function in the green iguana showed similar uptake when radioactive substances were administered IV or IO.3 Mask or chamber induction with inhalant agents is commonly described, but often requires extended induction periods due to breath holding.1,2

PRE-ANESTHETIC WORKUP Reptiles benefit from pre-aesthetic workup as do other species. Many reptiles with chronic disease present in an apparent acute crisis. Anesthetic patients require complete physical examination and careful evaluation for the presence of underlying disease conditions, in particular disease as a result of poor diet and husbandry. Ill reptiles must be stabilized prior to anesthesia. Well patients presenting for elective anesthetic procedures benefit from evaluation of a complete blood count and chemistry panel.1,2

PRE-MEDICATION In traditional pet species, premedication is recommended to provide analgesia, ameliorate the stress of anesthetic induction, and to reduce the dosage and thus potential untoward effects of any single agent. These benefits can be

308


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 309

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

expected in reptiles as well, and premedication may allow quicker induction, and permit procedures such as catheterization and endotracheal intubation. Large, powerful or venomous species may require preanesthetic drug administration to facilitate safe handling and anesthetic induction. Unfortunately, clinical trials on the use of these drugs in various reptile species are lacking and reports suggests results are highly variable. The most commonly reported preanesthetic agent used in reptiles is butorphanol. In other species, administration of butorphanol often results in reduction of isoflurane mean alveolar concentration (MAC). However, a single study in the green iguana showed that butorphanol had no such effect.4 Others report use of midazolam in combination with an opioid agent like butorphanol or buprenorphine. The author and others often find this combination will reduce patient struggling during manipulation and induction somewhat, but results are highly variable. Acepromazine is not considered a useful drug for preanesthesia of reptiles.2 Other injectable agents can be used for preanesthesia in preparation for induction of anesthesia, and include ketamine, xylazine, medetomidine and combinations such as tiletamine and zolazepam.2 Higher doses of these drugs often result in prolonged recovery times. There is no conclusive data on the efficacy of analgesics in reptilian species. However, most agree the use of analgesia is a humane choice, especially when considering potentially painful procedures.2

In dogs and cats, the drug can be used as a repeated bolus, or as a constant rate infusion (CRI) as part of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA). As a CRI, the drug does not accumulate and recovery does not appear prolonged. This is supported by the observation that repeated bolus doses in reptiles do not appear to prolong recovery. Alfaxan is frequently used in dogs and cats with premedications, including benzodiazepines and opiates. It is described for slow intravenous use, with a recommended rate of administration of about 60 seconds. Alfaxan is labeled for intravenous use only. However the drug causes no irritation or untoward effects if administered extravascularly. The manufacturer does not recommend combining Alfaxan with other drugs into the same syringe. Alfaxan appears to have a wide margin of safety. In a study in dogs, patients were administered a 10 times overdose and survived, but required respiratory support. Cats survived a similarly at a 5 times overdose.

Use of alfaxalone in reptiles in clinical practice The author and others have experience with the use of Alfaxan in reptiles in clinical practice. The motivation for use of Alfaxan are two fold: frustration with the array of drugs currently recommend for IM use in reptiles available in the United States, and technical difficulties associated with reliable intravenous administration. Some reptile practitioners claim near 100% success rate with intravenous administration of anesthetics such as propofol in reptile patients. Skepticism aside, for those in practice with lesser talent, an effective, consistent intramuscular anesthetic agent with a reasonable recovery time is attractive. The best uses for Alfaxan in reptiles appear to be the following: a) induction (with or without pre-anesthetics) followed by immediate intubation and maintenance with isoflurane; and b) sedation (with or without other agents) combined with local analgesia for brief, minor procedures. Even when combined with pre-medications, Alfaxan alone does not appear to achieve an acceptable surgical plane of anesthesia at currently explored dosages. Duration of action is variable but in general brief, often no more than 15 minutes. Full recovery is usually within one hour, but can be longer when combined with other agents, including inhalant agents, and especially in debilitated patients. Dosages ranges based on the author’s experience are 5-25 mg/kg. Ill or debilitated patients require significantly less drug than fractious, more stable patients. Dosages required appear to be higher in chelonians and green iguanas, and lower in snakes and leopard geckos. The author always begins with the lower end of the dosage range (5-10 mg/kg), adding boluses as needed to effect. The author has experienced only one fatality directly related to administration of Alfaxan, in a moderately debilitated green tree frog with a rectal prolapse. The author also was unable to inject enough Alfaxan (before running out) to achieve anything close to sedation in a 25pound sulcatta tortoise.

INDUCTION OF ANESTHESIA The most commonly reported induction agent in use in reptiles is propofol, as results tend to be reliable and predictable.1,2 However, use depends on the ability of the practitioner to achieve IV access, which can be difficult and stressful. Other injectable induction agents typically used include ketamine, tiletamine/zolazepam, and combinations using dexmedetomidine, again with variable results described from good to poor. Success and safety are often enhanced when these drugs are used in combination with preanesthetic agents, as described above. 2 Simple mask or chamber induction with inhalant agents can be prolonged, as long as 13 minutes in Dumeril’s monitors.5 Alternatively, reptiles can be restrained and intubated while conscious, and then manually ventilated to achieve anesthesia. This technique is expected to produce stress, and should be utilized only when necessary.2

ALFAXALONE IN REPTILES Recently, much attention has been focused on the use of alfaxalone (Alfaxan, Jurox, NSW, Australia), which is currently the author’s drug of choice for induction of reptile patients. Alfaxalone is an injectable anesthetic agent used for induction and maintenance of anesthesia in dogs and cats. The drug is available in Australia, and the UK, but not currently manufactured and distributed in the United States.

309


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 310

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

cal fluid rate has not been established for reptiles, but is assumed to be lower than that of birds and mammals. The author used 1-2 ml/kg/hour. The best cardiac monitor for reptiles is the ultrasonic Doppler, which is placed as close to the heart of the patient as possible, and taped into place. Measurement of blood pressure is difficult in reptiles, and seldom used.

MAINTENANCE OF ANESTHESIA Inhalant agents (isoflurane, sevoflurane) are overwhelmingly preferred for maintenance of anesthesia, and intubation is practical in all but the smallest reptile species. The glottis is easily visualized, and the availability of medium to very small sized endotracheal tubes facilitates intubation.

THE SURGICAL/ANESTHETIC EMERGENCY

ANALGESIA As discussed above, very little is understood about effective analgesia in reptiles. The author combines an analgesic in pre-medication (usually butorphanol) with a lidocaine/ bupivacaine incisional block at 1 mg/kg each combined and diluted with saline to desired volume. Toxic doses are unknown, but the author has found no complications with the use of these dosages.

Procedures for how to address anesthetic emergencies should be discussed and planned out well in advance of the actual emergency. All emergency drugs should be on hand with dosages precalculated and pre-drawn, or with immediate access to a weight/dosage chart (Table 1). Very little is reported on the use of emergency drugs in reptile patients. Anecdotally, most practitioners extrapolate from known mammal/avian drugs with variable success.

MONITORING OF ANESTHESIA AND PATIENT SUPPORT

POST SURGICAL MONITORING AND CARE

Most reptile patients do not spontaneously breath while under general anesthesia; therefore patients must be periodically mechanically ventilated (1-2 breaths per minute), or ventilated with a mechanical ventilator. Retention of body heat is critical, and temperature should be monitored with a flexible constant read out temperature probe inserted into the oral cavity and into the esophagus. Body heat is maintained with active warming of the patient, and of administered fluids. Vascular access can be difficult, but choices include IV catheter placement (often achieved with a cut down of the jugular vein), or IO placement in reptiles with limbs. Surgi-

Recoveries in reptile patients are usually long, and time from end of anesthesia to purposeful movement may be many hours. Ventilation should continue with the use of an ambu bag, (not with pure oxygen, as respirations are inhibited in an oxygen rich environment) until the patient begins spontaneous movement. Recovery will be prolonged if the patient is below optimum body temperature.

TABLE 1 - Injectable agents preferred by the author for anesthesia and analgesia of most common reptiles1,2 Drug

Dosage (mg/kg)

Primary Usage

Comments

Butorphanol

0.4-2.0 SQ, IM IV

Pre-anesthesia and analgesia

Efficacy uncertain in many species

Buprenorphine

0.02-0.2 mg/kg SQ

analgesia

Efficacy uncertain in many species

Morphine

0.05-4.0 mg/kg IM, IC, SQ

analgesia

Efficacy uncertain in many species

Midazolam

1-2 IM, IV in all species

Pre-anesthesia

Used in combination with butorphanol

Alfaxalone

5-25 mg/kg IM

Induction or sedation

Authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drug of choice, combined with butorphanol

Ketamine

5-20 IM lizards 10-60 IM snakes 5-50 IM chelonians

Pre-anesthesia and anesthesia

Results extremely variable, use in combination with other pre-anesthetics to reduce required amount

Propofol

3-5 IV, IO

Induction of anesthesia

Induction agent of choice; requires intravenous or intraosseous administration

Isoflurane

Induce at 5%, maintain at lowest effective concentration

Induction and maintenance of anesthesia

Not recommended as sole agent due to high concentrations and time needed for induction; use in combination with preanesthetic and induction agents

310


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 311

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

5.

REFERENCES 1.

2. 3.

4.

Mader D, Schumacher J Yalen T. Anesthesia and analgesia. In: Reptile Medicine and Surgery 2nd ed. Saunders, Elsevier, St. Louis, MO. 2006 pp. 442-452. Mosley Anesthesia and analgesia in reptiles. Sem Av Ex Pet Med 2005. Maxwell LK, Jacobson ER: Allometric scaling of kidney function in green iguanas. Comp Biochem Phsiol A Mol IntegrPhsol 138:383390, 2004. Mosley CA, Dyson D, Smith DA: Minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in Green Iguanas and the effet of butorphanol on minimum alveolar concentration. J Am Vet Med Assoc 222(11):15591564, 2003.

6. 7.

Bertelsen MF, Mosley CAE, Crawshaw GJ, et al. Minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in mechanically ventilated Dumeril monitors. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 226(7) pp 1098-1101, 2005. Read MR. Evaluation of the use of anesthesia and analgesia in reptiles. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 224(4) â&#x20AC;&#x201C;547-552, 2004. Sladky KK, Mans C. Clinical anesthesia in reptiles. J Exotic Pet Med 21;2012,17-31.

Address for correspondence: Angela M. Lennox Avian and Exotic Animal Clinic 9330 Waldemar Road Indianapolis IN 46268, United States www.exoticvetclinic.com

311


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 312

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Aspetti clinici delle malattie fotoindotte nel cane e nel gatto Federico Leone Med Vet, Senigallia (Ancona)

dose dipendente all’esposizione solare. La fotosensibilità si verifica quando la cute è resa maggiormente sensibile agli effetti della luce in seguito alla produzione, all’ingestione, all’inoculazione o al contatto con agenti fotodinamici. I fenomeni di fotosensibilizzazione interessano principalmente gli animali da reddito ed esulano da questa trattazione. Trattandosi di malattie indotte dai raggi solari si preferisce utilizzare il termine “solare” piuttosto che “attinico” in quanto il primo si riferisce a lesioni dovute all’azione dei raggi solari mentre il secondo a lesioni conseguenti all’azione di qualsiasi tipo di radiazione. La dermatite solare, la cheratosi solare e il carcinoma squamoso sono gli estremi di uno stesso spettro evolutivo per la cui differenziazione è spesso necessaria l’indagine istopatologica che consente di distinguere le lesioni non neoplastiche (dermatite solare), dalle forme neoplastiche. La cheratosi solare è da sempre considerata una lesione preneoplastica (carcinoma in situ) anche se in medicina umana si tende attualmente a classificarla come una variante di carcinoma squamoso definito carcinoma squamoso superficiale. L’aspetto istopatologico di differenziazione tra le due forme è che mentre nella cheratosi solare la crescita delle cellule epiteliali atipiche resta confinata nei limiti della membrana basale dell’epidermide e della parete follicolare, nel carcinoma squamoso si verifica l’infiltrazione del derma sottostante.

INTRODUZIONE Le radiazioni solari sono responsabili di numerosi effetti biologici sulla cute dell’uomo e degli animali. Sono costituite da un largo spettro di radiazioni elettromagnetiche caratterizzate da una propria lunghezza d’onda; la quantità di energia delle radiazioni è inversamente proporzionale alla loro lunghezza d’onda per cui le radiazioni a minor lunghezza d’onda sono le più pericolose. I raggi ultravioletti (UV) rappresentano le radiazioni di maggior interesse dermatologico e sono suddivisi, in base alla loro lunghezza d’onda, in UVA (400-320 nm), UVB (320-290 nm) e UVC (inferiori a 290 nm). Lo strato di ozono presente nella stratosfera consente il passaggio degli UVA, la frazione a maggior lunghezza d’onda e quindi la meno pericolosa, mentre assorbe quasi completamente le altre due frazioni di cui solo una piccolissima quota raggiunge la superficie terrestre. Nel cane e nel gatto il mantello rappresenta la prima barriera fisica nei confronti dei raggi solari e ne impedisce in parte il contatto diretto con la cute. I raggi UV assorbiti aumentano il livello di energia di specifiche molecole organiche, i cromofori di cui i più importanti presenti sulla cute sono acidi nucleici, proteine, melanina ed emoglobina. Di questi solo la melanina è deputata alla funzione di protezione mentre gli altri sono patologicamente danneggiati dall’assorbimento delle radiazioni luminose. Rispetto all’uomo nel cane e nel gatto le malattie fotoindotte sono meno frequenti per la presenza del pelo che funge da barriera fotoprotettrice nei confronti dei raggi UV con una variabilità in funzione del colore, della lunghezza e della densità. Gli animali glabri, a pelo corto, con cute non pigmentata o a pelo bianco sono maggiormente esposti agli effetti dannosi dei raggi UV. Le malattie fotoindotte si sviluppano in seguito all’esposizione diretta o riflessa alla luce solare e dipendono da diversi fattori legati all’individuo, alla durata dell’esposizione e all’intensità della luce solare. I raggi solari sono molto intensi nei mesi estivi in particolare in determinate ore del giorno (tra le 11 e le 14 raggiungono la massima intensità). Anche l’altitudine influisce sull’intensità delle radiazioni che aumenta per ogni 300 metri di circa il 4%. La fototossicità e la fotosensibilità sono di interesse primario in dermatologia veterinaria. La fototossicità è una risposta

ASPETTI CLINICI Nel gatto la dermatite solare interessa soprattutto i soggetti a mantello bianco o a mantello pezzato bianco; in particolare i gatti a mantello bianco con gli occhi blu risultano più sensibili. Pur interessando soprattutto i soggetti che soggiornano all’esterno, occorre sottolineare che i gatti bianchi che vivono in appartamento non sono esenti da rischi, in quanto i vetri non sono in grado di schermare completamente i raggi ultravioletti. La dermatite solare è più frequente nei soggetti anziani trattandosi di una malattia ad andamento progressivo strettamente dipendente dal tempo di esposizione al sole. Le lesioni possono insorgere precocemente, anche a tre mesi di età, ed evolvono nel corso del tempo, tendendo ad intensificarsi con l’età. Le lesioni iniziali sono discrete e caratterizzate dalla comparsa di eritema, scaglie e alopecia e si localizzano soprattut-

312


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 313

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

to sulle aree maggiormente fotoesposte quali l’apice dei padiglioni auricolari, il planum nasale, il dorso del naso, la zona temporale, le narici, le labbra e le palpebre. Questa condizione può passare inosservata e persistere per diverso tempo senza apparente evoluzione ma i segni clinici possono progredire con aumento della desquamazione e, in presenza di dolore e di prurito, con comparsa di erosioni e di croste. Se interessato il padiglione auricolare si può osservare una sua iniziale deformazione con tendenza all’accartocciamento. Nel cane la dermatite solare colpisce di preferenza i soggetti a pelo bianco, sottile con cute scarsamente pigmentata e principalmente razze quali il Bull Terrier, il Dogo argentino, l’American Staffordshire terrier, il Pitbull, il Dalmata, il Boxer bianco e il Whippet. Le lesioni sono limitate alle zone fotoesposte poco pigmentate e scarsamente coperte dal mantello quali la cute glabra dell’addome, la regione ascellare ma anche i garretti, il padiglione auricolare, il dorso del naso, la regione perioculare e la punta della coda. La localizzazione delle lesioni può riflettere particolari modalità di esposizione ai raggi solari dei singoli soggetti come, ad esempio, si verifica nei cani che amano prendere il sole in posizione supina in cui si può osservare il coinvolgimento dello scroto e della regione ventrale o nei cani si espongono al sole in decubito laterale utilizzando un lato del corpo preferenziale in cui le lesioni possono avere una distribuzione monolaterale. La durata e l’intensità dell’esposizione influenza il grado del danno cutaneo. Le lesioni iniziali sono rappresentate da eritema e scaglie ma, in seguito all’esposizione solare cronica, si assiste ad un marcato ispessimento cutaneo a carico delle aree eritematose con formazione di placche lineari che tendono a confluire nelle aree cutanee non pigmentate adiacenti alla cute pigmentata. Alcuni cani sviluppano papule eritematose, croste, comedoni e noduli. Le infezioni batteriche secondarie sono frequenti. La dermatite solare cronica può evolvere in cheratosi solare e in neoplasia se non precocemente riconosciuta e trattata. Nella cheratosi solare e nel carcinoma squamoso le lesioni si localizzano, sia nel cane che nel gatto, nelle medesime aree corporee descritte nella dermatosi solare di cui spesso rappresentano la progressione. Nella cheratosi solare del gatto la cute interessata si presenta alopecica, ispessita, ricoperta di scaglie assumendo talvolta un aspetto lucido e lucente simil-cicatriziale. Le lesioni sono caratterizzate dalla formazioni di erosioni, ulcere e placche eritematose. Gravi ulcerazioni possono indicare la presenza di carcinoma squamoso ma questo aspetto non può essere considerato discriminante di carcinoma in quanto il prurito può essere responsabile di lesioni ulcerative autoindotte in corso di cheratosi solare. È possibile la formazione di corni cutanei. I segni clinici nel cane sono estremamente variabili. Le lesioni iniziali possono essere rappresentate da macule eritematose che evolvono rapidamente in papule, placche crostose e noduli. La palpazione cutanea può evidenziare diversità di consistenza tra le aree cutanee pigmentate e le aree depigmentate affette dalle lesioni. Le infezioni batteriche secondarie sono frequenti. La formazione di comedoni è caratteristica nelle aree non pigmentate e scarsamente coperte dal mantello e dalla loro rottura si libera cheratina follicolare nel derma responsabile di una reazione da corpo estraneo con conseguente foruncolosi.

Il carcinoma squamoso può presentarsi come lesione ulcerativa ricoperta da croste dal margine rilevato con aspetto centrale crateriforme; altre volte si osserva invece una lesione a carattere proliferativo vegetativo a cui si associa ulcerazione. È frequente riscontrare contemporaneamente sullo stesso soggetto i diversi stadi della trasformazione maligna delle lesioni.

CONCLUSIONI Il riconoscimento precoce delle lesioni e la prevenzione nei soggetti a rischio rappresentano condizioni indispensabili per evitare l’evoluzione in senso neoplastico della malattia. È fondamentale evitare l’esposizione ai raggi solari, in particolare nelle ore più calde della stagione estiva, e utilizzare adeguate misure di fotoprotezione impiegando protettivi solari di natura fisica o chimica. I primi determinano la formazione di una barriera opaca che riflette i raggi solari impedendone la penetrazione cutanea e sono rappresentati dall’ossido di zinco e dal diossido di titanio; i secondi assorbono i raggi ultravioletti e sono prodotti a base di acido aminobenzoico e derivati dal benzofenone.

BIBLIOGRAFIA Almeida EM et al. Photodamage in felin skin: clinical and histomorphometric analysis. Vet Pathol 2008; 45(3):327-35. Bensignor E. Soleil et peau chez les carnivores domestique. 1-effect des raynnement solaires sur les structures cutanées. Le Point Veterinaire 1999; 30 (198): 225-8. Bensignor E. Soleil et peau chez les carnivores domestique. 2- affections photo-induites et photo-aggravées. Le Point Veterinaire 1999; 30 (198): 229-36. Burrows AK. Canine actinic dermatitis. In Proceedings 6th World Congress of Veterinary Dermatology, Hong Kong 2008; 189-97. Calmont JP. Dermatoses solaires (1er partie): photodermatoses et dermatoses photo-aggravées. Prat Méd Chir Anim Comp 2002; 37:185-93. Calmont JP. Dermatoses solaires (2er partie): tumeurs induites par les ultraviolets. Prat Méd Chir Anim Comp 2002; 37:269-79. Coyner K. Diagnosis and Treatment of Solar dermatitis in dogs. Vet Med 2007; 102(8): 511-15. Dunstan RW, Credille KM, Walder EJ. The light and the skin. In: Advances in Veterinary Dermatology. Knockka KW et coll. Eds., Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford, 1998; vol 3: pp 3-35. Gross TL et al. Hyperplastic diseases of epidermis. In Gross TL, Ihrke PJ, Walder EJ, Affolter V. Skin disease of the dog and cat. Clinical and histopathologic diagnosis. 2nd ed. London, Blackwell Science, 2005; 148-51. Gross TL et al. Diseases with abnormal cornification. In Gross TL, Ihrke PJ, Walder EJ, Affolter V. Skin disease of the dog and cat. Clinical and histopathologic diagnosis. 2nd ed. London, Blackwell Science, 2005; 183-4. Gross TL et al. Epidermal tumors. In Gross TL, Ihrke PJ, Walder EJ, Affolter V. Skin disease of the dog and cat. Clinical and histopathologic diagnosis. 2nd ed. London, Blackwell Science, 2005; 575-89. Marconato L, Abramo F. Lesioni cutanee indotte dal sole nel gatto: dalla cheratosi attinica al carcinoma squamoso. Veterinaria 2010; 24(3):7-24 Scott DW, Miller WH, Griffin CE. Environmental skin disease. In Scott DW, Miller WH, Griffin CE: Muller and Kirk’s Small Animal Dermatology, 6th ed. WB Saunders Company, Philadelphia 2001; 1073-81.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Federico Leone Clinica Veterinaria Adriatica, Senigallia (Ancona)

313


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 314

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

How to do a great eye exam David Maggs DVM, BVSc, Dipl ACVO, USA

patient’s normal ocular appearance. A prepared exam sheet reminds the practitioner to perform all necessary tests in the correct sequence. An example is included on the following page.

INTRODUCTORY PHILOSOPHY It is undoubtedly important to know how to treat disease but without a diagnosis, treatment is often ineffective or worse. Fortunately, reaching an ophthalmic diagnosis relies almost completely on performing a thorough ophthalmic examination, which can be done with the simplest of instrumentation. Although historical data may provide essential clues to the diagnosis, ready visualization of almost all parts of the eye means nothing can replace a complete examination. Indeed, never were the famous words “more is missed through not seeing than not knowing” more apt. Fortunately, a thorough and revealing ophthalmic examination is readily performed with just 4 guidelines, 4 skills, and equipment that is almost certainly already in your clinic.

FOUR BASIC EXAM TECHNIQUES Mastering just 4 procedures will provide all of the essential information from the anterior segment: 1. Retroillumination 2. Focal illumination or transillumination 3. Tonometry (measurement of intraocular pressure) 4. Assessment of aqueous flare Retroillumination is a simple but extremely useful technique for assessment of pupils and all parts of the transparent ocular media (tear film, cornea, aqueous, lens, and vitreous). A focal light source held close to the examiner’s eye and directed over the bridge of the patient’s nose from at least arm’s length is used to elicit the fundic reflection or reflex. This is usually gold or green in tapetal animals or red in atapetal individuals. Each eye is illuminated equally and the fundic reflex is used to assess and compare pupil size, shape, and equality. Additionally, opacities in the ocular media will obstruct the fundic reflection and are noted for more detailed subsequent examination using transillumination or retroillumination again after pupil dilation. Both of these subsequent techniques can be augmented by magnification. Retroillumination is particularly useful for differentiating nuclear sclerosis from cataract. The anterior segment includes all structures in front of and including the lens. These are bestexamined using focal illumination and subsequently magnification. To maximize the benefits of focal illumination, the light source should be directed from an angle that differs from the observer’s viewing angle. Varying the viewing and lighting angles relative to each other permits the examiner to utilize parallax, reflections, perspective, and shadows to gain valuable information regarding lesion depth. This technique is particularly useful for examining the anterior chamber since changes within the anterior chamber can be more easily differentiated from corneal, iridal, or lenticular changes when viewed transversely. In cats and horses, the corneal curvature and anteri-

FOUR BASIC EXAM REQUIREMENTS There are 4 essential requirements for a thorough ophthalmic examination: 1. The patient and doctor must be at eye level with each other 2. The exam must be performed in dim ambient light 3. A bright, focal light source and a means of magnification are essential 4. Always perform an orderly and complete examination Detection of minute but very significant changes necessitates use of magnification and a focal, intense light source. This combination can be provided using an Optivisor® head loupe and Finoff® transilluminator. A readily available alternative is the otoscope used without the plastic cone. This provides a focal light source and approximately 2-3X magnification. The slit lamp biomicroscope maximizes the combination of magnification and focal light source. By focusing the light to a narrow slit, an optical section provides microscopic detail in transparent ocular media such as the tear film, cornea, aqueous, lens, and vitreous. Small, less expensive hand-held slit lamps are also available. The ophthalmic examination should be carried out in a repeatable and sequential manner to ensure that nothing is overlooked. Examining the unaffected eye prior to the affected eye in animals with unilateral disease ensures that it is not forgotten and provides information on the individual

314


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 315

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

or chamber depth are so great that limited visualization of the iridocorneal angle is also possible. The importance of a sequential anterior segment examination cannot be overstated. Following retroillumination and assessment of menace response and pupillary and palpebral reflexes, an obvious method is to begin at the front and progress to the back of the eye. This ensures that the lids (including skin, margin, and cilia), conjunctiva (nasolacrimal puncta, third eyelid, bulbar, and palpebral conjunctival surfaces), sclera, cornea (including tear film and particularly the limbus), anterior chamber, iris, and lens are examined completely. Anterior segment examination should be initiated prior to dilation so that the iris face is easily examined; however complete examination of the lens requires full dilation. Assessment of intraocular pressure (tonometry) is essential for differentiation of the two major, visionthreatening conditions in which red-eye is the hallmark feature – uveitis and glaucoma. The availability of easily used and reasonably priced applanation tonometers such as the Tonopen® (Ph: 1-888-TONOPEN [888-866-6736]; http://www.danscottandassociates.com/) make measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) easier in all species, particularly cats. Unlike the Schiotz tonometer, the Tonopen measures IOP directly and does not require any conversion. It can also be held horizontally and therefore allows measurements to be performed with the patient’s head held in a normal, relaxed position. Finally, it has a small probe that permits easy measurement of IOP in even the smallest feline and pediatric canine eyes. The instrument comes with an excellent instructional video and manual, however the following tips may assist you to get the most from your Tonopen. A drop of topical anesthetic is applied to the cornea. A disposable cover is placed over the Tonopen tip and the pen is turned on with firm, somewhat protracted pressure on the large black button about one third way down the shaft. The equipment should be periodically calibrated according to the manufacturer’s directions. Correct patient restraint is essential. The patient should be lightly restrained so as to not artificially raise IOP. In particular, direct pressure on the jugular veins and on the globe itself via the eyelids should be avoided. I prefer to have an assistant (and not the owner!) restrain the patient’s head using the angle of the mandible. I then hold the Tonopen in my dominant hand, and gently part the patient’s eyelids using my non-dominant hand but such that pressure is applied to the underlying orbital rim; not globe. I then rest the hand holding the Tonopen onto the hand holding the eyelids or onto the patient’s head itself and gently touch the central cornea with the Tonopen tip. Minor movements away from the cornea and very gentle “blotting” of the cornea with the tip will enhance the reliability and reproducibility of the readings while reducing the number of readings necessary. Particular attention should be paid to the “approach angle” of the Tonopen tip to the cornea. The tip’s flat surface should be exactly parallel to the corneal surface. This is best achieved by viewing the interface between the cornea and the tip from the side. The approach angle of the Tonopen itself should be exactly perpendicular to the

corneal surface. However, note that due to corneal curvature, this means the approach angle must be changed dramatically if any area other than the central cornea is used. Each time the cornea is appropriately “blotted” with the probe, an electronic tone will advise the operator that a reading has been obtained. When a suitable number of readings has been obtained, a tone of a different pitch will sound and no further readings can be obtained without restarting the Tonopen using the large black button again. The number of readings required to achieve an average varies depending on how disparate the readings are from each other and from the normal physiologic range. A small digital screen at the end distant from the tip displays the IOP in mmHg and provides an estimate of the “reliability” (coefficient of variance) of the result. This appears as a small bar above one of 4 percentage readings. This bar should be above the 5% mark or tonometry should be repeated on that eye. Across large populations, normal canine and feline IOP is reported as approximately 10-25 mmHg. However, significant variation is noted between individuals, technique, and time of day. Comparison of IOP between right and left eyes is therefore critical to interpretation of results. A good rule of thumb is that IOP should not vary between eyes of the same patient by more than 20%. The obvious application for the Tonopen is the diagnosis of glaucoma where IOP is generally elevated. However tonometry is also used to diagnose uveitis; in which IOP is lowered due to loss of function of the inflamed ciliary body. Perhaps the most important role for tonometry is the monitoring of progress of these diseases and the adjustment of medications based on these data. Aqueous flare is a pathognomonic sign of uveitis and is due to breakdown of the blood-ocular barrier with subsequent leakage of proteins into the anterior chamber. Aqueous flare is best detected using a very focal, intense light source in a totally darkened room. The passage taken by the beam of light is viewed from an angle. In the normal eye, a focal reflection is seen where the light strikes the cornea. The beam is then invisible as it traverses the almost protein- and cell-free aqueous humor in the anterior chamber. The light beam is visible again as a focal reflection on the anterior lens capsule and then as a diffuse beam through the body of the normal lens due to presence of lens proteins. If uveitis has allowed leakage of serum proteins into the anterior chamber then these will cause a scattering of the light as it passes through the aqueous. Aqueous flare is therefore detected when a beam of light joining the focal reflections on the corneal surface and the anterior lens capsule is visible traversing the anterior chamber. A slit lamp provides ideal conditions for detecting flare; however the beam produced by the smallest circular aperture on the direct ophthalmoscope held as closely as possible to the cornea in a completely darkened room and viewed transversely will also provide excellent results. The slit beam on the direct ophthalmoscope is not as intense and does not provide as many “edges” of light where flare can be appreciated most easily. Assessment of flare may be easier after complete pupil dilation due to the apparent dark space created by the pupil. Combined

315


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 316

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

assessment of IOP and aqueous flare should be performed whenever glaucoma or uveitis is suspected because of the frequency with which these conditions co-exist.

mal pooling. Small, “scuffed” areas of corneal epithelium are occasionally seen following the STT. Passage of dye down the nasolacrimal duct is referred to as the Jones test and is used to assess functional and anatomic patency of the nasolacrimal apparatus. Seidel’s test also utilizes fluorescein stain. This test is used to assess integrity of the cornea following suspected penetrating trauma or ulceration and to guide decisions regarding management of such wounds. In this case, excessive dye is not rinsed from the cornea but is examined with a cobalt blue light and magnification. Leakage of aqueous humor will cause small rivulets to form in the fluorescein dye pooled on the corneal surface. Rose bengal stain is retained by devitalized corneal or conjunctival epithelial cells. Recent studies have suggested that even changes in amount or quality of some normal tear film components such as mucin and albumin can cause otherwise viable epithelial cells to retain rose bengal stain. Its clinical utility is therefore detection of subtle epithelial abnormalities as seen in keratoconjunctivitis sicca (“dry eye”) or dendritic ulcers that occur with feline herpesvirus keratitis. Rose bengal and fluorescein stains may affect culture and virological results and should be applied following collection of microbiological samples. Rose bengal is also epitheliotoxic and may cause discomfort in some animals, and therefore should be reserved for cases where it may provide useful additional information. Basic neuro-ophthalmic testing should include assessment of cranial nerves involved in ocular function (CN II – VII), the central visual pathways, and the visual cortex. This can be performed reasonably completely with relatively few simple tests: • Menace response (CN II & VII, visual cortex, and cerebellum) • Behavioral vision testing (CN II, visual cortex, and all areas involved in motor function) • Direct and consensual pupillary light responses (CN II & III, and central visual pathways excluding the visual cortex) • Palpebral and corneal reflexes (CN V & VII) • Dazzle reflex (CN II & VII, and subcortical visual pathways) • Doll’s eye reflex (CN III, IV, & VI) Retropulsion of the globe is a simple but useful method for investigating orbital disease. This is performed by applying gentle digital pressure to both globes in a posterior direction through closed lids. The resistance to retropulsion and the resilience with which the globes “spring” back against the retropulsive force are subjectively assessed. This is quite distinct from digital tonometry where the globe is gently compressed against the orbital rim thus providing a crude and unreliable assessment of IOP. Retropulsion of the globe in a variety of directions may further localize orbital masses or outline smaller masses that would be missed by direct caudal retropulsion only.

OTHER OPHTHALMIC DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES Unlike assessment of other less accessible organs, visual examination of the eyes frequently provides all of the clues necessary to reach a clinical diagnosis. The Schirmer tear test, fluorescein staining, assessment of aqueous flare, and tonometry are likely to form part of most routine ophthalmic examinations. Other tests are used less frequently but can provide valuable information in specific disease conditions. The Schirmer tear test (STT) records basal and reflex tearing as number of millimeters of wetting of a strip of absorbent paper placed in the lateral, ventral conjunctival fornix for one minute. The lateral fornix is used to ensure that the strip lightly abrades the cornea and produces reflex tearing. If the strip is placed more medially, it may be prevented from touching the cornea by the third eyelid. The STT should be performed prior to application of any topical solutions, particularly anesthetic drops. General anesthesia and sedation also cause a temporary (at least 48 hours) depression of normal tearing. Normal STT values for dogs are well established; a STT reading of > 15 mm in 60 seconds is considered normal. Wetting of less than 10 mm in 60 seconds is abnormal and is usually associated with evidence of keratoconjunctivitis. Wetting of 10-15 mm in 60 seconds represents a “gray zone” and warrants careful assessment in light of clinical signs. Reassessment at a later date should also be considered in these situations. The range of reported STT values in normal cats (3-32 mm; mean = 17 mm in 60 seconds) is much wider and more difficult to interpret than in dogs. However, experience suggests that lower readings than the reported mean can frequently be expected in completely normal cats. This is probably due to autonomic control of tear secretion and short-term alterations in tear flow due to stress in the exam room. Feline STT values should still be recorded, but interpreted in conjunction with clinical signs. Application of fluorescein dye to the cornea can yield a large amount of information. A few drops of irrigation solution are trickled over a strip impregnated with fluorescein to liberate dye onto the cornea. Care should be taken not to touch the strip onto the cornea. Excess dye is then rinsed from the corneal surface and the eye examined with either white or cobalt blue light. This simple, water-soluble dye has great affinity for the hydrophilic corneal stroma but is not absorbed by epithelial cells or Descemet’s membrane. Its most common use therefore is identification and characterization of corneal ulcers. Excitement of the fluorescent dye with a cobalt blue light can assist with identification of minor lesions, however excessive dye must be adequately rinsed from the cornea to avoid over-interpretation of nor-

316


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 317

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

The 7 colors of corneal pathology David Maggs DVM, BVSc, Dipl ACVO, USA

Learning to recognize and interpret these color changes and the mechanisms responsible for them provides a simple and logical approach to diagnosis of all corneal and some intraocular diseases. It also facilitates selection of appropriate diagnostic tests.

CLINICALLY RELEVANT CORNEAL ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY The cornea comprises the anterior part of the outer fibrous tunic and is the major refractive structure of the eye. Four layers are identified histologically. From the outside in, they are: • Stratified squamous epithelium and its basement membrane • Regularly-arranged, collagenous stroma • Descemet’s membrane (basement membrane formed by the endothelium) • Single-layer endothelium

1. Corneal vascularization causes a red discoloration of the cornea. It is a non-specific indication of chronic inflammatory disease; however distribution of corneal blood vessels provides valuable information regarding location and depth of the inciting cause. That is, blood vessels reveal not what the inciting cause is, but where it is. Differentiation of deep from superficial corneal vascularization is therefore critical for selection of further diagnostic steps and for differentiation of vision-threatening intraocular disease from irritating surface ocular disease (Fig. 1). Superficial corneal vessels arise from the conjunctiva at the limbus. They tend to be fine, branch dichotomously to form “tree-shaped” patterns on the cornea, and can be seen crossing the limbus. Superficial vessels reflect surface ocular disease due to inadequate protection or excessive frictional irritation of the corneal surface. Deep corneal vessels arise from perilimbal ciliary and scleral vessels and tend to be darker, shorter, straighter, and to not branch. They cannot be seen crossing the limbus, but instead arise from under the scleral shelf. They form a “hedge-shaped” pattern on the cornea. They are characteristic of serious, vision-threatening disease such as deep keratitis, uveitis, or glaucoma.

The epithelium is the main ocular surface barrier to entry of pathogenic organisms and penetration of therapeutic agents. The epithelium and endothelium both are responsible for maintaining the corneal stroma in a state of relative dehydration (or deturgescence). The epithelium prevents penetration of tears, while the endothelium performs the more significant role by “pumping” ions (and therefore water) from the stroma and into the aqueous. Total corneal thickness is approximately 0.6 mm. The cornea receives sensory innervation from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (CN V) and is protected principally by the eyelids and tear film. The corneoscleral junction is termed the limbus.

CORNEAL PATHOLOGIC RESPONSES Corneal clarity is essential for normal vision and is due to: • Absence of blood vessels • Deturgescence (relative dehydration) • Highly regular arrangement of collagen lamellae in the stroma • Absence of pigment • Relative acellularity Any decrease in clarity is indicative of a pathologic process. Pathologic responses include vascularization, edema, scarring, lipid and/or mineral deposition, pigmentation, inflammatory cell infiltration, and destruction from degradative enzymes (“melting”). A combination of these pathologic responses is commonly observed. Each of these pathologic changes is associated with a defining color change.

Figure 1

317


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 318

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

and the feline endothelium seems more resistant to senile changes, diffuse corneal edema in cats is usually secondary to these more serious intraocular diseases and warrants urgent and complete examination. An exceptional disease in which corneal edema is the major sign and that seems peculiar to cats is feline acute bullous keratopathy. This tends to occur in younger cats without any recognized predisposing cause or history. The onset of massive stromal edema and sometimes rupture can occur within hours! The pathogenesis is proposed to involve the stroma itself rather than the endothelium. Treatment involves emergency conjunctival grafting. 3. Corneal scars are due to derangement of the usual highly regular array of stromal collagen. The scattering of light this induces causes gray, wispy discolorations in an uninflamed cornea. These lesions do not retain fluorescein stain. Scars are by definition inactive and require no further treatment. Presence of inflammatory signs such as vascularization or cellular infiltrates in association with scarring suggests continuing active inflammation.

Figure 2

2. Corneal (stromal) edema is usually evident as a bluish discoloration of the cornea, often in a “fluffy” or “cloud-like” pattern. Corneal edema represents dysfunction of one or both of the cell layers responsible for corneal deturgescence (the epithelium or endothelium). Application of fluorescein stain and careful attention to the severity and area of edema will assist in differentiating which cell layer is dysfunctional (Fig. 2). Epithelial loss (corneal ulceration) produces more focal and milder edema in close spatial association with a currently or recently fluoresceinpositive area of cornea. Endothelial decompensation tends to produce more severe and diffuse corneal edema because endothelium has the more important role in maintaining deturgescence. Endothelial dysfunction may occur as a primary event, especially in dogs. Primary endothelial dystrophy is relatively common in Boston Terriers and Chihuahuas, while senile endothelial degeneration might be suspected in older dogs of any breed. Unless ulceration occurs secondary to corneal bullae (blister) formation, these primary endothelial diseases are characteristically fluorescein negative and non-painful. Therapy for corneal edema must be directed at the inciting cause. However, symptomatic treatment with hyperosmotic 5% sodium chloride ointment (Muro 128 ® and others) used BID-QID may minimize epithelial edema and subsequent bullae formation. Hypertonic saline usually will not cause clinically appreciable reduction in stromal edema and therefore will not alter the blue discoloration of the cornea unless it is applied at least QID. Hypertonic ointments appear to be better tolerated than solutions. Without treatment of the underlying cause (where possible), any beneficial effects of topical sodium chloride are transient and progression of corneal disease is inevitable. Thermokeratoplasty may be beneficial in advanced cases. This technique involves making multiple, small, superficial stromal burns using a specialized ophthalmic cautery unit. Great care is advised because the cornea can “melt like butter” under the heat of the cautery unit. Secondary endothelial decompensation occurs in dogs and cats with uveitis, glaucoma, anterior lens luxation, (or rarely scleritis) and is associated with ocular pain, inflammation, and other specific abnormalities. Because domestic (outbred) cats are less prone to primary inherited disease

4. Lipid and/or mineral accumulation appears as sparkly, crystalline, or shiny white areas in the cornea. These accumulations frequently contain cholesterol and/or calcium, however varying combinations of lipids and minerals are possible. It occurs as a primary inherited but not necessarily congenital condition in many canine breeds (corneal lipid dystrophy) but rarely in cats, or secondary to corneal inflammation or injury (corneal degeneration) in dogs (and sometimes cats) (Fig. 3). Corneal lipid dystrophy is usually bilateral and approximately symmetrical with lipid usually deposited in the central or paracentral cornea, often in a circular or elliptical shape. All corneal layers may be involved, but lipid deposits are usually sub-epithelial, and therefore, the cornea is negative to fluorescein stain retention. Lipid dystrophy is typically non-painful, has minimal effect on vision, and requires no therapy. Commonly affected breeds include the Siberian husky, Samoyed, Bichon Frise, and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

Figure 3

318


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 319

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Corneal lipid degeneration, by contrast, is usually unilateral and frequently associated with inflammation evident as coincident corneal edema, or vascularization. These lesions are frequently seen in animals with chronic uveitis, especially with long-term corticosteroid use. Occasionally there will be a history of ocular trauma often with ulceration that healed with lipid deposition. Some animals that deposit lipid in their cornea either spontaneously (and then usually extending into the cornea from the limbus) or at the site of previous keratitis do so due to elevated serum lipid. Investigation of common causes of systemic hyperlipidemia such as hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hyperadrenocorticism, or primary hyperlipidemia is therefore warranted in such animals. In these animals, lamellar keratectomy may be curative following correction of any underlying abnormality in systemic lipid metabolism but as the keratectomy site heals, the degenerative lesion may return.

a “greasy” appearance, and tend to be deposited in vertically aligned, linear arrays along the ventral cornea. KP’s are a pathognomonic sign of uveitis. Thorough investigation for causes of uveitis should be undertaken. A staphyloma describes the protrusion (“herniation”) of uveal tissue out through the corneoscleral tunic. This usually follows ulcerative or traumatic perforation of the cornea. The surrounding corneal health is usually poor (malacic, edematous, vascularized, infiltrated with WBC’s, etc). The protruding uvea (iris) is coated in a layer of fibrin and inflammatory cells and therefore has a tannish-brown appearance. A staphyloma frequently appears as a raised area in the center of an otherwise deep ulcer. 7. Inflammatory cell infiltration of the corneal stroma appears as yellowish-green discoloration. This usually occurs in response to an infectious etiology however, nonseptic infiltration of the cornea can occur. This finding is most dramatic in the equine cornea, is commonly seen in dogs, and is relatively infrequently seen in cats. Inflammatory cells originate from the tear film, limbus, and, sometimes the uveal tract and can accumulate within the cornea surprisingly quickly, indicating a potent chemotactic stimulus. This is most often due to an infectious cause, blunt trauma (corneal contusions) or an intracorneal foreign body. Therefore, corneal cytology along with culture and sensitivity testing should be performed and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy initiated promptly. An antibiotic with reasonable corneal penetration such as chloramphenicol may be necessary if the cornea is fluorescein negative. Frequent reexamination of the cornea is justified as liberation of lytic enzymes from inflammatory cells and bacteria can be associated with rapid collagenolysis or corneal “melting”.

5. Corneal pigmentation causes an obvious black discoloration of the corneal surface. In dogs, the pigment is melanin and tends to encroach insidiously from the limbus. Heavily pigmented dogs, especially Pekingese, Pugs and Chows, seem to be more prone to this change (sometimes called “pigmentary keratitis”). In sharp contrast, black discoloration of the feline cornea is rarely due to melanin. Instead, the feline corneal pigment is soluble and appears to originate from or be spread in the tear film. It may cause black tear staining at the medial canthi or on occasions, can be deposited in the corneal stroma. In the latter case, it is usually associated with an area of necrotic, sequestered stromal collagen (so called “Corneal Sequestrum”). Regardless of pigment type (or species affected), corneal pigmentation is generally a sign of chronic irritation. It is often seen in conjunction with corneal vascularization, which shares the same mechanism (Fig. 1). Like corneal vascularization, pigmentation of the cornea provides no information regarding nature of the specific irritant but does accurately direct attention to the location of the irritation.

DIAGNOSTIC TESTING FOR CORNEAL DISEASE The most commonly employed tests for investigation of corneal pathology are the Schirmer tear test, fluorescein and/or rose bengal staining, tonometry, assessment of aqueous flare, and corneal cytologic and microbiologic assessment. Histopathological examination of keratectomy samples may be required to confirm a diagnosis in some cases of proliferative or inflammatory corneal disease.

6. Fibrin and WBC’s appear as a tannish-gray corneal discoloration. These appear in two common locations with characteristic appearances. Keratic precipitates (KP’s) are multiple, clumped accumulations of inflammatory cells and debris on the inner corneal (endothelial) surface. They have

319


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:42

Pagina 320

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Knowledge of the mechanisms by which these 7 corneal color changes occur can therefore be used to direct diagnostic testing as suggested in this table.

Color

Histology

Mechanism

Recommended Tests

Red

Blood vessels

Chronic irritation

Fluorescein stain, STT, Palpebral & corneal reflexes

“Fluffy” Blue

Stromal edema

Endothelial or epithelial dysfunction

Fluorescein stain, IOP, flare, check for lens luxation

“Wispy” Gray

Stromal scar

Previous (inactive) inflammation

Fluorescein stain

“Sparkly” White

Lipid/mineral accumulation

Dystrophy, degeneration, or hyperlipidemia

Fluorescein stain, systemic lipid analyses

Black

Pigmentation

Chronic irritation

Fluorescein stain, STT, Palpebral & corneal reflexes

“Punctate” Tan

KP’s or Staphyloma

Uveitis

IOP, flare, systemic disease testing

Yellow-green

Inflammatory cell infiltration

Inflammation (usually septic)

Fluorescein stain, cytology, culture & sensitivity testing, PCR

320


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 321

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Ocular pharmacology – which drugs when David Maggs DVM, BVSc, Dipl ACVO, USA

WHAT OPHTHALMIC DRUGS SHOULD I HAVE IN MY PHARMACY?

ANTIBIOTICS Topically applied antibiotics are principally indicated for treatment of corneal ulcers and conjunctivitis. Although no bacteria are believed to be primary corneal epithelial pathogens and initiate ulcers in small animals, disruption of epithelium does predispose the corneal stroma to infection. Triple antibiotic (neomycin, polymyxin B and bacitracin or gramicidin) is an excellent first choice for prophylaxis because it is broad-spectrum, and polymyxin B is effective against many Pseudomonas spp. There are some concerns that it may induce fatal anaphylaxis in cats; however this appears to be extraordinarily rare. Although chloramphenicol is bacteriostatic, it has broad antimicrobial spectrum and will penetrate intact corneal epithelium. It may have activity against It is therefore a good choice, especially if an ulcer has healed but residual organisms are suspected within the corneal stroma. Gentamicin and tobramycin are widely used and inexpensive. They have better efficacy against Gram-negative than Grampositive organisms. Gentamicin is relatively cytotoxic. Topical oxytetracycline/polymyxin (Terramycin) has typically been recommended for treatment of feline conjunctivitis due to its efficacy against Mycoplasma spp. and Chlamydophila felis. There are now strong data confirming that cats harbor and shed C. felis from non-ocular sites and that systemic doxycycline is more effective at decreasing clinical signs and shedding of C. felis than topical therapy with a tetracycline-containing ophthalmic ointment alone. I usually recommend a 3 week course of doxycycline (10 mg/kg PO SID) and I include “in-contact” cats if reasonable. The usual precautions regarding esophageal stricture apply. There is a range of fluoroquinolones suitable for topical ophthalmic use. These are particularly effective against Gramnegative organisms, including Pseudomonas spp. Therefore widespread use of these preparations for prophylaxis in noninfected ulcers is actively discouraged. They are relatively ineffective against anaerobes (which rarely cause surface ocular disease) and against Gram-positive organisms (which are the major component of the ocular conjunctival flora). Therefore for serious infected corneal ulcers, an agent with additional Gram-positive spectrum should be added. This can be done relatively easily by use of a compounded cefazolin eye drop (see recipe below).

Obviously, no answer to this question is correct for every practice but here are some basics I could not manage without for canine and feline practice. The list is compiled without consideration of availability and price which vary frequently and widely across the world.

Antibiotics Triple antibiotic ointment and solution Ofloxacin solution Cefazolin compounded solution (see below) Doxycycline Anti-inflammatory/Immunomodulatory agents Neopolydex ointment and solution Prednisolone acetate1% suspension Diclofenac solution Cyclosporine ointment and suspension Tacrolimus suspension Oral prednisone/prednisolone Oral NSAIDs Glaucoma Dorzolamide solution Dorzolamide/timolol combo solution Latanoprost solution Antivirals Idoxuridine solution Cidofovir compounded solution Famciclovir tablets Tear substitutes Hyaluronate solution Petrolatum ointment Other Atropine ointment and solution Serum

321


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 322

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

The topical route is used for moderating immune responses involving the lacrimal gland, conjunctiva, cornea, and sclera, especially treatment of keratoconjunctivitis sicca, corneal graft rejection, autoimmune keratitis (especially pannus), and immune-mediated episclerokeratoconjunctivitis. When applied topically it penetrates the eye poorly and is not useful via this route for treatment of intraocular inflammation. Cyclosporine’s most important ophthalmic use is the treatment of canine keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Its major mechanism of action for this disease is potent reduction of immune-mediated destruction of the lacrimal gland and gland of the third eyelid, which permits spontaneous glandular regeneration. However, cyclosporine is also directly lacrimogenic, reduces corneal melanosis and vascularization, and stimulates canine conjunctival goblet cells to secrete mucin, which possibly accounts for some of its therapeutic effects in surface ocular disease resulting from qualitative tear film disturbances and other causes. Tacrolimus works via a similar mechanism to that of cyclosporine, in that it reduces T-cell activation by inhibiting calcineurin-dependent activation of lymphokine expression, apoptosis, and degranulation. However, the intracellular receptors for tacrolimus and cyclosporine are different, leading some veterinary ophthalmologists to use tacrolimus when cyclosporine is not effective for the treatment of keratoconjunctivitis in dogs. A 0.02% aqueous suspension was recently investigated in a double-masked study of 105 dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Dogs naïve to tear stimulation therapy, dogs maintained successfully on cyclosporine therapy, and dogs unresponsive to cyclosporine therapy were all included. Twice-daily tacrolimus administration was continued for 6 to 8 weeks. Schirmer tear test (STT) results improved by 5 mm/min in more than 85% of dogs never treated before and in 51% of dogs whose disease was unresponsive to cyclosporine. In March 2005 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a public health advisory to warn health care providers and patients about a potential cancer risk (lymphoma and skin cancer) associated with the commercial topical (dermatologic) preparation of tacrolimus for human use. This issue may be relevant to topical (ophthalmic) veterinary use. The FDA’s concern was based on information from animal studies, case reports in a small number of patients, and how drugs of this class work. The FDA estimates that it may take human studies of 10 years or more in duration to determine whether use of tacrolimus is linked to cancer. In the meantime the agency advises that tacrolimus should be used only as labeled and for patients whose disease is unresponsive to or who are intolerant of other treatments. The FDA also recommends avoiding use of tacrolimus in children younger than 2 years, using tacrolimus only for short periods rather than continuously, and using the minimum amount needed to control the patient’s symptoms. Owners of veterinary patients should be advised of these guidelines and maybe should wear gloves when applying this medication. Currently, the FDA advises that, in humans, tacrolimus should be used only as labeled and for patients whose disease is unresponsive to or who are intolerant of other treatments. The FDA also recommends avoiding use of tacrolimus in

COMPOUNDED CEFAZOLIN “RECIPE” 1. Remove 2 ml from a 15-ml bottle of artificial tear solution and discard. 2. Reconstitute a 500-mg vial of cefazolin with 2 ml of sterile water. 3. Add entire 500 mg of the reconstituted cefazolin (2.4 ml) to the bottle of artificial tear solution. Final concentration = 33 mg/ml (3.3% solution). Shelf life: 28 days. Keep refrigerated. In all cases, frequency of antibiotic application is determined both by severity of the condition and the preparation used. Ointments have a longer contact time and can be applied less frequently. Ointments should be avoided when there is a risk of or actual corneal perforation since the petrolatum vehicle causes a severe granulomatous uveitis if it enters the eye.

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY & IMMUNOMODULATORY DRUGS Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory drugs are essential for controlling often painful and sometimes blinding inflammation in many ophthalmic diseases. Of these, corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and cyclosporine warrant special mention for ophthalmic use. As a general rule, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents should not be used unless a diagnosis has been made and a specific immunologic or inflammatory response is to be inhibited. In addition, every eye should be stained with fluorescein before therapy with corticosteroids is initiated. Corticosteroids must not be used topically or subconjunctivally when fluorescein or rose bengal stain indicates a corneal epithelial defect. Commonly available ophthalmic corticosteroids include hydrocortisone, prednisolone and dexamethasone. Of these only prednisolone and dexamethasone are potent and penetrate the corneal epithelium to reach useful concentrations within the corneal stroma and intraocularly. For inflammatory disorders of the eyelids, posterior segment, optic nerve, or orbit, corticosteroids must be administered systemically, not topically. Topical NSAIDs such as diclofenac may be used in place of topical corticosteroids, compared with which they appear to be slightly less potent but also less likely to inhibit would healing. They are used for the same conditions as corticosteroids, but may be preferred in diabetic or Cushingoid patients owing to their lack of systemic adrenocortical effects. Topical NSAIDs inhibit breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier by 80% to 99% in research studies. Cyclosporine is a potent immunosuppressive drug which affects cell-mediated immunity and possibly humoral immunity by inhibition of helper T cells, but does not affect epithelial wound healing. The drug commonly is applied topically as a 1% or 2% solution in various oils, or as a 0.2% ointment. An aqueous suspension can also be compounded.

322


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 323

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

anhydrase inhibitors (CAI’s) such as dorzolamide (Trusopt®) or brinzolamide (Azopt®) which reduce aqueous humor production and are typically well tolerated. These require TID application in humans and dogs. Latanoprost (Xalatan®) represents a new class of drugs (synthetic prostaglandins) for treatment of glaucoma. It promotes non-conventional (or uveoscleral) outflow and also produces marked miosis after one or two applications. It produces a very potent and rapid reduction in IOP in dogs. However it failed to show an IOP-lowering effect in a recent clinical trial in cats. It should be used with great caution (if at all) in cases of glaucoma with significant uveitis since prostaglandins will exacerbate uveitis. I prefer to use it in acute congestive crises and then for maintenance in patients resistant to CAIs.

children younger than 2 years, using tacrolimus only for short periods rather than continuously, and using the minimum amount needed to control the patient’s symptoms.

GLAUCOMA DRUGS The large range of glaucoma medications can be daunting. All work by at least one of three mechanisms: 1. Decrease aqueous production 2. Promote aqueous outflow (usually with miosis) 3. Dehydrate the vitreous Although some drugs are better studied than others, many are not well understood in humans, let alone small animals. Some general rules seem to apply though • Topical drugs seem to be less potent but carry fewer side effects than systemic agents • Dogs seem to tolerate these drugs better than do cats • Expect primary glaucoma to go “into remission” with continued treatment with a single drug and later need additional or alternate drugs • Always aim for synergy in mechanism of action when adding a new drug • Drugs designed for human (typically open angle) glaucoma; do not work predictably on dogs or cats with (typically closed angle) glaucoma

ANTIVIRAL DRUGS Antiviral agents should be considered when signs are severe, persistent, or recurrent, or when there is corneal involvement, particularly ulceration. Antiviral agents are virostatic; therefore most require relatively frequent dosing or topical application. The effect of some antiviral drugs on FHV-1 replication in vitro has been studied and their relative potency reported as trifluridine >> idoxuridine ≈ ganciclovir >> cidofovir ≈ penciclovir >> acyclovir >> foscarnet. Therapy with antiviral drugs should be continued for at least one week beyond resolution of ocular lesions. Typically this is for 2-3 weeks.

For maintenance of IOP or reduction of relatively minor increases in IOP, I generally prefer the topical carbonic

Drug

Trade Name

Formulation

Dose

Idoxuridine

Compounded

0.1% Solution 0.5% Ointment

Apply at least 5 times daily

Vidarabine

Compounded

3% Ointment

Apply at least 5 times daily

Trifluridine

Viroptic® & generic

1% Solution

Apply at least 5 times daily

Drug

Trade Name

Formulation

Dose

Cidofovir

Compounded

Acyclovir

Zovirax

Tablets Capsules Oral suspension

Effective plasma concentrations not reached with predictably safe doses

Valacyclovir

Valtrex

Tablets

Fatal in cats; DO NOT USE

Famciclovir

Famvir

Tablets

Not yet confirmed for cats (40 mg/kg PO TID)

Apply twice daily

323


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 324

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

• Formulation: Ointment Drops • Indications: Anterior uveitis Posterior synechia less likely and in dilated position (Peripheral anterior synechia more likely) Reduces uveal surface area Tamponades radial iridal blood vessels Stabilizes vascular endothelium? • Contraindications: Glaucoma Dry eye • Comments: Long duration of effect Do not use for diagnostic pupil dilation Uveal melanocytes act as a reservoir Blue eyes quicker to dilate but stay dilated shorter Brown eyes slower to dilate but stay dilated longer • Dose: To effect - sufficient to produce desired (analgesic) effect Usually SID (rarely BID) x 1-2 days and then EOD Taper rapidly Monitor IOP and STT

TEAR SUBSTITUTES Artificial tears are used when the normal tear quality or quantity is altered or when loss of tears is increased due to evaporation, or, in some cases, primary corneal pathology. These agents are lacrimomimetic and therefore not as physiologic as lacrimogenic agents, such as cyclosporine. If possible, the production of endogenous tears is always preferred over the replacement of tears with “artificial” tears. Artificial tears vary broadly in the nature of their vehicle and especially its viscosity, with saline solutions being the least viscous and having the shortest contact time on the eye; methylcellulose and polyvinyl alcohol solutions being intermediate in viscosity and petrolatum products (ointments) being the most viscous. Aqueous solutions such as normal saline are not preferred for tear replacement in animals because they do not adhere to the lipophilic corneal epithelium and have extremely brief ocular retention times. Additionally they dilute what endogenous tears are present, and the preservatives most contain may cause inflammation or worsening of primary disease. Therefore aqueous solutions modified by the addition of agents to bind the solution to the epithelium and/or increase viscosity of the preparation are preferred in veterinary medicine. In the normal precorneal tear film this function is performed by mucopolysaccharide molecules within the mucin layer of the tear film and having both hydrophilic and lipophilic ends. Solutions modified in this way, termed mucinomimetic, have longer contact time and better “eye feel,” and offer more anti-desiccant advantages than traditional saline solutions. My favorite is hyaluronate (http://www.imedpharma.com/). I also recommend use of petrolatum ointments at bedtime or for very severe dry eye. In general, tear substitutes can be used for: • For treatment of exposure keratitis (e.g., facial nerve paralysis, buphthalmos, breedassociated lagophthalmos) • For treatment of keratoconjunctivitis sicca (“dry eye”) • Patients with abnormal volume or composition of the tear mucins or lipids (qualitative tear film disturbances) • During and after general anesthesia to prevent corneoconjunctival desiccation • As a lubricant, refractive/electroconductive, and cushioning solution during gonioscopy and electroretinography • As a diluent for compounding of some ophthalmic solutions • In patients with primary ocular surface disease, such as feline corneal sequestration and canine superficial punctate keratitis, and chronic conjunctivitis.

SERUM We are discovering more and more uses for topicallyapplied serum. In addition to its broadspectrum anti-collagenase properties (to slow melting ulcer), benefits are presumed to arise from numerous growth factors contained in serum. It is also described by humans with ocular surface disease as helping to relieve discomfort. Since these factors are not unique to the patient being treated and found across species, serum from other individuals may be used. However, the donor should meet all criteria required of a blood donor (except for the need for crossmatching of blood type). The following are a few suggestions for the collection and use of serum for ophthalmic disease. Harvesting, preparation, and storage: A venous blood sample is collected and allowed to clot in a redtop tube. After centrifugation, serum is separated and stored in a commercially available eye-drop container (http://www.medidose.com/ or 1-800-523-8966). Aseptic technique should be practiced throughout. Since serum is a potential growth medium for infectious organisms and because anticollagenase properties and growth factors likely degrade over time, serum for ophthalmic use should be collected fresh at least weekly and stored in a refrigerator while in use. If necessary, larger volumes can be collected, aliquotted into suitable portions, and frozen for up to 3 months. Indications: We commonly use serum in ulcerated eyes of all species. Its major use is in melting (malacic) ulcers where its anticollagenase properties antagonize proteases that digest collagen. There is some evidence that it may also promote healing of indolent (chronic superficial) ulcers of dogs and cats. Serum can be applied to the affected eye as often as needed (as frequently as q 30-60 minutes for a rapidly melting corneal ulcer).

ATROPINE • Class: Parasympatholytic • Ocular effects: Dilates pupil Paralyzes ciliary body (Analgesia) Collapses ciliary cleft (Increases IOP) Reduces tear production

324


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 325

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Cherry eye surgeries in dogs David Maggs DVM, BVSc, Dipl ACVO, USA

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS

STERILE PREPARATION

Although instruments used for general surgery can also be used for some eyelid procedures, instruments intended specifically for ophthalmic surgery will reduce surgeon frustration and length of procedure, and improve surgical outcome and client satisfaction. These benefits justify purchase of some dedicated ophthalmic instruments (Sontec Surgical Instruments 1-(800) 821-7496; http://www.sontecinstruments.com/). These instruments can be assembled into a devoted surgical pack for eyelid surgeries. Magnification is best provided by binocular head loupes, which vary widely in their optical quality, magnification (38X), and working distance. Some surgeons are initially uncomfortable with the fixed working distance dictated by loupes, particularly at higher magnification. Therefore loupes that offer lower magnification (3-5X) are more practical for most adnexal procedures.

There are two important considerations when preparing the ocular surface for a sterile surgical procedure. Firstly, the conjunctival fornix is an external surface with a normal flora. This is composed of primarily gram-positive bacteria, but may also comprise fungi and viruses. Secondly, ocular surface structures must be handled gently during preparation for surgery to avoid excessive swelling, bruising, corneal ulceration, or chemical burns. Choice of ocular disinfectants and method of surgical preparation are therefore very important. I do not clip periocular hair for third eyelid procedures. My preference for an antiseptic that can be used on the ocular surface is povidone iodine (Betadine®) solution diluted 1:50 in saline. This is easily formulated by adding 20mls of povidone iodine solution to 1 liter of sterile saline. It is essential that iodine solution be used since iodine scrub contains detergents and is irritating when applied topically. Povidone iodine has viricidal, bactericidal, and fungicidal activity at this concentration, but is minimally toxic to corneal and conjunctival epithelium, or inflammatory cells. More concentrated povidone iodine solution (10%) may be applied to the eyelid skin, but this solution should not be allowed to contact the cornea or conjunctiva. Some patients may develop blepharedema or wheals in reaction to this agent. Preoperative treatment with ophthalmic ointments should be avoided, since these will create a greasy operating surface and because the vehicle can lead to granulomatous inflammation if it contacts subcutaneous, subconjunctival, or intraocular tissues.

PATIENT AND SURGEON POSITIONING Maximizing surgeon comfort and manual control is best if the surgeon is seated with forearms or wrists comfortably stabilized on the patient or operating table. Table height and patient position should be arranged to further complement surgeon comfort. The patient is usually best positioned so that the surface to be operated upon is parallel with the table surface. In most cases, lateral recumbency with the nose raised provides adequate positioning for eyelid surgery. Ventral or dorsal recumbency provides the opportunity to view both eyes, which can be advantageous if a symmetrical surgical result is required. Vacuum beanbags (Vac-Pac, Olympic Medical 1800-426-0353; http://www.olymed.com/) are an excellent means for firmly retaining patient positioning throughout surgery. A rectangular bag is useful for restraint of the patient’s body and a “U”-shaped bag provides excellent head restraint. These bags can also be adjusted to form platforms for stabilizing the surgeon’s wrists or forearms. Some shapes available: http://www.natus.com/index.cfm? page=products_1&crid=131&contentid=218.

SURGERY OF THE THIRD EYELID The third eyelid (TE) or membrana nictitans plays a critical role in tear production, retention, and dispersion. The third eyelid gland is estimated to provide up to half of the total basal tear secretion for the eye. When the retractor bulbi muscle retracts the globe, the TE passively covers the eye and serves as a protective barrier. Movements of the TE also aid in the expulsion of particulate matter from the eye. It is therefore important that the gland and free margin of the TE

325


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 326

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

are preserved during surgery. Ideally, TE mobility should also be preserved by surgical procedures, however this is not always possible. A T-shaped hyaline cartilage serves as support for the gland, connective tissue stroma, and conjunctiva, which covers the anterior (palpebral) and posterior (bulbar) surfaces of the TE. The seromucous gland of the TE wraps around the base of the cartilage. The posterior aspect of the TE also contains extensive lymphoid tissue that is intimately associated with the gland. The TE is highly mobile but in close proximity to the globe and therefore should be effectively stabilized prior to surgery. One of the best techniques involves the placement of a Barraquer eyelid speculum and then gently grasping the leading edge of the third eyelid with small Hartman straight mosquito hemostatic forceps. These are best placed approximately at the ends of the horizontal bar of the cartilage. They can be then used to tense and exteriorize the TE for examination and surgical manipulations. Like conjunctiva at all other sites, TE conjunctiva is highly vascular and will rapidly become chemotic even with apparently gentle handling. To minimize this, minimal re-grasping with finetoothed instruments such as Bishop-Harmon tissue forceps as described for general eyelid surgery applies equally here. Any incisions must be made carefully and with great respect for the underlying globe. This may be best achieved with the use of a Jaeger lid plate to protect the globe or by elevating and everting the TE from the globe using the mosquito hemostats. Blunt-tipped tenotomy scissors are ideal for conjunctival incisions. Because conjunctiva heals rapidly and is exposed to minimal forces, smaller conjunctival wounds often do not need to be closed.

combination of glandular hypertrophy (due to a normal but exuberant immunological response to “new” antigens by a young dog) and a conformational laxity of the supporting structures are BOTH required for this condition to occur. Despite the introduction of simple methods to replace these glands, and clear information linking gland removal with the development of KCS, the resection of prolapsed glands is still practiced by some veterinarians. The only indication for gland removal is malignancy. There are two basic methods for gland replacement – the pocket techniques and the TE anchoring techniques. There are numerous variations on these two basic themes. On first principles, the pocket techniques are preferred because they retain TE mobility. In practice, the anchoring techniques may be necessary in some dogs, especially those where a pocket technique has failed.

THE MORGAN POCKET TECHNIQUE This technique is easily perfected, effective in the vast majority of cases, and proven to retain glandular function. It is my first choice of procedures. It is well described in numerous texts, but the essential features are presented here. The patient is placed under general anesthesia and in lateral recumbency. A Barraquer eyelid speculum and two Hartman straight mosquito forceps are used to provide maximal visualization and control of the TE, which is extended and then everted away from the cornea to expose the gland on the bulbar surface of the TE. Using a # 15 blade, the gland is almost surrounded by 2 curvilinear incisions – one on the orbital side of the gland, and one on the side near the leading edge of the TE. The two edges of conjunctiva furthest from the gland are then sutured together using 5-0 to 7-0 Vicryl® placed in a simple continuous pattern. As this suture is drawn tight the gland can be gently replaced with a moistened Q-tip. Small holes are left open at each end of the suture line to facilitate outflow of glandular secretions. A useful modification of this procedure has been described to minimize the

“CHERRY EYE” OR PROLAPSE OF THE TE GLAND Prolapse of the TE gland or “cherry eye” is a common condition of young dogs of predisposed breeds such as Cocker Spaniels, Bulldogs, and many others. Presumably a

326


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 327

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

chance that any suture abrades the cornea. This involves initiating and finishing the continuous suture with a small subconjunctival suture placed on the anterior face of the TE.

anterior face of the third eyelid. The nylon suture is then placed so that it begins and ends in this subconjunctival space. It runs along the ventral orbital rim (lateral to medial is generally easiest) and up, across, and back down the periphery of the gland as a buried suture, and then back to emerge where it began in the conjunctival fornix. The nylon suture is tied using a surgeon’s knot and with sufficient tension to reduce the prolapsed gland. As it is tightened, this acts as a “purse-string” to pull the gland into the ventral fornix. The conjunctiva is closed with 6-0 or 7-0 Vicryl in a simple continuous pattern.

THE KASWAN ANCHORING TECHNIQUE The Kaswan anchoring procedure uses a 2-0 or 3-0 nylon suture to anchor the gland to fascia extending off the ventral orbital rim. Access to the orbital rim is achieved with a small incision in the ventral conjunctival fornix at the base of the

I acknowledge Elsevier for provision of surgical figures used in today’s lecture. They can be found in “Slatter’s Fundamentals of Veterinary Ophthalmology 4th Edition” Ed Maggs, Miller and Ofri.

327


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 328

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Feline keratoconjunctivitis – clinical signs & the latest on diagnosis and therapy (Feline Herpesvirus, Chlamydia Felis, and Mycoplasma Spp.) David Maggs DVM, BVSc, Dipl ACVO, USA

at peripheral epithelial sites, recrudescent disease occurs in a minority of these. Further, disease severity and tissue involvement can range very widely between individuals and even between episodes in the same cat. Recrudescent conjunctivitis is usually milder than in acute infections, but can become chronic and “smoldering”. Although recrudescent conjunctivitis is usually nonulcerative, substantial conjunctival thickening and hyperemia can occur secondary to inflammatory cell infiltration. Corneal involvement is relatively frequent in recrudescent disease compared to primary infection and may involve the corneal epithelium or stroma. With epithelial involvement, dendritic and later geographic corneal ulceration may be seen just as in primary infections. Corneal stromal disease is typically immunopathological (i.e., immune-mediated, but not necessarily autoimmune) in origin and includes stromal neovascularization, edema, stromal cell infiltration, and ultimately fibrosis usually under an intact epithelium. Consensus has not been reached regarding the antigens responsible for the subepithelial immunological response within cornea and/or conjunctiva. Some believe the process is driven by viral antigens, while others are suspicious that altered self antigens are the focus of the immunological response.

INTRODUCTION Feline herpesvirus is a ubiquitous virus that varies very little worldwide; i.e. strains do not vary greatly in their clinical virulence. And yet, we see a huge range of clinical signs in cats infected with this virus. There are probably a large number of reasons for this; however principle among these is likely the host’s response to this virus. FHV-1-naïve kittens infected in the first few weeks of life against a backdrop waning maternal immunity almost inevitably get severe upper respiratory and ocular disease with high morbidity but rare mortality. By contrast, adult cats can undergo viral reactivation with viral shedding and can infect in-contact cats; all without demonstrating clinical signs themselves. These two scenarios represent just the two extremes of infection; within your clinic you see cats with a huge diversity of clinical signs in between. For this reason, I like to consider clinical signs associated with FHV-1 under one of three broad categories: primary infection, recrudescent infections, and FHV-1-associated syndromes.

PRIMARY HERPETIC DISEASE Primary ocular FHV-1 infection is characterized by blepharospasm, conjunctival hyperemia, serous ocular discharge that becomes purulent by day 5-7 of infection, mild to moderate conjunctival swelling, and often conjunctival ulcers. Corneal involvement is not reliable; however some cats develop corneal ulcers which are transiently dendritic at the very earliest phase only. These dendrites quickly coalesce to become geographic ulcers. The ocular signs are seen in association with typical signs of upper respiratory infection. The uncomplicated clinical course is typically 10-14 days; however it is critical to realize that almost all cats become latently infected within ganglia for life. Reactivation from latency is likely in at least 50% of cats, sometimes with viral shedding.

FHV-1-ASSOCIATED DISEASE SYNDROMES The following diseases have been associated with detection of FHV-1 in affected tissues; however the causative role of the virus in each syndrome has been variably proven. Symblepharon. There is little question that symblepharon can be a sequela to severe primary FHV-1 infection. It is commonly seen in young animals, and presumably occurs as a result of widespread ulceration with exposure of the conjunctival substantia propria and sometimes also the corneal stroma. FHV-1 is almost certainly the predominant cause of symblepharon formation in cats and other infectious agents are unlikely to cause symblepharon formation.

RECRUDESCENT FHV-1 SYNDROMES Corneal sequestration. Experimentally, FHV-1 inoculation (in cats receiving corticosteroids) can result in corneal sequestration. However, the prevalence of detectable FHV-1

Despite the frequency with which latently infected cats undergo viral reactivation at the ganglia and viral shedding

328


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 329

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

in samples collected from cats with sequestra has varied widely in the clinical setting and the link between FHV-1 and sequestra has not been shown to be causative. It seems likely that sequestration is a non-specific response to stromal exposure or damage and that FHV-1 is just one possible cause of this disease. This is borne out in a study by Nasisse et al who reported identification of FHV-1 DNA in 86 of 156 (55%) of sequestra analyzed (compared with only 6% of clinically normal corneas). A lower prevalence of FHV-1 DNA was found in corneas of Persian and Himalayan cats with sequestration, suggesting that other non-viral causes of sequestration are more likely to be operative in these breeds. We will mention this further in the corneal conundrums lecture.

causes dermal lesions. We have recently examined the diagnostic utility of FHV-1 PCR for this disease. FHV-1 DNA was detected in all 9 biopsy specimens from 5 cats with herpetic dermatitis but in 1 of 17 biopsy specimens from the 14 cats with nonherpetic dermatitis, and was not detected in any of the 21 biopsy specimens from the 8 cats without dermatitis. This is in sharp contrast to the use of this technique in ocular tissues where the extent of viral shedding in normal animals dramatically reduces the sensitivity of a positive test in affected animals. When results of histologic examination were used as the gold standard in this study of cats with dermatitis, sensitivity and specificity of the PCR assay were 100% and 95%, respectively. We concluded that FHV-1 DNA can be detected in the skin of cats with herpetic dermatitis, that the virus may play a causative role in the disease, and that this PCR assay may be useful in confirming a diagnosis of herpetic dermatitis.

Eosinophilic keratitis. Prior clinical studies have suggested a link between FHV-1 infection and eosinophilic keratitis. PCR testing of corneal scrapings from cats with cytology-confirmed eosinophilic keratitis has revealed 76% (45/59) of cases to be FHV-1 positive. However, PCR performed on tears collected onto a STT was negative in 10 cats with cytologically proven eosinophilic keratitis. As with corneal sequestra, the role of the virus in the initiation or exacerbation of this disease has not been determined; however anecdotally some patients with this syndrome improve with antiviral therapy alone. We will mention this further in the corneal conundrums lecture.

DIAGNOSING CATS WITH KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS One of my least favorite questions is “What is the best laboratory test for cats with corneal or conjunctival disease?”. In reality there is not one. Explaining this position requires an understanding of an essential fact about feline herpesvirus (FHV-1) - clinically normal cats (and lots of them) can shed FHV-1 at their ocular surface. Because PCR is more sensitive than IFA or VI, this assay exacerbates this problem. In fact, in some humane shelter-based populations, about half of all normal cats are shedding FHV-1 DNA as determined by PCR. Therefore, in some circumstances, the number of false positive test results we can expect is extraordinarily high and we may be better to flip a coin than to run that PCR assay! Given the predictably high rate of false positive (particularly with serology and PCR) and negative test results (particularly with VI and IFA), I now no longer conduct laboratory tests for FHV-1 or Chlamydia felis (previously Chlamydia psittaci and, before that, Chlamydophila felis) in individual cats with keratoconjunctivitis. Rather, I resort to good old fashioned clinical acumen. My diagnostic “tests” now are (i) the history and clinical exam findings followed by (ii) response to therapy. This requires acceptance of a couple of critical facts: first I have to be willing to be wrong when making an educated guess regarding the etiological diagnosis and, second, I have to use the absolute best therapeutic trial and demand excellent owner compliance in executing that trial.

Uveitis. HSV-1 is a well-documented cause of uveitis in humans. Given the shared biological behavior of the alphaherpesviruses, we examined the role of FHV-1 in feline uveitis. The PCR assay was used to demonstrate FHV-1 DNA in the aqueous humor of 12/86 cats; all but one of which had uveitis. The same study also used ELISA to examine FHV-1-specific antibody concentrations in aqueous humor and serum. While seropositivity did not vary among cats, intraocular antibody production, as determined by a Goldman-Witmer coefficient (C-value) > 1, was detected only in cats with uveitis. Additionally, a Cvalue > 8, which is frequently quoted as a more clinically useful indicator of intraocular antibody production, was found only in cats with idiopathic uveitis. This information suggests that FHV-1 can infect the intraocular compartment and that, at least in some cats, it stimulates a specific and local antibody response. Because the trigeminal nerve supplies the uveal tract, it is possible that virus may reactivate spontaneously or via induction and arrive in the uvea (and aqueous humor) by the “round trip theory”, as for surface ocular disease. Viral pathogenic mechanisms similar to those reported in surface disease are therefore plausible explanations for the uveal pathology seen. That is, virally mediated cytolysis and immunopathological responses directed at auto or viral antigens are both possible. However, proving a casual association remains difficult.

DIAGNOSING KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS USING CLINICAL SIGNS AS YOUR GUIDE Using clinical signs of surface ocular disease as a “diagnostic assay” requires a philosophical approach that I liken to adding pebbles to one of two sides of an old-fashioned scale or balance. I start with the paradigm that feline keratoconjunctivitis is infectious till proven otherwise and that by far and away the most commonly implicated infectious organisms are FHV-1 and Chlamydia felis. I then consider

Dermatitis. Periodically, FHV-1 has been identified as a cause of dermatological lesions, particularly those surrounding the eyes and involving nasal skin of domestic and wild felidae. This is not surprising when one considers the marked epithelial tropism of this virus and the reliability with which HSV-1

329


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 330

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

• Many antiviral agents require host metabolism before achieving their active form. These agents are not reliably or predictably metabolized by cats and pharmacokinetic studies in cats are required. • Antiviral agents tend to be more toxic than do antibacterial agents since viruses are obligate intracellular organisms and co-opt or have close analogues of the host’s cellular “machinery”. This limits many antiviral agents to topical (ophthalmic) rather than systemic use. • All antiviral agents currently used for cats infected with FHV-1 are virostatic. Therefore, they typically require frequent administration to be effective. The following antiviral agents have been studied to varying degrees for their efficacy against FHV-1, their pharmacokinetics in cats, and/or their safety and efficacy in treating cats infected with FHV-1.

the clinical signs outlined in the table. Using each feature as a discerning feature I aim to place one of my “diagnostic pebbles” on the herpetic or chlamydial sides of the balance, thereby making a clinical judgment at the end of the examination as to which of these 2 organisms is more likely to be the cause of the disease seen.

Table. Clinical observations as a means to differentiate chlamydial and herpetic ocular surface disease Clinical Signs

FHV-1

C. felis

Conjunctival hyperemia

+++

++

Chemosis

+

+++

Conjunctival ulceration

+/-

-

Keratitis

+/-

-

Dendrites

Pathognomonic

-

Respiratory signs/malaise

++

+/-

Trifluridine (TFU or trifluorothymidine) is too toxic to be administered systemically but topically administered trifluridine is considered one of the most effective drugs for treating HSV-1 keratitis. This is in part due to its superior corneal epithelial penetration. It is also one of the more potent antiviral drugs for FHV-1. It is commercially available in the USA as a 1% ophthalmic solution that should be applied to the affected eye 5-6 times daily. Unfortunately, it is expensive and is often not well tolerated by cats, presumably due to a stinging reaction reported in humans.

Note that both agents cause some of the signs and that it is a weighted assessment. This introduces a notable element of subjectivity into the assessment. I unashamedly tell clients this and explain that I still believe that this is better than wasting their money on a laboratory test. I also use this time to introduce the concept that the clients themselves will form the critical next step in the diagnostic process – “response to therapy”. We will discuss this more fully in the next session.

Idoxuridine (IDU) is a nonspecific inhibitor of DNA synthesis, affecting any process requiring thymidine. Therefore, host cells are similarly affected, systemic therapy is not possible, and corneal toxicity can occur. It has been used as an ophthalmic 0.1% solution or 0.5% ointment. This drug is reasonably well tolerated by most cats and seems efficacious in many. It is no longer commercially available in the USA but can be obtained from a compounding pharmacist. It should be applied to the affected eye 5-6 times daily.

ANTIVIRAL THERAPY If we are to use response to therapy as a “diagnostic test”, then we must choose the optimum therapeutic approach possible for each cat. This requires knowledge regarding: 1. General features of the antiviral drug class 2. Specific in vitro susceptibility of FHV-1 to each drug 3. How well tolerated and how safe each drug is in cats 4. Which tissues are reached following topical or systemic therapy 5. The owner preferences

Vidarabine (VDB) interferes with DNA polymerase and, like idoxuridine, is non-selective in its effect and so is associated with notable host toxicity if administered systemically. Because it affects a viral replication step different from that targeted by idoxuridine, vidarabine may be effective in patients whose disease seems resistant to idoxuridine. As a 3% ophthalmic ointment, vidarabine often appears to be better tolerated than many of the antiviral solutions. Where it is not available commercially, it can be obtained from a compounding pharmacist. Like idoxuridine, it should be applied to the affected eye 5-6 times daily.

Some general comments. Although a large variety of antiviral agents exists for oral or topical treatment of cats infected with feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1), some general comments regarding these agents are possible: • No antiviral agent has been developed for FHV-1; although many have been tested for efficacy against this virus. Agents highly effective against closely-related human herpesviruses are not necessarily or predictably effective against FHV-1 and all should be tested in vitro before they are administered to cats. • No antiviral agent has been developed for cats; although some have been tested for safety in this species. Agents with a reasonable safety profile in humans are not always or predictably nontoxic when administered to cats and all require safety and efficacy testing in vivo.

Acyclovir (ACV) has relatively low antiviral potency against FHV-1, poor bioavailability, and is potentially toxic when systemically administered to cats. Oral administration of 50 mg/kg acyclovir to cats was associated with peak plasma levels of only approximately one third required for this virus. Common signs of toxicity are referable to bone marrow suppression. However, acyclovir is also available as a 3% ophthalmic ointment in some coun-

330


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 331

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

tries. In one study in which a 0.5% ointment was used 5 times daily, the median time to resolution of clinical signs was 10 days. Cats treated only 3 times daily took approximately twice as long to resolve and did so only once therapy was increased to 5 times daily. Taken together, these data suggest that very frequent topical application of acyclovir may produce concentrations at the corneal surface that do exceed the reported concentration required for this virus but are not associated with toxicity. There are also in vitro data suggesting that interferon exerts a synergistic effect with acyclovir that could permit an approximately 8fold reduction in acyclovir dose. In vivo investigation and validation of these data are needed.

petic disease. Further studies of this drugs pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy are required before dose rates and frequency can be recommended; however we have recently demonstrated that cats receiving 40 or 90 mg famciclovir/kg TID achieve similar plasma penciclovir concentrations. Therefore, it seems likely that 40 mg/kg PO TID might be expected to be as effective as 90 mg/kg PO TID. By comparison the plasma penciclovir concentration following oral administration of 15 mg/kg was only approximately onethird that achieved with 40 or 90 mg/kg. There is also a report of this drug being administered to a small number of clientowned cats with good results. In no study to date have any signs of toxicity been noted. Finally, we have shown that 40mg/kg PO TID produced tear penciclovir concentrations likely to be effective against FHV-1 for approximately 4 hours after oral administration.

Valacyclovir (VCV) is a prodrug of acyclovir that, in humans and cats, is more efficiently absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract compared with acyclovir and is converted to acyclovir by a hepatic hydrolase. Its safety and efficacy have been studied in cats. Plasma concentrations of acyclovir that surpass the IC50 for FHV-1 can be achieved after oral administration of this drug. However, in cats experimentally infected with FHV-1, valacyclovir induced fatal hepatic and renal necrosis, along with bone marrow suppression, and did not reduce viral shedding or clinical disease severity. Therefore, despite its superior pharmacokinetics, valacyclovir should never be used in cats.

Cidofovir (CDV) is commercially available only in injectable form in the USA but has been studied as a 0.5% solution applied topically twice daily to cats experimentally infected with FHV-1. Its use in these cats was associated with reduced viral shedding and clinical disease. Its efficacy at only twice daily (despite being virostatic) is believed to be due to the long tissue half-lives of the metabolites of this drug. There are occasional reports of its experimental topical use in humans being associated with stenosis of the nasolacrimal drainage system components and, as yet, it is not commercially available as an ophthalmic agent in humans. Therefore, at this stage there are insufficient data to support its long term safety as a topical agent in cats.

Ganciclovir (GCV) appears to be at least 10-fold more effective against FHV-1 compared with acyclovir. It is available for systemic (IV or PO) and intravitreal administration in humans, where it is associated with greater toxicity than acyclovir. Toxicity is typically evident as bone marrow suppression. It has just been released as a new topical antiviral gel in humans. There are no reports of its safety or efficacy in cats as a systemic or topical agent.

LYSINE The literature regarding lysine has become very interesting recently with some data that at first glance appear contrary to earlier study outcomes which suggested efficacy. This requires a more detailed assessment.

Penciclovir (PCV) is available as a dermatologic cream for humans that should not be applied to the eye. We have some preliminary data in which we administered PCV intravenously to cats, but this was done largely to assist with our ongoing investigations of the penciclovir prodrug – famciclovir (unpublished data). In vivo studies of penciclovir’s safety or efficacy in cats are lacking and at this time, its use in cats cannot be recommended.

In Vitro efficacy against FHV-1. Lysine limits the in vitro replication of many viruses, including FHV-1. The antiviral mechanism is unknown; however, many investigators have demonstrated that concurrent depletion of arginine is essential for lysine supplementation to be effective. This finding suggests that lysine exerts its antiviral effect by antagonism of arginine. This is certainly true for FHV-1 where arginine is an essential amino acid for viral replication but, in the presence of small amounts of arginine, lysine supplementation reduces viral replication by about 50%. However, this effect was not seen in media containing higher arginine concentrations, suggesting that a high lysine: arginine ratio was critical for efficacy.

Famciclovir (FCV) is a prodrug of penciclovir; however metabolism of famciclovir to penciclovir is complex and requires di-deacetylation followed by oxidation to penciclovir by a hepatic aldehyde oxidase. Unfortunately, hepatic aldehyde oxidase activity is nearly absent in cats. This necessitates cautious extrapolation to cats of data generated in humans. Our data to date in normal and experimentally infected cats suggest that the pharmacokinetics of this drug are extremely complex and likely result from nonlinear famciclovir absorption, metabolism, or a combination of the two. Despite this, there is mounting evidence that suggests famciclovir is very effective in some cats with experimentally induced (90 mg/kg TID) or suspected spontaneous her-

In Vivo Research in Cats. Results of 2 early independent in vivo studies have supported the clinical use of l-lysine in cats. In the first of these studies, 8 FHV-1–naive cats were administered 500 mg of lysine per os q 12 hours beginning 6 hours before, and continuing for 3 weeks after, experimental inoculation with FHV-1. Lysine-treated cats had sig-

331


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 332

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

nificantly less severe conjunctivitis than cats that received placebo. In the second study, 14 latently infected cats received 400 mg of lysine per os q 24 hours. Viral shedding was monitored for 30 days. Lysine administration in these cats was associated with a statistically significant reduction in basal viral shedding compared with cats that received placebo. Since these cats were normal, latently infected carrier cats, little or no clinical disease was seen during the month-long study in the placebo or lysine group. In both studies, plasma arginine concentrations remained in the normal range, and no signs of toxicity were observed, despite notably elevated plasma lysine concentrations in treated cats. Importantly, both studies reported results of lysine administration to experimentally infected cats; therefore, the applicability of these data in naturally infected cats needed to be investigated. A subsequent study examined the effects of lysine in 144 cats in a shelter. Cats received oral boluses of 250 mg (kittens) or 500 mg (adult cats) of lysine once daily for the duration of their stay at the shelter and outcomes were compared with those of an untreated control group. No significant treatment effect was detected on the incidence of infectious upper respiratory disease (IURD), the need for antimicrobial treatment for IURD, or the interval from admission to onset of IURD. However it was not determined if and to what extent these cats were shedding or infected with FHV-1 or other pathogens. This study raised the concern that bolus administration of lysine to individual cats within multicat environments such as shelters, where FHV-1 is prevalent, may not only be ineffective but it is also plausible that twice daily handling of these cats may actually stimulate further viral reactivation through stress and cause transfer of pathogens between cats by shelter workers administering the lysine. Thus we became interested in studying the safety and efficacy of l-lysine incorporated into cat food. Results of an initial safety trial were encouraging. Cats fed a diet supplemented with up to 8.6% (dry matter) l-lysine showed no signs of toxicity, had normal plasma arginine concentrations, and had normal food intake. Mean plasma lysine concentration of these cats was increased to levels similar to that achieved with bolus administration. In a subsequent study, 50 cats with enzootic upper respiratory tract disease were fed a diet supplemented to approximately 1% (n = 25) or 5% (n = 25) lysine for 52 days while subjected to rehousing stress which is known to cause viral reactivation. Perhaps not unexpectedly, food (and therefore lysine) intake decreased coincident with peak disease and viral presence. As a result, cats did not receive lysine at the very time they needed it most. Analysis of the data revealed that disease in cats fed the supplemented ration was more severe than that in cats fed the basal diet. In addition, viral shedding was more frequent in cats receiving the supplemented diet. To further elucidate the efficacy of dietary lysine supplementation, we performed a similarly designed experiment in a local human shelter with a more consistent “background” level of stress and with greater numbers enrolled compared to the initial rehousing study. We enrolled 261 cats; each for 4 weeks.

Despite plasma lysine concentration in treated cats being greater than that in control cats, more treated cats than control cats developed moderate to severe disease during week 4. Meanwhile, during week 2, FHV-1 DNA was detected more commonly in swab specimens from treated than control cats. Taken together, these data suggest that approximately 5% dietary lysine supplementation is not a successful means of controlling infectious upper respiratory disease within large multicat populations in which IURD is enzootic. In fact, it can lead to an increase in disease severity and the presence of FHV-1 DNA on oropharyngeal or conjunctival mucosa at certain points. Indications and Course of Treatment. Lysine is now commercially available in veterinary formulations and is recommended by many veterinarians for cats infected with FHV-1. There are no published data on dose, frequency of administration, course of therapy, or timing of lysine administration relative to herpetic disease episodes in client-owned patients; thus, information on these issues is anecdotal or derived from the studies described above. I administer 500 mg lysine per os q 12 hours. I administer it therapeutically at the time of recrudescent disease and encourage owners of cats that have frequent recurrences to administer this same dose over the long term as a prophylactic measure. More recently I have strongly recommended that client-owned animals receive lysine as a twice daily bolus; not sprinkled on food. Unlike the protocol for HSV-1–infected humans, owners of cats receiving l-lysine for FHV-1 should not be advised to restrict their cat’s arginine intake.

THE INTERFERONS Interferons are a group of cytokines that have diverse immunological and antiviral functions. Interferons are divided into 4 groups; α, β, γ, and ω interferons, and numerous subtypes. Viral infection stimulates cells to secrete interferon (IFN) into the extracellular space where it binds to specific receptors on neighboring cells and, through mechanisms not fully understood, prevents or limits the spread of infection (i.e., it is not virucidal). Although interferons may play important physiological roles in the control of viral infections, in vitro and clinical trials investigating potential therapeutic applications have produced conflicting results. In in vitro studies, 1 x 105 - 5 x 105 IU/ml of recombinant human IFNα or recombinant feline IFNω significantly reduced FHV-1 titer and/or cytopathic effect while not producing any detectable cytotoxic changes in the feline corneal cell line or CRFK cells on which the virus was grown. At higher concentrations, the effect the recombinant feline IFNω was greater than that of IFNα. In a separate in vitro study, notable synergistic activity against FHV-1 was demonstrated when 10 - 62.5 μg/mL acyclovir was combined with 10 or 100 IU/mL of human recombinant IFNα. The combined use of the 2 compounds did not cause increased cytotoxicity but permitted a nearly eightfold reduction in the dose of acyclovir required to achieve maximal inhibition of FHV-1. Significant synergistic interactions

332


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 333

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

cal corticosteroids are therefore contraindicated in primary ocular FHV-1 infection. The potential complications from using corticosteroids have prompted interest in the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for managing the inflammatory effects of ocular FHV-1 infection. Although there are no studies of their effects in cats infected with FHV-1, they are known to have similar negative effects to corticosteroids in humans and experimental studies investigating HSV-1.

resulted when the IFNα was given before or after infection at the lower doses of acyclovir; however IFNα pretreatment was more effective. I know of very few peer-reviewed, placebo-controlled, prospective clinical trials of IFN administration in SPF cats experimentally infected with FHV-1. One study utilized 10,000 IU recombinant feline IFNω administered topically (OU) q 12 hours and 2,000 IU administered PO q 24 hours. Based on data generated in studies utilizing other viruses and knowledge of the mode of action of IFNs, IFN administration in this feline study was initiated 2 days prior to viral inoculation but was not continued after inoculation. No beneficial effects were shown. The effects of very high-dose systemic administration of IFNα prior to experimental FHV1 infection have also been studied; 108 IU/kg were administered subcutaneously BID on two consecutive days prior to inoculation. Although disease was not prevented, cumulative clinical scores were lower for cats treated with IFNα. An abstract has also been presented detailing preliminary low-dose oral data. Cats received 1, 5 or 25 IU/cat IFNα PO q 24 hrs 24 and 48 hours after inoculation. Scores for disease severity were significantly lower in cats receiving 5 or 25 units than in control cats. Given the lack of peer-reviewed, masked, placebocontrolled studies and the variability in methodology and outcome in the few studies to date, further research is necessary to determine dosage, timing, and efficacy of this group of compounds, especially in the more chronic or recrudescent syndromes seen most commonly by ophthalmologists.

Cyclosporine is capable of suppressing inflammatory events operative in viral stromal keratitis, but also impairs viral clearance from the eye and suppresses some beneficial immune responses. In vitro, cyclosporine exerts a dose dependent effect on HSV-1 replication. In some experimental model systems, however, cyclosporine therapy resulted in more severe and persistent keratitis. In a recent clinical trial, cyclosporine and trifluridine were used in combination to treat HSK in humans with good results. Use of cyclosporine in chronic feline herpetic disease has been inadequately studied and I am unaware of any studies examining the effects of tacrolimus on ocular herpetic infections in any species. This suggests that use of these agents should, as a minimum, be restricted by the same principles that govern the use of corticosteroids in HSK.

ANTICHLAMYDIAL THERAPY Chlamydia felis is also common cause of feline conjunctivitis; sometimes with mild rhinitis but without keratitis. Cats harbor and shed C. felis from non-ocular sites and systemic doxycycline is more effective at decreasing clinical signs and shedding of C. felis than topical therapy with a tetracycline-containing ophthalmic ointment alone. Azithromycin has good efficacy against chlamydial and mycoplasmal organisms and studies in humans show that antichlamydial concentrations are maintained in conjunctiva for 14 days and in tears for 4 days following a single oral administration. A feline pharmacokinetic study using a single oral dose of 5mg/kg showed reasonably rapid absorption, adequate bioavailability, and “ocular” concentrations that were detectable for at least 3 days. Based on these data and clinical reports from other ophthalmologists, I began using azithromycin at 5 mg/kg PO twice weekly for 3 weeks. I also treated all in-contact cats since “silent” harboring of C. felis is possible. This regimen is usually associated with adequate resolution of the chronic “smoldering” conjunctivitis for which C. felis is blamed; however it seemed that this effect was somewhat unpredictable in its duration following cessation of therapy. Repeat courses were often necessary. A recent experimental drug trial revealed that clinical disease was controlled approximately equally by doxycycline and azithromycin for about 20 days. However, while doxycycline-treated cats rapidly ceased to shed (day 7) and remained negative throughout the study, azithromycin-treated cats ceased shedding by day 6 but then shed Chlamydophila sporadically throughout the study. This suggests azithromycin decreases shedding but does not clear the

CONTRAINDICATED THERAPY Anti-inflammatory therapy has relative or, in some circumstances, absolute contraindications in cats with herpetic disease, especially those undergoing primary infection and use of such agents remains controversial in the management of FHV-1 infections. However, a return to basic virology and a review of the literature makes some general comments possible. FHV-1 produces disease by at least 2 very different mechanisms that require markedly different (in fact, almost opposite) therapeutic approaches. Cytolytic infection represents active viral replication and is often ulcerative. Immunomodulation at this point is almost certainly contraindicated. By contrast, immunopathological (or immune-mediated) injury is mediated by host inflammatory responses and driven” by persistent viral antigen and/or autoimmunity. Systemic administration of corticosteroids is a wellestablished and reliable means of inducing viral reactivation from latency. This must be considered whenever these drugs are considered in the clinical management of FHV-1-infected cats. The ability of locally-administered corticosteroids to exacerbate self-limiting primary conjunctival infection and to sometimes induce chronic herpetic keratitis has also been well established. Complications seen in corticosteroid treated eyes included deeper and more persistent corneal ulcers, corneal edema, corneal vascularization, sequestrum or band keratopathy formation, and protracted viral shedding. Topi-

333


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 334

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

organism or that dosing more frequently than twice weekly is necessary. Therefore, I sometimes use an informed “diagnostic (and therapeutic) trial” of azithromycin because it is usually safe and relatively easy for clients to administer, particularly in multi-cat households. If this is successful but signs return in all or some cats, I usually recommend a 3 week course of doxycycline (10 mg/kg PO SID) for all cats.

The usual precautions regarding esophageal stricture apply. I also use a topical tetracycline or erythromycin if conjunctivitis is severe so as to guarantee high drug concentrations at this site and to provide some surface ocular lubrication. Note that triple antibiotic is not effective against C. felis and that topically or systemically-administered corticosteroids are contraindicated as for FHV-1.

334


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 335

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Fattori prognostici: mettiamo un po’ d’ordine Laura Marconato Med Vet, Dipl ECVIM-CA Oncology, Bologna (I)

Il mastocitoma cutaneo è un tumore molto frequente nel cane (7-25% di tutti i tumori cutanei in questa specie), che origina dai mastociti ed il cui comportamento biologico è molto variabile, spaziando dal nodulo solitario benigno alla malattia metastatica. La prognosi è pertanto molto variabile e sono numerosi i fattori che devono essere presi in considerazione per inquadrare il comportamento biologico del tumore e, quindi, istituire la terapia più appropriata. Nel corso degli anni sono stati identificati diversi fattori prognostici, che devono possibilmente essere valutati nell’insieme per predire nel modo più accurato possibile il comportamento biologico del mastocitoma.

tre i mastocitomi con metastasi linfonodali devono essere considerati biologicamente aggressivi ed associati a prognosi sfavorevole, indipendentemente dal grado del tumore primitivo. Spesso i mastocitomi multipli (stadio III) hanno prognosi migliore rispetto a mastocitomi con metastasi linfonodali (stadio II). I mastocitomi in stadio IV (coinvolgimento viscerale e/o midollare) hanno prognosi infausta.

GRADO ISTOLOGICO11-15 Il grado istologico (secondo Patnaik) è nel cane forse il più importante indicatore prognostico sia di sopravvivenza sia di intervallo libero. I mastocitomi canini ben differenziati hanno tasso di sopravvivenza a 3 anni dopo chirurgia di 90% circa, quelli mediamente differenziati di 55%, mentre quelli indifferenziati di 10% circa. In uno studio si valutava la sopravvivenza a 1500 giorni di 83 cani con mastocitomi trattati solo con chirurgia: 93% di cani con mastocitomi di grado I era vivo, mentre solo 44% di cani con mastocitomi di grado II e 6% di quelli con mastocitomi di grado III sopravviveva. Secondo uno studio retrospettivo, il tasso di sopravvivenza ad un anno dopo chirurgia era di 100% per mastocitomi di I grado, 92% per mastocitomi di II grado e 46% per quelli di III grado. La sopravvivenza mediana era di 278 giorni per mastocitomi indifferenziati e > 1300 giorni per quelli mediamente o ben differenziati. Secondo un altro lavoro scientifico, la sopravvivenza mediana per mastocitomi di III grado era di 18 settimane contro 28 e 51 settimane per quelli di II e di I grado, rispettivamente. Purtroppo non sempre la definizione istologica di grado collima con il comportamento biologico della neoplasia, soprattutto per quanto riguarda i mastocitomi di grado intermedio, che sono poi i più frequenti. Per questo motivo recentemente è stato proposto un nuovo sistema di grading, volto a eliminare incertezze e ambiguità che riguardano i mastocitomi di grado II. Kiupel e collaboratori hanno classificato i mastocitomi in basso grado e alto grado, valutando essenzialmente le caratteristiche morfologiche delle cellule neoplastiche, ignorando la profondità di invasione neoplastica. Applicando tale sistema, i patologi erano in grado di identificare i mastocitomi a comportamento biologico

RAZZA1,2 Boxer, bulldog e carlini sono particolarmente predisposti allo sviluppo di mastocitomi, ma in queste razze la maggior parte di questi tumori è ben differenziata e pertanto tendenzialmente meno aggressiva. Al contrario, i cani di razza shar-pei tendono a sviluppare MCT biologicamente molto aggressivi e in età più giovanile. Altre razze in cui MCT tende ad avere comportamento biologico aggressivo sono labrador e golden retriever.

SEDE ANATOMICA3-6 In base alla sede in cui si sviluppa il mastocitoma è possibile ipotizzare il comportamento biologico. Le localizzazioni orale, su muso, inguinale (incluso scroto e prepuzio), digitale, viscerale hanno prognosi sfavorevole, poiché mostrano elevato tasso metastatico e breve sopravvivenza. I mastocitomi che invece si sviluppano sulle estremità hanno invece prognosi migliore. In generale, i mastocitomi sottocutanei hanno prognosi migliore, dal momento che mostrano minor percentuale di recidiva, minor tasso metastatico, e migliore risposta antitumorale.

STADIO CLINICO7-10 I mastocitomi a sede dermica senza coinvolgimento linfonodale (stadio 0 e 1) si associano a prognosi migliore, men-

335


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 336

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

aggressivo, con maggiore consistenza e minore ambiguità rispetto al sistema di Patnaik.

BIBLIOGRAFIA 1. 2.

INDICI DI PROLIFERAZIONE CELLULARE16,17

3.

PCNA e Ki-67 consentono di determinare la proporzione di cellule attivamente proliferanti, ma non danno indicazioni in merito a quanto velocemente le cellule progrediscono attraverso le varie fasi del ciclo cellulare. Al contrario, il numero medio di AgNOR per nucleo è inversamente correlato al tempo di rigenerazione, ma non indica in quale fase del ciclo si trova una particolare cellula e non distingue tra cellule ciclanti e non ciclanti. Per questo motivo è sempre consigliabile utilizzare PCNA, AgNOR e Ki67 in pannello. Solo Ki-67 sembra essere un indicatore prognostico indipendente dal grado istologico.

4.

5.

6.

7.

INDICE MITOTICO18,19

8.

In analisi multivariata, le mitosi rappresentano la componente più rilevante del grading da un punto di vista prognostico. In particolare, considerando i mastocitomi di II grado, un indice mitotico > 5 mitosi per 10 campi a forte ingrandimento permette di differenziare mastocitomi a comportamento più aggressivo.

9.

10.

11.

KIT17,20,21

12.

C-kit è un proto-oncogene che codifica per la proteina KIT (o CD117), un recettore tirosin-chinasico che, attraverso fenomeni di fosforilazione, produce segnali di fondamentale importanza per la cellula. Il ligando per KIT è il cosiddetto fattore di crescita per mastociti (SCF): in condizioni normali il segnale dato da ckit è essenziale per differenziazione, maturazione, proliferazione, sopravvivenza (soppressione di apoptosi) e funzionalità di mastociti. Una mutazione con acquisizione di funzione a carico di c-kit porta dunque ad alterazione di KIT, il quale è sottoposto ad autofosforilazione costitutiva in assenza di ligando, determinando in ultimo incontrollata proliferazione di mastociti. La positività immunoistochimica a KIT consente di identificare mastocitomi biologicamente aggressivi con tendenza a recidivare. La positività citoplasmatica intensa (prevalentemente paranucleare) si associa ad elevato tasso di recidiva, breve sopravvivenza e maggiore incidenza di complicanze. I mastociti neoplastici che mostrano invece espressione di KIT a livello di membrana cellulare esibiscono in genere comportamento biologico più benigno. La presenza di duplicazione interna a tandem in corrispondenza di esone 11 è più frequente in mastocitomi di alto grado con tendenza a metastatizzare, quindi biologicamente più aggressivi, così come le mutazioni puntiformi attivanti in corrispondenza di dominio extracellulare a livello di esoni 8 e 9, più recentemente identificate.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

Bostock DE, (1986), Neoplasms of the skin and subcutaneous tissues in dogs and cats. Br Vet J, 142: 1-19. White CR, Hohenhaus AE, Kelsey J, Procter-Gray E, (2011), Cutaneous MCTs: associations with spay/neuter status, breed, body size, and phylogenetic cluster. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc, 47: 210-216. Sfiligoi G, Rassnick KM, Scarlett JM, et al., (2005), Outcome of dogs with mast cell tumors in the inguinal or perineal region versus other cutaneous locations: 124 cases (1990-2001). J Am Vet Med Assoc.; 226: 1368-1374. Newman SJ, Mrkonjich L, Walker KK, Rohrbach BW, (2007), Canine subcutaneous mast cell tumour: diagnosis and prognosis. J Comp Pathol, 136: 231-239. Thompson JJ, Pearl DL, Yager JA, et al., (2011), Canine subcutaneous mast cell tumor: characterization and prognostic indices. Vet Pathol, 48: 156-168. Gieger TL, Théon AP, Werner JA, et al., (2003), Biologic behavior and prognostic factors for mast cell tumors of the canine muzzle: 24 cases (1990-2001). J Vet Intern Med, 17: 687-692. Murphy S, Sparkes AH, Blunden AS, et al., (2006), Effects of stage and number of tumours on prognosis of dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumours. Vet Rec, 158: 287-291. Marconato L, Bettini G, Giacoboni C, et al., (2008), Clinicopathological features and outcome for dogs with mast cell tumors and bone marrow involvement. J Vet Intern Med, 22: 1001-1007. Stefanello D, Valenti P, Faverzani S, et al., (2009), Ultrasound-guided cytology of spleen and liver: a prognostic tool in canine cutaneous mast cell tumor. J Vet Intern Med, 23: 1051-1057. Book AP, Fidel J, Wills T, et al., (2011), Correlation of ultrasound findings, liver and spleen cytology, and prognosis in the clinical staging of high metastatic risk canine mast cell tumors. Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 52: 548-554. Patnaik AK, Ehler WJ, MacEwen EG, (1984), Canine cutaneous mast cell tumor: morphologic grading and survival time in 83 dogs. Vet Pathol, 21: 469-474. Simoes JP, Schoning P, Butine M., (1994), Prognosis of canine mast cell tumors: a comparison of three methods. Vet Pathol, 31: 637-647. Murphy S, Sparkes AH, Smith KC, et al., (2004), Relationships between the histological grade of cutaneous mast cell tumours in dogs, their survival and the efficacy of surgical resection. Vet Rec, 154: 743-746. Northrup NC, Harmon BG, Gieger TL, et al., (2005), Variation among pathologists in histologic grading of canine cutaneous mast cell tumors. J Vet Diagn Invest, 17: 245-248. Kiupel M, Webster JD, Bailey KL, et al., (2011), Proposal of a 2-tier histologic grading system for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors to more accurately predict biological behavior. Vet Pathol, 48: 147-155. Maglennon GA, Murphy S, Adams V, et al., (2008) Association of Ki67 index with prognosis for intermediate-grade canine cutaneous mast cell tumours. Vet Comp Oncol, 6: 268-274. Thompson JJ, Yager JA, Best SJ, et al., (2011) Canine subcutaneous mast cell tumors: cellular proliferation and KIT expression as prognostic indices. Vet Pathol, 48: 169-181. Romansik EM, Reilly CM, Kass PH, et al., (2007), Mitotic index is predictive for survival for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors. Vet Pathol, 44: 335-341. Elston LB, Sueiro FA, Cavalcanti JN, Metze K, (2009), The importance of the mitotic index as a prognostic factor for survival of canine cutaneous mast cell tumors: a validation study. Vet Pathol, 46: 362-364. Webster JD, Kiupel M, Kaneene JB, et al., (2004) The use of KIT and tryptase expression patterns as prognostic tools for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors. Vet Pathol, 41: 371-377. Webster JD, Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan V, Miller RA, et al., (2007), Cellular proliferation in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors: associations with c-KIT and its role in prognostication. Vet Pathol, 44: 298-308.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Laura Marconato E-mail: lauramarconato@yahoo.it - Centro Oncologico Veterinario Via San Lorenzo 1-4, 40037 Sasso Marconi (BO)

336


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 337

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Terapie antiblastiche nel mastocitoma: vecchie, attuali e nuove Laura Marconato Med Vet, Dipl ECVIM-CA Oncology, Bologna (I)

La terapia per il mastocitoma varia moltissimo in funzione di stadio clinico, grado istologico e sede d’insorgenza. Le terapie considerate efficaci includono: chirurgia, chemioterapia, radioterapia, terapia a bersaglio molecolare, immunoterapia, o le loro combinazioni.

INIBITORI TIROSIN-CHINASICI L’evidenza che le mutazioni di proto-oncogene c-Kit giocano ruolo importante nell’eziopatogenesi del mastocitoma canino pone le basi per l’utilizzo a scopo terapeutico degli inibitori tirosin-chinasici. Le chinasi sono dei recettori che giocano un ruolo critico nel regolare crescita, differenziazione e morte cellulare, pertanto una loro alterazione genera un segnale errato che si traduce in crescita cellulare incontrollata.12-14 La prima mutazione ad essere riconosciuta è stata la duplicazione interna a tandem (esone 11) che interessa il dominio transmembranario di KIT, la quale determina attivazione costitutiva del recettore in assenza di ligando. Più recentemente sono state identificate mutazioni puntiformi attivanti in corrispondenza di dominio extracellulare a livello di esoni 8 e 9. Rispetto ai wild-type, i mastocitomi che mostrano la mutazione sono biologicamente più aggressivi, con tendenza a metastatizzare. Gli studi in medicina veterinaria sono stati condotti valutando efficacia antitumorale e tossicità di 3 molecole in modo particolare: imatinib, masitinib e toceranib.15

CHEMIOTERAPIA Tra le terapie mediche, la chemioterapia rappresenta l’arma più antica. Generalmente la chemioterapia è indicata se il mastocitoma si è sviluppato in un’area anatomica considerata “maligna” (e quindi a rischio di metastatizzazione), se il grado istologico è elevato (grado III secondo Patnaik; oppure grado II con fattori prognostici negativi), se il tumore è inoperabile per ottenere un downstaging, se si riscontrano metastasi regionali e/o a distanza, in caso di mastocitomi multipli. Un’ulteriore indicazione è rappresentata dall’utilizzo adiuvante di chemioterapia dopo un intervento chirurgico non radicale, con la finalità di sterilizzare i margini, se una seconda chirurgia o la radioterapia curativa non sono possibili o vengono rifiutate dal proprietario. Il prednisone è senza dubbio il farmaco più utilizzato nel trattamento di MCT del cane, tuttavia la remissione ottenuta è breve e parziale con tasso di risposta di 20-70%.1,2 È riportato in letteratura l’utilizzo intralesionale di corticosteroidi a lunga durata d’azione, come ad esempio triamcinolone, con risultati tuttavia aneddotici. Da un punto di vista biologico, la somministrazione topica di triamcinolone favorisce la riduzione di edema peritumorale e flogosi, mostrando inoltre effetto citolitico su mastociti. La combinazione di prednisone somministrato per via sistemica e farmaci citotossici sembra dare i risultati migliori, prolungando la durata di remissione e, in genere, anche la sopravvivenza. I chemioterapici più efficaci nel trattamento del mastocitoma sono vinblastina e lomustina.3-9 La vincristina, un altro alcaloide della vinca, non sembra essere efficace;10 al contrario, la vinorelbina ha recentemente mostrato attività antitumorale. Clorambucile, se somministrato con prednisone (sinergismo), mostra attività antitumorale nei confronti di mastocitomi e può essere utilizzato in pazienti non candidati per forme terapeutiche locali (chirurgia e/o radioterapia).11

Imatinib16,17 è una piccola molecola ad attività inibente, che compete con ATP per il legame in corrispondenza di recettore tirosin-chinasico KIT, prevenendo la cascata di eventi all’interno della cellula. La presenza di mutazioni interne a tandem non sembra essere condizione imprescindibile per ottenere una risposta ad imatinib. Infatti, sia mastocitomi mutati sia mastocitomi wild-type rispondono al trattamento. Masitinib18,19 è un nuovo inibitore tirosin-chinasico, ideato per la medicina veterinaria, che in uno studio prospettico, randomizzato, controllato da placebo (trial clinico di fase 3) migliorava tempo a progressione, soprattutto se utilizzato come farmaco di prima linea, in cani con mastocitoma di grado II o III (recidiva o tumore non operabile). La mutazione di c-kit non era requisito fondamentale per osservare risposta a masitinib, ad indicare che il farmaco inibisce altri bersagli (come PDGF) o che KIT wild-type possa essere indirettamente coinvolto nella progressione o sopravvivenza di mastociti. Il controllo del tumore (remissione o malattia stabile) a 6 mesi era predittivo di sopravvivenza a lungo termine. Per-

337


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 338

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

tanto, la stabilizzazione di mastocitoma per almeno 6 mesi con masitinib si associa a lunga sopravvivenza. La risposta immediata alla somministrazione del farmaco è invece irrilevante nel valutarne efficacia.

4.

Toceranib20 è un inibitore tirosin-chinasico multitarget (KIT, VEGFR2, PDGFRβ) che ha mostrato efficacia (tasso di risposta 37.2%) in regime adiuvante contro mastocitomi di grado II e III recidivanti (sia localmente sia a distanza). In cani in cui non si evidenziava coinvolgimento metastatico linfonodale ed in cui era presente una mutazione rispondevano meglio, generalmente entro 3 mesi dall’inizio di terapia. Sfortunatamente, le cellule neoplastiche tendono a diventare nel tempo resistenti anche ad inibitori tirosin-chinasici, in seguito a mutazioni che riguardano il sito di legame con il farmaco, comportando minore affinità tra inibitore tirosinchinasico e suo target. Altri meccanismi descritti prevedono la sovraespressione recettoriale che silenzia l’effetto del farmaco e l’attivazione di altre vie che consentono di evitare la fosforilazione di KIT. Per migliorare la risposta antitumorale e cercare di contrastare la resistenza ai farmaci inibitori, è stato descritto l’utilizzo combinato di inibitori tirosin-chinasici e chemioterapici. Recentemente la somministrazione combinata di toceranib (3.25 mg/kg EOD) e vinblastina (1.6 mg/m2 EV ogni due settimane) dava tasso di risposte oggettive di 71%, suggerendo attività additiva o sinergistica.21

6.

5.

7.

8.

9.

10. 11.

12.

13.

14.

TERAPIA DI SUPPORTO

15.

L’utilizzo di antistaminici nella specie canina è indicato in caso di tumori voluminosi, presenza di sintomatologia sistemica riconducibile a degranulazione di mastocitomi, mastocitomi di III grado con tendenza a metastatizzare ed in concomitanza a somministrazione di corticosteroidi. L’uso di antistaminici è raccomandato anche se l’animale è sottoposto a chemioterapia perché i mastocitomi, se chemioresponsivi, possono degranulare in corso di terapia. Gli antistaminici inibiscono in maniera competitiva l’azione di istamina su recettori H1 e H2 delle cellule parietali gastriche e riducono pertanto il rischio di ulcerazione gastroenterica. Se somministrati prima della chirurgia, riducono il rischio di sanguinamento intraoperatorio.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

BIBLIOGRAFIA 1.

2.

3.

McCaw DL, Miller MA, Ogilvie GK, et al, (1994), Response of canine mast cell tumors to treatment with oral prednisone. J Vet Intern Med, 8: 406-408. Takahashi T, Kadosawa T, Nagase M, et al, (1997), Inhibitory effects of glucocorticoids on proliferation of canine mast cell tumors. J Vet Med Sci, 59: 995-1001. Davies DR, Wyatt KM, Jardine JE, et al, (2004), Vinblastine and prednisolone as adjunctive therapy for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc, 40: 124-130.

Thamm DH, Mauldin EA, Vail DM, (1999), Prednisone and vinblastine chemotherapy for canine mast cell tumor-41 cases (1992-1997). J Vet Intern Med, 13: 491-497. Rassnick KM, Bailey DB, Flory AB, et al, (2008), Efficacy of vinblastine for treatment of canine mast cell tumors. J Vet Intern Med., 22:1390-1396. Thamm DH, Turek MM, Vail DM, (2006), Outcome and prognostic factors following adjuvant prednisone/vinblastine chemotherapy for high-risk canine mast cell tumour: 61 cases. J Vet Med Sci., 68: 581587.5. Rassnick KM, Moore AS, Williams LE, et al, (1999), Treatment of canine mast cell tumors with CCNU (lomustine). J Vet Intern Med, 13: 601-605. Cooper M, Tsai X, Bennett P, (2009), Combination CCNU and vinblastine chemotherapy for canine mast cell tumours: 57 cases. Vet Comp Oncol, 7: 196-206. Rassnick KM, Bailey DB, Russell DS, et al, (2010), A phase II study to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of alternating CCNU and highdose vinblastine and prednisone (CVP) for treatment of dogs with high-grade, metastatic or nonresectable mast cell tumours. Vet Comp Oncol, 8: 138-152. McCaw DL, Miller MA, Bergman PJ, et al, (1997), Vincristine therapy for mast cell tumors in dogs. J Vet Intern Med, 11: 375-378. Taylor F, Gear R, Hoather T, Dobson J, (2009), Chlorambucil and prednisolone chemotherapy for dogs with inoperable mast cell tumors: 21 cases. J Small Anim Pract., 50: 284-289. Downing S, Chien MB, Kass PH, et al, (2002), Prevalence and importance of internal tandem duplications in exons 11 and 12 of ckit in mast cell tumors of dogs. Am J Vet Res, 63: 1718-1723. Kiupel M, Webster JD, Kaneene JB, et al, (2004), The use of KIT and tryptase expression patterns as prognostic tools for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors. Vet Pathol, 41: 371. Webster JD, Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan V, Miller RA, et al, (2007), Cellular proliferation in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors: associations with c-kit and its role in prognostication. Vet Pathol., 44: 298-308. London C, (2004), Kinase inhibitors in cancer therapy. Vet Comp Oncol, 2: 177-193. Isotani M, Ishida N, Tominaga M, et al, (2008), Effect of tyrosine kinase inhibition by imatinib mesylate on mast cell tumors in dogs. J Vet Intern Med. 22: 985-988. Marconato L, Bettini G, Giacoboni C, et al, (2008), Clinicopathological features and outcome for dogs with mast cell tumors and bone marrow involvement. J Vet Intern Med. 22: 1001-1007. Hahn KA, Ogilvie G, Rusk T, et al, (2008), Masitinib is safe and effective for the treatment of canine mast cell tumors. J Vet Intern Med. 22:1301-1309. Hahn KA, Legendre AM, Shaw NG, et al, (2010), Evaluation of 12and 24-month survival rates after treatment with masitinib in dogs with nonresectable mast cell tumors. Am J Vet Res, 71:1354-1361. London CA, Malpas PB, Wood-Follis SL, et al, (2009), Multi-center, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized study of oral toceranib phosphate (SU11654), a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for the treatment of dogs with recurrent (either local or distant) mast cell tumor following surgical excision. Clin Cancer Res. 15: 3856, 2009. Robat C, London C, Bunting L, et al, (in press), Safety evaluation of combination vinblastine and toceranib phosphate (Palladia®) in dogs: a phase I dose-finding study. Vet Comp Oncol.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Laura Marconato E mail lauramarconato@yahoo.it Centro Oncologico Veterinario Via San Lorenzo 1-4, 40037 Sasso Marconi (BO)

338


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 339

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012 • SESSIONI AVANZATE

IL MASTOCITOMA DEL GATTO Le terapie vecchie e nuove in aiuto al clinico: sapere; prima di saper fare Laura Marconato Med Vet, Dipl ECVIM-CA Oncology, Bologna (I)

Nel gatto, il mastocitoma tende a presentarsi in due diverse forme dal comportamento biologico variabile e, conseguentemente, da un diverso approccio terapeutico: cutanea e viscerale (splenica ed intestinale).1 Il mastocitoma viscerale è relativamente più frequente di quello cutaneo ed il comportamento biologico è molto aggressivo con spiccata tendenza alla metastatizzazione.

Studi di immunoistochimica hanno mostrato che i mastocitomi cutanei del gatto sono generalmente positivi per KIT, e la valutazione di KIT-pattern applicando lo stesso schema adottato nel cane ha evidenziato una localizzazione aberrante del recettore in 52% di casi.6,7 Inoltre la sovraespressione di KIT, valutata considerando contestualmente il numero di cellule positive e la localizzazione della positività, è risultata correlata ad un comportamento biologico più aggressivo. Pertanto, i gatti con sovraespressione/mutazioni di KIT sono potenzialmente sensibili al trattamento con specifici inibitori tirosinchinasici.8,9 Di nuovo, mancano studi clinici che ne dimostrino il reale beneficio.

MASTOCITOMA A SEDE CUTANEA Nel gatto, il comportamento biologico del mastocitoma cutaneo primitivo è tendenzialmente benigno, ad eccezione delle forme pleomorfe o anaplastiche, caratterizzate da elevato tasso di recidiva e metastatico.2-5 Il mastocitoma atipico (anche detto istiocitico) ha comportamento biologico tendenzialmente benigno. Tuttavia, accanto a casi di regressione spontanea, sono segnalati anche casi con comportamento biologico decisamente più aggressivo, pertanto lo staging è d’obbligo. Il mastocitoma mastocitico ben differenziato è in assoluto la forma più frequente a sede cutanea ed è caratterizzato da un comportamento biologico tendenzialmente benigno. Al contrario, il mastocitoma mastocitico pleomorfo ha comportamento biologico più aggressivo e richiede un approccio terapeutico più complesso. In generale, gli elementi istologici associati a comportamento più aggressivo sono l’istotipo pleomorfo e l’elevata attività mitotica. La chirurgia rappresenta la terapia d’elezione in caso di mastocitomi singoli, asportabili, non metastatici. L’escissione con 2 cm di margini nei tessuti sani è sufficiente nella maggior parte dei casi. Radioterapia adiuvante e chemioterapia sono indicate in caso di margini chirurgici non radicali e/o mastocitomi pleomorfi. Contrariamente al cane, il prednisone non sembra avere un ruolo determinante nel trattamento di mastocitomi felini. Chemioterapici potenzialmente efficaci sono lomustina o clorambucile, il cui uso è indicato in caso di mastocitomi pleomorfi e/o in caso di metastasi regionali o a distanza. È importante sottolineare che non esistono al momento studi clinici che ne dimostrino la reale efficacia, e che il suggerimento di utilizzare chemioterapia adiuvante o neoadiuvante derivi dai principi base di oncologia.

MASTOCITOMA A SEDE VISCERALE Il mastocitoma felino a sede viscerale deve essere considerato una patologia terminale, tendenzialmente associate a prognosi da sfavorevole a infausta. La terapia è volta a rallentare la progressione neoplastica, controllare o palliare i sintomi clinici, mantenendo qualità di vita il più a lungo possibile.

a.) Mastocitoma a sede splenica Il mastocitoma a sede splenica rappresenta, insieme al linfoma, una delle due più comuni cause di splenomegalia nel gatto. Si accompagna spesso a mastocitemia e metastatizza in fasi precoci a fegato (circa 70%), linfonodi regionali (circa 70%), midollo osseo (40%), polmoni (20%) ed intestino (17%). La terapia d’elezione prevede la splenectomia, anche in presenza di malattia metastatica, poiché associata a lunga sopravvivenza (12-19 mesi).10-12 È indicato il pretrattamento con antagonisti H1 e H2 ed antiserotoninergici. La chemioterapia adiuvante è stata utilizzata in un numero troppo basso di soggetti per poterne valutare l’efficacia, infatti al momento non esiste alcun protocollo chemioterapico che abbia mostrato reale efficacia nel mastocitoma viscerale felino. Teoricamente, l’utilizzo di chemioterapia adiuvante dopo splenectomia ha lo scopo di ridurre ulteriormente il volume tumorale in setting microscopico. Diversi agenti chemioterapici sono stati studiati nella specie felina, con risultati per lo più scoraggianti. Il prednisone come agente

339


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 340

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

singolo non prolunga la sopravvivenza. Anche protocolli combinati (vincristina, ciclofosfamide, prednisone e metotrexate) non hanno migliorato la prognosi. Non esistono studi circa l’utilità di vinblastina, agente chemioterapico molto efficace invece nel trattamento del mastocitoma nel cane. Esiste invece interesse nell’utilizzo di lomustina, un agente alchilante che appartiene alle nitrosouree. La massima dose tollerata nel gatto è di 50-60 mg/m2 ogni 6 settimane.13,14 La terapia con inibitori tirosin-chinasici non è ancora stata estensivamente esplorata nella specie felina.15,16 La terapia medica ha finalità esclusivamente palliativa, ed ha efficacia questionabile. I farmaci che possono palliare i sintomi includono antagonisti competitivi sui recettori H2, gastroprotettori e antistaminici. Gli antagonisti competitivi sui recettori H2, tra cui cimetidina e famotidina, bloccano i recettori per l’istamina delle cellule parietali dello stomaco, diminuendo la produzione di acido cloridrico. I gastroprotettori, tra cui sucralfato, agiscono rivestendo la superficie mucosale erosa, impedendo l’ulteriore ulcerazione. Infine, gli antistaminici, tra cui difenidramina, aiutano nella prevenzione della vasodilatazione e dell’ipotensione antagonizzando i recettori H1 posti a livello di muscolatura liscia intestinale. È importante sottolineare che la difenidramina, comunemente utilizzata nel mastocitoma canino, ha efficacia questionabile nella riduzione della sintomatologia clinica nel gatto. Infatti, sembra che il mediatore principale rilasciato dai mastociti sia, nel gatto, la serotonina. Pertanto la ciproeptadina sembra essere un farmaco migliore nella specie felina, dal momento che antagonizza i recettori H1 e mostra proprietà anti-serotoninergiche.17 Inoltre, stimolando l’appetito, può essere utile nei soggetti cachettici. Ancora, è importante stressare che il trattamento medico palliativo non rappresenta una terapia antitumorale, ed è spesso inefficace nel gatto nella palliazione dei sintomi clinici.

BIBLIOGRAFIA 1.

2. 3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10. 11. 12.

13.

14.

b.) Mastocitoma a sede intestinale

15.

Il mastocitoma a sede intestinale è biologicamente molto aggressivo, e si accompagna ad una prognosi generalmente infausta, con brevi tempi di sopravvivenza.18 La terapia d’elezione è chirurgica, e prevede ampia resezione con margini di 5-10 cm nei tessuti sani, a monte e a valle. Per il comportamento biologico aggressivo e la difficoltà di escissione radicale, è indicata chemioterapia adiuvante (lomustina), anche se il reale beneficio della chemioterapia sia neoadiuvante sia adiuvante non è stato ancora dimostrato.

16.

17.

18.

Litster AL, Sorenmo KU, (2006), Characterisation of the signalment, clinical and survival characteristics of 41 cats with mast cell neoplasia. J Feline Med Surg. 8: 177-183. Buerger RG, Scott DW, (1987), Cutaneous mast cell neoplasia in cats: 14 cases (1975-1985). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 190: 1440-1444. Molander-McCrary H, Henry CJ, Potter K, et al, (1998), Cutaneous mast cell tumors in cats: 32 cases (1991-1994). J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 34: 281-284. Johnson TO, Schulman FY, Lipscomb TP, et al, (2002), Histopathology and biologic behavior of pleomorphic cutaneous mast cell tumors in fifteen cats. Vet Pathol, 39: 452-457. Lepri E, Ricci G, Leonardi L, et al, (2003), Diagnostic and prognostic features of feline cutaneous mast cell tumours: a retrospective analysis of 40 cases. Vet Res Commun, 27: 707-709. Rodriguez-Carino C, Fondevila D, Segales J, Rabanel RM, (2009), Expression of KIT receptor in feline cutaneous mast cell tumors. Vet Pathol., 46: 878-83. Sabattini S, Bettini G, (2010), Prognostic value of histologic and immunohistochemical features in feline mast cell tumors. Vet Pathol, 47: 643-53. Isotani M, Tamura K, Yagihara H, et al, (2006), Identification of a ckit exon 8 internal tandem duplication in a feline mast cell tumor case and its favorable response to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate. Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 114: 168-172. Lachowicz JL, Post GS, Brodsky E, (2005), A phase I clinical trial evaluating imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) in tumor-bearing cats. J Vet Intern Med. 19: 860-864. Gordon SS, McClaran JK, Bergman PJ, Liu SM, (2010), Outcome following splenectomy in cats. J Feline Med Surg. 12: 256-261. Guerre R, Miller P, Groulade P, (1979), Systemic mastocytosis in a cat: remission after splenectomy. J Small Anim Prac 20: 769-772. Liska WD, MacEwan EG, Zaki FA, et al, (1979), Feline systemic mastocytosis: A review and results of splenectomy in seven cases. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 15: 589-597. Rassnick KM, Gieger TL, Williams LE, et al, (2001), Phase I evaluation of CCNU (lomustine) in tumor-bearing cats. J Vet Intern Med. 15: 196-199. Rassnick KM, Williams LE, Kristal O, et al, (2008), Lomustine for treatment of mast cell tumors in cats: 38 cases (1999-2005). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 232: 1200-1205. Hadzijusufovic E, Peter B, Rebuzzi L, et al, (2009), Growth-inhibitory effects of four tyrosine kinase inhibitors on neoplastic feline mast cells exhibiting a Kit exon 8 ITD mutation. Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 132: 243-250. Dank G, Chien MB, London CA, (2002), Activating mutations in the catalytic or juxtamembrane domain of c-kit in splenic mast cell tumors of cats. Am J Vet Res. 63: 1129-1133. Padrid PA, Mitchell RW, Ndukwu IM, et al, (1995), Cyproheptadine induced attenuation of type-I immediate hypersensitivity reactions of airway smooth muscle from immune-sensitized cats. Am J Vet Res 56: 109-115. Halsey CHC, Powers BE, Kamstock DA, (2010), Feline intestinal sclerosing mast cell tumour: 50 cases (1997-2008). Vet Comp Oncol. 8: 72-79.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Laura Marconato - E-mail: lauramarconato@yahoo.it Centro Oncologico Veterinario - Via San Lorenzo 1-4, 40037 Sasso Marconi (BO)

340


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 341

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

SISTRI: facciamo chiarezza Giorgio Neri Med Vet, Granozzo con Monticello (NO)

comprenda più unità locali dovrà dotarsi di tanti dispositivi elettronici quante sono tali unità. Con le chiavette USB sarà possibile entrare nel sistema ed interagire in esso attraverso previo inserimento delle credenziali assegnate ad ogni responsabile dei dispositivi stessi. Per ogni dispositivo possono essere individuate un massimo di tre certificati elettronici facenti capo ad altrettante persone fisiche autorizzate ad accedere al Sistema. L’iscrizione al SISTRI è soggetta al pagamento di un contributo annuo variabile in funzione del numero di addetti occupati nell’unità locale di produzione dei rifiuti e al numero di chiavette assegnate. La sequenza delle azioni previste per la movimentazione dei rifiuti pericolosi a carico degli Enti o Imprese produttrici è la seguente: - Entro i 10 giorni lavorativi successivi alla produzione dei rifiuti pericolosi prodotti (e comunque prima del passaggio di cui al punto successivo): effettuazione di una Nuova Registrazione Cronologica mediante compilazione di una Scheda di Carico nell’Area Registro Cronologico;

Il Sistema di controllo della Tracciabilità dei Rifiuti (SISTRI) nasce a recepimento della Direttiva UE 2008/98/CE, con il Decreto Ministeriale 17 novembre 2009, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale del 13 gennaio 2010. L’applicazione della norma, che avrebbe dovuto attuarsi subito dopo la pubblicazione del decreto, ha subito molteplici slittamenti. Pertanto se non si verificheranno ulteriori proroghe la piena applicabilità del Sistema si verificherà a partire dal 30 giugno 2012. Trattando di attività veterinarie, sono tenute ad iscriversi al SISTRI solo quelle configurabili come Enti (per esempio le Asl) o come imprese (Per esempio le società di servizi). L’iscrizione deve avvenire prima dell’inizio dell’attività o, successivamente, al verificarsi delle condizioni che ne configurano l’obbligo. A seguito dell’iscrizione viene consegnato in comodato d’uso, dalla Camera di Commercio territorialmente competente al responsabile delegato dall’Ente o Impresa, un dispositivo elettronico (chiavetta USB) per ogni unità locale produttrice di rifiuti pericolosi. Pertanto l’Ente o Impresa che

341


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 342

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

- Almeno 4 ore prima della movimentazione dei rifiuti (prelievo da parte della ditta che si occupa del prelievo dei rifiuti pericolosi prodotti): compilazione di una nuova Scheda SISTRI di movimentazione dei rifiuti nell’Area Movimentazione;

- Entro i 10 giorni lavorativi successivi al conferimento dei rifiuti pericolosi (l’operazione può tuttavia essere effettuata anche precedentemente al materiale conferimento dei rifiuti): collegamento della Scheda SISTRI al Registro cronologico con contestuale registrazione di scarico dei rifiuti pericolosi, mediante compilazione della scheda accessibile attraverso il pulsante “Associa Registrazione” previsto sulla Scheda SISTRI.

Tutta la documentazione SISTRI dovrà essere firmata elettronicamente dalla persona responsabile. All’atto del conferimento dei rifiuti pericolosi al gestore autorizzato, quest’ultimo prenderà in carico i rifiuti pericolosi inserendo la propria chiave USB nel computer del produttore e accedendo all’area di propria competenza (“Area Conducente”). In caso di malfunzionamento del Sistema SISTRI dovrà essere compilata provvisoriamente una scheda cartacea, scaricabile e stampabile attraverso il Sistema stesso, che pertanto dovrà essere sempre tenuta a disposizione. Per i soggetti non configurabili come Ente o Impresa e pertanto non tenuti all’iscrizione al SISTRI, l’inserimento dei dati e la compilazione e stampa delle schede dovrà avvenire a cura del gestore (trasportatore o smaltitore) autorizzato.

342


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 343

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Il punto sulla patogenesi della dermatite atopica del cane e strategie terapeutiche Chiara Noli Med Vet, Dipl ECVD, Peveragno (CN)

È stato inoltre scoperto che i cheratinociti dei pazienti atopici hanno numerosi difetti funzionali e morfologici: ad esempio sono più predisposti alla produzione di mediatori della flogosi, se comparati a quelli dei pazienti normali, e sono capaci di produrre fino a trenta diverse molecole proinfiammatorie, anche in seguito ad insulti di entità minima. L’epidermide dei pazienti affetti differisce anche da un punto di vista morfologico: gli spazi intercellulari tra i cheratinociti che costituiscono lo strato corneo dei pazienti atopici sono più larghi e mancano di lipidi intercellulari. Queste sostanze, per lo più della famiglia delle ceramidi e degli acidi grassi, assicurano l’impermeabilità dell’epidermide ed una funzione di barriera tra l’esterno e l’interno. Nei pazienti affetti da malattia, questi lipidi sono difettosi per qualità e quantità, e le differenze morfologiche degli spazi intercellulari osservate tramite microscopia elettronica, sono peggiorate dall’esposizione sperimentale all’allergene. Anche un’altra proteina, denominata filaggrina, responsabile della formazione dello strato corneo, è espressa in minore quantità nei pazienti affetti da malattia, forse per una mutazione genetica dei geni che la codificano. I cani affetti da dermatite atopica soffrono spesso di una concomitante infezione batterica cutanea e/o di una dermatite da Malassezia. Il ruolo che questi microrganismi giocano nella manifestazione dei sintomi non è limitato al peggioramento del quadro clinico (prurito e lesioni) ma anche ad una vera e propria stimolazione del sistema immunitario, che per difendersi dalle infezioni, esacerba la risposta allergica. È stato anche dimostrato che, nei soggetti atopici,vi è una maggiore adesività batterica ai corneociti, una minore produzione di defensine (peptidi con proprietà antimicrobiche) da parte dei cheratinociti e una maggiore esposizione di recettori, quali la fibronectina, sulla superficie cellulare, che permettono l’adesione dei microorganismi.

PATOGENESI La dermatite atopica è una malattia multifattoriale, che contempla anomalie immunitarie (ipersensibilità di tipo I e IV) e anatomiche (barriera cutanea alterata), genetiche (predisposizione per alcuni tipi di DLA), e fattori ambientali (predisposizione per i cani che vivono indoor e in ambienti urbani), inclusi in microorganismi (batteri e Malassezie). Nella prima fase di sensibilizzazione, un allergene, quale una molecola proteica di pollini, muffe, acari o corneociti nella polvere di casa, dal peso molecolare che varia tra 20 e 200 KDa, penetra nell’organismo attraverso un epitelio (epidermide o mucose). Qui incontra una cellula di Langerhans, cellula residente negli strati epidermici con il ruolo di sentinella immunologica, che cattura e processa l’allergene, lo espone sulla sua superficie, e migra dall’epidermide al linfonodo tributario, dove l’allergene viene presentato ad una popolazione di linfociti Tnaif. Questi stimolano la produzione da parte di plasmacellule di IgE allergene-specifiche, che attraverso la linfa abbandonano il linfonodo, si distribuiscono per via ematica a tutti i distretti corporei e si fissano sulle membrane dei mastociti, che nel cane risiedono principalmente nel derma della cute e nella sottomucosa intestinale. La fase di sensibilizzazione richiede almeno sei mesi di esposizione allergenica. Nella seconda fase, detta fase acuta, l’allergene, entrato nuovamente in contatto con l’organismo, viene catturato dalla cellula di Langerhans e presentato direttamente al mastocita sensibilizzato dalla presenza delle IgE sulla sua superficie. Il legame allergene-IgE induce degranulazione del mastocita che rilascia una serie di mediatori vasoattivi (tra cui l’istamina) e dell’infiammazione. Il sintomo associato a questa fase è l’eritema, segno clinico primario della dermatite atopica, legato alla dilatazione del letto vascolare nei siti esposti. La terza fase, detta fase cronica, e prescinde dalla presenza di IgE, essendo più simile ad una immunità cellulomediata, tipica dell’ipersensibilità di tipo IV. Il segno clinico associato a questa fase è la formazione di piccole papule eritematose e da intenso prurito. L’attenzione dei ricercatori negli ultimi anni si è focalizzata sui difetti immunitari, che conducono alla formazione di alti livelli di IgE, e sui difetti di barriera cutanea, che permettono la penetrazione di elevate quantità di allergene nell’epidermide.

TERAPIA La dermatite atopica non è una malattia che si può guarire, si può però riuscire a controllarla in modo efficace. Idealmente, l’eliminazione dell’allergene o degli allergeni responsabili è la terapia di elezione. Questo non sempre è possibile, si rende perciò necessaria in questi casi l’immunoterapia e/o una terapia sintomatica.

343


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 344

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

L’immunoterapia allergene-specifica (ASIT) è la scelta di elezione in tutte quelle situazioni in cui l’eliminazione dell’allergene sia impossibile e la terapia si renda necessaria per periodi superiori ai quattro mesi l’anno. La risposta varia tra il 50 e l’80% dei cani e dei gatti trattati. I risultati si possono ottenere in un mese come dopo un’anno, e si può ottenere una completa o parziale scomparsa dei sintomi. Si rende necessaria quindi, in attesa dell’effetto del vaccino o per integrarne i benefici, l’impiego della terapia sintomatica generale o locale, nonché il controllo delle altre allergie, qualora presenti, e delle infezioni secondarie concomitanti. La terapia sintomatica impiega farmaci antiprurito per via sistemica o topica. Tra i farmaci sistemici i corticosteroidi sono i più efficaci. Il prednisolone viene somministrato alla dose di 0,5-1 mg/kg al giorno nel cane e 1-2 mg/kg al giorno nel gatto, sino a remissione del prurito, passando poi alla somministrazione a giorni alterni e diminuendo progressivamente il dosaggio, sino a raggiungere la posologia minima sufficiente a controllare il prurito (in genere, 0,25-0,5 mg/kg ogni 48 ore). Purtroppo, il cortisone ha molti effetti collaterali, per cui è importante considerare alternative non steroidee. Gli acidi grassi essenziali (EFA) sono costituenti importanti delle membrane cellulari dei cheratinociti, della parete dei corneociti epidermici e pilari, dei lipidi intercellulari e del film idrolipidico protettivo di superficie. Una loro supplementazione per bocca o topica migliora notevolmente l’aspetto della cute e del mantello, e ne favorisce le loro funzioni protettive nei confronti dell’ambiente circostante, inclusi i microorganismi patogeni. Gli acidi grassi hanno anche effetto antiinfiammatorio e possono alleviare le manifestazioni di irritazione e ipersensibilità cutanea, incluso il prurito. La maggior parte degli studi sugli EFA riguardano il cane, e riportano una efficacia nel controllare il prurito, se somministrati per os, variabile dall’11 al 65% dei casi trattati. Ancora oggi non è chiaro se sia più efficace la somministrazione di EFA omega-6, omega-3 o la combinazione di entrambi, e se così, in che proporzione. Nel cane Beagle il rapporto ottimale fra omega-6

e omega-3 per ottenere un effetto antiinfiammatorio nella cute oscilla fra 5:1 e 10:1. La ciclosporina è un farmaco che inibisce selettivamente l’attività dei linfociti T, bloccandone l’attivazione cellulare. Essa ha, inoltre, attività inibitoria sulla degranulazione e sulla proliferazione dei mastociti e dei granulociti eosinofili. È stata recentemente registrata per l’impiego nei cani atopici alla dose di 5 mg/kg al giorno per un mese e poi 5 mg/kg a giorni alterni. Gli effetti della terapia sono apprezzabili dopo circa 15-30 giorni e la riduzione del prurito e delle lesioni (eritema, seborrea, eccetera) è paragonabile a quella che si ottiene con il cortisone. Occasionalmente, nel corso della terapia sono stati segnalati vomito, diarrea e papillomatosi cutanea. Dati aneddotici sul gatto riportano una buona efficacia nel 50% circa degli animali allergici. Terapie topiche per la dermatite atopica si basano sull’uso di creme o spray antiinfiammatori o di shampoo. L’idrocortisone aceponato spray è risultato efficace nel diminuire l’eritema e il prurito localizzato (ad esempio agli spazi interdigitali) nella maggior parte degli animali testati. In Italia è anche in commercio uno spray a base di acido glicirrizico, un analogo naturale del cortisone. Shampooterapia: il bagno può migliorare le condizioni del paziente con prurito, rinfrescando la cute, idratandola e rimuovendo batteri, lieviti, allergeni e detriti organici. I prodotti adatti a questo scopo devono essere antiprurito, ipoallergenici, detergenti ed idratanti. La dermatite atopica è una malattia che predispone ad infezioni batteriche e da Malassezia secondarie. Queste infezioni contribuiscono sensibilmente ad aumentare il prurito e l’infiammazione cutanea. I soggetti atopici dovrebbero essere controllati periodicamente, per verificare la presenza di queste complicazioni, e trattati con antibiotici e antifungini per via sistemica e/o topica ogni qualvolta sia necessario.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Chiara Noli Servizi Dermatologici Veterinari, Peveragno (CN) www.servizidermavet.it

344


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 345

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

L’uso di solosterolo (fitosteroli e acidi grassi essenziali) in corso di dermatite atopica del cane Chiara Noli Med Vet, Dipl ECVD, Peveragno (CN)

piretico, immunomodulatore e antineoplastico10-13. Le proprietà antiinfiammatorie rilevate includono un decremento delle citochine pro-infiammatorie e del TNFα11, la riduzione dell’edema cutaneo indotto sperimentalmente nei ratti12, la normalizzazione dalle funzioni delle cellule T, con stimolazione della componente Th1, inibizione della Th2 e aumento dell’IL2 e dell’IFNγ13. Una dose di 125 mg/kg è stata stimata avere un efficacia antiinfiammatoria nei ratti pari a 10mg/kg di idrocortisone, conferendo ai fitosteroli un valore di potenza relativa pari a 0.08. Quando usati per via topica, i fitosteroli hanno mostrato un effetto antiinfiammatorio pari a quello di alcuni preparati steroidei, una capacità ristrutturante la barriera epidermica e una diminuzione della perdita transepidermica di liquidi (TEWL), con durata prolungata14. I fitosteroli paiono quindi possedere una efficacia comparabile a quella dei prodotti steroidei insieme ad una alta sicurezza di impiego: non sono conosciuti effetti collaterali, né interazioni con altri farmaci, né si sono osservate alterazioni del profilo ematologico o biochimico negli animali in cui sono stati somministrati. Il prodotto oggetto del seguente studio contiene olio di Brassica napus (colza) con un contenuto totale di fitosteroli pari a 50 mg per grammo di olio. Altri ingredienti, con apporto di altri fitosteroli e di acidi grassi essenziali della serie omega-6 e omega-3 sono l’olio di soja, l’olio di mais, l’olio di cartamo, l’olio di semi di girasole, l’olio di pesce e la vitamina E. Inoltre contiene lecitina, selenio, zinco e biotina, microelementi e vitamine utili ber la salute della cute. La lecitina migliora l’assorbimento grastroenterico del prodotto, la vitamina E ha un effetto sinergico contro i radicali liberi, prodotti in corso di infiammazione15, mentre l’efficacia degli altri microelementi e vitamine nella dermatite atopica canina è ancora da determinare.

INTRODUZIONE La dermatite atopica, è la malattia allergica più frequente del cane, causata da allergeni quali i pollini, le erbe, le muffe, o gli acari della polvere di casa, che si manifesta in genere tra 1 e 3 anni di età1. Gli animali affetti hanno prurito, soprattutto alla testa e alle estremità, e si provocano escoriazioni e ipotricosi1. In corso di dermatite atopica, a causa di difetti della barriera epidermica, l’allergene è in grado di penetrare nell’organismo per via percutana legarsi alle IgE allergene-specifiche sulla superficie dei mastociti, e ne provoca la degranulazione2. I mediatori preformati e quelli neoprodotti da questa cellula provocano uno stato infiammatorio e prurito nella cute del soggetto affetto2. Fra i mediatori responsabili del prurito e dell’infiammazione cutanea ci sono eicosanoidi (specialmente prostaglandine della serie 2 e leucotrieni della serie 4), derivati dal metabolismo dell’acido arachidonico di membrana3. È stato osservato che alcuni possono mostrare attività antiinfiammatorie e ricostituente l’integrità della barriera epidermica4. Questa attività antiinfiammatoria si espleta nella competizione per gli stessi enzimi (ciclo- e lipoossigenasi) con i precursori dei mediatori dell’infiammazione, con produzione di leucotrieni e trombossani con attività antiinfiammatoria o nulla5. Per queste loro doti antiinfiammatorie, antipruriginose e ristrutturanti la barriera eipdermica gli acidi grassi essenziali sono stati impiegati con successo variabile in cani affetti da dermatite atopica6. È stato inoltre riconosciuto il valore della componente omega 3 degli olii contenenti acidi grassi essenziali, che in rapporto 1:5 con gli acidi grassi omega 6, pare dare il migliore effetto antiinfiammatorio7. I fitosteroli sono precursori naturali vegetali per alcuni ormoni, enzimi e vitamine8. Piante e semi oleosi ne contengono di più di frutta e vegetali a foglia. Nello specifico, si ottiene lo stigmasterolo dall’olio di soja, il beta-sitosterolo dall’olio di germe di grano, il campesterolo e il brassicasterolo dall’olio di colza. In medicina umana è stata dimostrata l’efficacia dei fitosteroli nel decremento del colesterolo nel sangue: una dose di 1.5-3.3 g/persona al giorno è capace di diminuire del 10% il livello di colesterolo LDL in 25 giorni9. Altri studi hanno dimostrato un effetto antiinfiammatorio, antireumatico, anti-

SCOPO E DISEGNO DELLO STUDIO Scopo dello studio era di valutare l’efficacia e la tollerabilità del mangime complementare SOLOSTEROL® DERMA alla dose consigliata dal produttore per il trattamento del prurito in cani affetti da dermatite atopica. Poiché il prodotto veniva provato per la prima volta per la dermatite atopica si optò per uno studio pilota non controllato.

345


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 346

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

MATERIALI E METODI

Somministrazione del prodotto

Criteri di selezione, inclusione e esclusione

Ai cani inclusi nello studio venne somministrato per 4 settimane il prodotto secondo le prescrizioni della ditta produttrice, e cioè: • 1,4 ml die da 0 a 10 kg pv • 2,8 ml/die da 10 a 20 kg pv • 4,2 ml/die oltre i 20 kg pv La dose media di fitosteroli introdotta risultava così essere circa 2.5.5m/kg al giorno. Il prodotto venne sempre somministrato a stomaco vuoto per un migliore assorbimento.

Sono stati selezionati ed inclusi nello studio 10 cani affetti da dermatite atopica. Sono stati inclusi cani che rispettavano i criteri per la dermatite atopica di Willemse16, con prurito stagionale, oppure con prurito permanente ma senza risposta a due mesi di dieta ipoallergenica rigorosa. Tutti i cani sono stati sottoposti a profilassi antipulci con fipronil o imidacloprid una volta al mese a partire da due mesi prima dell’inclusione sino al termine nello studio. Tutti i cani sono stati sottoposti a test di intradermoreazione con allergeni di pollini di alberi, erbe infestanti, graminacee, muffe, acari ed epiteli e con l’allergene della saliva della pulce. Per essere inclusi dovevano mostrare una o più positività agli allergeni ambientali unitamente a negatività all’antigene delle pulci. Gli animali inclusi non dovevano avere ricevuto terapie cortisoniche a breve durata, antistaminiche o a base di acidi grassi essenziali nei 15 giorni precedenti, o terapie cortisoniche a deposito nelle 6 settimane precedenti. Non potevano venire inclusi animali con problemi di piodermiti o infezioni da Malassezia ricorrenti o in atto, animali affetti da altre allergie concomitanti o parassitosi o altre malattie cutanee o non cutanee in atto. Durante lo studio non venne permessa alcuna terapia, inclusa l’iposensibilizzazione allergene-specifica. Gli unici trattamenti permessi furono la profilassi antipulci e della filariosi cardiopolmonare. La dieta non venne standardizzata ma non vennero permessi cambiamenti di dieta da due mesi prima dell’inclusione sino al termine dello studio.

Criteri di valutazione di efficacia L’efficacia venne determinata valutando e comparando al giorno 0 e al giorno 28 i seguenti parametri: - il prurito, l’eritema e le lesioni cutanee autoindotte, mediante una scala di valori da 0 (assente) a 3 (grave), in cinque aree corporee: testa e collo, tronco ventrale, tronco dorsale, arti anteriori e arti posteriori. Mentre l’eritema e le escoriazioni furono valutate dal Veterinario, il prurito fu valutato dal proprietario. - l’indice di gravità lesionale sviluppato per i cani con dermatite atopica CADESI-01.

Valutazione statistica La normalità della distribuzione dei dati è stata valutata mediante il test K-S, e il miglioramento della media dei parametri è stato determinato mediante il test T di Student per campioni appaiati. La significatività statistica venne posta a p<0.05. È stato utilizzato il software SAS per Windows 98.

Tavola 1 - Media dei valori per i parametri prurito, eritema, escoriazioni e CADESI al giorno 0 (barra celeste) e al giorno 28 (barra rossa).

346


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 347

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

RISULTATI

CONCLUSIONE

Vennero inclusi 4 incroci, due bassotti, 2 pitbull, un bulldog inglese e un golden retriever. Quattro cani erano maschi interi e 6 femmine sterilizzate. L’età media era di 4.5 anni. Nove animali su dieci hanno mostrato un miglioramento. Nello specifico si ottenne il seguente un miglioramento del punteggio medio per i singoli parametri (tavola 1): - 41% per il prurito - 50% per l’eritema - 78% per le escoriazioni - 49% per il CADESI-01

Questo studio suggerisce che SOLOSTEROL® DERMA possa essere di beneficio nell’alleviare la sintomatologia in corso di dermatite atopica del cane. I risultati dell’utilizzo del SOLOSTEROL® DERMA sulle manifestazioni di dermatite atopica del cane sono incoraggianti e meriterebbero un ulteriore approfondimento. È possibile che una somministrazione più prolungata, oltre le 4 settimane, possa dare una maggiore efficacia.

Bibliografia disponibile su richiesta La differenza delle medie risultò significativamente diminuita per i parametri prurito (p=0.006), eritema (p=0.3), lesioni e CADESI-01 (entrambi con p=0.01), ma non per le escoriazioni (p=0.11). Non sono stati osservati effetti avversi.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Chiara Noli - Servizi Dermatologici Veterinari, Peveragno (CN) www.servizidermavet.it

347


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 348

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

L’uso della ciclosporina nelle dermatiti allergiche del gatto Chiara Noli Med Vet, Dipl ECVD, Peveragno (CN)

Le manifestazioni di allergia nel gatto sono le malattie dermatologiche più frequenti e probabilmente più difficili da identificare e curare. Allergie differenti si manifestano con lo stesso quadro clinico così come la stessa allergia può avere quadri clinici differenti in gatti diversi.

rogna otodettica). Più raramente esso è una manifestazione di malattie immunomediate (lupus eritematoso, penfigo foliaceo), o, nel gatto persiano, del cosidetto “dirty face disease”, una forma idiopatica di dermatite facciale essudativa. L’allergia alimentare colpisce gatti di tutte le razze e di tutte le età, dai 3 mesi in su. Gli ingredienti che più frequentemente causano allergia sono carne bovina, pesce, latticini, o soja. Il prurito è più frequentemente facciale, tuttavia l’allergia si può manifestare anche con alopecia da leccamento addominale.

ALOPECIA SIMMETRICA FELINA Ritenuta erroneamente per molti anni una manifestazione di un disturbo endocrino, l’alopecia simmetrica felina è in realtà il risultato di un costante leccamento e strappamento del pelo da parte del gatto stesso. Per differenziare l’alopecia simmetrica felina autoindotta da altre cause (molto più rare) di perdita spontanea del pelo (dermatofitosi, problemi di muta, sindromi paraneoplastiche) ci si basa sull’esame tricoscopico del pelo, che evidenzia la presenza di radici in fase anagena e di punte spezzate. L’alopecia autoindotta, che colpisce spesso l’addome, il torace, la parte laterale delle cosce e occasionalmente anche il dorso, è la manifestazione o di una malattia pruriginosa (allergia, ectoparassitosi) o di un malessere psicogeno. Tutte e tre le allergie più comuni, l’allergia al morso della pulce, l’allergia alimentare e la dermatite atopica, possono manifestarsi con alopecia da leccamento.

COMPLESSO DEL GRANULOMA EOSINOFILICO Il granuloma eosinofilico, la placca eosinofilica e l’ulcera indolente sono raggruppate perché presentano eosinofilia tissutale. Nessuna di loro è una diagnosi, bensì esse sono quadri di reazione a diverse cause sottostanti, soprattutto di natura allergica. Il granuloma eosinofilico è una lesione lineare ben circoscritta, sopraelevata di colore giallo-rosa localizzata sul profilo posteriore della coscia. Può anche essere localizzato sulla commessura delle labbra, sui cuscinetti, nella cavità orale, sul mento e sulle ascelle. È generalmente asintomatica, ma può occasionalmente ulcerare e può diventare pruriginosa. È stato riscontrato in gatti di tutte le razze, può risolversi spontaneamente, è stato associato ad allergia al morso della pulce, allergia alimentare, dermatite atopica, punture di zanzara, ipersensibilità agli insetti, e può conoscere una predisposizione genetica.

DERMATITE MILIARE Nella dermatite miliare si osservano piccole papule e croste distribuite su tutto il tronco, associate spesso a prurito e occasionalmente a alopecia autoindotta e/o placche eosinofiliche. Come per le altre manifestazioni di allergia la dermatite miliare è un modello di reazione della cute ad una serie di differenti cause eziologiche, quali le allergie, alcune malattie parassitarie (cheyletiellosi) e la dermatofitosi.

La placca eosinofilica è una lesione ben circoscritta, da rotonda ad ovale, eritematosa, essudativa ed ulcerata, prevalentemente localizzata sull’addome e sulla faccia mediale delle coscie. È stata riscontrata in gatti di tutte le età e razze, ed è spesso stata osservata in associazione ad allergia alle pulci, dermatite atopica e allergia alimentare. La placca eosinofilica probabilmente si sviluppa in seguito al trauma cronico causato dalla lingua del gatto, quando si lecca le aree pruriginose e ha le stesse cause eziologiche dell’alopecia simmetrica felina autoindotta. L’infezione batterica secondaria è frequente.

PRURITO FACCIALE Il prurito facciale del gatto, che a volte può essere molto violento e presentare escoriazioni e ulcerazioni profonde autoindotte, può essere causato da malattie allergiche (per lo più allergia alimentare) o parassitarie (rogna notoedrica e

348


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 349

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

L’ulcera labiale (ulcera indolente) è una ulcera necrotica, ben circoscritta, con bordi sopraelevati, localizzata in modo mono- o bilaterale sulle labbra superiori. Normalmente non è dolorosa. È stata riscontrata in gatti di tutte le età e razze, e può essere associata alla placca e/o al granuloma eosinofilico. Anche l’ulcera labiale è stata associata alle allergie.

Se non è stata identificata la causa dell’allergia, o il gatto rifiuta il cambio di dieta, o non risponde alla iposensibilizzazione, è necessario ricorrere ad una terapia sintomatica. Gli antiistaminici (soprattutto clorfeniramina 2-4 mg/gatto BID) gli acidi grassi essenziali possono alleviare il prurito con risultati variabili (30-75% di successo). Un studio pilota ha suggerito che il palmidrol, un modulatore della degranulazione dei mastociti, può essere efficace nei casi di granuloma e placca eosinofilici. I corticosteroidi per via orale (prednisone o metilprednisolone 1-2 mg/kg SID poi ogni 48 ore) sono in grado di ottenere una regressione temporanea della sintomatologia, tuttavia il loro uso può dare effetti collaterali pericolosi, come il diabete mellito (anche irreversibile), la sindrome della fragilità cutanea felina, l’obesità e l’immunosoppressione. La ciclosporina rappresenta oggi una valida alternativa per la terapia sintomatica di mantenimento del gatto affetto da malattia cutanea allergica. Numerosi studi ne hanno provato l’efficacia in gatti affetti da prurito, alopecia autoindotta, granuloma o placca eosinofilica. Uno studio controllato da prednisolone non ha rilevato alcuna differenzia di efficacia fra i due trattamenti. Il dosaggio nel gatto (7 mg/kg, preferibilmente a digiuno) è leggermente superiore a quello utilizzato nel cane, viene consigliata la somministrazione quotidiana per 1-2 mesi, o fino all’ottenimento di risultati soddisfacenti, poi si può passare alla somministrazione ogni 48-72 ore come mantenimento. Nel gatto è sconsigliato l’uso in gravidanza, allattamento, nei gattini al di sotto dei 6 mesi, e in animali affetti da insufficienza renale, epatica, tumori maligno positivi per FIV e FeLV. Poiché sono stati descritti casi di toxoplasmosi felina anche fatali, contratta durante la somministrazione di ciclosporina nel gatto, si consiglia di cibare solo mangimi commerciali o alimenti cotti e di limitare la caccia negli animali che la praticano. Gli effetti collaterali più frequenti sono vomito o diarrea transitori entro la prima settimana di terapia (in un quarto dei gatti), una possibile perdita di peso per inappetenza che, in rari casi può portare alla lipidosi epatica (2% dei casi), per cui si consiglia di monitorare con regolarità il peso dell’animale. Come nel cane è stata descritta la iperplasia gengivale reversibile, mentre non sono state riportate riacutizzazioni di infezioni latenti da herpesvirus.

APPROCCIO DIAGNOSTICO Per tutte le lesioni sopra descritte la lista di diagnosi differenziali comprende le allergie (al morso delle pulci, alimentare ed dermatite atopica), le ectoparassitosi (cheyletiellosi, infestazione da Otodectes, rogna notoedrica e pulicosi). Inoltre si possono avere anche infezioni complicanti da batteri e/o da Malassezia. L’approccio diagnostico inizia dalla ricerca degli ectoparassiti mediante l’uso di un pettine per le pulci (a denti stretti), raschiati cutanei, scotch test, esame del cerume auricolare e trattamento antiectoparassitario di prova per 6-8 settimane. Con l’esame citologico degli essudati si può diagnosticare la presenza di infezioni batteriche o da Malassezia complicanti, o si può confermare il sospetto di allergia con l’osservazione di alte quantità di eosinofili nei preparati, in particolare da lesioni somiglianti a placche o granulomi eosinofilici. Nel dubbio una biopsia cutanea può confermare la diagnosi. Con una dieta ad eliminazione si possono identificare gli animali con allergia alimentare. La dieta va eseguita in maniera esclusiva con cibi preferibilmente cotti in casa e che il gatto non abbia mai mangiato precedentemente per la durata di 8 settimane. In alternativa si possono utilizzare cibi commerciali monoproteici o idrolisati. Nel caso che il gatto non tragga giovamento dalla dieta, e in presenza di un quadro clinico compatibile, si può emettere diagnosi di dermatite atopica.

TERAPIA In tutti i casi di lesioni erose o ulcerate, dovrebbe essere somministrato un ciclo di antibiotici per per 3-4 settimane (amoxicillina/ac. clavulanico 25 mg/kg/BID, cefalessina 30 mg/kg/BID, cefovecina 8 mg/kg sc ogni 14 giorni), per eliminare l’infezione batterica. Occasionalmente con gli antibiotici le lesioni regrediscono totalmente. Per gli animali con allergia alimentare la terapia si limita ad una dieta ipoallergenica di mantenimento. Per i gatti con dermatite atopica si può proporre al proprietario l’esecuzione di test allergologici (in genere sierologici) per l’identificazione degli allergeni responsabili dell’allergia, e la conseguente l’iposensibilizzazione.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Chiara Noli, Servizi Dermatologici Veterinari Peveragno (CN) www.servizidermavet.it

349


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 350

73째 CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Leishmaniosi e altre CVBD: i casi clinici diventano gioco di squadra!!! Gaetano Oliva Med Vet, Dr Ric, Napoli

ATTI NON PERVENUTI

350


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 351

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

L’osteoartrosi nel gatto: una review Bruno Peirone Med Vet, Dr Ric, Torino (I)

Lo studio di Hardie5 ha evidenziato la presenza di grave OA a carico del gomito nel 17% di una popolazione di 100 gatti anziani. Questa elevata incidenza solleva la questione se anche nel gatto siano presenti dei fattori scatenati l’artrosi, quali la displasia o l’incongruenza del gomito. L’osteoartrosi a carico dell’anca è spesso secondaria a displasia dell’anca4, mentre la gonartrosi è frequentemente associata a rottura del legamento crociato. Il fattore limitante che accomuna la maggior parte di questi studi è che sono di tipo retrospettivo, basati su radiografie effettuate per valutare il torace e per l’addome: in questo modo era possibile dare una valutazione su anche, gomiti e ginocchia, ma spesso carpi e tarsi non erano visibili.

INTRODUZIONE L’osteoartrosi (OA) è una patologia raramente diagnosticata nel gatto, mentre è di riscontro molto frequente nel cane. Negli ultimi anni però si sta prestando maggior attenzione all’osteoartrosi nel gatto come anche alle patologie articolari che ne costituscono le cause scatenanti. Studi recenti hanno dimostrato che il riscontro radiografico, spesso occasionale, di ostesoartrosi felina è decisamente elevato, ma che al dato radiografico spesso non corrisponde, o meglio non viene correlato, un quadro sintomatologico1, 2, 3 . Risulta pertanto auspicabile una maggiore sensibiltà clinica nella formulazione della diagnosi dell’osteartrosi felina. Anche se la presenza di osteoartrosi è tipica dei soggetti anziani, sicuramente le patologie articolari sottostanti possono determinare l’insorgenza di una sintomatologia clinica in età più precoce. Queste malattie comprendono: la displasia dell’anca, del gomito, la lussazione di rotula, l’osteocondrosi, tutte patologie che riconoscono una forte componente ereditaria. Tuttavia l’espressione della sintomatologia clinica è anche condizionata da differenti fattori predisponenti, quali crescita, nutrizione, attività motoria e peso.

DIAGNOSI La manifestazione clinica di OA è più frequente nei gatti obesi. Nello studio di Scarlett5 viene riportato che i gatti in soprappeso presentano zoppia clinica in una percentuale 3 volte superiore rispetto ai soggetti di peso normale I segni clinici possono differire rispetto a quelli riscontrati in altre specie. I gatti presentare spesso segni non-specifici, quali modificazioni comportamentali, inattività, riluttanza al movimento e al salto, mentre raramente presentano zoppia. I proprietari spesso riferiscono che vedono il loro gatto esitante a muoversi dopo un periodo di riposo, o che si presenta riluttante a compiere attività routinarie, quali salire le scale o arrampicarsi. A volte il dolore osteo-artrosico può modificare alcune attività fisiologiche: non è infrequente osservare alcuni gatti urinanare o defecare vicino al contenitore con la gabbietta, perché hanno difficoltà a salire dentro il contenitore. Spesso i segni clinici sopra riportati vengono erroneamente attribuiti ad un invecchiamento fisiologico dell’animale, sia da parte del clinico che del proprietario.

INCIDENZA I gatti affetti da OA sono solitamente anziani1. Uno studio ha rilevato che il 34% dei gatti di età superiore al 6,5 anni presentano i segni radiografici di OA2. Nei gatti di età superiore ai 12 anni l’incidenza di OA sfiora addirittura il 90%3. Ciononostante la diagnosi clinica di OA è ancora oggi irrilevante. Tuttavia solo il 33% dei gatti con segni radiografici di OA presentano sintomatologia clinica1. Ciò implica che i gatti sono in grado di compensare il dolore e il deficit funzionale in maniera molto più efficace rispetto ai cani, probabilmente in ragione della loro agilità e per la loro mole ridotta. Peraltro il livello d’attenzione sia del proprietario che del veterinario nei confronti della malattia non è così elevato come nel cane e spesso i segni clinici non vengono rilevati o vengono malinterpretati. In accordo con la letteratura3, 4, la colonna vertebrale rappresenta la sede preferenziale di OA felina, seguita dal gomito, dall’anca, dal ginocchio e infine dalla spalla.

I segni radiografici di OA non differiscono da quelli caratteristici del cane. In particolare si osserva proliferazione periostale, sclerosi subcondrale, modificazioni morfologiche dei capi articolari, calcificazioni intra-articolari e ispessimento capsulare6, 7. Rispetto al cane, l’inspessimento capsulare è meno marcato, mentre la presenza di calcificazioni intraarticolari risulta più frequente nel gatto.

351


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 352

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Figura 1 - Rx LL gomito e VD anca: si evidenziano chiari segni radiografici riferibili ad artrosi.

La diagnosi differenziale deve prendere in considerazione: • l’osteocondrodisplasia dello Scottish Fold • l’ipervitaminosi A • l’osteocondroma • l’osteocondromatosi sinoviale • la “slipped capital ephiphisiolisys” • l’artrite immunomediata e quella settica Relativamente a quest’ultimo gruppo, la presenza di patologie articolari bilaterali simmetriche, segnatamente a carico di carpo e tarso, dovrebbero orientare il clinico a valutare la presenza di patologie articolari infiammatorie e/o immuno-mediate.

TRATTAMENTO Il trattamento chirurgico dell’OA va riservato ai pazienti che presentano un’evidente causa scatenante, quale l’instabilità articolare e le rotture legamentose. Viceversa la maggior parte dei casi può essere trattata efficacemente in modo conservativo. I cardini del trattamento conservativo poggiano su: • Modificazioni dello stile di vita • Fisioterapia • Riduzione del peso per i gatti obesi • Trattamento del dolore.

Figura 2 - L’obesità nel gatto è considerata fattore predisponente all’insorgenza di artrosi.

3.

4. 5. 6.

BIBLIOGRAFIA

7. 1. 2.

Godfrey DR. Osteoarthritis in cats: a retrospective radiological study. J Small Anim Pract. 2005;46:425-9. Clarke SP, et al. Radiographic prevalence of degenerative joint disease in a hospital population of cats. Vet Rec 2005;157:793-9.

8.

352

Hardie EM, et al. Radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease in geriatric cats: 100 cases (1994-1997). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002; 220:628-32. Clarke SP, Bennet D. Feline osteoarthritis: a prospective study of 28 cases. J Small Anim Pract 2006;47:439-45. Scarlett JM, Donoghue S. Associations between body condition and disease in cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1998;212:1725-31. Hardie EM. Management of osteoarthritis in cats. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 1997;27:945-53. Graeme SA. Radiographic features of feline joint disease. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2000;30:281-302. Lascelles BD, et al. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of meloxicam in cats with painful locomotor disorders. J Small Anim Pract 2001; 42:587-93.


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 353

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

La malattia infiammatoria intestinale (IBD) del cane e del gatto: nuovi orizzonti di terapia Graziano Pengo Med Vet, Cremona

Giacomo Rossi Med Vet, Dr Ric, Camerino

La disreattività immunitaria coinvolge anche i mastociti enterici, elementi portanti del GALT (Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue)11. Normalmente presenti lungo tutto il tratto gastro-intestinale del cane e del gatto, dove presiedono ad importanti funzioni come la regolazione della permeabilità epiteliale e del sistema nervoso enterico11-12, i mastociti variano significativamente di numero e funzionalità in corso di IBD13-14. In particolare, la loro anomala attivazione determina l’eccessiva degranulazione di mediatori, sia preformati che sintetizzati ex novo, coinvolti nell’infiammazione intestinale e nei disturbi funzionali (es. diarrea) associati11,15. Recentemente, nei mastociti enterocolici è stata osservata una significativa espressione del recettore della triptasi mastocitaria (recettore proteinasi-attivato, PAR-2)16,17, anche costantemente associata alla secrezione di elevati livelli di TNF-alfa da parte dei mastociti enterocolici in corso di grave flogosi18. L’attivazione di PAR-2 induce forte infiltrazione granulocitaria enterocolica, sviluppo di edema parietale ed incremento della permeabilità paracellulare mucosale con secrezione elettrolitica attiva, soprattutto a livello colico19,20. Questi reperti patologici sottolineano ancora di più l’importanza e la centralità dei mastociti nella patogenesi dell’IBD.

INTRODUZIONE Con il termine di malattia infiammatoria intestinale (IBD, Inflammatory Bowel Disease) si intende un gruppo di enteropatie cronico-ricorrenti idiopatiche, classificate in base alla localizzazione e all’istopatologia dell’infiltrato infiammatorio mucosale, oltre che alla parziale/assente responsività a regimi dietetici e terapeutici1,2. Da un punto di vista clinico, i quadri di IBD canina e felina sono variabili, dipendendo dal tratto gastrointestinale coinvolto, dalla fase, di remissione o di riacutizzazione, della malattia, piuttosto che dalle complicanze legate ad una concomitante enteropatia proteino-disperdente e/o alla carenza di micronutrienti (cobalamina)1. In ogni caso, l’IBD rappresenta una causa comune di vomito e diarrea cronica in cani e gatti adulti, e tali sintomi risultano molto spesso associati a riduzione dell’appetito, perdita di peso e diminuita attività generale1,3. La diagnosi è ad esclusione, comportando la progressiva eliminazione di cause allergiche/infettive/parassitarie, alterazioni da malassorbimento, neoplasie (es. linfoma) e disordini non gastrointestinali, come l’insufficienza pancreatica esocrina, l’ipoadrenocorticismo o l’ipertiroidismo felino. La diagnosi di IBD viene confermata dall’endoscopia. L’analisi istopatologica delle biopsie consente di classificarla, in base all’infiltrato infiammatorio predominante nella lamina propria, in linfocitica-plasmacitica, eosinofilica, granulomatosa e istiocitico-ulcerativa5.

TERAPIA: DALLA TRADIZIONE ALL’INNOVAZIONE ORIENTATA AL MECCANISMO Le attuali terapie prevedono una combinazione di interventi, dietetici e farmacologici, mirati a minimizzare gli stimoli antigenici (diete ad eliminazione), modulare la risposta immunitaria (cortisonici, immunosoppressori), controllare il microbioma intestinale (antibiotici) e ristabilirne la corretta omeostasi (probiotici, prebiotici e micronutrienti)1. Le evidenze di efficacia risultano comunque sparse e contraddittorie, tant’è che l’IBD rimane un problema frustrante e di difficile gestione in gastroenterologia veterinaria1. Nell’ultimo decennio, la ricerca farmacologica ha individuato sostanze endogene di natura lipidica, sintetizzate localmente al bisogno (on demand), in risposta a stimoli lesivi, con l’obiettivo

EZIOPATOGENESI Come nell’uomo, anche nell’animale da compagnia l’IBD ha un’eziopatogenesi plurifattoriale, basata sull’interazione di fattori genetici, ambientali ed immunitari6. Alla suscettibilità che certe razze manifestano nei confronti delle enteropatie croniche7(es. PT, Boxer), si sommano infatti fattori quali la perdita di tolleranza ad antigeni ambientali, le alterazioni della barriera luminale, la modifica del microbioma intestinale (disbiosi) ed un’anomala risposta immunoregolatoria, sia innata che acquisita, diretta contro la flora enterica commensale8-10.

353


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 354

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

di proteggere e ripristinare l’equilibrio omeostatico tissutale. La più nota nel settore veterinario è la Palmitoiletanolamide (PEA): capostipite delle aliamidi, così denominate per la capacità di controllare infiammazione e dolore down-modulando l’eccessiva degranulazione dei mastociti tissutali (effetto ALIA, Autacoid Local Injury Antagonism)21. In gastroenterologia, si è dimostrato che i livelli mucosali endogeni di PEA aumentano significativamente sia in modelli sperimentali di infiammazione cronica22, sia nella IBD dell’uomo (colite ulcerosa)23 e del cane (Petrosino S, unpublished results). Tale aumento è da interpretarsi come naturale meccanismo di difesa locale, tant’è che in studi preclinici la somministrazione di PEA normalizza in maniera dose-dipendente la motilità intestinale alterata dalla flogosi cronica24, ed esercita significativi effetti protettivi ed antinfiammatori in corso di danno ischemico intestinale25. Gli effetti sono probabilmente da ascriversi al meccanismo ALIA con cui la PEA controlla la degranulazione dei mastociti enterici21, diminuendo il rilascio di mediatori inducenti l’infiammazione mucosale e l’alterato transito intestinale. Le evidenze emerse da alcuni casi clinici mostrano come la somministrazione orale di PEA normalizzi sia la frequenza delle evacuazioni che la consistenza delle feci in cani e gatti affetti da IBD26,27, determinando nel cane un miglioramento non solo clinico, ma anche di altri parametri (es. livello di attività generale, vomito)3,27.

12.

13.

14.

15. 16.

17.

18. 19.

20.

21.

22.

BIBLIOGRAFIA 23. 1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9. 10. 11.

Jergens AE, Simpson KW, (2012), Inflammatory bowel disease in veterinary medicine, Front Biosci, 4: 1404-1419. Simpson KW, Jergens AE, (2011), Pitfalls and progress in the diagnosis and management of canine inflammatory bowel disease, Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract, 41(2):381-398. Jergens AE, Schreiner CA, Frank DE et al., (2003), A scoring index for disease activity in canine inflammatory bowel disease, J Vet Intern Med, 17: 291-297. Hall EJ, Simpson KW, (2000), Diseases of the large intestine. In: Ettinger SJ, Feldmann EC eds, Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Saunders WB, Philadelphia, pp. 1238-1256. Washabau RJ, Day MJ, Willard MD et al., (2010), Endoscopic, biopsy, and histopathologic guidelines for the evaluation of gastrointestinal inflammation in companion animals. J Vet Intern Med, 24(1):10-26. Cerquetella M, Spaterna A, Laus F et al., (2010), Inflammatory bowel disease in the dog: differences and similarities with humans. World J Gastroenterol, 16: 1050-1056. Kathrani A, Werling D, Allenspach K, (2011), Canine breeds at high risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease in the south-easternh UK. Vet Rec, 169(24): 635. Suchodolski S, (2011), Companion animals symposium: microbes and gastrointestinal health of dogs and cats. J Anim Sci, 89(5): 15201530. Allenspach K, (2011), Clinical immunology and immunopathology of the canine and feline intestine. Vet Clin Small Anim Pract, 41: 345-360. Jergens AE, (2004), Clinical assessment of disease activity for canine inflammatory bowel disease. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc, 40(6):437-445. de Winter BY, van den Wijngaard R, de Jonge WJ., (2012), Intestinal mast cells in gut inflammation and motility disturbances. Biochim Biophys Acta, 1822(1):66-73.

24.

25.

26.

27.

van Diest SA, Stanisor OI, Boeckxstaens GE et al., Relevance of mast cell-nerve interactions in intestinal nociception. Biochim Biophys Acta, 1822(1): 74-84. Kleinschmidt S, (2007), Characterization of mast cell numbers and subtypes in biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract of dogs with lymphocytic-plasmacytic or eosinophilic gastroenterocolitis. Vet Immunol Immunopathol, 120: 80-92. Kleinschmidt S, Harder J, Nolte I et al., (2010), Phenotypical characterization, distribution and quantification of different mast cell subtypes in transmural biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract of cats with inflammatory bowel disease. Vet Immunol Immunopathol, 137(34):190-200. Bischoff SC, (2009), Physiological and pathophysiological functions of intestinal mast cells. Semin Immunopathol, 31(2): 185-205. Kunzelmann K, Schreiber R, Konig J et al., (2002), Ion transport induced by proteinase-activated receptors (PAR2) in colon and airways. Cell Biochem Biophys, 36: 209-214. Molino M, Barnathan ES, Numerof R et al., (1997), Interactions of mast cell tryptase with thrombin receptors and PAR-2. J Biol Chem, 272: 4043-4049. Kim JA, Choi SC, Yun KJ et al., (2003), Expression of protease-activated receptor 2 in ulcerative colitis. Inflamm Bowel Dis, 9:224-229. Cenac N, Coelho AM, Nguyen C et al., (2002), Induction of intestinal inflammation in mouse by activation of proteinase-activated receptor-2. Am J Pathol, 161:1903-1915. Mall M, Gonska T, Thomas J et al., (2002), Activation of ion secretion via proteinase-activated receptor-2 in human colon. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol, 282: G200-G210. Re G, Barbero R, Miolo A et al., (2007), Palmitoylethanolamide, endocannabinoids and related cannabimimetic compounds in protection against tissue inflammation and pain. Potential use in companion animals. Vet J, 173: 23-32. D’Argenio G, Petrosino S, Gianfrani C et al., (2007), Overactivity of the intestinal endocannabinoid system in celiac disease and in methotrexate-treated rats. J Mol Med, 85(5): 523-530. Darmani NA, Izzo AA, Degenhardt B et al., (2005), Involvement of the cannabimimetic compound, N-palmitoylethanolamine, in inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. A review of the available pre-clinical data and first human studies. Neuropharmacology, 48(8): 11541163. Capasso R, Izzo AA, Fezza F et al., (2001), Inhibitory effect of palmitoylethanolamide on gastrointestinal motility in mice. Br J Pharmacol, 134(5): 945-950. Di Paola R, Impellizzeri D, Torre A et al., (2012), Effects of palmitoylethanolamide on intestinal injury and inflammation caused by ischemia-reperfusion in mice. J Leukoc Biol, Apr 2. [Epub ahead of print]. Pengo G, Miolo A., (2011), Utilizzo di palmitoiletanolamide micronizzata nell’infiammazione intestinale cronica del gatto: descrizione di 9 casi clinici. Atti 71° congresso nazionale SCIVAC, Arezzo, 2123 ottobre, pp. 139-141. Pengo G, Miolo A., (2012), Utilizzo di palmitoiletanolamide micronizzata nell’infiammazione gastrointestinale idiopatica (IBD) del cane: descrizione di 7 casi clinici. Atti 72° congresso internazionale SCIVAC, Milano, 23-25 marzo, pp. 299-301.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Graziano Pengo Clinica Veterinaria Sant’Antonio, Strada Statale Paullese 415 km 39, n.6, 26020 Madignano (Cremona), E-mail: grazianopengocv@gmail.com Giacomo Rossi, Professore Associato di Patologia Generale Veterinaria, Fisiopatologia e Immunopatologia, Dipartimento Scienze Veterinarie, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università di Camerino E-mail: giacomo.rossi@unicam.it

354


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 355

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Management della fibrillazione atriale Manuela Perego Med Vet, Samarate, Varese, Italia Marco Baron Toaldo, Med Vet, PhD, Bologna Tommaso Vezzosi, Med Vet, Samarate, Varese, Italia Roberto Santilli, Med Vet, PhD, Dipl ECVIM-CA(Cardiology), Samarate, Varese, Italia

La fibrillazione atriale (FA) è un disturbo del ritmo sopraventricolare caratterizzato da un’attivazione atriale incoordinata con conseguente deterioramento della funzione meccanica. La FA è caratterizzata dalla presenza di rapide oscillazioni della linea isoelettrica denominate onde f che sostituiscono le onde P e dalla presenza di una risposta ventricolare irregolare che, nel caso di conduzione atrioventricolare intatta, risulta rapida. La penetranza ventricolare in corso di FA è dipendente dalle proprietà elettrofisiologiche del nodo atrioventricolare, dallo stato del tono vagale e del tono simpatico, dall’eventuale presenza di vie accessorie atrioventricolari e dalla somministrazione di farmaci. L’irregolarità e l’elevata frequenza della risposta ventricolare in corso di FA causano un’alterazione del riempimento ventricolare associato a un deterioramento della funzione sistolica ventricolare con conseguente riduzione della gittata e della portata cardiaca. In medicina umana, diversi sistemi di classificazione della FA sono stati proposti in relazione alle caratteristiche elettrocardiografiche, al mappaggio endocavitario e alle caratteristiche cliniche. La classificazione a oggi in uso prevede la distinzione dei quadri di FA in parossistica nel caso in cui l’aritmia inizi e termini in maniera spontanea, persistente nel caso in cui il disturbo del ritmo sia presente per un periodo superiore a sette giorni e permanente nel caso in cui le terapie di natura farmacologica o elettrica non consentano il ripristino del ritmo sinusale. Un ulteriore sistema prevede la definizione di FA primaria (lone atrial fibrillation) nel caso in cui il disturbo del ritmo sopraventricolare non sia accompagnato da patologie di natura cardio-strutturale e FA secondaria nel caso in cui il disturbo del ritmo risulti una conseguenza della patologia cardio-strutturale sottostante. Nel cane la FA è l’aritmia più comunemente riconosciuta con una prevalenza compresa fra lo 0,04% e il 5,9%. La FA rappresenta il 10% di tutti i disturbi del ritmo diagnosticati. La prevalenza di questo disturbo del ritmo risulta superiore nei cani di grossa taglia rispetto ai soggetti di piccola taglia e l’aritmia è rara nei cani con età inferiore a 12 anni con la presentazione più precoce riportata in letteratura in soggetti di taglia gigante di età compresa fra 1 e 2 anni. La FA è un disturbo del ritmo comune nei soggetti di razza Irish Wolfhound, Alani e terranova. La prevalenza dell’aritmia nei

soggetti di razza Irish Wolfhound è risultata essere del 21% in un gruppo di 500 cani analizzato da Vollmar e del 10,5% in un gruppo di cani analizzato da Brownlie. La prevalenza complessiva della FA nella popolazione di cani aumenta con l’età e con la gravità della patologia strutturale sottostante che può essere rappresentata da cardiomiopatia dilatativa o da malattia valvolare mitralica cronica. I soggetti di sesso maschile risultano più frequentemente colpiti rispetto alle femmine. I cani di razza gigante sviluppano, invece, FA in assenza di patologie cardio-strutturali sottostanti. Questa condizione patologica è assimilabile alla lone atrial fibrillation riconosciuta in campo umano. L’età al momento della diagnosi di quest’aritmia risulta variabile da 1 a 14 anni. L’esame clinico in un paziente affetto da FA consente di rilevare all’auscultazione un ritmo irregolare con una frequenza che può oscillare da 70 a 270 bpm in relazione alla malattia cardio-strutturale sottostante e all’eventuale presenza d’insufficienza cardiaca congestizia e allo stato del sistema nervoso autonomo. A causa dell’elevata irregolarità della lunghezza di ciclo ventricolare, la stima della frequenza cardiaca effettuata mediante il metodo auscultatorio può risultare non accurata anche se eseguita da personale esperto. L’esame elettrocardiografico rappresenta lo strumento diagnostico essenziale per la diagnosi di FA. Le caratteristiche elettrocardiografiche della FA sono rappresentate dall’assenza di onde P sostituite da onde f associate alla presenza di complessi QRS stretti e intervalli R-R irregolari. Alcune eccezioni sono rappresentate dalla FA pre-eccitata in cui l’irregolarità degli intervalli R-R è accompagnata dalla presenza di complessi QRS larghi e dalla FA con blocco atrioventricolare di III° caratterizzata da intervalli R-R regolari. L’iter diagnostico in un soggetto affatto da FA prevede, inoltre, l’esecuzione di un esame ecocardiografico al fine di definire l’eventuale presenza di patologie cardio-strutturali sottostanti. Inoltre, la stima delle dimensioni atriali in corso di FA può rappresentare un indice prognostico in caso di attuazione di cardioversione elettrica. Dal punto di vista terapeutico, la FA può essere gestita mediante il controllo del ritmo o il controllo della frequenza. Il controllo del ritmo prevede il ripristino del ritmo sinusale mediante terapia farmacologica o elettrica, mentre il con-

355


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 356

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

trollo della frequenza prevede l’impiego di farmaci nodobloccanti in grado di controllare la penetranza ventricolare dell’aritmia. Studi effettuati in campo umano, hanno dimostrato che il controllo della frequenza fornisce uguali benefici in termini di qualità di vita e di mortalità a lungo termine rispetto al controllo del ritmo. In campo veterinario, non esistono al momento dati che indichino che la strategia del controllo della frequenza presenti una mortalità e una morbidità e una mortalità superiore alla conversione in ritmo sinusale. Il punto critico nella gestione della FA nel cane è rappresentato dalla definizione della frequenza ventricolare in grado di garantire l’assenza di peggioramento emodinamico e una buona qualità di vita. In medicina umana, diversi studi hanno definito l’intervallo di frequenza ventricolare raccomandato (60-80 bpm a riposo, 110-120 bpm sotto sforzo) mentre in medicina veterinaria questi dati risultano al momento limitati. Diversi studi hanno provato che l’elettrocardiogramma con durata standard rappresenta un mezzo diagnostico non adeguato a definire la penetranza ventricolare della fibrillazione atriale. Al contrario, il monitoraggio del ritmo cardiaco prolungato eseguito con metodica Holter è considerato come approccio diagnostico essenziale per la definizione della frequenza ventricolare della FA e dell’eventuale efficacia terapeutica dei farmaci antiaritmici. Tuttavia, solamente uno studio in letteratura riporta le caratteristiche del monitoraggio Holter in 18 cani affetti da FA. In relazione ai dati rilevati mediante monitoraggio Holter, uno studio ha rilevato che la frequenza ventricolare media dei soggetti affetti da FA con patologie cardiostrutturale sottostanti risulta spesso superiore a 170 bpm e in alcuni soggetti può essere superiore a 220 bpm. La frequenza cardiaca media in un soggetto di grossa taglia in ritmo sinusale risulta solitamente inferiore a 90 bpm. I soggetti che presentano lone atrial fibrillation possono mostrare frequenze medie nelle 24 ore simili ai soggetti in ritmo sinusale. La terapia antiaritmica nodo-bloccante in questi soggetti può, quindi, risultare non necessaria. In linea generale, le indicazioni estrapolate da studi presenti in letteratura su un numero limitato di soggetti indicano che i cani affetti da FA devono essere sottoposti a trattamento antiaritmico quando presentano una frequenza ventricolare media superiore a 140-150 bpm. Ulteriori informazioni relative alla frequenza ventricolare minima, media e massima ed alla eventuale presenza di disturbi del ritmo ventricolare e della loro organizzazione sono necessari al fine di stabilire i corretti obiettivi della terapia antiaritmica in corso di FA e l’efficacia terapeutica dei farmaci somministrati. Un numero totale di 2060 monitoraggi Holter è stato valutato da gennaio 2005 a dicembre 2010 presso il servizio di telemedicina ecgontheweb. Di questi soggetti, 347 cani erano affetti da FA persistente. Per ogni monitoraggio Holter sono stati analizzati la frequenza ventricolare minima, media e massima e la presenza e grado di organizzazione dei disturbi del ritmo ventricolare in relazione alla presenza o assenza di segni di insufficienza cardiaca congestizia (ICC), alla presenza o assenza di patologie cardio-strutturali sottostanti, alla presenza o assenza di disfunzione sistolica ventricolare sinistra, alla presenza o assenza di terapia antiaritmica nodo-bloccante in atto. L’analisi multivariata per l’età, il sesso, il peso corporeo e la razza ha rive-

lato una relazione statisticamente significativa con la frequenza ventricolare minima e media (rispettivamente p=0.041 e p=0.01), mentre non sono state definire relazioni statisticamente significative con la frequenza ventricolare massima (p=0.82). Inoltre, sono state rilevate differenze statisticamente significative fra la frequenza ventricolare media dei soggetti con FA senza malattie cardiache sottostanti e senza ICC e soggetti con FA con malattie cardiache sottostanti in assenza di ICC e con ICC. La frequenza ventricolare minima si è rivelata essere statisticamente differente nel gruppo con FA senza malattie cardiache e senza ICC rispetto ai gruppi di soggetti con FA e malattie cardiache sottostanti con e senza disfunzione sistolica. L’analisi dei disturbi del ritmo ventricolare ha consentito di rilevare una differenza statisticamente significativa fra il gruppo di soggetti con FA senza patologie cardiache sottostanti e il gruppo di soggetti con FA con patologie cardiache sottostanti con e senza disfunzione sistolica. La scelta del trattamento antiaritmico dei soggetti affetti da FA dovrebbe quindi essere determinato, oltre che sulla base dei rilievi elettrocardiografici ed ecocardiografici, considerando i dati ottenuti dall’analisi del monitoraggio prolungato secondo la metodica Holter. In medicina veterinaria, i dati riportati indicano che il trattamento della fibrillazione atriale può essere effettuato mediante terapia elettrica o terapia farmacologica. Il trattamento mediante terapia elettrica, definito cardioversione elettrica, è rappresentato da una procedura secondo la quale viene rilasciata uno shock elettrico trans-toracico bifasico sincronizzato con il ritmo cardiaco atto a ripristinare l’attività sinusale in soggetti con fibrillazione atriale o tachicardia sopraventricolare. Questi disturbi del ritmo vengono interrotti dallo shock elettrico mediante una depolarizzazione simultanea di tutte le cellule miocardiche eccitabili con prolungamento del periodo refrattario. I dati riportati in letteratura dimostrano che la cardioversione elettrica è una procedura efficace, sebbene il tempo in cui il soggetto permane in ritmo sinusale sia correlato alla presenza di patologie cardio-strutturali sottostanti e alla cronicità del disturbo del ritmo sopraventricolare. Anche in medicina umana non esiste accordo relativamente alla pratica di questa procedura, sebbene le linee guida oggi in uso la indichino come necessaria in soggetti di età giovane, gravemente sintomatici. Sebbene siano presenti dati discordanti, in medicina umana i fattori in grado di prevedere il mantenimento del controllo del ritmo sono rappresentati dalla durata della FA inferire a 3 mesi, dall’età del soggetto, dalla riduzione dello strain atriale e dalla frequenza delle onde di depolarizzazione atriale. Diversi meccanismi riportati spiegano l’effetto deleterio della cronicità della FA sul mantenimento del ritmo sinusale dopo cardioversione elettrica. In primo luogo, è stato ampiamente dimostrato che immediatamente dopo lo sviluppo di FA inizia un rimodellamento di natura elettrica e strutturale della muscolatura atriale. Dal punto di vista elettrofisiologico, il rimodellamento atriale prevede alterazioni delle correnti di ioni potassio attraverso i canali Ito, IKs e delle correnti di ioni calcio attraverso i canali ICaL. Queste alterazioni ioniche rappresentano un trigger della FA dal momento che accorciano la durata del potenziale d’azione

356


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 357

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

favorendo la presenza di micro-rientro funzionale. Anche in medicina veterinaria, è stato dimostrato che la presenza di malattie cardio-strutturali e la durata della FA presentano un effetto significativo sul mantenimento del rito sinusale dopo cardioversione elettrica. Inoltre, la durata della FA è inversamente correlata alla durata del ritmo sinusale in soggetti affetti e non affetti da malattia cardio-strutturale. La terapia farmacologica della FA è volta al controllo della penetranza ventricolare mediante l’utilizzo di farmaci nodo-bloccanti. Il farmaco più comunemente utilizzato per il trattamento della FA è rappresentato dalla digossina, sebbene questo principio attivo, in alcuni casi possa non essere sufficiente nel controllo della FA con risposta ventricolare eccessivamente rapida. Inoltre, la digossina, a causa del suo meccanismo di azione, non risulta efficace nel controllo della velocità di conduzione lungo il nodo atrioventricolare nei periodo caratterizzati da elevato tono del sistema nervoso autonomo simpatico. Un altro farmaco antiaritmico che può essere utilizzato per l’azione nodo-bloccante è il diltiazem, un principio attivo con proprietà calcio-bloccanti. Dati riportati in medicina veterinaria hanno dimostrato che in soggetti affetti da FA con rapida risposta ventricolare e malattie cardiostrutturali sottostanti sottoposti a monitoraggio Holter la somministrazione dell’associazione fra digossina e diltiazem per due settimane risulta superiore nel controllo della frequenza ventricolare rispetto alla somministrazione in mono-terapia di digitale o diltiazem. L’associazione fra digossina e diltiazem consente, infatti, di mantenere la frequenza ventricolare della FA a livelli inferiori a 140 bpm per circa il 60% del tempo, mentre entrambi le mono-terapie consentono di ottenere questi valori solamente per il 12% del tempo. In campo umano, questa differenza è attribuita al miglior controllo da parte dell’associazione digossina-diltiazem della frequenza ventricolare nei periodi d’ipertono simpatico. Infatti, l’azione calcio-bloccante fornita dal diltiazem completa l’effetto vago-mimetico ottenuto mediante la somministrazione di digossina. Recenti studi in medicina umana hanno individuato altri farmaci come potenzialmente utili nella terapia della FA. I farmaci ACE-inibitori e i farmaci bloccanti il recettore dell’angiotensina II hanno mostrato avere, almeno a livello sperimentale, un effetto di prevenzione della FA. Questo effetto è ottenuto mediante l’attenuazione delle modificazioni strutturali del muscolo cardiaco atriale indotte dalla FA. È stato, infatti, dimostrato che la somministrazione di questi principi attivi previene la dilatazione atriale sinistra, la fibrosi atriale, il rallentamento della velocità di conduzione. Un altro nuovo approccio terapeutico è rappresentato dalla somministrazione di farmaci sodio bloccati con azione selettiva sul miocardio atriale. Il principale farmaco di questa categoria è rappresentato dalla ranolazina, un potente bloccante dei canali INa. Il blocco delle correnti len-

te attraverso i canali dello ione sodio induce un prolungamento del potenziale d’azione che rende più difficoltoso il permanere dei microcircuiti di rientro funzionale alla base del mantenimento della FA. In medicina umana, oltre alla cardioversione elettrica e al trattamento farmacologico, l’ablazione con radiofrequenza rappresenta un’opzione interventistica per il trattamento della FA. Lo scopo dell’ablazione con radiofrequenza è rappresentato dall’eliminazione dei fattori d’innesco in grado di dare origine alla FA e dall’alterazione dei meccanismi di rientro in grado di mantenere nel tempo l’aritmia. LA strategia ablativa più comunemente utilizzata è basata sull’isolamento delle vene polmonari mediante la creazione di lesioni circonferenziali attorno agli osti delle vene polmonari dal momento che questa localizzazione anatomica rappresenta frequentemente il trigger e il fattore di mantenimento dell’aritmia. Infatti, in questa area anatomica, oltre essere presenti focolai ectopici ad elevata frequenza di scarica in grado di indurre FA, sono anche localizzati circuiti di rientro che possono garantire la perpetuazione del disturbo del ritmo. Inoltre, la creazione di lesioni circonferenziali è in grado di alterare l’innervazione simpatica e parasimpatica dei gangli autonomici che rappresenta un potenziale fattore d’innesco della FA. Un’ulteriore possibilità terapeutica interventistica attuabile in medicina veterinaria è rappresentata dall’ablazione del nodo atrioventricolare associata all’impianto di un cardiostimolatore biventricolare. La metodica consente di eliminare la conduzione atrioventricolare degli impulsi sopraventricolari e di controllare artificialmente il ritmo ventricolare mediante un pacemaker biventricolare dotato di un elettrodo posto a livello di apice ventricolare destro e di un elettrodo posto in una vena infero-laterale del seno coronarico che stimola con adeguato intervallo interventricolare il ventricolo sinistro dal punto di vista epicardico. Studi effettuati in medicina umana hanno dimostrato che i tempi di sopravvivenza dei soggetti sottoposti a questa procedura interventistica sono simili a quelli dei soggetti trattati con terapia farmacologica. In medicina veterinaria questa terapia è riservata a pazienti che mostrano refrattarietà al trattamento farmacologico.

Indirizzo per la corrsipondenza: Manuela Perego, Roberto Santilli, Tommaso Vezzosi Clinica Veterinaria Malpensa Viale Marconi, 27 21017 - Samarate, Varese, Italia E-mail: m.perego@ecgontheweb.com Pagina Web: www.ecgontheweb.com Marco Baron Toaldo Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche Veterinarie Università degli Studi di Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50 I-40064 Ozzano Emilia, Bologna, Italia

357


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 358

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

L’uso di Ermidrà spray idratante per la normalizzazione dei difetti della barriera epidermica protettiva Didier Pin Med Vet, PhD, Dipl ECVD, Lione (F)

ATTI NON PERVENUTI

358


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 359

73째 CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Muscle and tendon injuries in sporting dogs, classification, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis Alessandro Piras Med Vet, SCV, MRCVS, ISVS, Northern Ireland - UK

Contusions involve more often the deep portion of the muscle, adjacent to the periosteum. They are traumatic injuries caused by a concussive trauma resulting in local vascular damage with extravasation of blood from the capillary bed or from the main vessels and subsequent hematoma formation. Unless the contusion is massive, treatment is usually unnecessary. Muscle lacerations are a result of fights or collisions against sharp objects. The treatment, either conservative or surgical, of muscle lacerations depends on the severity of the injury, however in either case the basic principles of treatment of open wounds should be followed. A basic understanding of how muscles are injured during athletic activity needs to be appreciated to better approach the diagnosis and treatment of strain injuries. Concentric contraction, the most common type of contraction, consists of a shortening of the muscle following the motor unit activation. This is in contrast to eccentric contraction, in which the muscle lengthens during its contraction. There are contractile (active) and passive elements within the muscle that aid in the function and structure of the muscle. The contractile elements are muscle fibers that are activated during contraction. The passive elements of the muscle include the connective tissue within the muscle and are not dependent on contraction of the muscle. Muscles innately protect themselves and joint structures from injury. It is a combination of these passive and contractile elements which contributes to the muscles ability to absorb energy and this ability is greatly enhanced when the muscle is activated during concentric contraction. Muscle strains occur when the muscle is elongated passively or when the muscle is activated during stretch by a powerful eccentric contraction. Eccentric contraction of the muscle contributes to injury by generating high muscle forces during lengthening, adding to the forces already produced by the passive, connective tissue element. Any condition that diminishes the ability of the muscle to contract, diminishes its ability to absorb energy, leaving the muscle more susceptible to injuries. Strain injuries can vary in severity depending on the amount of muscle fibers involved from a partial to a complete rupture. Although the injury can occur at any location in the muscle, muscle ruptures occur more frequently at the distal musculotendinous junction, leaving a small amount of muscle tis-

MUSCLE INJURIES Muscle injuries are a frequent problem in athletic dogs. Most of the high performance athletes like racing and coursing dogs are likely to suffer some type of muscle injury during their career. Typical muscle skeletal injuries, such as contusions, lacerations, strains and complete tears usually occur either during the competition or training sessions. In addition, certain breeds, like Greyhounds, can sustain serious muscle injury with minimal apparent exertion, such as, while being walked on lead or exercising in a small paddock. There are several predisposing conditions that can influence the frequency and severity of muscle injuries in sporting dogs. Individual predisposing factors include; age, conformation, previous injuries, temperament, training program and diet. Specifically for racing Greyhounds; track shape, racing surface, care and maintenance of the track, speed and conduct of the hare, number of dogs in the race, race time and length of kenneling are influencing factors for musculoskeletal injury. For other types of working dogs, the nature of the terrain and its conditions are determining conditions. Weather conditions such as relative humidity, temperature and rain fall can also play an important role. Research by Bloomberg and Dugger on track injuries in racing Greyhounds confirms this data and recognizes that muscle injuries comprise from 3 to 25% of the total injuries. Stretch induced injuries or strains and contusions seem to be prominent in Greyhound Sports Medicine. These injuries can lead to serious pain and disability causing loss of performance and downtime from training.

TYPE OF INJURIES AND INJURY MECHANISM Muscles injuries can be of a different nature in relationship to the injury mechanism. Contusions, strains and lacerations are generally considered to be minor injuries while partial and complete ruptures are considered major injuries.

359


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 360

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

sue attached to the tendon. It has also been observed that muscles that cross multiple joints, such as the gastrocnemious or muscles with complex architecture are more susceptible to strain injuries.

quite evident especially in short coated breeds due to the obvious swelling or “dropped” appearance of the muscle, e.g., gracilis muscle rupture in sight hounds, or abnormal stance and limb position. Some other muscle injuries are quite difficult to diagnose because of structural complex of the involved muscle or its anatomical location. Detection of muscle injuries by palpation can be very subjective. A systematic approach is essential, and everyone should develop their own palpation technique and examination pattern. The excellent work produced by Davis provides an invaluable guide to palpation and diagnosis of muscular injuries and is an exceptional reference. Here are some guidelines to keep in mind when conducting a physical examination of the musculoskeletal system: - Whenever possible check every individual muscle along its entire length from the origin to the muscle belly and to its insertion. Palpation of the muscle must be performed both in the flexed and stretched positions. - Always work in a systematic manner comparing one side to the contralateral side looking for asymmetry and different pain responses. - Palpate gently, looking for minor swelling, edema, loss of anatomical detail and inability to resist palpation. Check for tears in the fascial sheath and splits along the muscle fibers. - Chronic injuries are characterized by the presence of a distinct fibrous scar that fills a gap between the normal muscle fibers or by a “cording” at the musculotendinous junction. - Examine the patient while walking at different speeds; sometimes lesions of specific muscles, in their acute stage, can be identified by the typical lameness that they produce. Chronic lesions, with partial loss of function and shortening or lengthening of the musculotendinous unit, may provoke a characteristic “swinging” movement of the limb during the walk, for example contracture of the gracilis muscle. These abnormal limb movements are caused by the inability of the muscle fibers to contract and relax in synchrony with the other normal muscles, by eccentric multifocal contractions or by scar tissue that act as an elastic band.

MUSCLE INJURIES CLASSIFICATION For convenience, Hills has classified greyhound muscle injuries into three categories according to severity. Although this classification was originally created for racing dogs it can be applied to any dog. Stage I: myositis, simple contusion or bruising. This injury is caused usually by direct trauma or overstretching of the muscle. There is minimal muscle fiber disruption and no hematoma formation present. Clinical signs include: localized pain and inability to resist to firm palpation. Swelling and heat are minimal to absent, there is usually minimal to no loss of function. Stage II: myositis, minor fiber disruption, tearing of the fascial sheath. Clinical signs include: marked pain on palpation, localized swelling and slight heat, palpable tear in the fascial sheath. A slight lameness can be present for the first 24-48 hours following the injury. Stage III: tearing of the muscle sheath, major disruption of the muscle fibers and hematoma formation. Clinical signs include: obvious pain, palpable disruption of the normal muscle architecture, swelling and heat, variable degrees of lameness. Sporting dogs are usually very stoic animals and they can often walk without showing any lameness even after a severe muscle injury. If lameness persists longer than 48 hours an additional injury or an injury to other structure should be suspected.

DIAGNOSIS Clinical history: an accurate clinical history is essential before proceeding with the physical examination. Given the clinical history, it is often possible to identify one or more of the mentioned predisposing factors. It is important to collect data regarding the type of athletic activity, the time of onset of the symptoms, the severity of the injury, and the evolution of the lameness. In patients that are subject to training and competitive activities, the injuries tend to be repetitive (e.g. dogs racing around an oval track, utility dogs or agility dogs) and are often called typical or “ professional” injuries.

Ultrasound: While sonographic findings in muscle injuries are well known in human field they have not been studied extensively in small animals. Ultrasonography is an invaluable diagnostic tool as it allows a more precise evaluation of the extension and severity of the muscle damage. The 7.5 Mega Hertz, fluid offset probe is generally considered ideal for muscle and tendon evaluation offering an optimal panoramic view of the muscle together with excellent definition of both the superficial and deep structures.

Videotapes: The careful analysis of the racing behavior in Greyhounds can offer invaluable information regarding the site of a subtle or a chronic injury. The same considerations can be extended to other working breeds.

Magnetic resonance imaging is an extremely useful diagnostic technique. The extreme accuracy of the results make it one of best diagnostic tools, however, obvious economical considerations restrict the use of magnetic resonance imaging to a very few cases.

Physical examination: Most of the muscle injuries in sporting dogs are diagnosed by direct palpation. Some injuries are

360


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 361

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

TREATMENT PRINCIPLES

TREATMENT FOR SPECIFIC CONDITIONS

The first treatment goal is to reduce local bleeding and consequent hematoma formation and to decrease inflammation and the edematous process. Reducing swelling improves local circulation, decreases pain and enables an early return to function. Cold: The application of cold on the acutely injured muscle, reduces bleeding and inflammation by causing vasoconstriction. Cold can be applied in the form of ice packs or chemical refrigerants. Guidelines: ice pack the affected area for 15 to 20 minutes for 2-3 (up to 6 times per day according to the physiotherapists, i.e. as much as possible) times a day for the first 48 hours after the injury. Avoid excessive cooling and complete wrapping around distal extremities. Compression bandages: Whenever allowed by the anatomical conformation of the affected area, a compressive bandage should be applied. Compression bandages restrict movements reducing post-traumatic and postoperative discomfort, and additionally prevent further damage by excess of movement. Local compression reduces fluid accumulation and local swelling making the conservative or the surgical management easier. Anti–Inflammatory therapy, systemic and topic: The anti-inflammatory therapy helps decrease myositis and therefore is considered an essential step in the treatment of muscle injuries. Both steroidal and NSIADs have been used to decrease inflammation and the pain sensation. Based on the results of a recent research work, NSAIDs may be of some benefit for the early treatment of pain control and functional improvement. However the delay in the repair process seen histologically raises concern regarding the long-term treatment. Whenever using anti-inflammatory medications it is crucial to be cognizant of the potential gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic side effects and to use these medications wisely. In addition, in racing dogs, it is important to be aware of the withholding periods of anti-inflammatory medications according to the racing rules. Topical anti-inflammatory agents can be used to help stop inflammation and their effect is often enhanced by the massage required to apply them. Physiotherapy: Physiotherapy represents an additional therapy in the multimodal treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Physiotherapy techniques including Passive range of motion, Massage, Ultrasound, Magnetic field, Trans Cutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS), Laser, Heat therapy, Underwater treadmills, Therapeutic exercise and Faradic Contractors, are currently used. Massage therapy helps to remove edema and reduce adhesion formation. It is necessary to use a good lubricant containing a mild rubifactent to warm up the area. Best results are achieved when treating sub-acute or chronic injuries. Routine treatment of muscle strain injuries emphasizes the restoration of flexibility and muscle strength. During this period of rehabilitation, graded exercise and stretching play an essential therapeutic rule allowing a faster functional recovery.

Stage I strain injuries are best treated conservatively. Immediate treatment consists of the application of cold packs to the area followed by mild massage and anti-inflammatory drugs for 3 to 5 days. In addition, 7 to 14 days of “active” rest, physiotherapy and massage, are beneficial and promote early healing and limb function. Stage II strain injuries can be treated conservatively if the fascial tear is smaller than 1 cm, the same treatment principles as Stage I can be applied. In the case of greater extensive fascial damage, surgical correction is recommended. The post-op care consists of 3 to 4 weeks of rest and physiotherapy. Controlled exercise should be encouraged after the first 7 days. Stage III muscle injuries are best treated surgically. Ice packs, systemic anti-inflammatory drugs and compression bandages may be used during the first 48 hours to reduce the inflammation. The golden period for surgical repair is within the first 3 days as additional delay will interfere with the healing process. After 4-5 days the muscle ends tend to retract and the repair is extremely difficult. The objective of surgical treatment is to: evacuate the hematoma, gently debride the damaged muscle and eliminate the dead space by anatomical realignment of the muscle ends with an end to end anastomosis. To obtain the maximum healing response, the muscle needs a good vascular supply and a substrate of myoblastic cells that can be recruited from the injury site or from a graft of denerved autologous muscle. Deep fascial layers and tendons that pass alongside the muscle may provide solid tissue for suture placement. The muscle ends may be approximated with large horizontal mattress sutures or near-far-far-near pulley sutures. A combination of the aforementioned suture patterns together with modified Kessler loops may be used to repair ruptures localized at the musculotendinous junction or to reinforce the repair in case of bi- or multipennate muscles. General suture size and usage recommendations for muscle repair: Suture size (USP): 0 to 3-0. Suture material classes: Synthetic absorbable (Polyglactin 910, Polyglycolic acid, Polyglyconate, Polydioxanone) or non-absorbable (Polypropylene, Nylon). Adduction or abduction of the leg during surgery can be useful to decrease the tension at the repair site.

Post operative care The return to the function of a repaired muscle is never complete. As described in several experimental studies, the muscle can recover up to 80% of it’s ability to contract but only the 50% of it’s original tensile strength. Immobilization is necessary for a minimum of 2 to 3 weeks after repair of a muscle tear to protect the initial repair, promote new collagen formation and sustain the stress of the remobilization.

361


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 362

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

SELECTED MUSCLE INJURIES

Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL)

Gracilis Muscle

Injuries of the Tensor Fascia Latae are very common in racing dogs. Rupture of the tensor Fascia Latae can occur at its distal musculotendinous junction with a complete separation of the muscle belly from the fascia latae. It is not uncommon however to find a distinct longitudinal split along the muscle fibers involving the fascial sheath and the lateral portion of the muscle. During the clinical examination it is possible to appreciate a distinct hematoma with marked pain on palpation; the muscle can present areas of hardening or a marked depression. Extension of the hip is very likely to elicit pain especially if accompanied by a firm palpation. Injuries to this muscle can be easily misdiagnosed resulting in healing by scar tissue formation, loss of function and a high rate of recurrence. Minor injuries can be treated conservatively, with 3-5 weeks of controlled exercise and physiotherapy. Use of 830-nm laser therapy with a power output of 30 mw appears to give encouraging results according to one Author. Early surgical treatment is recommended whenever possible. The TFL is approached by longitudinal skin incision directly over the affected area, the same repair principles as described for the Gracilis M. can be applied. The medial portion of the muscle must be repaired, inadvertent suture of the adjacent muscles can lead to postoperative pain and delayed recovery. Postoperative care is similar to the previously described for the Gracilis M. Rehabilitation period is usually from 4 to 6 weeks.

Rupture of the Gracilis muscle is one of the most common muscle injuries. The Gracilis is an adductor of the thigh, an extensor of the hip and probably partially contributes to the extension of the tarsus. The injury can occur at the muscle origin, mid belly or its tendinous insertion. The rupture can be partial or complete resulting in the typical “dropped” conformational appearance. The injury is usually unilateral with no side predisposition, however, it is not uncommon to have bilateral injuries either concomitantly or staged. The diagnosis is based on the history, clinical examination and careful palpation as some mid belly partial injuries can be quite subtle to detect. The owners often report a loss of performance, a mild lameness apparent for 24-48 hours and a typical “throwing out” of the affected leg while ambulating. With an acute complete rupture of the muscle, a vast hematoma accompanies the dorsal displacement of the insertion or the ventral displacement of the muscle origin. Immediate surgical repair is the treatment of choice and offers the best prognosis for return to full function. Proper surgical positioning consists of placement of the dog in lateral recumbence to expose the medial aspect of the affected leg. The controlateral leg can be flexed and secured vertically allowing a perfect approach to the injury site. Muscle debris and the hematoma removal is recommended with meticulous hemostasis and a thorough moistening of the area during surgery. Several near-far-far-near pulley sutures are pre-placed and progressively tightened to achieve the muscle continuity. Slight flexion of the stifle and adduction of the thigh will help to decrease tension at the repair site. The tendinous portion of the Gracilis muscle is composed of a thick posterior band located caudally that inserts on the proximo-medial aspect of the tibia. Injuries at this location are best approached by a longitudinal skin incision over the affected site. Modified Kessler loop sutures can be used in addition to the near-far-far-near suture patterns. Significant flexion of the stifle will be necessary to properly appose the tendon edges Although difficult to place, a light compressive bandage can be applied postoperatively for two or three days. Postoperatively, the dog should be confined in a small kennel for 7-10 days. Short walks on the leash will be allowed for elimination. Early controlled exercise can begin after this period gradually increasing the regimen. Physiotherapy should be encouraged and 8 to 12 weeks should be allowed for return to full activity. Prognosis is ranges from good to excellent when acute injuries are treated with early surgery. Conservative treatment is recommended only for very minor origin and mild belly injures with a recovery time of 6-8 weeks. Early surgical treatment is recommended whenever possible.

Triceps Muscle The Long Head of the Triceps usually tears from its origin along the posterior margin of the Scapula. It is a very classic injury of the front limb of the racing Greyhound that still represents an open controversy regarding the modality of treatment. Some Authors suggest surgical treatment as the best option to achieve a better prognosis; some others propose the conservative treatment as an alternative, describing successful results with a combination of early controlled exercise and physiotherapy. The Author, on the basis of his personal experience, recognizes that a great number of dogs with small injuries return to a successful performance in 3-5 weeks without undergoing surgical treatment. However in case of an acute massive rupture the preference is the primary repair. The same repair principles and postoperative care as already described can be applied. Return to full activity usually in 6-8 weeks.

Other muscles commonly involved Pectoral Muscles: usually the origins. Trapezius: thoracic portion, Latissimus Dorsi, Rhomboid Thoracicus: insertion. External Abdominal Oblique: origines. Rectus Abdominis: insertion. Longissimus Dorsi. Gluteal Muscles: mid belly. Fore limb: Deltoideus, Biceps Brachi: insertion. Infraspinatus: origin. Hind limb: Pectineus: origin. Sartorius, Biceps Femoris: mid belly. Gastrocnemious: origin of medial and lateral portions, musculotendinous junction. Stage I and II injuries are generally treated conservatively while stage III injuries require immediate surgical treatment.

362


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 363

73째 Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

This areas of hypovascularity are apparently at greater risk of injury. The healing mechanism of paratenon covered tendons, in presence of a gap is by scar tissue formation as in other tissues. Initially the gap is filled by the haematoma and fibrin followed by infiltration of inflammatory cells. In within the following week the gap is invaded by undifferentiated fibroblasts and capillary buds that form granulation tissue between the tendon ends. The fibroblasts start producing collagen that organizes initially in fibrils arranged in an irregular pattern. Around the second week the tendon ends are joined by a bridge of fibrous tissue that extends to the surrounding paratenon and epitenon. As the fibroblasts proliferation continue more collagen is produced and the fibrils start to orientate perpendicular to the long axis of the tendon. From the third week the fibroblasts and the collagen fibrils, responding to the stress transmitted along the tendon long axis, start to orientate parallel to it. The remodeling of the scar tissue continues for several weeks and is associated to increased tendon strength and elastic modulus. Unfortunately the scar tissue do not have the same mechanical properties of the normal tendon and this has an impact on the final outcoming in terms of tendon function. Gliding tendons can heal by two mechanisms. In tendons that are immobilized, particularly in presence of a gap, the healing is by ingrowth of connective tissue from the tendon sheath and scar tissue formation. Healing in this manner result in decrease tendon function due to the adhesions between the tendon and its sheath. If the tendon is repaired with a perfect end to end apposition and is subjected to controlled passive motion the healing is by an intrinsic response characterized by the migration and proliferation of the tenocytes from the endotenon and epitenon resulting in minimal adhesion and preservation of the gliding ability. This second mechanism of healing is critically important in the repair of lesions to the digital flexor tendons in man. In veterinary surgery the return of sufficient tensile strength my be more important than gliding function. A practical approach to minimize the formation of tendon adhesions is the use of proper surgical technique, early passive mobilization and proper postoperative care.

PREVENTION STRATEGIES Important factors in preventing muscle strain injuries include warm up and pre-exercise stretching. New data demonstrates the beneficial effects of these factors on the mechanical properties of the muscle due to the stretch reflex mechanism and its viscoelastic properties. Previously strained muscles carry an increased risk of reinjury. Patients presented with a major muscle strain have often a history of a prior minor injury affecting the same area. Probably some alteration in the mechanical properties of the muscle may precede a major injury. These are important considerations suggesting that an early return to activity and aggressive rehabilitation prior to complete healing may increase the risk of further and more serious injury.

TENDON INJURIES Tendon injury can occur in a number of ways, strain from overloading, degeneration and disruption. The majority of tendon injuries in small animals are related to lacerations rather than rupture. A direct trauma my cause a laceration or an avulsion injury. Strain injuries are less common in the canine pet population but are not infrequent in athletic dogs. Strain injury can affect the tendinous unit when the tensile load within the structure exceeds the yield point. A single submaximal load may damage a certain amount of fibers without complete failure of the tendon. However, the loads exerted on the tendons during normal activity are far lower than those required to exceed the elastic range of tendon loading. Repetitive strain injury may start a degenerative process that lead to inflammation and tendinitis that is generally expressed as lameness. The result of a chronic tendinitis is a progressive weakening of the tendon that can result in a spontaneous disruption. Because tendons are able to absorb energy more effectively than muscle or bone, an extreme overload rarely result in a midsubstance tendon injury but more like results in an injury to the musculotendinous junction or an injury to the tendon bone junction.

HEALING MECHANISM

PRINCIPLES OF TENDON REPAIR

Tendons that move in a straight line are surrounded by loose areolar connective tissue called paratenon that is continuous with the epitenon. The paratenon contains a network of blood vessels that, at different points along its length, penetrate the tendon, anastomizing with the longitudinal vessels within the tendon. Tendons surrounded by a synovial sheath, receive their vascular supply mostly from the periosteal attachment at their insertion, from the musculotendinous junction and in small part from few small bands, located along the synovial sheath that are known as vincula. Perfusion studies demonstrate consistent areas of hypovascularity in some tendons and suggest that diffusion may play an important role in the nutrition of this tendons.

In general, basic principles of asepsis and atraumatic handling of soft tissues as previously described for muscle injuries, are followed. The goal of tendon repair is to minimize the formation of adhesions and to restore as much gliding function as possible. Indications for primary tendon repair are fresh clean tendon wounds. Contaminated or infected wounds or lacerations associated with crushing injuries are best treated by delayed repair. Skin incision should not be made directly over the tendon but should be parallel to the area to be repaired or should follow a curvilinear pattern over the tendon in order to minimize the risk of adhesions of the skin to the tendon repair.

363


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 364

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Maintenance of a perfect hemostasis is essential and can be achieved with the moderate us of electrocautery, by application of gentle pressure with a moistened swab, or where possible, by the application of a tourniquet. Gentle handling of the soft tissues and of the tendon presuppose the use of adequate surgical instruments. Tendon ends can be grasped with straight needles placed through the tendon, by gloved fingers or by special forceps. Traumatized tendinous ends should be excised after sutures have been secured. Various suture patterns have been described for tendon anastomosis. Locking suture patterns like the Kessler-Mason-Allen (locking loop), modified Kessler and three-loop pulley suture are generally preferred over the traditional horizontal mattress, Bunnell and Bunnell â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Mayer patterns. The Kessler patterns and its many modifications form loops around a small bundle of fascicles achieving an excellent hold of the tendon. The three-loop pulley suture has a greater strength and resistance to gap formation when compared to the locking-loop pattern. This should be expected considering that in the three-loop pulley there are six strands of suture material that cross the repair while in the other there are only two strands. After placement of the primary load bearing sutures, a fine continuous or interrupted horizontal mattress suture may be placed along the epitendon to increase the strength of the repair and minimize the formation of adhesions. The choice of the suture material for tendon repair should meet a few basic requirements. It should slide easily through tissue, it should have good knot security and should be nonirritant. Requirement for prolonged retention of strength is necessary due to the slow healing of the tendons. Monofilament non absorbable sutures are usually the first choice although monofilament absorbable sutures with prolonged retention of strength (eg. polydioxanone or polyglyconate) usually give satisfactory results. When repairing gliding tendons is possible to use a soft braided suture, such as polyglycolic acid (Vicryl), in order to minimize the irritation to the surrounding sheath. The size of the suture is usually determined by the size of the tendinous structure. Large diameter sutures are often used because the tendon is expected to experience significant loads. However a large suture have the tendency to distort the tissue in which is placed and do not loop or tie appropriately. The best recommendation is to use slightly smaller diameter suture material and place additional strands across the repair in order to achieve extra strength. Avulsion of tendons from bone requires reattachment. A locking loop or pulley-suture pattern is placed in the tendon and the suture then threaded through bone tunnels. Because this injures often take a long time to heal and gain strength, the suture may be subject to wearing and tearing due to the friction against the bone edges. For this reason it is advisable to place additional supporting sutures from the epitenon to the periosteum or surrounding soft tissues. In some cases augmentation of the repair can be achieved using synthetic materials, fascia or tendons. Post operative support is indicated for up to 6 weeks for larger tendons. The method of support vary according to the

specific location of the injury, preference of the surgeon and temperament of the patient. Bandage support, external fixation and internal fixation have been all successfully used. The most likely reason for failure of tendon repair is patient overactivity. Because of this, the patient should be strictly confined for at list the first 6 to 8 weeks, after this period controlled limited activity will follow for other 6 weeks. Physical therapy modalities include application of heat followed by passive range of motion exercises. Water tread mill exercise is an extremely useful modality as allow early exercise with reduced weight bearing on the repaired tendon.

SELECTED TENDON INJURIES Injury to the Achilles Mechanism The Achilles tendon has three distinct components. The primary tendon of the Achilles mechanism is given by the gastrocnemious muscle that inserts on the lateral aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity. The conjoined tendons of the biceps femoris, semitendinous and gracilis muscles that inserts on the medial aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity. The superficial digital flexor tendon that also runs with this tendons but passes over the calcaneus. This tendons may be lacerated by direct trauma or can be affected by varying degrees of strain injury. Achilles injuries have been classified by Meustege. Type 1 injuries are complete ruptures of the Achilles mechanism and are usually caused by direct trauma. Dogs affected by a Type 1 injury present usually with a typical plantigrade stance. Type 2 lesions are divided in to three subtypes. Type 2a lesions are ruptures affecting the musculo-tendinous junction. Type 2b lesions are ruptures accompanied by an intact paratenon. Type 2c lesions are avulsions of the insertion of the gastrocnemious tendon with an intact superficial digital flexor tendon. The patient affected by a Type 2c present a typical plantigrade stance with the digits tightly flexed. A Type 3 lesion is a tendinopathy affecting the distal part of the gastrocnemious tendon but without functional lengthening of the mechanism. Ultrasound examination is an excellent diagnostic toll to determine the extend of the injury and the involvement of the different tendon structures. Type 1, 2a, 2b and 2 c are managed by direct repair following the general techniques described earlier in this abstract. Type 3 injures respond very well to conservative treatment with strict rest or via immobilization of the hock in extension for a short period and usually carry a good prognosis. Protecting the tendon repair from loading from 6 to 10 weeks postoperatively is crucial. Limb splintage is usually complicated by pressure sores and require frequent changes and high patient and owner compliance. For this reason many surgeons prefer to protect the repair with a transarticular external skeletal fixation or with a calcaneotibial screw.

364


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:43

Pagina 365

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Still controversy exists regarding the period of immobilization post operative due to the deleterious effects on the joints. For this reasons the latest recommendations are to not exceed 4 weeks of complete immobilisation and rehabilitation should be started immediately after. A good strategy consists on decreasing the amount of support incrementally over the time from the 4rth to the 10th week. An excellent method is the use of orthotic devices such as a neoprene brace, hinged splint, or custom-made articulated devices. These orthotic devices allow variable degree of mobilization and easy access to the area in order to apply physiotherapy modalities. Among this modalities, methods that enhance the speed of tendon healing are Ultrasound therapy (may be able to accelerate tendon healing and maturation), Low Energy Shock wave (may enhance neovascularization of bone tendon junction). In terms of prognosis, the patient may achieve a stable functional limb after surgical repair and appropriate recovery but the return to full competitive activity is guarded and is related to the type of sport. A recent study from New Zeland determined that only seven on 10 dogs returned to full substantial levels of work after healing, and 29% of those had moderate persistent lameness.

sive ROM movements and gentle wobble board activities are recommended, with progression to active ROM later. To break down scar tissue and remodel the tendon fibers, the inflammatory processes have to be reinitiated in chronic cases. Because of that NSAID or corticosteroids are not recommended chronic tendinopathies, Therapy for chronic BT includes deep cross-friction massage, heat and ultrasound therapy. In these cases, along with other exercises as for acute cases, stretching after treatment in advised. For patients with nonresponsive BT, surgical treatment, which consists of tenodesis or arthroscopic tendon release, is recommended. During the post-operative period and rehabilitation, controlled activity is extremely important and it includes leash walking of increasing intensity and end-stage eccentric exercises (walking and trotting down hills). When lameness is resolved, short periods of off-lead activity are allowed.

REFERENCES Bloomberg M. Muscles and Tendons. In: Slatter. Textbook of Small Animal Surgery. W.B. Saunders Company. Second Edition 1993; 1996-2020. Eaton-Wells R. Muscle Injuries in Racing Greyhounds. In: Bloomberg, Dee, Taylor. Canine Sports Medicine and Surgery. W.B. Saunders Company. 1998; 84-91. Hill F. W. G. Muscle injuries: their extent and therapy in the racing greyhound. In: Greyhounds Proceed. No. 64, Post-Grad. Committee Vet. Sci. University of Sydney, 1983, 298-303. Davis P. E. Examination of the greyhound for racing soundness. In: Greyhounds Proceed. No. 64, Post-Grad. Committee Vet. Sci. University of Sydney, 1983, 601-672. Stauber W.T. Eccentric action of muscles: physiology, injury and adaptation. Exerc. Sports Sci Rev. 17: 157-185; 1989. Nikolau P.K., Macdonald B.L., Glisson R.R. et al: Biomechanical and histological evaluation of muscle after controlled strain injury. Am J. Sports Med. 15:9-14, 1987. Bohemo C. Ferguson R. The treatment of soft tissue injuries in the racing greyhounds. In: Lecture series for 5th year students. University of Melbourne. 30-43, 1998.

Bicipital Tenosynovitis BT is one of the most frequent shoulder conditions in agility dogs. It involves the biceps brachii muscle and it’s tendon that crosses shoulder joint. Biceps extends and stabilizes the shoulder joint during standing and during weigh bearing. Causes of this injury are related to repeated strain injury. Dogs with BT usually have performance problems or are reluctant to jump. Lameness can be subtle to severe. Pain is elicited by direct palpation over the biceps tendon by flexing the shoulder with extended elbow. With chronic conditions mineralization of the tendon can be seen radiographically. Shoulder arthroscopy can be used to diagnose and treat the problem. Acute cases of BT can be treated conservatively by controlled activity, NSAID, cryotherapy, and possibly injections of hyaluronic acid or peri-tendineus injections of Triamcinolone Acetonide. Some surgeon advice the use of intra articular steroids but this treatment is not recommended by this Author. Laser therapy, acupuncture and electrical nerve stimulations therapy can be applied. Acute tendon injuries shouldn’t be stretched to prevent more micro tears. Pain-free, pas-

Further references available from the author upon request Address for correspondence: Alessandro Piras Adjunct Professor University College Dublin (UCD) Northern Ireland – UK - E mail alexpvet@mac.com

365


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 366

73째 CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

The athletic dog and physiopathology of exercise related injuries Alessandro Piras Med Vet, SCV, MRCVS, ISVS, Northern Ireland - UK

During the last decade, we assisted to dramatic increase in popularity of canine sport disciplines. For years thinking of sports for dogs was thinking of racing and coursing for sighthounds; or sled dogs in the Iditarod type of competition, or even field trial dogs for hunting. Agility, Frisbee catching, Flyball, tracking for search and rescue, earthdogs and dock jumping are just some examples among the many new disciplines that recognize thousands of Associations and events around the world. One of the major reasons for the increased popularity is that since breed specificity is no longer a requirement, anyone can play. The drawback of this is that many pets are enrolled in different disciplines without adequate training and with insufficient knowledge of the sport on the part of the owners. Direct consequence of this phenomenon is that Veterinarians and Physiotherapists are assisting to an increased demand for sport medicine related issues from injuries prevention and treatment, training, performance oriented diets and supplementation to rehabilitation and fitness. Unfortunately, although the canine model has been extensively used in human research in the field of exercise physiology, very little research has been conducted to determine parameters that can help in optimizing frequency, intensity and duration of exercise during training for specific disciplines. The very concept of fitness, described as the ability to perform physical work, has not been fully defined in the dog. Fitness is the mechanism of adaptation of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal system to exercise. It is a lifelong process that requires cardiorespiratory function, muscle strength, endurance and flexibility. In humans, maintenance of fitness is often defined as at least 30 minutes of moderateintensity activity per day. The level of fitness of the canine athlete should be determined by the sport participated in. Conditioning is the performance of a series of exercises that are aimed to prepare mentally and physically for a specific activity. Conditioning programs start early in the life of the canine athlete and continue during adulthood. Puppy should start with playing activity with littermates and self-motivated activity like walks, runs and swimming. Any form of strenuous exercises should be avoided before closure of the growth plates (7 to 10 months according to the breed) in order to avoid damage to the physeal cartilages with consequent risk of premature closure and deformities. Mental conditioning plays an important role in the preparation of the athlete to the specific discipline. It also starts early as a playful exercise that

reproduce the type of activity or part of a specific exercise in order to mentally condition the puppy. Training is used to teach sporting dogs the specifics of sporting activities and it should reflect that effort trying to mimic the conditions as much as possible. This is a very important concept that is defined as the principle of Specificity. The body systems should be trained in a manner consistent with how they are used during the sporting activity. Muscles and tendons need to be strengthened with exercises that resemble the sporting activity either in terms of typology of exercise (aerobic versus anaerobic) and duration of exercise. Sled dogs are required to have high endurance and strength to pull a sled many hours over long distances and rough terrain in a day. The sled dog must be exercised for extended periods every day and be required to strengthen muscles as well, so that swimming would not be an appropriate exercise since it would not place the stress and strain that a sled would on the musculoskeletal system. However, swimming would be an appropriate exercise for retrieving dogs, along with short sprints on land. Same concept applies to racing dogs where walking on treadmills or swimming is of little value in a training program that should be designed for speed and strength. An ideal training program should include sprinting exercises on selected distances, repeated sprints on short distances with variable recovery time, running uphill in order to strengthen the hind limbs and running around bends in order to potentiate the fore limbs and the steering ability. Field trial dogs also require speed and strength but agility is important as well to perform in unpredictable terrain. Field trial dogs must also be acclimated to the environment or risk heat stroke and severe dehydration. Hunting dogs often travel long distances but need only short bouts of strength so training may be geared toward sprinting keeping in mind the often difficult terrain they face as well. Herding dogs, similar to sled dogs, must have endurance for the long arduous task ahead. Agility dogs must be able to sprint, make sharp turns (balance) and of course, be agile, to run the course without injury. These skills require not as much strength as practice to prevent injury. Search and rescue dogs must have endurance similar to sled dogs, while being able to navigate in never-before experienced conditions. They must also have excellent balance or proprioception to remain uninjured in conditions where their safety may be in jeopardy. Flyball dogs certainly require strength for the speedy navigation of the jumps but also must practice regularly to

366


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 367

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

prevent injury- the dogs must be taught how to hit the platform and catch the ball in a manner that will not predispose them to chronic overuse injuries Conditioning that is appropriate for the individual will prevent injury while overtraining will induce injury and inadequate conditioning will predispose to it. Physical skills for canine sporting activities:

SPORT

PHYSICAL SKILLS REQUIRED

Racing and Coursing Greyhounds

Speed, strength

Sled Dogs

Muscle and cardiovascular endurance

Field trial

Speed, strength, agility

Hunting

Muscle endurance

Herding

Speed, agility, muscle endurance

Agility

Speed, balance, agility

Search and rescue

Endurance, balance

Flyball/Frisbee

Peed, strength, agility, balance

Last but not the least, the presence of pre-existing orthopedic conditions and physical conformation play an important part as predisposing factors. A field trial dog with Fragmented Coronoid Process or a mild Hip Dysplasia can start showing clinical signs of the disease after the field event. A racing Greyhound with long legs and short thoraco-lumbar segment has difficulty in changing stride in the bends and can not lean sufficiently while engaging the turns. This inability to counteract centrifugal forces predisposes to falls and shoulder injuries. With the exception of the racing Greyhound and sled dogs, few surveys have reported the relative incidence of this different factors (trauma, accident, overuse, pre existing condition and conformation). The data that emerges support the believe that accidents occur mostly in high performance dogs like Greyhound while traumatic injuries seem to be common also in other sports. Presence of predisposing conditions seems to be more a problem in “less professional” sports in which breed specificity is not required and where, due to the “open to everybody” concept, home pets compete without appropriate medical screening for hereditary diseases. A recent study tried to identify the risk factors and the anatomical sites most commonly injured in Agility dogs. Of the 1627 dogs included in the study, 33% were injured, and of those 58% were injured in competition. Most injuries occurred on dry outdoor surfaces. Border Collies were the most commonly injured, and injuries were in excess of what would be expected from their exposure. For all dogs, soft tissue injuries were most common. The shoulders and backs of dogs were most commonly injured. Dogs were most commonly injured by contact with an obstacle. The A-frame, dog-walk and bar jump obstacles were responsible for nearly two-thirds of injuries that resulted from contact with the obstacle. The conclusion of this study is that Border Collies are at higher risk for injury than would be expected from their exposure. Another conclusion was that the A-frame, dogwalk and bar jump obstacles put the shoulders and backs of dogs at risk. The clinical relevance of this study is that for the first time, a scientific study gives us insight into injuries occurring in dogs participating in canine agility. This will help direct prospective studies that evaluate the breed predisposition to injuries, the safety of individual obstacles, direct rule changes and enable practitioners to understand the risks of the sport.

Sport related injuries Sporting dogs are predisposed to a variety of injuries that are mostly related to the type of activity and result from the extreme conditions to which their musculo skeletal and ligamentous systems are subjected. Several factors can cause or predispose to injuries. Some can be induced by trauma during the specific activity, an hyperextension of the carpal joint in an agility dog during jumping down from a wall or a collateral ligament rupture in the stifle joint of a Frisbee dog are just some typical examples. Injuries can be the consequence of an accident for instance a collision against fences or a pile up during a Greyhound race. Chronic overload predispose as well to injuries with different mechanisms. The bones of athletes subjected to repetitive cycling loads, can undergo to a process known as adaptive stress remodeling. This phenomenon is well-known human athletes as well as racing and jumping horses and racing greyhounds. Cyclic loading stimulates remodeling of the bones most subjected to loads and is characterized by structural changes in the density and distribution of the cortical and cancellous bone. These changes predispose to the formation of micro-cracks that can evolve in to complete fracture lines predisposing to catastrophic structural failure. Fractures of the Central tarsal bone of the right hock and fractures of the metabones are considered “professional” injuries in racing Greyhounds. Chronic overload is also involved in the mechanism of injury of some well-described musculo tendineus contractures. A good example is the contracture of the tendon of insertion of the infraspinatus muscle in a hunting dog due to repeated micro trauma.

Acknowledgements: Special thanks to Denis Marcelin Little and Wendy Balltzer

Notes freely adapted from: Marcellin-Little DJ, Levine D, Taylor R: Rehabilitation and conditioning of sporting dogs. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 35:1427-1439, ix, 2005. Wendy Baltzer: Mechanism of injury in Sport dogs. College of Veterinary Medicine Oregon State – USA. Levy M, Hall C, Trentacosta N, Percival M: A preliminary retrospective survey of injuries occurring in dogs participating in canine agility. Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol. 2009;22(4):321-4. Epub 2009 Jun 23.

Address for correspondence: Alessandro Piras Adjunct Professor University College Dublin (UCD) - Northern Ireland - UK E-mail: alexpvet@mac.com

367


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 368

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

L’anestesista: solo una costosa perdita di tempo? Guido Pisani Med Vet, Dipl ECVS, Luni Mare, Ortonovo (SP)

Fabiana Sergiampietri, Med Vet

Questa relazione cerca di focalizzare il delicato rapporto esistente tra il chirurgo e l’anestesista, due figure professionali, al tempo stesso divise nei ruoli e unite nella professione, che si trovano inevitabilmente a dover interagire. Per capire questa correlazione si parte dal significato di anestesia, intesa come una intossicazione reversibile e controllata del sistema nervoso centrale mediante la quale il paziente non percepisce stimoli dolorosi. Il termine chirurgia ha origini molto antiche e significa lavorare con le mani. Da ciò si comprende il ruolo delle due figure professionali: - l’anestesista: il medico che mira a prevenire la consapevolezza del dolore, a produrre immobilità e se necessario rilassamento muscolare. - il chirurgo: il medico che applica i principi della chirurgia.

concorrono con le loro competenze specifiche per ottenere sinergicamente la migliore assistenza dei pazienti. Sarebbe opportuno che anche la medicina veterinaria si impegnasse nello stesso percorso per motivi che non sono solo l’emulazione dei “cugini” più anziani (e più ricchi) ma hanno solidi significati economici e professionali. La collaborazione riduce il costo economico della struttura chirurgica razionalizzandone la la programmazione ed il funzionamento con la conseguente diminuzione dei tempi operativi e dei costi legati all’esercizio e al personale. Dal punto di vista psicologico con la collaborazione si accresce la serenità lavorativa che permette ai singoli di applicare le loro migliori conoscenze e capacità operative. Non ci sono rinunce o perdite di prestigio professionali nel riconoscere come necessaria l’interdipendenza tra chirurgo e anestesista. Le competenze individuali, l’esperienza e le capacità di ognuno trovano ampia esaltazione nel lavoro di squadra; il dettaglio applicato da ogni singolo medico riduce i rischi di complicanze peri e post operatorie migliorando la qualità di vita a breve e lungo termine. Sia sempre chiaro che né l’anestesia né la chirurgia sono prive di rischi (morti in anestesia in chirurgia dei piccoli animali varia da 0,06%-0,43%), per cui collaborare per ridurre al minimo questo rischio diventa fondamentale, anche dal punto dal vista etico. Tutto ciò permette di applicare al meglio le singole conoscenze ottenendo i migliori risultati, ricordandosi che l’esigenza del paziente non è ricevere esclusivamente una buona chirurgia o una buona anestesia ma percorrere un corretto iter diagnostico e terapeutico che lo porti ad avere una soluzione possibile del suo problema... La figura del chirurgo veterinario è ormai un’idea salda nel buon senso comune. Viene ormai considerato normale che in una struttura ci sia almeno un chirurgo cui vengano demandati gli atti operatori. La figura dell’anestesista veterinario deve assumere lo stesso criterio di “normalità” tanto nell’opinione pubblica quanto, e soprattutto, nella nostra coscienza professionale. L’anestesista non rappresenta una “costosa perdita di tempo”, ma un medico indispensabile per una corretta gestione di un paziente chirurgico.

Già ai tempi dei babilonesi si hanno notizie di rudimenti chirurgici e anestesiologici, per continuare nel periodo greco-romano fino ad arrivare ai giorni nostri. Solo nel XX secolo le due figure professionali hanno cominciato a esistere come entità a sé stanti, indipendenti, anche dal punto di vista legale. Il chirurgo ha avocato per sé l’attenzione, facendo ricadere nelle sue competenze anche la gestione anestesiologica, almeno fino a quando l’evoluzione scientifica e il comune buon senso gli hanno richiesto prestazioni alle quali non poteva fare fronte con le sue capacità. Così il chirurgo ricorreva all’anestesista, scegliendolo spesso più in base alla disponibilità altrui ad eseguire i suoi ordini e assecondare le proprie necessità. Nasceva la figura del “somministratore di anestetico”, del tutto dipendente, anche dal punto di vista economico, dall’autorità chirurgica. Anche per questo retaggio ci sono oggi dogmi da sfatare. Infatti il chirurgo non è responsabile per ogni cosa che avviene nel blocco operatorio e la sua responsabilità non si arresta al termine della sua opera. È altrettanto errato affermare che il chirurgo abbia priorità nelle valutazioni anestesiologiche e che deleghi tali competenze all’anestesista. Nella realtà medica attuale tali considerazioni sono state largamente superate in campo umano. Chirurgo e anestesista

368


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 369

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

BIBLIOGRAFIA 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10. 11.

Abouleish AE, Zornow MH, Levy RS, Abate J, Prough DS, (2000), Measurement of individual productivity in an academic anaesthesiology department, Anesthesiology, 93: 1509-16. Abouleish AE, Prough DS, Whitten CW, Zornow MH, Lockhart A, Conlay LA, Abate JJ, (2002), Comparing clinical productivity of anesthesiology groups, Anesthesiology, V 97, N° 3, Sep 2002. Abouleish AE, Dexter F, Epstein RH, Lubarsky DA, Whitten CW, Prough DS, (2003), Labor costs incurred by anaesthesiology groups because of operating rooms not being allocated and cases not being scheduled to maximize operating room efficiency, Anesth analg, 96: 1109-13. Abouleish AE, Prough DS, Whitten CW, Zornow MH, (2003), The effects of surgical duration and tipe of surgery on hourly clinical productivity of anaesthesiologists, Anesth analg, 97: 833-8. Abouleish AE, Dexter F, Whitten CW, Zavaleta JR, Prough DS, (2004), Quantifying net staffing costs due to longer-than-average surgical case durations, Anesthesiology, V 100, N° 2, Feb 2004. Dexter F, Traub RD, (2002), How to schedule elective surgical cases into specific operating rooms to maximize the efficiency of use of operating room time, Anesth analg, 94: 933-42. Dexter F, Traub RD, Macario A, (2003), How to release allocated operating room time to increase efficiency: predicting which surgical service will have the most underutilized operating room time, Anesth Analg, 96: 507-12. Dexter F, Macario A, (2004), When to release allocated operating room time to increase operating room efficiency, Anesth Analg, 98: 758-62. Freund PR, Posner KL, (2003), Sustained increases in productivity with maintenance of quality in an academic anesthesia practice,

12. 13.

14.

15. 16.

17. 18.

19. 20. 21.

369

Anesth analg, 96:1104-8. Hall LW, Clarke KW, Trim CM, (2001), Veterinary anaesthesia, W.B. Saunders, Cap 1: 1-31. Harland JH, Mewett AW, (1959), Relationship between the surgeon and the anaesthetist, Can anaes soc. J, V 6, N° 4, Oct 1959. Birchard SJ, Sherding RG, (2006), Manual of small animal practice, Saunders Elsevier, Cap 2: 18-28. McIntosh C, Dexter F, Epstein RH, (2006), The Impact of servicespecific staffing, case scheduling, turnovers, and first-case starts on anesthesia group and operating room productivity: a tutorial using data from an australian hospital, Anesth analg, Vol 3, N° 6, dec 2006: 1499-1516. Overdyk FJ, Harvey SC, Fishman RL, Shippey F, (1998), Successful strategies for improving operating room efficiency at academic institutions, Anesth analg, 86: 896-906. Schuster M, Kotjan T, Fiege M, Goetz AE, (2008), Influence of resident training on anaesthesia induction times, Br J Anaesth, 101: 640-7. Silbet JH, Rosenbaum PR, Zhang X, Even-Shoshan O, Estimating anesthesia and surgical procedure times from medicare anesthesia claims, Anestehesiology, (2007), 106: 346-55. Slatter D, Textbook of small animal surgery, (2003), Saunders Elsevier, Vol 1, cap 12: 162-178. Sokal SM, Chang Y, Craft DL, Sandberg WS, Dunn PF, Berger DL, (2007), Surgeon profiling - A key to optimum operating room use, Arch Surg, 142: 365-370. Tobias KM, Jonnston SA, Veterinary surgery small animal, (2012), Saunders Elsevier, St Louis, Vol 1: XIII-XXV. Tobias KM, Jonnston SA, (2012), Veterinary surgery small animal, Saunders Elsevier, St Louis, V 1, sec 2, cap 14, 64-169. Tranquilli WJ, Thurmon JC, Grimm KA, (2007), Lumb & Jones Veterinary anesthesia and analgesia, Blackwell publishing, Oxford, 3-6.


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 370

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Il neonato sano: cosa fare e soprattutto cosa non fare Maria Carmela Pisu Med Vet, Torino

no ancora essere presenti a livello delle alte e basse vie respiratorie. Per far ciò è molto utile l’uso di un piccolo aspiratore nasale per bambini o di una piccola siringa senza ago, sono invece da evitare i movimenti di oscillazione rapidi per il rischio di concussione ed emorragia celebrale. Solo dopo aver liberato le vie aeree è possibile stimolare il respiro, se il neonato non inizia a respirare spontaneamente, attraverso l’evocazione del riflesso cutaneo-respiratorio, mimando ciò che la madre compie con il lambimento. Con un panno morbido e asciutto e tenendo il cucciolo leggermente inclinato in avanti si strofina delicatamente il torace e il dorso del neonato in senso caudo-craniale e l’area ombelicale e genitale in modo da evocare un’inspirazione profonda. Fisiologicamente, infatti, il distacco della placenta dalla parete uterina e la resezione del cordone ombelicale portano ad un’improvvisa ipossia nel neonato che risponde con la contrazione dei muscoli toracici e la conseguente creazione di una pressione negativa nelle vie aeree che esita nell’inspirazione di aria; poiché durante la vita fetale gli alveoli sono collassati e contengono liquido, per poter ottenere l’espansione polmonare e l’apertura del maggior numero possibile di alveoli, il cucciolo deve fare un notevole sforzo per creare un’alta pressione inspiratoria. In questo processo interviene inoltre il surfactante,una miscela di fosfolipidi prodotta dagli pneumociti di tipo II negli ultimi giorni di gravidanza, la cui funzione consiste nell’abbassare la tensione superficiale alveolare, impedendo agli alveoli di collabire durante l’espirazione e favorendo l’ingresso di aria negli alveoli collassati durante l’inspirazione. Inoltre, poiché la tensione superficiale del surfactante varia con il grado di distensione degli alveoli, esso svolge un ruolo di grande importanza nella meccanica respiratoria perché permette di creare già dopo il primo atto respiratorio il volume residuo polmonare, richiedendo quindi minori pressioni per i successivi atti respiratori. Risulta quindi facilmente comprensibile come in neonati prematuri o immaturi in cui la quantità di surfactante è insufficiente il rischio di distress respiratorio sia elevato. L’ipossia iniziale comporta nel neonato un’elevata frequenza respiratoria ed ad un elevato volume tidalico, anche in funzione della maggior richiesta di ossigeno rispetto all’adulto. La frequenza respiratoria si assesta, dopo le prime ore, intorno ai 15-20 atti al minuto, per aumentare nella seconda settimana a 30 atti al minuto e rientrare nella terza settimana nei valori tipici dell’adulto. Dopo il primo atto respiratorio, l’au-

Il neonato non è un piccolo adulto e neanche un piccolo cucciolo ma un soggetto con immaturità multisistemica che lo contraddistingue e di cui bisogna tener conto in ogni procedura. I neonati di cane e gatto appartengono alla cosidetta “prole inetta” cioè dipendente in modo totale dalle cure materne almeno sino allo svezzamento. Al momento del parto il cucciolo subisce una serie di drastici cambiamenti fisiologici: passa da una situazione nella quale ossigeno e nutrienti sono disponibili direttamente a livello ematico ad una in cui questi elementi devono essere assunti, da un ambiente liquido e a temperatura corporea costante ad un ambiente aereo a temperatura ed umidità inferiori e variabili.

COSA FARE E COSA NON FARE AL MOMENTO DELLA NASCITA Al momento della nascita è importante valutare immediatamente lo stato di salute dei neonati per verificarne la vitalità ed escludere malformazioni evidenti che potrebbero comprometterne la sopravvivenza. Entro 5 minuti dalla nascita è buona norma eseguire un test APGAR, per la valutazione della vitalità neonatale utilizzato in medicina umana da oltre 60 anni e adattato ai cuccioli negli ultimi anni (Veronesi et al 2009). Il metodo, veloce e utile, prevede la valutazione di 5 parametri (mucose, attività cardiaca, reattività, attività motoria e respirazione) e l’assegnazione di un punteggio da 0 a 2 per ogni parametro. La somma dei punteggi permette di stilare una valutazione di vitalità classificando i neonati in 3 categorie: da 7 a 10, neonati di normale vitalità; da 4 a 6 neonati di disvitalità lieve e da 0 a 3 neonati con disvitalità grave. È importante ricordare che anche neonati apparentemente perfettamente sani possono, al momento della nascita, risultare moderatamente o gravemente disvitali e avere bisogno di immediato intervento di rianimazione. Se il parto è stato eutocico e la madre ha buon istinto materno provvede da sola a recidere il cordone ombelicale, a liberare il neonato dagli invogli e ad asciugarlo con il lambimento attivando così anche il riflesso del respiro. Nel caso in cui la madre non provveda a liberare le vie respiratorie (ad es. per inesperienza o in caso di cesareo) è fondamentale intervenire immediatamente per eliminare sia le membrane che possono ostruire bocca e narici sia i fluidi che posso-

370


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 371

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

mento della saturazione di O2 causa la vasodilatazione delle arteriole polmonari e la contrazione del dotto arterioso entro il primo giorno di vita (mentre la chiusura completa avviene nei primi 5 giorni); l’aumento della pressione nella parte sinistra del cuore che ne deriva porta alla chiusura del forame ovale. Dopo aver stimolato il riflesso respiratorio si può recidere il cordone ombelicale, previa allacciatura a circa 2 cm di distanza dalla parete addominale; personalmente preferisco il metodo “a strappo” che prevede la clampatura del cordone e la recisione a strappo utilizzando 2 kocher e avendo massima cura di evitare trazioni sull’addome del neonato. In questo modo le arterie spiralate ombelicali collabiscono in modo fisiologico e non è necessario l’uso di fili che potrebbero indurre eccessivo lambimento dell’area ombelicale da parte della madre. È inoltre importante la disinfezione del moncone ombelicale con soluzioni non irritanti. Se è presente bradicardia bisogna ricordare che nella quasi totalità dei casi è indotta dalla depressione miocardica causata da ipossia. Infatti, diversamente dall’adulto, il neonato risponde all’ipossia non con aumento della frequenza cardiaca ma con bradicardia e ipotensione, ciò dipende probabilmente da un meccanismo protettivo nei confronti dell’ipossia che salvaguarda organi e cervello riducendo la richiesta di O2. In caso di bradicardia è pertanto necessario intervenire per correggere lo stato ipossico, ma non utilizzando farmaci simpatico mimetici perché nelle prime 3 settimane l’attività vagale è immatura e l’impiego di questi farmaci può risultare poco efficace se non addirittura dannoso. È quindi utile somministrare O2 e continuare con il controllo del respiro sino a quando il cucciolo non avrà un ritmo respiratorio corretto e la frequenza cardiaca sarà tornata ai valori normali. In caso di arresto cardiaco è necessario effettuare un massaggio cardiaco comprimendo latero-lateralmente il torace tra indice e medio da un lato e pollice dall’altro e somministrare adrenalina (in questi caso è possibile sfruttare ancora la vena ombelicale o la via intraossea). I neonati di normale vitalità o dopo le procedure di rianimazione, devono essere pesati perché sia il sottopeso sia il sovrappeso sono riconosciuti fattori di rischio per numerose patologie neonatali: il sottopeso predispone, ad esempio, a ipotermia e ipoglicemia mentre il sovrappeso può predisporre ad esempio alla sindrome del cucciolo nuotatore. Il peso iniziale è inoltre fondamentale per poter valutare la curva di crescita neonatale. Tutte le manovre andranno sempre eseguite con l’attenzione di evitare di far perdere calore poiché i neonati non sono in grado di mantenere l’omeostasi termica. Dopo la nascita il mantenimento della temperatura corporea costante diventa di pertinenza del neonato e non più della madre. Subito dopo la nascita la temperatura è compresa tra i 32 e i 35°C anche a causa dell’evaporazione dei liquidi fetali dalla cute, e sale gradualmente sino ai 37°C nel corso della prima settimana. Il sistema di termoregolazione è però immaturo poiché il neonato ha una scarsissima capacità di vasocostrizione in risposta al freddo, è scarsamente provvisto di grasso sottocutaneo termoisolante e soprattutto non ha ancora il riflesso del rabbrividimento per produrre calore. La termogenesi è quindi quasi totalmente a carico del rilascio di noradrenalina da parte delle surrenali che attiva le lipasi nel grasso bruno (praticamente assente nell’adulto); nel neo-

nato, inoltre, il rapporto tra la superficie cutanea disperdente e la massa corporea è sfavorevole. Per questi motivi il neonato ha bisogno di fonti di calore esterne per non andare incontro a ipotermia grave o prolungata e di un ambiente che non permetta la termodispersione. Il neonato ipotermico perde il riflesso di suzione per evitare la bronco-aspirazione di latte e l’enterite necrotizzante conseguente all’ileo paralitico, ma ciò predispone ad ipoglicemia sia per consumo energetico sia per mancata assunzione di alimento. L’ipotermia prolungata comporta il rischio di bradicardia, danni neurologici e ileo. Se da una parte, quindi, il mantenimento di una breve ipotermia costituisce un meccanismo difensivo del neonato, dall’altra l’ipotermia prolungata rende poco efficace ogni procedura di rianimazione neonatale. Immediatamente dopo la visita, che deve essere condotta in modo accurato ma nel più breve tempo possibile, e l’eventuale rianimazione, il neonato va riaffidato alle cure materne per permettere l’immediata assunzione di colostro, il contatto con la madre e i fratelli per mantenere l’omeostasi termica e il corretto rapporto materno-neonatale. La pronta assunzione di colostro è infatti importantissima per i cuccioli poiché nascono con scarsissime riserve di glicogeno e con immaturità del sistema epatico di gluconeogenesi e sono quindi facilmente esposti all’ipoglicemia. Anche le restanti funzioni epatiche sono limitate nel neonato poiché gli enzimi microsomiali epatici non sono ancora completamente attivi almeno sino alla quarta settimana di vita per tale motivo risultano insufficienti le capacità di metabolizzazione ed è questo un dato di cui bisogna assolutamente tener conto nell’eventuale utilizzo di farmaci. L’assunzione precoce di colostro è inoltre necessaria per il trasferimento dell’immunità passiva materna. Anche a livello immunitario il neonato risulta immaturo poiché il timo non è attivo in modo completo almeno sino alla dodicesima settimana di età e la risposta immunitaria è quindi solamente aspecifica. La placenta dei carnivori è di tipo endotelio-coriale e ed è quindi difficilmente attraversabile dalle immunoglobuline che il neonato dovrà assolutamente assumere con il colostro. La permeabilità intestinale alle grosse molecole è però totale solo entro le prime 8 ore di vita e la mucosa intestinale risulta completamente impermeabile alle immunoglobuline dopo 48 ore. Poiché le proteine verrebbero inattivate a livello gastrico dalla tripsina, il colostro contiene inoltre un inattivatore di tale enzima; è quindi evidente come sia importante che il neonato possa avere il prima possibile l’accesso al colostro materno.

COSA FARE E COSA NON FARE NEL PERIODO NEONATALE Durante il periodo neonatale le cucciolate andrebbero visitate con regolarità per valutare il corretto accrescimento, lo sviluppo motorio e sensoriale, l’ambiente della nursery e evidenziare precocemente l’insorgenza di eventuali patologie. Il primo controllo deve essere previsto già al primo giorno dopo la nascita e deve includere il controllo della vitalità del neonato, dell’attività cardiorespiratoria, del peso e la

371


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 372

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

valutazione del moncone ombelicale e dei riflessi neurologici primari (riflesso di suzione e di sottrazione all’insulto). Nelle prime 24 ore di vita è possibile assistere ad un leggero calo ponderale fisiologico che deve però essere contenuto entro il 10% del peso iniziale e recuperato entro le 72 ore. Dal secondo giorno in avanti i cuccioli dovrebbero assumere quotidianamente il 10% del peso. Nei successivi controlli, fissati entro la fine della prima settimana di vita, ai 15 giorni e al 20-25 giorno prima che inizi lo svezzamento, i cuccioli saranno visitati, pesati, si valuterà il moncone e la cicatrice ombelicale nonché il loro sviluppo motorio e neuro-sensoriale. Dovranno poi essere esaminate le palpebre che sono saldate nei neonati di cane sino al 12-15 giorno di vita e sino all’8-12 nei gattini ma la cui commessura deve essere pulita e non deve essere presente tumefazione sottopalpebrale spesso indice di pan oftalmite, soprattutto nei gattini. È importante inoltre poter valutare le escrezioni dei cuccioli che in condizioni di normalità non devono essere visibili, ma utilizzando substrati chiari per la cassa parto se nedevono poter rilevare solo le tracce, attraverso l’osservazione di aloni; è però possibile favorire attraverso la stimolazione delle regione ano-genitale sia l’emissione di urina sia di piccole quantità di feci, che devono essere soffici ma comunque formate e di color crema, a causa della dieta completamente lattea. La valutazione dello sviluppo neurologico è possibile nel periodo neonatale utilizzando i test di risposta posturale per cui, nei primi 4 giorni caratterizzati da predominio flessorio, un neonato tenuto sospeso risponde con la totale flessione di arti e collo, mentre dal 5-6- giorno sino alla fine della terza settimana di età risponde estendendo tutti gli arti e il collo per arrivare alla normotonia dalla quarta settimana. La mancanza o la ritardata scomparsa di questi riflessi posturali arcaici è solitamente segno di compromissione neurologica centrale. A livello motorio nei primi 10-12 giorni il neonato si muove strisciando come un piccolo rettile, o quasi nuotando sul suolo, da questo momento è possibile osservare i primi tentativi di assunzione di postura corretta e di deambulazione, che assume nei giorni successivi con il caratteristico “saltellamento”, per arrivare ad una deambulazione corretta dal compimento della quarta settimana.

Dal 21-25° giorno in poi si sviluppa anche l’orientamento acustico e i neonati dovrebbero rispondere anche al Boeltest, dovrebbero cioè girare il capo in direzione di uno stimolo acustico acuto. Anche la nursery deve essere valutata: madre e neonati devono essere collocati in ambiente separato da altri adulti e la temperatura dell’ambiente deve essere di 31-32°C per contrastare il rischio di infezione neonatale da Herpesvirus; all’interno della cassa-parto deve essere presente inoltre una fonte di calore per i neonati (scalda cuccia, lampada) alla quale la madre si possa però sottrarre quando lo desidera per evitare che abbandoni la cucciolata per l’eccesso di calore. Anche l’umidità nella nursery è molto importante: un’umidità eccessiva predispone i neonati a difficoltà respiratoria e malattie infettive per l’aumento della colonizzazione batterica ma soprattutto percentuali inferiori al 40% comportano il rischio di disidratazione poiché la cute del neonato è sottilissima e anche il sistema urinario è immaturo e non in grado di trattenere i liquidi necessari. A livello renale assistiamo infatti ad una nefrogenesi incompleta e la capacità di filtrazione glomerulare nei primi 5 giorni è di circa 1/5 quella di un soggetto adulto per aumentare a circa la metà entro i primi 15 giorni ed arrivare a valori pari a quelli dell’adulto verso la 10-11a settimana di età, nello stesso tempo risulta anche diminuito il riassorbimento tubulare per cui è fisiologico riscontrare glicosuria nelle prime settimane, così come è fisiologica la natriuresi e la presenza di aminoacidi. L’immaturità funzionale dell’ansa di Henle sembra invece essere responsabile del basso PS urinario (1.006-1.008) e dell’altra eliminazione di liquidi che espone il neonato al rischio di disidratazione. È facilmente comprensibile come con soggetti con tali caratteristiche fisiologiche e mancando ancora in neonatologia degli animali da compagnia l’“evidence based medicine” un neonato orfano o un neonato patologico pongano di fronte ad una vera e propria sfida.

Bibliografia disponibile su richiesta Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Maria Carmela Pisu E-mail: mariacarmela.pisu@vierreci.it

372


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 373

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Vademecum della sicurezza per il medico veterinario libero professionista (applicazione del DLGS 81/08) Carlo Pizzirani Med Vet, Firenze

A far data dal 15 maggio 2008 il DLgs 9 aprile 2008 n. 81 ha sostituito il DLgs 626 che dal 1994 era il testo di riferimento per quello che concerneva la salute e la sicurezza sul lavoro. Il novo decreto legislativo, definito Testo Unico, rappresenta l’attuazione dell’art. 1 della Legge 3 agosto 2007 n. 123 ed è stato pubblicato sul Supplemento Ordinario n. 108 della GU n. 101 del 30 aprile 2008. Si rinnova dunque l’attenzione alla tutela della salute sia collettiva che individuale dei lavoratori nei luoghi di lavoro e viene ribadito il concetto di centralità e di responsabilità del datore di lavoro. Particolare attenzione viene dedicata alle microimprese storicamente meno propense ad accogliere i cambiamenti e le trasformazioni soprattutto nell’organizzazione della prevenzione. Per certi versi e rispetto a numerosi argomenti il nuovo DLgs ricalca il precedente DLgs 626 a dimostrazione di quanto quest’ultimo fosse moderno e ben fatto, ma apporta una novità importantissima nel fatto che adesso tutti gli ambienti di lavoro vengono coinvolti anche se a diverso titolo, e non esistono più situazioni, come invece si verificava in regime 626, nelle quali era possibile lavorare ignorando completamente le norme e rimanere nella legalità. Questa grande novità è riportata nel comma 4 dell’art. 3 “Campo di applicazione” che recita: il decreto si applica a tutti i lavoratori e lavoratrici, subordinati e autonomi, nonché ai soggetti ad essi equiparati… (ricordiamo che in precedenza vigeva la circolare ministeriale n. 126 del dicembre 1996, esplicativa in riferimento agli studi professionali: il decreto legislativo 626/94 si applica agli studi professionali associati esclusivamente nel caso che siano presenti lavoratori subordinati, indipendentemente dal numero degli associati). Sempre nell’art. 3 si legge il comma 11 che limita al rispetto degli articoli 21 e 26 i doveri dei lavoratori autonomi. Prima di procedere nel chiarire quali siano i doveri di un medico veterinario titolare o contitolare di una struttura veterinaria è bene chiarire il concetto di “lavoratore” inteso dalla legislazione attualmente vigente in merito alla salute e sicurezza nei luoghi di lavoro. L’art. 2 del DLgs 81/08 definisce lavoratore la persona che svolge una attività lavorativa per conto di un datore di lavoro indipendentemente dal tipo di contratto, con o senza retribuzione, anche al solo fine di apprendere un mestiere,

un’arte o una professione. Per quanto concerne il settore veterinario si possono inquadrare sotto questa prima definizione i dipendenti veri e propri e i praticanti (laureati o non). Al lavoratore così definito sono equiparati i soci lavoratori di società che gestiscono la struttura (ad esempio se l’organizzazione dell’attività è una srl, i soci dell’srl che prestano la loro opera all’interno della società stessa vengono considerati alla stregua di lavoratori). Sono altresì considerati lavoratori i beneficiari delle iniziative di tirocini formativi e di orientamento promossi da leggi regionali al fine di realizzare momenti di alternanza tra studio e lavoro e di agevolare le scelte professionali mediante la conoscenza diretta del mondo del lavoro. Sono infine lavoratori i volontari (ad esempio membri di associazioni animaliste che potrebbero frequentare la struttura sanitaria veterinaria al fine di aiutare nello svolgimento dell’attività anche solo in riferimento agli animali in cura di interesse dell’associazione stessa). Come si intuisce chiaramente non sono considerati lavoratori i collaboratori che come tali effettuano prestazioni occasionali nelle strutture quando sia necessaria una consulenza o una prestazione specialistica. Ai fini della determinazione del numero dei lavoratori dal quale il DLgs 81/08 fa discendere particolari obblighi si prendono in considerazione i soli lavoratori dipendenti, quelli a busta paga, e gli eventuali soci lavoratori. Per spiegare quali siano gli obblighi e chi sia il destinatario di questi, è necessario identificare le varie tipologie di struttura veterinaria, soprattutto come sia organizzato il lavoro e quali siano le figure presenti e a quale titolo. 1) la forma più semplice ipotizzabile è lo studio individuale o lo studio professionale associato nel quale opera il solo titolare o i titolari associati tra loro. In questo caso non esistono obblighi formativi per il medico veterinario titolare o per gli associati e non esistono obblighi documentali. Si deve comunque rispettare le prescrizioni dell’art. 21 che riporta tre obblighi: a) utilizzare attrezzatura di lavoro in conformità alle disposizioni del titolo III, titolo che definisce attrezzature di lavoro le macchine utilizzate, gli apparecchi, gli utensili e gli impianti; b) munirsi di dispositivi di protezione individuale e utilizzarli; c) munirsi di apposita tessera di riconoscimento corredata di foto e contenete le generalità, qualora le prestazioni vengano effettuate in luoghi di lavoro che non siano i propri (come quando ci si reca presso una struttura esterna chiamati per offrire una prestazione occasionale).

373


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 374

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

2) nel caso in cui nell’organizzazione di lavoro ipotizzata al punto 1 si decidesse di avvalersi di uno o più colleghi interpellati occasionalmente quando le circostanze lo richiedano allora si deve rispettare anche quanto previsto nell’art. 26 che obbliga il titolare a verificare l’idoneità tecnico-professionale del lavoratore al quale affida il lavoro e quindi sarà necessario chiedere al collega che collaborerà, una autocertificazione di iscrizione all’Ordine professionale. Il titolare dovrà inoltre fornire agli stessi soggetti, una dettagliata informazione sui rischi specifici esistenti nell’ambiente di lavoro e sulle misure di prevenzione e di emergenza adottate relativamente all’attività svolta. Il titolare e il collaboratore dovranno così collaborare all’attuazione delle misure di prevenzione e protezione dai rischi inerenti all’attività lavorativa oggetto della collaborazione. Il titolare dovrà infine elaborare un documento di valutazione dei rischi (DVR) che indichi le misure adottate. Nasce così un primo obbligo documentale; il documento di valutazione dei rischi può comunque essere sostituito da una autocertificazione e questo è valido per attività che occupano fino a 10 lavoratori e comunque fino al 30 giugno 2012. Dal 1 luglio 2012 sarà infatti obbligatoria la redazione del DVR per tutti e non sarà più accettata l’autocertificazione di avvenuta valutazione dei rischi. Come si vede non è ancora obbligatoria la partecipazione a corsi di formazione specifici in materia di salute e sicurezza nei luoghi di lavoro anche se risulterà difficile capire come si possa elaborare una corretta valutazione dei rischi senza essere in possesso di conoscenze attinenti a meno che non ci si affidi a professionalità esterne. 3) il terzo gruppo di strutture veterinarie comprende tutte le altre, quelle organizzate in società e iscritte alla camera di commercio, oppure quelle dove sono presenti dipendenti e/o tirocinanti e/o volontari. In questi ambienti di lavoro, essendo presenti figure definite “lavoratori” viene automaticamente prevista anche la figura del “datore di lavoro” e questi ha l’obbligo di rispettare tutta la legislazione esistente in materia di salute e sicurezza nei luoghi di lavoro e così applicare nella sua completezza il DLgs 81/08 e successivi. Per chiarire ulteriormente si definisce datore di lavoro il soggetto titolare del rapporto di lavoro con il lavoratore o comunque il soggetto che ha la responsabilità dell’organizzazione stessa in quanto esercita il potere decisionale e di spesa. Nel caso di omessa individuazione, il datore di lavoro coincide con l’organo di vertice medesimo (questo è molto importante in caso di sanzione amministrativa che vedrà punito il datore di lavoro se individuato o individualmente tutti gli eventuali titolari se al loro interno non sarà stato scelto e nominato un responsabile).

Gli altri obblighi che di seguito elencheremo sono, a differenza dei primi due, delegabili qualora esistano documenti di attribuzione di competenze; c) deve essere nominato il medico competente per l’effettuazione del servizio di sorveglianza sanitaria nei casi previsti; d) devono essere nominati i responsabili del servizio prevenzione incendi, lotta antincendio e responsabile dell’evacuazione e del servizio di primo soccorso aziendale; e) ai lavoratori devono essere forniti i DPI (dispositivi di protezione individuale); f) deve essere nominato il RLS (rappresentante dei lavoratori per la sicurezza); g) deve essere effettuata la formazione e l’informazione di tutti i lavoratori; h) devono essere adottate le misure necessarie ai fini della prevenzione incendi e dell’evacuazione dai luoghi di lavoro; i) devono essere rispettati gli obblighi per l’installazione e la manutenzione degli impianti per assicurare la sicurezza dei locali utilizzati; l) se ci sono lavoratori regolarmente assunti e quindi a busta paga deve essere presente all’interno della struttura il registro degli infortuni.

RLS (rappresentante dei lavoratori per la sicurezza) Questa persona è eletta o designata per rappresentare i lavoratori per quanto concerne gli aspetti della salute e della sicurezza durante il lavoro. Questo rappresentante è eletto all’interno dei lavoratori per attività che occupano fino a 15 lavoratori e comunque è un solo rappresentante fino a 200 unità lavorative anche nel caso che, eccedendo il numero di 15, venga designato nell’ambito delle rappresentanze sindacali in azienda. Qualora nessun lavoratore voglia assumersi l’onere di rappresentanza verrà designato un rappresentante esterno, definito RLST (territoriale) che, eletto dalle associazioni sindacali, rappresenterà più attività o aziende o ditte produttive che non abbiano designato il rappresentante al loro interno.

RSPP (responsabile del servizio di prevenzione e protezione) Questa figura è un “consulente” del datore di lavoro e collabora nella valutazione dei rischi e nella decisione dell’attuazione delle misure da adottare. Non ha mai particolari obblighi e non è quasi mai assoggettato a sanzioni, ricadendo tutti gli obblighi sul datore di lavoro. Può essere una figura esterna che abbia le capacità e i titoli per assumere questo incarico e può essere il datore di lavoro stesso nelle attività che non superano le 200 unità lavorative. Se il datore di lavoro decide di rivestire questo ruolo ha la facilitazione di poter ottenere l’attestato specifico frequentando un corso semplificato di 16 ore i cui contenuti sono previsti per decreto ministeriale. Nel caso che l’incarico sia conferito ad una persona esterna e nel caso che sia uno dei titolari ad assumersi questo ruolo, sarà necessario che agli atti sia presente una lettera di conferimento redatta su carta intestata e firmata dal datore di lavoro e una lettera di accettazione da parte della persona prescelta. Il RSPP ha l’obbligo di aggiornamento previsto dal DLgs 81/08 e da quanto verrà stabilito dalla Conferenza Stato

OBBLIGHI DEL MEDICO VETERINARIO/DATORE DI LAVORO Il medico veterinario titolare dell’attività che per organizzazione e strutturazione deve osservare le prescrizione del DLgs 81/08 ha diversi obblighi e due di questi sono non delegabili: a) deve procede alla valutazione dei rischi con la conseguente elaborazione del DVR; b) deve designare il RSPP (responsabile del servizio di prevenzione e protezione).

374


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 375

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Regioni e Province Autonome. A tuttoggi si prevede che l’aggiornamento debba essere quinquennale.

permanenza continuativa e in questo caso ogni 2 ore è obbligatorio disporre di 15 minuti di intervallo. Capita sicuramente nella professione veterinaria di trascorrere del tempo davanti al monitor dell’ecografo, del computer, davanti al monitor del controllo dei parametri vitali durante un’anestesia, ma non sono mai attività continuative come potrebbero essere quelle di un operatore di computer o di un programmatore. In ogni caso se si dovessero raggiungere o superare i tempi previsti dalla normativa, sarà obbligo del datore di lavoro nominare il medico competente che valuterà il rischio e appronterà un piano sanitario nel quale verrà stabilito il tipo e la frequenza delle visite e delle valutazioni medico/analitiche a cui dovrà essere sottoposto il lavoratore. In ogni caso nel momento in cui sarà nominato il medico competente si dovrà verificare un controllo da parte sua almeno una volta l’anno. • RISCHIO INCENDIO – La natura dell’attività svolta, la conformazione dei locali, la facilità nel potersi allontanare, la quantità e la natura dei materiali stoccati, fanno appartenere le attività veterinarie alla classe di “rischio incendio basso” o “A” e per questo sarà sufficiente la nomina di un addetto alla prevenzione incendi, lotta antincendio e responsabile dell’evacuazione, addetto che per essere tale dovrà essere in possesso di un documento che attesti la frequenza ad un corso specifico di 4 ore. Questa figura potrà essere uno qualsiasi degli operatori e potrà essere il datore di lavoro stesso nei luoghi di lavoro nei quali siano presenti al massimo 5 dipendenti. Al momento attuale non è previsto obbligo di aggiornamento. Sarà necessario un documento di nomina ed un documento di accettazione dell’incarico. Affinché l’addetto possa espletare le sue funzioni sarà cura, anzi obbligo, del datore di lavoro l’adozione di presidi idonei alla prevenzione e lotta antincendio, quindi dovranno essere presenti estintori portatili in numero e di natura idonei per l’ambiente di lavoro per il quale sono previsti (in genere è necessario un estintore per piano se la struttura è su più piani, e almeno uno ogni 30 metri lineari). In genere gli estintori che utilizzano come sostanza estinguente la polvere chimica sono i più efficaci contro tutti i tipi di incendio, che il combustibile sia un solido, un liquido o un gas, anche se sarebbe consigliabile l’adozione di un estintore a CO2 dedicato al quadro elettrico. Non sono necessari presidi complessi come gli idranti o i naspi o sistemi ambientali automatizzati come gli sprinkler. Nell’ottica di garantire una corretta evacuazione in caso di pericolo devono essere presenti nei vari ambienti appositi cartelli di colore rosso che indichino chiaramente l’ubicazione degli estintori, e di colore verde che segnalino la direzione della via d’emergenza necessaria a raggiungere l’uscita. Conviene apporre questa cartellonistica di sicurezza in vicinanza delle lampade di emergenza in modo da renderli ben visibili anche in caso di interruzione della fornitura elettrica. • RISCHIO FISICO – per rischio fisico s’intende il rischio derivante da fonti di rumore, da apparecchiature che potrebbero produrre vibrazioni, da apparecchiature che producono campi elettromagnetici e da strumenti che

VALUTAZIONE DEI RISCHI Il datore di lavoro in collaborazione con l’RSPP (o da solo nel caso che la stessa persona rivesta entrambi i ruoli) deve procedere alla valutazione di tutti i rischi che sono presenti nell’ambiente di lavoro soprattutto allo scopo di poter capire quando un rischio diventi un pericolo e pertanto necessiti di particolari accorgimenti e atteggiamenti e l’adozione di dispositivi di protezione individuale (DPI). I rischi che devono essere valutati all’interno di un luogo di lavoro dove si eserciti la professione veterinaria e dove si praticano tutte le attività a essa accessorie, sono molteplici e verranno ora di seguito presi in esame: • RISCHIO INFORTUNI – È intuibile che qualsiasi attività si pratichi possano verificarsi fenomeni imprevedibili che potrebbero portare a lesioni più o meno gravi a carico dell’operatore. Gli urti contro spigoli, lo scivolare su un pavimento umido, l’autotraumatismo per l’uso disattento o scorretto di uno strumento, e nel nostro caso il morso e il graffio da parte di un paziente sono sicuramente da non trascurare. Per tutte queste evenienze dovremo adottare procedure idonee ed utilizzare DPI adeguati, come ad esempio far indossare una museruola ad un cane o utilizzare degli specifici guanti di cuoio di un adeguato spessore nel caso si debba trattare un cane o un gatto … poco disponibile a collaborare. Al fine di poter portare un primo aiuto all’operatore che ha subito un infortunio è fatto obbligo che all’interno dell’unità sia presente un responsabile del primo soccorso, cioè una persona designata che abbia frequentato un apposito corso di 12 ore e che sia stata designata e abbia accettato l’incarico. Può essere il datore di lavoro stesso, sempre che sia in possesso di un attestato conseguito, o uno qualsiasi dei componenti lo staff. È il DM n.388/03 che individua le caratteristiche minime delle attrezzature di primo soccorso, i requisiti del personale e la formazione. Prevede tra l’altro che si debba disporre di una cassetta di pronto soccorso con un contenuto ben descritto dal DM stesso e che l’addetto al primo soccorso aggiorni la sua preparazione con cadenza triennale. • RISCHIO MOVIMENTAZIONE MANUALE DEI CARICHI – Non è certo questo un rischio specifico per la nostra attività se non nel momento in cui decidiamo di visitare un cane di peso considerevole sul tavolo di visita o nel momento in cui dobbiamo spostare un cane in anestesia dal tavolo chirurgico o dal radiologico. Dobbiamo ricordare che ci sono dei limiti massimi relativamente al peso che può sollevare un operatore adulto di sesso maschile o di sesso femminile e in ogni caso sarà sufficiente cooperare tra più persone oppure decidere di eseguire le manualità possibili, a terra. • RISCHIO DA VIDEOTERMINALI – Si intende lavoratore da videoterminale quella persona che rimane almeno 4 ore giornaliere davanti ad video e 20 ore nel computo settimanale. Le ore considerate devono essere di

375


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 376

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

producono radiazioni ottiche artificiali. Nelle strutture veterinarie non esistono normalmente situazioni o macchinari che sottopongano gli operatori a rumori che eccedano quelli consentiti (un lavoratore non deve essere sottoposto a un valore superiore a 87 decibel nell’unità di tempo). Per fare un esempio un compressore bicilindrico da 5 litri produce 64 DBA, le apparecchiature che producono ossigeno terapeutico non supero i 40 DBA. Pertanto non sarà necessaria una valutazione utilizzando un fonometro, ma sarò sufficiente una autocertificazione nella quale il datore di lavoro certifica la palese assenza di fonti di rumore che costituiscano pericolo per gli operatori. La stessa soluzione può sicuramente essere adottata per le vibrazioni e così anche in questo caso sarà sufficiente la redazione di una autocertificazione attestante l’assenza di macchinari o procedure che producano vibrazioni trasmissibile agli operatori. Per quanto riguarda gli strumenti che producono radiazioni ottiche artificiali manca al momento una norma tecnica di riferimento e pertanto quando si utilizza un apparecchio laser saremo obbligati ad applicare quanto è previsto nel manuale d’uso dell’apparecchio stesso. Infine in riferimento alle apparecchiature per la risonanza magnetica manca al momento attuale una normativa specifica per la medicina veterinaria. Stando alle norme generali attualmente vigenti si potrebbe ipotizzare il divieto di utilizzo per il medico veterinario visto che un decreto ministeriale impone la presenza come responsabile di un medico con specializzazione in radiologia e anche le linee guida dell’ISPESL parlano di medico responsabile e di tecnico responsabile. Per adesso, in attesa di una norma specifica per le strutture veterinarie, la responsabilità di tutto quanto concerne la risonanza magnetica non è a carico del datore di lavoro ma del medico veterinario qualificato come direttore sanitario. • RISCHIO DA RADIAZIONI IONIZZANTI – È forse questo l’unico rischio nei confronti del quale il datore di lavoro è si responsabile ma la presenza del fisico qualificato rende questa responsabilità praticamente nulla. Ogni struttura che utilizza un apparecchio radiologico ha l’obbligo di nominare un fisico qualificato che ne esegue il controllo periodico con le modalità e la frequenza che esso stesso stabilisce. Il verbale/registro delle verifiche periodiche deve far parte dei documentazione relativa alla sicurezza ed è quindi il fisico qualificato che è responsabile di quanto riportato. Certo, sarà cura del datore di lavoro che tutte le prescrizioni e le indicazioni vengano rispettate. • RISCHIO BIOLOGICO – per il tipo di attività che viene svolta in una struttura veterinaria è indubbio che si possa correre un rischio legato alla presenza di agenti biologici che potrebbero costituire un pericolo per gli operatori essendo agenti eziologici di malattie trasmissibili dall’animale all’uomo. Nella stesura del DLgs 81/08 il legislatore ha però fatto una netta differenza tra le attività che fanno “uso” di agenti biologici pericolosi (e quindi i laboratori di analisi o di ricerca) e quelle nelle quali pur non utilizzando deliberatamente agenti biologici, durante l’espletamento delle attività, potrebbero compor-

tare la presenza di agenti biologici (l’allegato XLIV del decreto riporta un elenco esemplificativo di attività lavorative che possono comportare la presenza di agenti biologici e tra le altre cita al punto 3 “attività nelle quali vi è contatto con gli animali e/o con prodotti di origine animale” e al punto 5 “attività nei laboratori clinici, veterinari e diagnostici, esclusi i laboratori di diagnosi microbiologica”). Questo significa che l’operatore all’interno di una struttura veterinaria dovrà osservare le norme di igiene e di attenzione microbilogica corretta utilizzando i dispositivi di protezione individuale adeguati qualora sospetti che l’animale con cui si trova a interagire possa avere una zoonosi. • RISCHIO CHIMICO – questo rischio fa parte di tutte le attività lavorative o produttive e a maggior ragione si possono correre dei pericoli durante l’attività nell’ambiente veterinario. I prodotti per la pulizia e la sanificazione degli ambienti, alcuni disinfettanti, i reagenti per le analisi di laboratorio sia di chimica liquida che secca, i prodotti utilizzati in radiologia durante lo sviluppo delle pellicole e molte altre situazioni sono a rischio chimico. Durante la valutazione del rischio il datore di lavoro dovrà valutare la composizione chimica delle sostanze e le loro proprietà pericolose, il livello, il tipo e la durata dell’esposizione, la frequenza di utilizzo, la quantità di utilizzo, la circostanza in cui viene utilizzata, la possibilità che l’uso corretto dei DPI riduca considerevolmente il rischio, e, molto importante, le informazioni sulla salute comunicate dal responsabile dell’immissione sul mercato tramite la relativa “scheda di sicurezza” predisposta ai sensi dei DLgs 52/97 e 65/03. Questa scheda di sicurezza deve accompagnare i prodotti al momento dell’acquisto se questo avviene in confezioni multiple e direttamente dal fornitore, oppure è rappresentata dall’etichetta apposta sul contenitore nel caso che l’acquisto avvenga tramite negozio (come nel caso dei prodotti per la pulizia). Questa valutazione potrà portare alla valutazione che il rischio chimico è basso per la sicurezza e irrilevante per la salute dei lavoratori e che le misure sono sufficienti a ridurre il rischio; in questo caso si potrà evitare la nomina del medico competente e l’attuazione della sorveglianza sanitaria. • RISCHIO CANCEROGENI E MUTAGENI – Anche per la valutazione di questo rischio, come per il rischio chimico, assume notevole importanza la scheda di sicurezza della sostanza o delle sostanze che andremo a utilizzare. Nella scheda viene dettagliatamente riportato il livello di pericolosità della sostanza, alla quale vengono attribuiti dei codici alfa numerici che ne caratterizzano appunto la pericolosità; questi codici, detti “frasi di rischio” riportano la lettera R seguita da un numero. Sono le sostanze con frasi di rischio R 39 (pericolo di effetti irreversibili molto gravi), R 40 (possibilità di effetti cancerogeni – prove insufficienti), R 45 (può provocare il cancro), R 46 (può provocare alterazioni genetiche ereditarie), R 49 (può provocare il cancro per inalazione), R 61 (può danneggiare i bambini non ancora nati), R 63 (possibile rischio di danno ai bambini non ancora nati), R 64 (possibile rischio per i bambini allat-

376


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 377

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

tati al seno), R 68 (possibilità di effetti irreversibili), che vengono classificate come cancerogene e/o mutagene e richiedono una attenzione particolare da parte del datore di lavoro; questi dovrà sostituirle con altre sostanze meno pericolose laddove sia possibile, dovrà applicare misure tecniche adeguate (servizi igienici adeguati, indumenti protettivi adeguati, DPI adeguati e mantenuti in efficienza, spogliatoi idonei e separati da quelli dove si lasceranno gli abiti civili, imporre il divieto di assumere cibi o bevande, applicare cosmetici, utilizzare pipette a bocca, fumare in tutti gli ambienti dove si utilizzano queste sostanze), dovrà sovrintendere alla raccolta e all’immagazzinamento ai fini dello smaltimento degli scarti e dei residui avvenga in condizioni di sicurezza, dovrà informare e formare i lavoratori esposti. I lavoratori per i quali la valutazione dei rischi ha evidenziato un rischio per la salute dovranno essere sottoposti a sorveglianza sanitaria. • RISCHIO STRESS LAVORO-CORRELATO – Dal 31 dicembre 2010 è scattato l’obbligo, sempre a carico del datore di lavoro, della valutazione del rischio che un lavoratore possa subire stress per circostanze legate direttamente al lavoro. È questa una valutazione notevolmente complessa da eseguire laddove il numero degli operatori sia elevato e dove esiste una struttura piramidale delle competenze. Sembrerebbe difficile da collegare all’attività che si svolge in una struttura veterinaria ma ci sono aspetti della vita del medico veterinario che non devono essere trascurati, basterebbe pensare a quante volte siamo chiamati a decidere della vita di un paziente terminale quando si inizi a considerare la possibilità dell’eutanasia. La valutazione del rischio stress lavoro-correlato dovrebbe verificarsi o essere aggiornata quando si ipotizzino situazioni di mobbing o stalking nel luogo di lavoro, quando si intuiscono situazioni di acredine o rivalità tra lavoratori, quando ci si accorge che problemi familiari o domestici arrivano ad interferire con il lavoro, infine dovremmo valutare lo stress qualora ci sia eccessiva ripetitività nell’attività che un lavoratore svolge. Sono frasi ricorrenti nelle discussioni tra medici veterinari l’impossibilità di avere un orario, le ferie non godute, il cellulare che squilla ininterrottamente… (allo scopo di aiutare in questa valutazione, E.BI.PRO., ente bilaterale per gli studi professionali, ha pubblicato un manuale “Studi professionali: stress da lavoro correlato – guida informativa” che potrebbe risultare molto utile a capire come si debba procedere).

Una domanda che spesso viene rivolta durante i corsi per addetto alla prevenzione incendi o responsabile del primo soccorso è come può questa figura essere sempre presente. Quando il rischio è importante il legislatore non parla di addetto o responsabile ma parla di “servizio” quindi attività svolta da più incaricati. Immaginiamo il servizio antincendio svolto all’interno di un deposito di gas o di combustibili liquidi magari dove operano centinaia di persone. Nel nostro caso è chiaro che se rivestiamo questo incarico in una struttura che opera 24 ore su 24 non dobbiamo vivere il resto della nostra vita all’interno dell’ambulatorio o della clinica, ma riveste grande importanza il tema della formazione e dell’informazione di tutti i lavoratori. L’addetto dovrà essere responsabile in prima persona quando è presente, quando invece sarà assente potranno agire in sua vece i lavoratori che lui stesso avrà provveduto a formare e a informare su tutte le procedure da adottare. REGISTRO INFORTUNI – Questo registro deve essere presente negli ambienti di lavoro dove sono presenti lavoratori a busta paga, quindi regolarmente assunti con contratto di lavoro e a cui è stato assegnato un “numero matricola”. Questo registro, ad esclusione della regione Lombardia, deve essere vidimato dall’autorità competente, ASL o Sindaco che sia, come qualsiasi altro registro. È un registro che non ha scadenza, sul quale devono essere riportati gli eventi infortunistici dei lvoratori che abbiano almeno un giorno di assenza dal lavoro oltre a quello in cui si è verificato l’evento. Devono essere riportati il numero matricola e le generalità dell’infortunato, devono essere descritti i fatti, deve essere segnalata la data dell’evento e quella di rientro al lavoro. IMPIANTI – In conclusione, ma non ultimo per importanza, vogliamo trattare l’argomento “impianti” con particolare riferimento all’impianto elettrico. Gli impianti devono essere “a norma” anche negli ambienti di lavoro in cui opera il singolo titolare, nel nostro caso anche un semplice studio professionale in cui visita un singolo medico veterinario (art. 21 del DLgs 81/08). L’importanza che riveste la corretta installazione di un impianto elettrico per la sicurezza degli operati è sotto l’occhio del legislatore da oltre un ventennio e le norme importanti partono dalla Legge n. 46 del 1990 la cui entrata in vigore fu differita al dicembre 1998 perché trovò impreparato la maggior parte del mondo del lavoro, legge poi sostituita dalla Legge n. 248 nel 2005 che è stata poi integrata dal DM n.37 del 22/1/2008. Nel frattempo, il 22/10/2001 il DPR n.462 regolamentava e semplificava il procedimento per la denuncia di installazione di dispositivi di messa a terra degli impianti elettrici. Allo stato attuale della legislazione l’impianto elettrico installato in un ambiente in cui si svolga attività medica, compreso la veterinaria, deve avere caratteristiche che si rifanno alle norme tecniche di riferimento rappresentate dalla NORMA CEI 64-56;V1 pubblicata nell’aprile 2007, deve essere verificato ogni 2 anni dall’autorità competente (ASL) o da ditte private che abbiano avuto il rilascio di un apposita autorizzazione regionale, deve essere stato realizzato sul-

Dopo aver proceduto alla valutazione dei rischi, come già anticipato, dovrà essere prodotto un documento, il DVR, che per attività produttive meno complesse può avere una veste semplificata e la valutazione può avvenire dividendo il luogo di lavoro in aree omogenee (nel nostro caso si potrebbe procedere alla valutazione dei rischi nella radiologia, nelle sale visita, nella chirurgia, nei locali di ricovero ecc.ecc.) senza dover analizzare nel particolare ogni procedura svolta. La redazione di questo documento sarà obbligatoria dal 1 luglio 2012.

377


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 378

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

le indicazioni di un progetto redatto da un ingegnere iscritto all’albo professionale e il titolare della ditta realizzatrice deve rilasciare una DICO (dichiarazione di conformità) nella quale sono riportati, oltre al progetto, le caratteristiche tecniche di tutti i materiali utilizzati e il documento di iscrizione alla camera di commercio della ditta realizzatrice. La DICO deve essere comunicata alle autorità competenti entro 30 giorni dalla messa in opera dell’impianto. La grande novità che la norma tecnica 64-56 V1 ha portato a vantaggio dei veterinari è stata l’abolizione dei locali “gruppo 2” cioè quei locali che equiparati alle sale chirurgiche degli ospedali o delle cliniche per la chirurgia dell’uomo richiedevano accorgimenti molto particolari e per un certo verso, molto costosi. I locali nei quali si esercita la professione veterinaria sono attualmente divisi in locali “gruppo 0” e locali “gruppo 1”. I

primi sono quelli in cui non si espletano attività mediche con l’utilizzo di apparecchi elettromedicali, quindi la sala d’attesa, il bagno, l’ufficio ecc., i secondi sono gli ambulatori, la sala radiologica e la sala chirurgica, o comunque tutte quelle stanze nella quali si utilizzano apparecchi elettromedicali. Ricordiamo infine che sono impianti sottoposti a norme peculiari per la loro realizzazione o a essere sottoposti a periodiche verifiche anche l’impianto di condizionamento/riscaldamento dell’aria ambientale e l’impianto di distribuzione dei gas medicali.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Via P. Togliatti, 9 - 50012 Bagno a Ripoli (FI) Tel.: 055/684360 - Fax 055/686115 E-mail: carlopizzirani@clinicaeuropa.191.it

378


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 379

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

L’abc dell’attaccamento Marzia Possenti Med Vet comportamentalista, Cassano D’Adda (MI)

“Se il fatto che i bambini piccoli non siano mai completamente o troppo a lungo separati dai loro genitori fosse diventato parte della tradizione, allo stesso modo in cui il sonno regolare e la spremuta d’arancia sono diventate consuetudini nell’allevamento dei piccoli, credo che molti casi di sviluppo nevrotico del carattere sarebbero stati evitati.” (John Bowlby)

primo anno di vita del bambino ed hanno la funzione di proteggere la persona “attaccata”. In questi ultimi anni la teoria dell’attaccamento ha sviluppato un notevole interesse verso un approccio che indaghi sui possibili eventi negativi nell’età evolutiva, il contesto relazionale in cui questi fatti hanno avuto luogo e gli aspetti psicologici dell’adulto rispetto alle esperienze precoci. Questo approccio postula che gli effetti a lungo termine di comportamenti genitoriali inadeguati e, quindi, di esperienze traumatiche all’interno della famiglia, siano in gran parte mediati dai modelli mentali sviluppati dall’individuo rispetto alle relazioni di attaccamento. Ciò permette di acquisire importanti indizi riguardo alle caratteristiche di personalità e di funzionamento interpersonale. Bowlby si rese conto che la madre (e la relazione con lei) fornisce al bambino una “base sicura” dalla quale egli può allontanarsi per esplorare il mondo e farvi ritorno, intrattenendo forme di relazione con i membri della famiglia. La base sicura è la persona fidata, ossia la figura di attaccamento, è quella che “fornisce la sua compagnia assieme a una base sicura da cui operare”. Lo sviluppo della personalità risente della possibilità o meno di aver sperimentato una solida “base sicura”, oltre che della capacità soggettiva di riconoscere se una persona è fidata e può o vuole offrire una base sicura. La personalità sana consente di far affidamento sulla persona giusta e, allo stesso tempo, di avere fiducia in sé e dare a propria volta sostegno. Al momento in cui il bambino avverte qualche minaccia, cessa l’esplorazione per raggiungere prontamente la madre per poter ricevere conforto e sicurezza. Il piccolo protesta vivacemente se vi è un tentativo di separarlo dalla madre. Per Bowlby i legami emotivamente sicuri hanno un valore fondamentale per la sopravvivenza e per il successo riproduttivo. Egli sottolinea che il conflitto è una dimensione ordinaria della condizione umana e che la malattia psichica è data dall’incapacità di affrontare efficacemente i conflitti. Il termine “base sicura” è da attribuirsi a Mary Ainsworth la quale ideò nei tardi anni ’60 un valido strumento di indagine, la “Strange Situation”, per classificare i tre pattern base di relazione in bambini di età prescolare ricongiuntisi ai genitori dopo un lungo periodo di degenza in un sanatorio. La Ainsworth distinse un primo gruppo di bambini che manifestava sentimenti positivi verso la madre, un secondo che manifestava relazioni marcatamente ambivalenti ed un

Il comportamento di attaccamento è quella forma di comportamento che si manifesta in una persona che consegue o mantiene una prossimità nei confronti di un’altra persona, chiaramente identificata, ritenuta in grado di affrontare il mondo in modo adeguato. La teoria dell’attaccamento nasce con un esplicito interesse verso i primi anni di vita dell’essere umano e, più in generale, dei mammiferi. Il più grande sostenitore e studioso di questa teoria è stato sicuramente John Bowlby, considerato uno dei tre o quattro più grandi psicoanalisti del ventesimo secolo. Egli sosteneva che “l’attaccamento è parte integrante del comportamento umano dalla culla alla tomba”. All’inizio della vita l’essere nutriti equivale all’essere amati, il bisogno biologico legato all’alimentazione è presente insieme a un altro bisogno, anch’esso fondamentale, quello di essere amati, nutriti d’amore, di essere desiderati, voluti, accettati per quello che si è. Per Bowlby prendere in braccio il proprio piccolo che piange è la risposta più adeguata, da parte della madre, ad un segnale di disagio del bambino: esso non si configura come un rinforzo né come un comportamento che condiziona il piccolo rendendolo “viziato” come asseriscono i comportamentisti e i teorici dell’apprendimento sociale. Bowlby aveva intuito che l’attaccamento riveste un ruolo centrale nelle relazioni tra gli esseri umani, dalla nascita alla morte. Insieme a Mary Ainsworth, anch’ella psicanalista e sua collaboratrice, lavorando all’applicazione di tale teoria ha contribuito a dimostrare come lo sviluppo armonioso della personalità di un individuo dipenda principalmente da un adeguato attaccamento alla figura materna o un suo sostituto. Egli ritiene che la ricerca della vicinanza sia la manifestazione più esplicita dell’attaccamento. Gli esseri umani hanno una predisposizione innata a formare relazioni con le figure genitoriali primarie. Queste relazioni si formano durante il

379


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 380

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

terzo che intratteneva con la madre relazioni non espressive, indifferenti o ostili. Da queste osservazioni nacque il famoso sistema di classificazione della Strange Situation che prevedeva inizialmente tre stili di attaccamento: sicuro, insicuro ansioso ambivalente e insicuro evitante. Lo stile di attaccamento che un bambino svilupperà dalla nascita in poi dipende in grande misura dal modo in cui i genitori, o altre figure parentali, lo trattano. In base a tale interazione si strutturerà uno dei seguenti stili di attaccamento: - Stile Sicuro: l’individuo ha fiducia nella disponibilità e nel supporto della Figura di attaccamento, nel caso si verifichino condizioni avverse o di pericolo. In tal modo si sente libero di poter esplorare il mondo. Tale stile è promosso da una figura sensibile ai segnali del bambino, disponibile e pronta a dargli protezione nel momento in cui il bambino lo richiede. I tratti che maggiormente caratterizzano questo stile sono: sicurezza nell’esplorazione del mondo, convinzione di essere amabile, capacità di sopportare distacchi prolungati, nessun timore di abbandono, fiducia nelle proprie capacità e in quelle degli altri, Sé positivo e affidabile, Altro positivo e affidabile. L’emozione predominante è la gioia. - Stile Insicuro Evitante: questo stile è caratterizzato dalla convinzione dell’individuo che, alla richiesta d’aiuto, non solo non incontrerà la disponibilità della Figura di attaccamento, ma addirittura verrà rifiutato da questa. Così facendo, il bambino costruisce le proprie esperienze facendo esclusivo affidamento su se stesso, senza l’amore ed il sostegno degli altri, ricercando l’autosufficienza anche sul piano emotivo, con la possibilità di arrivare a costruire un falso Sé. Questo stile è il risultato di una figura che respinge costantemente il figlio ogni volta che le si avvicina per la ricerca di conforto o protezione. I tratti che maggiormente caratterizzano questo stile sono: insicurezza nell’esplorazione del mondo, convinzione di non essere amato, percezione del distacco come “prevedibile”, tendenza all’evitamento della relazione per convinzione del rifiuto, apparente esclusiva fiducia in se stessi e nessuna richiesta di aiuto, Sé positivo e affidabile, Altro negativo e inaffidabile. Le emozioni predominanti sono tristezza e dolore. - Stile Insicuro Ansioso Ambivalente: non vi è nell’individuo la certezza che la figura di attaccamento sia disponibile a rispondere ad una richiesta d’aiuto. Per questo motivo l’esplorazione del mondo è incerta, esitante, connotata da ansia ed il bambino è inclina all’angoscia da separazione. Questo stile è promosso da una Figura che è disponibile in alcune occasioni ma non in altre e da frequenti separazioni, se non addirittura da minacce di abbandono, usate come mezzo coercitivo. I tratti che maggiormente caratterizzano questo stile sono: insicurezza nell’esplorazione del mondo, convinzione di non essere amabile, incapacità di sopportare distacchi prolungati, ansia di abbandono, sfiducia nelle proprie capacità e fiducia nelle capacità degli altri, Sé negativo e inaffidabile (a causa della sfiducia verso di lui che attribuisce alla figura di attaccamento), Altro positivo e affidabile. L’emozione predominante è la colpa.

Dalle osservazioni della Strange Situation è emerso che alcuni bambini manifestavano comportamenti non riconducibili a nessuno dei tre pattern sopra descritti, rivelando così la necessità di aggiungere un quarto stile di attaccamento alla classificazione originaria. Main e Salomon hanno proposto la definizione “disorientato/disorganizzato” per descrivere le diverse gamme di comportamenti spaventati, strani, disorganizzati e apertamente in conflitto, precedentemente non individuati, manifestati durante la procedura della Strange Situation di Mary Ainsworth. - Stile Disorientato/Disorganizzato: sono considerati disorientati/disorganizzati gli infanti che, ad esempio, appaiono apprensivi, piangono e si buttano sul pavimento o portano le mani alla bocca con le spalle curve in risposta al ritorno dei genitori dopo una breve separazione. Altri bambini disorganizzati, invece, manifestano comportamenti conflittuali, come girare in tondo mentre simultaneamente si avvicinano ai genitori. Altri ancora appaiono disorientati, congelati in tutti i movimenti, mentre assumono espressioni simili alla trance. Sono anche da considerarsi casi di attaccamento disorganizzato quelli in cui i bambini si muovono verso la figura di attaccamento con la testa girata in altra direzione, in modo da evitarne lo sguardo. È normale la presenza di attaccamenti multipli. Tali legami vengono collocati gerarchicamente e gli stessi nel corso dello sviluppo sono suscettibili di variazioni. Lo stesso legame genitoriale, col passare del tempo, potrebbe passare in secondo piano rispetto al legame affettivo sentimentale. Non è stato stabilito quando avvenga esattamente il passaggio dall’attaccamento genitoriale a quello tra pari, mentre invece nel cane sappiamo che dopo il terzoquarto mese di vita inizia una progressiva riduzione dell’attaccamento materno e di pari passo si sviluppa l’attaccamento al gruppo di appartenenza. Nell’adolescenza l’attaccamento attraversa un periodo di transizione nell’uomo. In questo periodo l’adolescente sembra spesso impegnato ad un allontanamento intenzionale dalla relazione con i genitori e familiari. Si cominciano così a stabilire le relazioni di attaccamento con coetanei (partner sentimentali e amici molto stretti). La componente sessuale di queste relazioni, che in questa fase comincia a manifestarsi, aiuta a favorire la componente dell’attaccamento, fornendo motivazioni stabili, l’esperienza di emozioni intense, intime. Nel cucciolo questo è un momento particolarmente delicato, in cui vengono rimessi in discussione tutti gli apprendimenti effettuati in precedenza. La pubertà si presenta in momenti diversi per cani di taglia diversa: i cani di grossa taglia completano la loro crescita psichica attorno ai 1820 mesi, mentre invece i cani di taglia più piccola hanno uno sviluppo psichico più rapido ed attorno all’anno di vita si possono considerare già adulti. I modelli di attaccamento determinano lo sviluppo dei modelli operativi interni. Questi ultimi sono rappresentazioni mentali che gli individui, secondo Bowlby, costruiscono nel corso dell’interazione col proprio ambiente. Essi hanno la funzione di veicolare la percezione e l’interpretazione degli eventi da parte dell’individuo, consentendogli di fare previsioni e crearsi aspettative sugli accadimenti della propria vita relazionale. I Modelli Operativi

380


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 381

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Interni consentono all’individuo di valutare e analizzare le diverse alternative della realtà, scegliersi quella ritenuta migliore, reagire alle situazioni future prima che queste si presentino, utilizzare la conoscenza degli avvenimenti passati per affrontare quelli presenti, scegliendo un’azione ottimale in relazione agli eventi stessi. Quindi permettono al bambino, e poi all’adulto, di prevedere il comportamento dell’altro guidando le risposte, soprattutto in situazioni di ansia o di bisogno. Lo sviluppo dei M.O.I. fa riferimento alla teoria dello sviluppo senso-motorio di Jean Piaget ed ai relativi processi di assimilazione e di accomodamento. Gli schemi interiorizzati del bambino, nei primi anni di vita, possono continuamente essere ridefiniti sulla base dei cambiamenti della realtà esterna e della relazione con la figura di attaccamento che muta con il mutare del bambino. I M.O.I. possono successivamente cambiare quando, ad esempio, un genitore cambia radicalmente il suo atteggiamento nei confronti del figlio. Questi cambiamenti dei Modelli Operativi Interni sono intesi sia in senso positivo che in senso negativo a seconda della variazione comportamentale del genitore. Per valutare i Modelli Operativi Interni dell’adulto fu messa a punto da Mary Main una procedura chiamata Adult Attachment Interview. A questo punto può essere stabilito a quale dei quattro stili di attaccamento viene assegnato l’individuo adulto esaminato. - Stile Sicuro: modello di Sé positivo e dell’Altro positivo. Basso esitamento, bassa ansia. Alta coerenza, alta fiducia in se stesso, approccio positivo con gli altri, alta intimità nelle relazioni. Il modello positivo dell’individuo sicuro lo porta ad avere una grande fiducia in se stesso ed un grande apprezzamento degli altri, dai quali viene considerato come tipo positivo. Le sue relazioni di coppia sono caratterizzate da intimità, rispetto, apertura emotiva ed i conflitti con il partner si risolvono in maniera costruttiva. - Stile Preoccupato: è assimilabile allo stile insicuro ansioso ambivalente (Ainsworth). Modello di Sé negativo e dell’Altro positivo. Il modello negativo che l’individuo preoccupato ha di sé lo porta ad avere una bassa autostima tendente alla dipendenza del giudizio degli altri. Invece, il modello positivo che ha dell’altro lo porta alla continua ricerca di compagni e di attenzione. Necessita continuamente di intimità nelle relazioni tanto che la sua insaziabilità nella richiesta di attenzione tende a far allontanare gli altri. Le sue relazioni sentimentali sono costellate di passione, rabbia, gelosia e ossessività. Tende ad iniziare i conflitti con il partner rimandando, però, la rottura del legame. - Stile Distanziante: è assimilabile allo stile Evitante (Ainsworth). Modello di Sé positivo, dell’Altro negativo. Il modello positivo dell’individuo distanziante lo porta ad avere alta fiducia in se stesso senza interessarsi del giudizio degli altri anche se pensa di essere considerato arrogante, furbo, critico, serio e riservato. Il modello negativo che ha dell’altro lo porta a dare l’impressione di non apprezzare molto le altre persone apparendo, talvolta, cinico o eccessivamente critico. Svaluta l’importanza delle relazioni e sotto-

linea l’importanza dell’indipendenza, della libertà e dell’affermazione. Le sue relazioni di coppia sono caratterizzate dalla mancanza dell’intimità, tendendo a non mostrare affetto nelle relazioni. Preferisce evitare i conflitti e si sente rapidamente intrappolato o annoiato dalla relazione. - Stile Timoroso-Evitante: è assimilabile allo stile disorientato-disorganizzato (Ainsworth). Modello di Sé negativo, dell’Altro negativo. Il modello negativo che l’individuo timoroso-evitante ha di se stesso lo porta ad avere bassa autostima e molte incertezze verso se stesso e verso gli altri. Il modello negativo che ha dell’altro lo porta ad evitare le richieste d’aiuto, evita i conflitti ed ha difficoltà a fidarsi degli altri. È difficile trovarlo coinvolto in una relazione sentimentale e quando vi si trova assume un ruolo passivo. In tali relazioni è dipendente ed insicuro. Tende ad autocolpevolizzarsi per i problemi di coppia ed ha difficoltà a comunicare apertamente e a mostrare i sentimenti al partner. In definitiva si può affermare che la relazione affettiva madre-figlio ha una funzione costitutiva e strutturale nei confronti della mente: l’attaccamento crea il contenitore psichico. In effetti l’attaccamento ha una forte valenza relazionale, ovvero reciproca: è un dialogo ed uno scambio reciproco di informazioni, sensazioni ed emozioni. Si tratta dunque di una relazione sia psichica che fisica, e la fisicità è davvero molto, molto importante. Oggi infatti si parla di “neonato competente”: la vita psichica si organizza intorno ad esperienze multiple, in un processo di comunicazione attivo dove TUTTO IL CORPO HA UN RUOLO. Ciò ha portato ad ipotizzare l’esistenza di schemi programmati geneticamente, esprimentesi sottoforma di insiemi organizzati di comportamento, che nella relazione con l’ambiente si strutturano in schemi di azione che fondano il modo di pensare più primitivo, una sorta di pensiero agito, un PENSIERO CORPOREO. Questa teoria si trova in contiguità con la scoperta dei neuroni specchio, della loro costituzione pre-natale e del ruolo che giocano nella percezione empatica dell’altro. E quali studi sono stati fatti per dimostrare ed indagare la relazione di attaccamento fra uomo e cane? Sono stati effettuati alcuni studi utilizzando la strange situation della Ainsworth, adattando opportunamente l’ambiente di studio alla specie cane. Tutti gli studi effettuati hanno messo in evidenza la presenza di un legame di attaccamento simile a quello che si sviluppa nell’uomo. Alcuni studi hanno anche dimostrato come il cane sia in grado di leggere lo stato emozionale del partner umano e come questo possa essere d’intralcio o viceversa di aiuto nell’esplorazione di un nuovo oggetto. Inoltre il cane, di fronte ad un problema, è portato a rivolgersi al partner umano per chiedere aiuto ed è in grado di individuare la persona maggiormente disponibile ad offrirgli ciò che desidera. Questi ultimi studi fanno pensare che esistano dei circuiti di neuroni specchio che sparano in modo interspecifico fra cane e uomo, poiché sembra che il cane presenti empatia nei confronti dell’uomo. Questo potrebbe essere il risultato del processo di domesticazione, parte insomma della selezione volta ad ottenere animali più predisposti all’interazione con l’uomo. Purtroppo

381


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 382

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

non sono ancora stati pubblicati studi che mettano in correlazione diversi tipi di attaccamento e diversi tipi di evoluzione comportamentale, o che evidenzino la correlazione fra attaccamento inadeguato e sviluppo di patologie comportamentali nel cane, ma in futuro potremmo avere evidenze anche in questo senso.

Sulle altre specie animali Claude Beata “la communication” Solal, 2005 Marc Bekoff “la vita emozionale degli animali”, Osai Alberto Perdisa, 2010 Patricia Kaulfuß · Daniel S. Mills “Neophilia in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and its implication for studies of dog cognition” Anim Cogn (2008) 11:553–556 B. Hare, M. Tomasello “Human-like social skills in dogs?” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2004 Roberto Marchesini “Pedagogia cinofila. Introduzione all’approccio cognitivo zooantropologico”, Osai Alberto Perdisa, 2007 Roberto Marchesini, Sabrina Tonutti “Manuale di Zooantropologia”, Meltemi, 2007 Roberto Marchesini “L’identità del cane”, Alberto Perdisa, 2005 Linda C. Marston, Pauleen C. Bennett “Reforging the bond—towards successful canine adoption” Applied Animal Behaviour Science 83 (2003) 227–245 Nagasawa M, Murai K, Mogi K, Kikusui T “Dogs can discriminate human smiling faces from blank expressions” Anim Cogn. 2011 Jul;14(4):525-33. Epub 2011 Feb 26. Patrick Pageat “patologie comportamentale del cane”, Le Point Veterinaire Italie, 199 Robyn Palmer, Deborah Custance “A counterbalanced version of Ainsworth’s Strange Situation Procedure reveals secure-base effects in dog–human relationships” Applied Animal Behaviour Science 109 (2008) 306–319 E. Prato-Previde, D. M. Custance, C. Spiezio, F. Sabatini “Is the dog-human relationship an attachment bond? An observational study using Ainsworth’s strange situation” Behaviour 2003, 140, 225-254 Marshall-Pescini, S, Valsecchi P, Prato-Previde, E (2011) Are dogs mislead more by their owners than by strangers in a food choice task? Animal Cognition, 14 (1) 137-142 L.A. Rosenblum et al ”Adverse early experiences affect noradrenergic and serotonergic functioning in adult primates” Biol. Psychiatry,1994 Feb 15;35(4):221-7 Lilla Toth, Marta Gacsi, Jozsef Topal, Adam Miklosi “Playing styles and possible causative factors in dogs behaviour when playing with humans” Applied Animal Behaviour Science 114 (2008) 473-484

Bibliografia Sull’uomo Ainsworth, M.D.S., Bell, S.M., e Stayton, D. “Infant-mother attachment and social development”, in M.P. Richards (a cura di), The introduction of a Child into a Social World, 1974 Didier Anzieu “l’io pelle”, Borla, 1987 John Bowlby “Attaccamento e perdita 1: l’attaccamento alla madre”, Bollati Boringhieri, 1999 John Bowlby “Attaccamento e perdita 2: la separazione dalla madre”, Bollati Boringhieri, 2000 John Bowlby “Attaccamento e perdita 3: la perdita della madre” Bollati Boringhieri, 2000 Sigmund Freud “aldilà del principio del piacere”, Mondadori, 2007 Gattico, E. “Jean Piaget”, Milano: Bruno Mondadori, 2001 Marco Iacoboni “I neuroni specchio. Come capiamo ciò che fanno gli altri”, Bollati Boringhieri, 2008 Lyons-Ruth K, Yellin C, Helnick S, Atwood G “Expanding the concept of unresolved mental states: Hostile/Helpless states of mind on the Adult Attachment Interview are associated with disrupted motherinfant communication and infant disorganization”. Dev Psychopathol 2005, 17: 1–23 R.M. Post, S.R. Weiss “Emergent properties of neural systems: how focal molecular neurobiological alterations can affect behavior”, Dev. Psychopathol.1997 Fall;9(4):907-29 Donald Winnicott “Una bambina di nome Piggle”, Bollati Boringhieri, 2008

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Marzia Possenti - E-mail: grayne@tiscali.it

382


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 383

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Terapia delle emergenze in cardiologia Cecilia Quintavalla Med Vet, Dr Ric, Parma

Per emergenza cardiologica si intende uno stato patologico acuto che mette in pericolo imminente o che ha già compromesso le funzioni vitali del paziente; in questi casi l’approccio migliore e unico consiste nel mettere in atto immediatamente tutte le misure necessarie per stabilizzare il paziente, limitando o rimandando a un secondo momento la ricerca diagnostica. Nelle emergenze cardiologiche il riconoscimento dei sintomi e segni della malattia sottostante deve essere rapido per consentire un altrettanto tempestivo ed ottimale intervento terapeutico. Occorre attuare le procedure diagnostiche minime indispensabili a comprendere rapidamente e se possibile correggere il meccanismo che è alla base dell’emergenza cardiaca. L’emergenza cardiologica può infatti derivare da una anomalia che riguarda primariamente il cuore (ad es. insufficienza valvolare, cardiomiopatia, contusione miocardica, aritmie) oppure essere legata ad alterazioni extracardiache che interferiscono con la funzione cardiaca (ad es. tamponamento cardiaco, ipertensione sistemica, turbe elettrolitiche, tromboembolismo arterioso). Le principali emergenze cardiologiche con cui deve confrontarsi il clinico sono l’edema polmonare acuto, lo shock cardiogeno, il tamponamento cardiaco, gravi tachiaritmie e bradiaritmie, il tromboembolismo arterioso.

-

-

o differente, polso filiforme; Anomalie delle vene: polso venoso giugulare, aumentato turgore venoso; Anomalie auscultazione cardiaca: soffio, ritmo di galoppo, affievolimento o scomparsa dei toni cardiaci; Anomalie auscultazione torace: rantoli, incremento del rumore broncovescicolare, scomparsa dei rumori respiratori; Anomalie alla palpazione addominale: distensione addominale con succussione positiva, epatomegalia; Altro: ipotermia, edemi sottocutanei, paresi/paralisi arto anteriore destro o treno posteriore.

I segni clinici e, in particolare, i parametri vitali (frequenza e profondità del respiro, temperatura, frequenza e ritmo cardiaco, colore delle mucose e TRC, polso arterioso, pressione arteriosa, sensorio) devono essere annotati e rivalutati periodicamente nel corso della terapia.

COME APPROFONDISCO LA DIAGNOSI IN CORSO DI EMERGENZA CARDIOLOGICA? Le procedure diagnostiche strettamente necessarie devono essere effettuate riducendo al minimo lo stress al paziente, manipolando l’animale delicatamente, evitando posizionamenti che possano compromettere la funzione respiratoria e lavorando in ambiente tranquillo. Eventualmente procedere a sedazione dell’animale facendo attenzione a non deprimere troppo la respirazione. I principi attivi maggiormente utilizzati allo scopo sono sedativi oppioidi (soprattutto butorfanolo e buprenorfina) e fenotiazine (acepromazina). Elettrocardiografia: il monitoraggio ECG è essenziale per rilevare aritmie che possono compromettere la sopravvivenza del paziente e per monitorare la terapia; Fast ecocardiografia: rapida valutazione di versamenti (pleurico, pericardico, addominale), rottura di corde tendinee, disfunzione sistolica e diastolica, masse o trombi intracardiaci, ingrandimenti tetracamerali o di alcune camere cardiache, ipertrofia delle pareti ventricolari; Radiografia toracica: solo se essenziale alla diagnosi con animale in stazione quadrupedale o in decubito sternale (non posizionare sul dorso o in decubito laterale in caso di difficoltà respiratoria) per valutare i campi polmonari (edema);

COME RICONOSCO UN’EMERGENZA CARDIOLOGICA AL TRIAGE? Occorre valutare rapidamente ma in modo efficiente: - Segnalamento: specie, razza, età - Anamnesi: difficoltà respiratoria, sincope, tosse, ridotta tolleranza all’esercizio fisico, somministrazione di fluidi endovenosi, corticosteroidi in dosi elevate, evento stressante acuto, carico alimentare di sale acuto. - Segni clinici: - Alterazioni di frequenza, ampiezza e tipo di respiro: tachipnea, dispnea restrittiva, discordanza toracoaddominale; - Anomalie delle mucose: mucose pallide, cianotiche, prolungamento del tempo di riempimento capillare (TRC); - Anomalie del polso arterioso: tachisfigmia, bradisfigmia, deficit del polso, polso paradosso, polso assente

383


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 384

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Misurazione della pressione arteriosa: con metodi rapidi, non invasivi quali flussimetro Doppler o metodo oscillometrico. Utile per rilevare gravi stati ipotensivi o ipertensivi che richiedono terapie appropriate. Pulsossimetria: consente una stima approssimativa non invasiva della pressione parziale di ossigeno (SaO2 > 90% all’aria ambientale corrisponde a PaO2 > 60 mmHg), ma non è attendibile in caso di vasocostrizione, ipotermia, artefatti dovuti al movimento o a tremori. Valuta l’ossigenazione arteriosa ma non la ventilazione (ovvero l’eliminazione di CO2). Se necessario ottenere un campione di sangue arterioso per emogasanalisi.

3. Venodilatatori: Nitroglicerina può essere applicata topicamente su un’area glabra (solitamente la parte interna del padiglione auricolare) per ridurre il precarico: 2,5-10 mg/cane/24 ore; 2,5-5 mg/gatto/24 ore. Il picco di effetto si ha dopo 1 ora e dura 2-12 ore. 4. Ambiente non stressante o sedazione Terapie addizionali in base alla fisiopatologia sottostante: 1. Inotropo-positivi: sono indicati nelle situazioni in cui lo scompenso congestizio è accompagnato anche da segni di bassa portata cardiaca come in caso di insufficienza miocardica/shock cardiogeno: a. Dobutamina: i. CRI 2,5 - 10 μgr/kg/min nel cane (in bibliografia riportati valori da 2,5 a 20 μgr/kg/min, a seconda degli autori). Iniziare con il dosaggio minimo e poi incrementare la dose in base alla risposta clinica. L’azione si manifesta in 1-2 minuti. Dopo 48 ore ridurre la dose del 50% ogni 2 ore fino a sospensione. ii. CRI 0,5 -3 μgr/kg/min non oltre 24 ore nel gatto (in bibliografia riportati valori da 0,5 a 5 μgr/kg/ min, a seconda degli autori). Attento monitoraggio di eventuali effetti avversi (tachicardia, aritmie, convulsioni). 2. Vasodilatatori: sono indicati nei casi in cui è necessario ottenere una rapida diminuzione di precarico e/o postcarico per ridurre le pressioni di riempimento sinistre ed aumentare il flusso anterogrado. a. Nitroprussiato sodico: i. CRI da 0,5 a 10 μgr/kg/min nel cane fino a 48-72 ore. Iniziare con il dosaggio minimo e titolare ad effetto. ii. CRI da 0,5 a 2 μgr/kg/min nel gatto fino a 12-24 ore. Iniziare con il dosaggio minimo e titolare ad effetto. È un vasodilatatore misto ad azione rapida (1-2 minuti dalla somministrazione EV) e riduce precarico e postcarico. Può provocare anche a dosi molto basse grave ipotensione, va utilizzato in casi selezionati, richiede monitoraggio invasivo della pressione con catetere arterioso (pressione arteriosa media non inferiore a 65-75 mmHg nel cane e 90 mmHg nel gatto), può essere usato in associazione a dobutamina. Tossicità in caso di somministrazioni prolungate nel tempo. b. Idralazina: è un potente dilatatore arterioso. La posologia è di 0,5-3 mg/kg PO/12 ore: non in commercio in Italia. c. Amlodipina: 0,2-1 mg/kg nel cane; 0,625-1,25 mg/ gatto. Può rappresentare un’alternativa nei casi in cui non sia possibile attuare un monitoraggio invasivo della pressione arteriosa o la somministrazione CRI. Occorrono da 6 a 24 ore perché compaia l’effetto. 3. Inodilatatori: Pimobendan rappresenta un’alternativa alla terapia finalizzata alla riduzione delle pressioni di riempimento in quanto dotato di effetti inotropo positivo e di vasodilatazione venosa e arteriosa. È in grado di agire su precarico, postcarico e contrattilità. È somministrato per os alla dose di 0,25-0,3 mg/kg/12 ore. Gli effetti positivi si manifestano nell’arco di alcune ore dalla somministrazione.

APPROCCIO TERAPEUTICO ALLE PRINCIPALI EMERGENZE CARDIACHE Edema polmonare cardiogeno acuto: si verifica per aumento della pressione idrostatica nelle vene e nei capillari polmonari a causa dell’incremento delle pressioni di riempimento nel ventricolo e/o atrio sinistro per sovraccarico volumetrico (insufficienza mitralica o aortica, insufficienza miocardica, shunt congeniti sinistra-destra) e/o disfunzione diastolica (cardiomiopatia ipertrofica, restrittiva). Può evolvere rapidamente e portare a morte il paziente. Richiede un riconoscimento rapido e terapia tempestiva. La terapia iniziale prevede: 1. Ossigenoterapia: fondamentale nei pazienti con distress respiratorio conseguente a edema polmonare. Ha lo scopo di “mantenere in vita il paziente” in attesa che abbia effetto la terapia farmacologica. Può essere effettuata in gabbia, con maschera, flow by, con collare elisabettiano o con metodi invasivi quali catetere nasale, nasofaringeo, transtracheale. Occorre avere a disposizione tubi endotracheali di varie dimensioni per procedere a ventilazione assistita in caso di arresto respiratorio indotto da grave ipercarbia. 2. Diuretici: Furosemide deve essere somministrato al più presto in boli endovenosi (2-6 mg/kg per dose ad intervalli di 1-2 ore fino a risposta nel cane; 1-2 mg/kg per dose a intervalli di 1-4 ore fino a risposta nel gatto) o in infusione endovenosa continua (CRI: 0,66 mg/kg EV come dose di attacco seguita da 0,66 mg/kg/ora). In alternativa utilizzare la via intramuscolare. Il tempo di insorgenza d’azione varia da 5 a 15 minuti. In caso di mancata urinazione entro 30-60 minuti devono essere prese in considerazione diverse possibilità: - Palpare la vescica urinaria: molti pazienti non urinano in gabbia o in assenza di una lettiera idonea: questo può costituire una ulteriore fonte di stress per il paziente. - Indicazione alla somministrazione di una dose ulteriore di furosemide. - Errore diagnostico: edema polmonare non cardiogeno, emorragia polmonare, neoplasia polmonare. - Misurare la pressione arteriosa: associazione di shock cardiogeno con inadeguata filtrazione glomerulare. Una diuresi aggressiva può provocare grave disidratazione, insufficienza renale, turbe elettrolitiche, shock ipovolemico.

384


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 385

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

4. Toracocentesi: soprattutto nel gatto la dispnea può essere causata o aggravata dalla concomitante presenza di versamento pleurico. In questi casi occorre effettuare una toracocentesi utilizzando una ago a farfalla o un ago cannula. 5. Antiaritmici: quando l’aritmia contribuisce alla sintomatologia clinica.

kaliemia in quanto l’ipopotassiemia riduce l’efficacia della lidocaina. Procainamide: 2 mg/kg in boli lenti (2 minuti) fino a un totale di 10-15 mg/kg in 10-15 minuti seguiti da CRI 25-50 μgr/kg/min. Gatto: 1. Lidocaina: 0,5-1 mg/kg In bolo endovenoso lento. Ripetere fino ad un massimo di 2 mg/kg in 10 minuti. Monitorare effetti avversi (fascicolazioni muscolari, convulsioni, sintomi neurologici centrali, nausea) 2. Esmololo (0,05-0,5 mg/kg EV lenta in 1-2 minuti seguita da CRI 10-200 μgr/kg/min; propranololo (0,02 mg/kg EV lenta in 1-2 minuti ripetuto fino a 4 volte). Sconsigliato l’uso in caso di scompenso cardiaco e insufficienza miocardica.

Tamponamento cardiaco: si verifica quando si accumula fluido nel sacco pericardico in quantità tale per cui la pressione intrapericardica supera la pressione atriale destra con conseguente compressione del cuore destro, compromissione del riempimento diastolico, scompenso congestizio destro e/o shock ostruttivo. La terapia diuretica non è efficace ed occorre effettuare una pericardiocentesi utilizzando preferibilmente un approccio destro (per ridurre il rischio di lacerazione dei vasi coronarici), con paziente in decubito sternale o laterale. L’ecocardiografia può essere utilizzata come guida. In alternativa può essere impiegato come punto di repere l’itto cardiaco (se palpabile) oppure usare come riferimento il gomito (in genere 5° spazio intercostale destro sopra la giunzione costocondrale). Se necessario può rendersi necessaria una lieve sedazione. È opportuno un monitoraggio ECG continuo per eventuali aritmie. Il drenaggio può essere effettuato utilizzando un catetere collegato ad un sistema a tre vie.

Bradiaritmie Possono causare sincope o shock cardiogeno. In genere sintomatiche quando la frequenza ventricolare è <40 bpm nel cane e <120 bpm nel gatto o in caso di arresti ventricolari prolungati (in genere >3-5 sec). Bradicardia sinusale: - Somministrare farmaci vagolitici per escludere forme vago-mediate e valutare l’importanza clinica della bradiaritmia. Test dell’atropina: 0,04 mg/kg SC: in caso di ipertono vagale la frequenza ventricolare aumenta di circa il 50% dopo 30 minuti. - In caso di mancata risposta e presenza di segni di shock cardiogeno somministrare dobutamina o dopamina CRI e considerare impianto di pacemaker temporaneo o permanente. - In un soggetto con segni di shock di qualunque natura la bradicardia sinusale può preludere all’arresto cardiaco. Valutare elettroliti, temperatura rettale, ventilazione. Considerare la somministrazione di atropina/epinefrina.

Tachiaritmie Tachiaritmie sopraventricolari: in genere non rappresentano un’emergenza a meno che non abbiano determinato tachicardiomiopatia o siano comunque associate ad insufficienza cardiaca congestizia/shock cardiogeno. Aritmie sopraventricolari in emergenza: Diltiazem: 0,15-0,25 mg/kg in bolo endovenoso lento (in due minuti) seguito da CRI 2-6 μgr/kg/min. Altri farmaci utilizzabili in emergenza: lidocaina (fibrillazione atriale vago-mediata; tachicardia atriale ortodromica reciprocante), amiodarone (tachicardia atriale focale – non utilizzare nel Dobermann e negli animali giovani), sotalolo.

Silenzio atriale: - Legato a distrofia muscolare atriale con coinvolgimento del nodo del seno e delle vie di conduzione internodali, interatriali e atrio-nodali. - Non risponde ad atropina. Se sintomatico impianto di pacemaker.

Tachiaritmie ventricolari: rappresentano più spesso un’emergenza cardiaca. In linea generale vanno trattate solo se significative dal punto di vista emodinamico e/o se potenzialmente in grado di degenerare in ritmi letali, ricercando nel frattempo la causa. L’aritmia ventricolare va trattata se: 1. È responsabile di sincope, debolezza, letargia, shock cardiogeno. 2. Presenta caratteri di gravità (molto rapida >180 bpm nel cane, > 200-220 bpm nel gatto; fenomeni di R su T, TV parossistica con polimorfismo, torsione di punte). 3. Non trattare il ritmo idioventricolare accelerato.

Ritmo seno-ventricolare: - Legato ad iperpotassiemia (oltre 8,0 mEq/L). - Trattare la turba elettrolitiche e la causa sottostante (ad es. ipoadrenocorticsmo o ostruzione uretrale) - Terapia dell’iperpotassiemia: o NaCL 0,9% per promuovere kaliuresi o Calcio gluconato 0,5 ml/kg di soluzione al 10% EV lenta (in 5-10 minuti) o Bicarbonato di sodio: 1 mEq/kg EV in 3-4 minuti o Insulina: 0,25-0,5 UI/kg EV seguita da destrosio: 1g/unità di insulina EV, seguito da destrosio 2,5% CRI per prevenire ipoglicemia

Tachiaritmie ventricolari in emergenza: Cane: Lidocaina: 2-4 mg/kg in boli endovenosi lenti (5 minuti) ripetuti fino a una dose totale di 6-8 mg/kg nell’arco di 1530 minuti) seguiti da CRI 50-75 μgr/kg/min. Misurare la

385


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 386

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Blocco atrioventricolare di II grado avanzato e di III grado: - Test atropina - Impianto di pacemaker

-

Tromboembolismo arterioso Si riscontra prevalentemente nel gatto in associazione a cardiomiopatia. Determina ostruzione del flusso arterioso periferico, prevalentemente a carico degli arti posteriori e dell’arto anteriore destro. I sintomi hanno insorgenza acuta e sono caratterizzati da forte dolore e paralisi degli arti colpiti. Il quadro può essere complicato da insufficienza cardiaca congestizia. La terapia prevede: - Ricovero in gabbia ed ossigenoterapia - Terapia dello scompenso cardiaco se presente

-

Analgesia: per il dolore ischemico soprattutto nelle 2448 ore successive all’evento (butorfanolo, buprenorfina) Terapia anticoagulante: eparina (100-200 UI/kg come dose di attacco, poi 50-100 UI/kg/6-8 ore), dalteparina (100 UI/kg/12 ore), enoxaparina (1-1,5 mg/kg/12-24 ore) Fluidoterapia (a meno di edema polmonare concomitante) Bicarbonato di sodio in caso di acidosi metabolica e iperkaliemia derivante da necrosi muscolare e riperfusione Acido acetilsalicilico per il dolore muscolare in addizione all’effetto antiaggregante piastrinico.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Cecilia Quintavalla Dipartimento di Salute Animale Università degli Studi di Parma, Italia

386


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 387

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

FANS: importanza spesso sottovalutata Giuliano Ravasio Med Vet, Dr Ric, Milano

La storia dell’aspirina e quindi dei successivi antinfiammatori costituisce un interessante esempio della trasposizione di una sostanza dal regno del folclore erboristico alla terapia contemporanea. L’utilizzo della corteccia e delle foglie del salice al fine di alleviare la febbre è stato attribuito per primo ad Ippocrate, ma venne poi più chiaramente documentato da Edmund Stone in una lettera del 1763 al presidente della Royal Society. Presto iniziò ad essere utilizzato per la terapia di febbre reumatica, gotta e come generale antipiretico. Il suo sapore sgradevole ed i suoi effetti gastrointestinali però rendevano difficile la sua tolleranza per lunghi periodi. Nel 1899, Hoffmann, cercò di migliorare il profilo degli effetti collaterali dell’acido salicilico; iniziò a testare l’acido acetilsalicilico sugli animali (era la prima volta in cui un farmaco veniva testato sugli animali in ambito industriale); si proseguì quindi con gli studi umani e con la commercializzazione dell’Aspirina1. Nonostante l’ampio utilizzo di questo farmaco, però, bisogna attendere fino al 1971 affinché JohnVane arrivi a spiegare il meccanismo d’azione dell’aspirina e degli altri antinfiammatori non steroidei (FANS), dimostrando che basse dosi di questi farmaci erano sufficienti ad inibire la produzione enzimatica di prostaglandine. Dalla scoperta dell’Aspirina ad oggi sono stati sintetizzati una vasta gamma di farmaci antinfiammatori non steroidei, utilizzati sia in medicina umana che in medicina veterinaria e tuttora continua la ricerca di nuovi FANS caratterizzati da un maggiore potere terapeutico e una minore incidenza di effetti collaterali. Tutti gli antinfiammatori non steroidei, compresa la più recente sottoclasse degli inbitori COX-2 selettivi, sono antinfiammatori, analgesici e antipiretici1. L’impiego di questi farmaci nella gestione del dolore, in sostituzione o associazione con i più comunemente usati oppioidi, prospetta lo sviluppo di numerosi nuovi protocolli analgesici. I FANS non presentano, infatti, quando usati a dosaggi indicati, i numerosi effetti collaterali degli oppioidi sul sistema nervoso centrale, comprese la depressione respiratoria e la comparsa di dipendenza fisica. I FANS non alterano le percezioni sensitive, ad eccezione di quella dolorifica. Questi farmaci controllano abbastanza bene il dolore cronico, il dolore acuto postoperatorio e tutti i dolori di tipo infiammatorio; al contrario non riescono ad eliminare altrettanto bene un dolore intenso di tipo viscerale1.

La migliore indicazione per l’uso dei FANS è il dolore ortopedico postoperatorio in cani o gatti ben idratati, normotesi, di giovane o media età, con funzionalità renale normale, senza alterazioni emostatiche, che non assumono corticosteroidi e senza evidenza o dubbio di lesione gastrica. Fino a poco tempo fa i FANS venivano usati principalmente come agenti antiinfiammatori per le osteoartriti, come antipiretici e come analgesici per il dolore da leggero a moderato. Ma sempre di più i FANS vengono utilizzati per il dolore da moderato a grave, specialmente per fornire analgesia perioperatoria nei cani e nei gatti2. Il confronto con l’efficacia analgesica degli oppioidi è abbastanza controversa: alcuni autori sostengono che i FANS posseggano un potere analgesico inferiore, altri che i FANS sostengono il confronto (e anzi a volte sono addirittura superiori) con gli oppioidi, sia nell’uomo che negli animali 4; indipendentemente da ciò, si concorda sul fatto che i FANS sono privi degli effetti collaterali indesiderati degli oppiacei a livello di SNC, che includono la depressione respiratoria e lo sviluppo di dipendenza fisica 6. I FANS non cambiano la percezione delle modalità di sensibilità diverse dal dolore. Il dolore cronico postoperatorio o il dolore che deriva dall’infiammazione è controllato particolarmente bene dai FANS. Sono quindi utili nel controllo del dolore postoperatorio e per la prevenzione di un eccessivo edema senza, apparentemente, avere nessun effetto negativo sulla guarigione della ferita7. Sono anche molto utilizzati, dal punto di vista clinico e come agenti antiinfiammatori, nel trattamento dei disordini muscolo-scheletrici 6. I FANS hanno anche un considerevole potenziale terapeutico per il trattamento dello shock endotossico. Per tutte le condizioni infiammatorie a cui è associato dolore i FANS sembrano essere più efficaci degli oppioidi: meningiti, tumori ossei (soprattutto dopo biopsia), edema dei tessuti molli (mastiti), poliartriti, cistiti, malattie infiammatorie dermatologiche gravi, o traumi (ad esempio morsi) 4 . Altre indicazioni per l’utilizzo dei FANS sono la panosteite, l’osteodistrofia ipertrofica, il dolore dato da neoplasie (soprattutto dell’osso) e il dolore dentale 4. L’analgesia multimodale o bilanciata è caratterizzata dalla somministrazione simultanea di due o più classi di farmaci analgesici, in modo tale che essi sviluppino un sinergismo di attività e possano essere quindi utilizzati a dosi inferiori, riducendo in questo modo gli effetti collaterali che potrebbero conseguire la loro

387


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 388

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

somministrazione. Questa teoria fa leva sul fatto che i diversi analgesici agiscono a diversi livelli lungo le vie del dolore 8. L’importanza spesso sottovalutata nell’utilizzo di un FANS, risiede nel fatto che questa categoria farmacologica è una delle poche, in grado di inibire la formazione di dolore cronico a livello di midollo spinale (memorizzazione spinale allodinica). Questo tipo di meccanismo d’azione interviene sull’inibizione della produzione di prostaglandine, principali responsabili della formazione di nuove sinapsi e dolore neuropatico a livello spinale. In presenza di un danno tissutale e di processo infiammatorio i livelli della ciclossigenasi di tipo 2 (COX-2), altrimenti detta inducibile, aumentano di 20 volte rispetto ai suoi livelli base. Questo incremento della COX-2 induce una maggiore sintesi di prostaglandine, che agiscono come mediatori dell’infiammazione e amplificatori degli impulsi nocicettivi e della loro trasmissione sia a livello del sistema nervoso periferico che centrale 4. Le prostaglandine hanno inoltre manifestato un potente effetto a livello dei processi nocicettivi spinali, facilitando l’infiammazione dei neuroni centrali ed aumentando il rilascio di neurotrasmettitori da parte degli afferenti primari5. In uno studio condotto da Xiaoying Zhu 9 è stato dimostrato il ruolo detenuto dalla COX-1 nell’insorgenza di una sensazione algica. Con l’iniezione di sostanze irritanti a livello degli arti posteriori di alcuni ratti si procurò allodina meccanica ed iperalgesia termica nelle regioni trattate ed un aumento del COX-2 mRNA e proteine a livello del midollo spinale lombare, mentre COX-1 mRNA rimase invariato ad indicare che la COX-2 gioca un ruolo prominente nel dolore di tipo infiammatorio. Quindi, risultando l’insulto chirurgico nella sintesi e rilascio periferico di numerosi mediatori infiammatori, comprese le prostaglandine, ed essendo essi responsabili della sensibilizzazione dei nocicettori periferici con l’alterazione della loro soglia di attivazione e, talvolta, con la stimolazione diretta, i COX-2 inibitori determinano analgesia riducendo, in ultima analisi, la sintesi delle prostaglandine Con questo meccanismo la COX-2 è responsabile in gran parte dell’iperalgesia e dell’esperienza dolorosa successiva ad un danno tissutale4. Quindi i FANS non esercitano un effetto diretto sulla normale percezione dolorifica, ma agiscono riducendo l’ipersensibilità al dolore causata dalla risposta infiammatoria7. Nelle pratiche chirurgiche ci sono tre momenti distinti che possono essere scelti per effettuare la terapia analgesica: prima dell’intervento (analgesia preventiva); dopo l’intervento, ma prima che il paziente ritorni cosciente e possa percepire il dolore; solamente nel momento in cui l’animale mostri i segni della presenza di dolore.

Quest’ultimo atteggiamento dovrebbe essere scartato definitivamente perché una volta che il paziente manifesta sofferenza, come accennato sopra, saranno necessarie elevate dosi di farmaci per ottenere un adeguata analgesia. Nel 1983 Davis scriveva: “una delle curiosità psicologiche nel decidere di intraprendere una terapia è come un clinico che non sia assolutamente sicuro che un animale stia soffrendo decida di non utilizzare analgesici. Lo stesso però somministrerà antibiotici, senza avere la certezza della presenza di un’infezione batterica”. Dal punto di vista di Davis, se esiste anche solo il sospetto di sofferenza, questo deve essere sufficiente per decidere di iniziare il trattamento 3. Migliorando il benessere dell’animale nel postoperatorio, inoltre, si riducono notevolmente le possibili disfunzioni organiche che seguono gli interventi chirurgici tra cui nausea, vomito ed ileo paralitico. Tutto ciò permette un più rapido apporto nutrizionale, quindi tempi di ricovero inferiori e minori complicazioni infettive.

BIBLIOGRAFIA 1.

2.

3.

4.

5. 6.

7.

8.

Burke A., Smyth E., FitzGerald G.A., 2006. Analgesic-Antipyretic Agents; Pharmacotherapy of Gout. In: Goodman & Gilman’s The Pharmacological basis of therapeutics; New York: Mc Graw-Hill; 11^ed.; Cap.26; pp:671-712. Carrol G.L., Simonson S.M. Recent development in Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs in Cats. Journal of American Animal Hospital Association 2005; 41:347-354. Watson A.D.J., Nicholson A., Church D.B., Pearson M.R.B., 1996. Use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats. Aust Vet J; 74 (3); pp: 203-210. Mathews K.A., 2000. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practise, vol. 30, n.4, pp.783-804. Mathews K.A., 2006. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics in pain management in dogs and cats. Can Vet J; 37; pp. 539-545. Robertson S.A., Taylor P.M. Pain managment in cats-past, present and future. Part 2. Treatment of pain-clinical pharmacology. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2004; 6: 321-333. Kallings P. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practise, 1993; vol.9, n. 3, pp. 523541. Lamont L.A., 2002. Feline perioperative pain management. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practise, vol. 32; pp. 747-763.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Giuliano Ravasio E-mail: giuliano.ravasio@unimi.it

388


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 389

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Performing a complete oral examination Jennifer Rawlinson DVM, Dipl AVDC, Ithaca, NY

A complete oral exam is the foundation for a good diagnosis and if needed treatment recommendations. To be able to perform a high quality oral exam the practitioner must have a solid understanding of maxillofacial and dental anatomy. A common reason presented for missing pathology on awake oral examinations is that “it is impossible to fully evaluate the mouth when the patient is alert, and sedated exams reveal far more pathology.” This drastically underestimates the ability of the dental specialist and the private practitioner to identify pathology. With slow hands, a little patience, and good lighting a veterinarian can detect 80-90% of oral pathology in an awake, non-fractious animal. Fractious animals are a completely different story. No oral exam is worth the risk of severe injury to you, your technician, or the owner. A sedated oral examination in these patients is well worth the extra time and cost. This cautious approach is prudent and wise in animals that are known biters, fear aggressive, or on the attack in the exam room. A complete oral examination consists of many components. These components are an understanding of maxillofacial and dental anatomy, acquiring a complete history, observing the animal during the client interview, performing a complete maxillofacial and dental exam starting at the ears and ending with opening the mouth, and attaining a full physical exam. A full physical examination always includes a complete oral exam. Upon walking in the door of an exam room, an astute practitioner has immediately started their oral assessment without even touching the animal. Odors within the room can be very telling of oral health. Observing the patient during the client interview is critical. Not only can the general health and demeanor of the animal start to be evaluated but also hints or signs of oral pain and pathology may be detectable. Cats with gingivostomatitis will frequently drool or paw at the mouth when unrestrained in the examination room, and upon a friendly greeting and pat, dogs may be head shy on the side of pathology. Eliciting a good history and listening to all the owners’responses carefully is key to deciphering the exact problem and addressing the owner’s concerns. Sometimes we are so programmed to ask routine questions and to hear expected responses that we miss critical small details. In addition to routinely asked questions regarding general health of the pet, there are a number of important dental related questions. Inquiring about halitosis, pawing at the face, head shaking,

periods of anorexia, asymmetrical chewing patterns, oralrelated behaviors, diet, eating behaviors, past dental care, home dental care, animal’s occupation (police dog vs. couch potato), past maxillofacial trauma, abnormal clicking/popping when using mouth, and past medical conditions can help a clinician determine possible problems and appropriate treatment recommendations. A few reliable patterns seen over the years are: • a decrease in vigorous oral play (tugging, chewing, fetching) is usually the first sign of oral pain in dogs that enjoy chewing, • a slow decrease in activity and playfulness in otherwise normal dogs can be related to significant periodontal disease, • a diet preference switch in kibble loving cats to soft food is usually the first sign of oral pain (this can also happen in reverse as some cats with oral pain will just swallow the kibble whole), • a hungry cat that meows for food and runs from the food dish after one bite is in severe oral pain most likely from gingivostomatitis, • and intricate periodontal surgery to salvage teeth in a dog is fruitless unless an owner has an expressed interest in providing daily oral care at home (tooth brushing). Once a thorough history has been provided, the exam can begin. Start with the oral exam as animals usually resent this portion of a full physical exam the most, rectal exams excluded. By starting with the head, the most difficult part of the examination is completed first. Oral examination relies heavily on symmetry and routine. If an established routine is used to evaluate symmetry, any species can be examined with confidence. To evaluate for symmetry, hands are placed on the left and right side of the face to palate the same regions at the same time. An example of a successful routine is provided. The EXTRAORAL examination is performed prior to examining the oral cavity proper. The head is observed first for any visual abnormalities (alopecic regions, swellings, neurological deficits, etc.). Palpation begins at the zygomatic arch and index fingers run rostral to caudal along the arch. At the most caudal extent of the zygomatic arch is the temporomandibular joint that is palpated for any heat,

389


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 390

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

swelling, or crepitus. Palpation resumes around the orbits while examining the eyes for inflammation, epiphora, and retropulsion. Once complete, the masseter and temporal muscles are palpated. Next, the base of the ears, the external ear canals, and the region of the parotid salivary gland are examined for abnormalities as animals that present for pain on opening the mouth may be suffering from ear disease. From the ears, fingertips run down the most caudal aspect of the mandible arriving at the mandibular salivary gland and lymph node. A gentle pinching motion is used to palpate the mandibular bodies. The pinch allows for the lingual and buccal aspects of the mandibular bodies to be palpated all the way to the symphysis. The symphysis is palpated completely as well as the intermandibular soft tissue structures. Once the mandibular exam is complete, palpation resumes at the zygomatic arch and runs rostral. The maxillary bone, suborbital region, and incisive bone are palpated carefully. Jugas of the maxillary carnassial teeth and canine teeth can be palpated in most animals during this portion of the exam. The nasal planum and nares are examined for irregularities and discharge. Finally, the mucocutaneous regions of the lips are examined closely. This concludes the EXTRAORAL examination. At this point, the clinician may have localized the affected side of the face or a specific region of pathology/suspicion. The INTRAORAL exam follows the extraoral exam with close scrutiny of dental structures and adjacent soft tissue. Work slowly from one side of the mouth to the other. When ready the lips are raised and the buccal mucosa, alveolar mucosa, and gingiva are examined.

With periodontitis, the cementum, periodontal ligament space, and alveolar bone level can be visualized and examined. A tooth with furcation exposure and gingival recession will show diseased cementum, alveolar bone loss, and widening of the periodontal ligament. This indicates significant pathology and most likely an extraction. The level of calculus deposited on the buccal/labial aspects of teeth and the associated debris and plaque retained by the calculus distracts most clinicians. Calculus can signify a region of abnormal plaque retention due to loss of the enamel structure, but more commonly it is associated with periodontal disease that the clinician can gauge by looking at the health of the periodontium. Once the buccal and labial aspects of the teeth have been evaluated, the mouth is opened. Opening the mouth is reserved for the end of the oral examination as most pets find it quite agitating. When the mouth is opened, the palate, tongue and lingual/palatal dental structures can be visualized. The palatoglossal arch is evaluated with particular attention in cats. As this view is usually fleeting, looking at the lingual/palatal aspects of the teeth for regions of a grey-green discharge associated with the periodontium and heavy deposits of calculus is a priority as they can signify significant periodontal disease. Ninety percent of calculus develops on the buccal/labial aspects of teeth, so when it is present on the lingual/palatal aspect it is usually very significant. With the mouth open, the occlusal aspect of the teeth can be viewed, important for caries evaluation. If the patient is very cooperative, the sublingual region can be visualized for any pathology. At the end of the oral examination, the remainder of the physical examination is performed. This portion of the exam is key for identifying any other additional systemic health issues that may relate to the oral cavity and/or the patients’ preparedness for anesthesia. As the majority of dental patients are geriatric, the physical examination commonly yields many other significant findings that will delay or change treatment recommendations for the patient. It is not uncommon to diagnose hyperthyroidism, renal failure, heart murmurs, arrhythmias, diabetes, conjunctivitis, lameness, and neoplasia from physical exam findings and subsequent related diagnostic tests. In some cases, it is critical to the patient’s health to treat other physical abnormalities prior to any dental pathology.

**It is important to remember to first take a gentle peek under the lips BEFORE retraction to view teeth. Oral lesions are sore, and if a clinician aggressively retracts lips in a painful region, the animal will no longer allow for a productive oral exam! This is the most common mistake made by clinicians. If a clinician recognizes regions of discomfort and avoids direct pressure on those regions, the vast majority of animals will be cooperative for a complete oral examination. This is particularly important in a gingivostomatitis cat.** The lips will need to be retracted past the last molar teeth to allow for a complete exam. Remember, the commissure of the lips falls roughly at the level of the carnassial teeth. Once the lips are retracted, the ipsilateral number of teeth is counted and the occlusion is evaluated. If a malocclusion is noted, soft tissues affected by the malocclusion are examined closely for signs of secondary trauma. Once tooth number and jaw position are evaluated, each tooth is viewed individually for proper crown formation, enamel structure, coloration, rotation/deviation, and periodontal health. Periodontal health is determined by appraising the health of all components of the periodontium. If the tooth is healthy, only the gingiva will be visible. Levels of gingivitis are gauged by gingival inflammation, edema, and recession.

RESOURCES 1.

2.

Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Oral examination and diagnosis. In: Veterinary dentistry: principles and practice. Philadelphia: LippincottRaven Publishers, 1997;87-103. Gioso MA, Carvalho VG. Oral anatomy of the dog and cat in veterinary dentistry. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2005;31:763-780.

Address for correspondence: Jennifer Rawlinson Section Chief and Lecturer, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

390


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 391

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Interpretation of intraoral radiographs Jennifer Rawlinson DVM, Dipl AVDC, Ithaca, NY

rays. If the clinician is familiar with the labial mounting technique, left and right can quickly be identified if the convex surface of the dimple in toward the eye. Digital systems either automatically place each film in a labial mount (DR systems) or require the practitioner to remember a system for placement of the identification dot (CR systems). Determining maxilla from mandible is quite simple. One main feature is the palatine process of the maxilla, which makes up most of the hard palate. This process creates a distinct radiodense line that is located at the apex of every maxillary canine, premolar, and molar tooth. The maxillary incisors are identified by a U-arch, the incisive canal, and the palatine fissures. The mandibular teeth also have easily identifiable features. The mandibular canal will be present from the coronoid process to the apex of the canine tooth. The middle and caudal mental foramens are located at the first and third premolars, respectively. The canine and incisor teeth will align in a more V-shaped arch, and the symphysis will clearly be visible between the central incisors.

INTRODUCTION Acquiring intraoral radiographs to evaluate canine and feline oral pathology is critical for appropriate treatment planning. If a veterinary clinic is looking to advance its dental program, the investment of roughly $5,000 to purchase a dental x-ray generator, film, and a chairside developer is well worth it. Digital systems that produce high quality dental images are also available but require a more substantial initial investment. Intraoral radiography lets clinicians evaluate the health of the periodontium, crown, root, pulp, root apex, alveolar bone, and adjacent bone and soft tissue. The information provided from intraoral radiography allows doctors to see pathology inapparent on oral examination, investigate the severity of periodontal disease, identify vital vs. non-vital teeth, image traumatic lesions of tooth and bone, explore the nature and extent of neoplasia, stage tooth resorption, uncover the cause of missing teeth, visualize odontogenic abnormalities, and determine the severity of palatal defects. The temporomandibular joint can also be imaged satisfactorily with dental film. Many times lesions in dogs and cats will be discovered on radiographs that were unknown previously. This is particularly true in the cat due to tooth resorption, and a set of full mouth radiographs is indicated for each patient. Intraoral radiography provides the information necessary for a practitioner to create a complete and thorough dental treatment plan.

DENTAL ANATOMY Any approach to reading dental film should include evaluation of adjacent and surrounding anatomy, aka. seeing the forest among the trees. The zygomatic arch, regional bones of the skull, nasal passages, frontal sinuses, maxillary recess, orbit, hard palate, mandibular canal, and symphysis can have changes independent of or related to dental anatomy. Prior to evaluating teeth, scan the surrounding anatomy for any abnormalities or variations of normal. Don’t forget to count teeth and look for overall variations in the dental arch during this time as well. Once adjacent structures have been explored, it is time to focus on dental anatomy. Evaluate the tooth from the outside in. First, explore adjacent alveolar bone. This bone will have a cancellous pattern and be less radiodense than the cortical bone lining the alveolus. The cortical bone lining the alveolus is termed the lamina dura, and it appears as a white line surrounding the tooth. Any disruption in the integrity of the lamina dura represents anatomical change that may or may not be pathological, tooth resorption vs. age-related ankylosis. Between the lamina dura and the tooth is the periodontal ligament visible as a radiolucent or black line. At the

ORIENTATION Due to the brevity of this presentation, acquisition of intraoral radiographs will be bypassed. There are many wet labs provided at international meetings dedicated to teaching intraoral radiographic technique, and it is the author’s experience that film acquisition is best taught with a wet lab which enables a participant to visualize angles (see www.ecvd.info). To utilize time most efficiently usually a specialist will take all films required then ask his/her technician to clean and polish the teeth while the radiographs are reviewed. A system must be in place for the doctor to recognize left from right. On standard film, a small dimple on the corner of the film provides this clue as long as all images are acquired intraorally. The convex surface of the dimple always faces the incoming x-

391


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 392

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

crown-root junction, 2-3 mm below the apical portion of the dental bulge is the cementoenamel junction and the beginning of the root. The cementoenamel junction (CEJ) is normally located at the same height along the tooth root as the surrounding bone, termed either the alveolar ridge or crestal bone. A difference in height between the CEJ and the crestal bone indicates that alveolar bone has been lost, most likely due to periodontal disease. The bulk of visible tooth structure is dentin; cementum cannot be seen radiographically. Enamel will appear as a bright white, radiodense covering on coronal dentin though it is usually only visible on canine and molar teeth. The pulp chamber, in the crown, and root canal, in the root, create the radiolucent stripe centered within the dentin, and this channel houses the nerves, vessels, and lymphatics to the tooth. The width of the dentin and root canal will change with age as dentin is continually added throughout the lifespan of the animal; therefore, the dentin will thicken and the root canal will thin. The apex of the tooth is located at the tip of the root, and in dogs and cats, an apical delta is present. Depending on the tooth, there may be multiple roots present. The bifurcation of the roots is simply termed the furcation, and the bone between the roots is the interradicular bone. Bone between teeth in termed interproximal bone.

Endodontic Disease Determining whether a tooth is vital or non-vital is critical to identifying the source of dental related regional swellings and fistulas and to formulating the best treatment plan for traumatized teeth. Two key features to evaluate in suspected non-vital teeth are the thickness of the dentin/pulp and the health of the apex, periodontal ligament, lamina dura, and adjacent apical cancellous bone. Teeth in question are compared to contralateral similar teeth for dentinal and root canal thickness. Widening of the pulp and thinning of the dentin indicates a non-vital tooth, as the tooth is no longer able to age and produce secondary dentin. Resorption of the apex and loss of the periodontal ligament, lamina dura, and apical alveolar bone can also be seen with non-vital teeth as infection within the tooth causes chronic apical inflammation and cellular destruction. This loss of structure is seen as a radiolucent halo around the apices of roots.

Missing teeth Missing teeth arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always teeth that congenitally never formed. Many times missing crowns are associated with fractured teeth (TR in cats!), unerupted teeth with or without dentigerous cyst formation, impacted/embedded teeth, or past extractions which may or may not be complete. If a swelling exists in the region of a missing tooth or if an animal in under general anesthesia for exam and cleaning, missing teeth should always be investigated radiographically.

COMMON PATHOLOGY Periodontal Disease Periodontal disease (PD) is judged by the loss of surrounding alveolar bone and crestal height. Radiographic signs of PD include decreased alveolar ridge height, widening periodontal ligament space, and irregularities on the surface of the root. PD is categorized as general vs. localized and staged 14. Stages of PD are quantified by the relative difference in height between the CEJ and the alveolar ridge along the length of the root. Stage 1 shows normal bone height radiographically and is characterized purely by gingivitis. Stage 2 indicates 1-25% bone loss, and stage 3 is 25-50% bone loss. Stage 4 is bone loss >50%. Depending on the severity of PD, interradicular bone may be lost exposing furcations. Bone loss can also be quantified as vertical or horizontal, which is important when considering bone augmentation. Staging PD and recognizing the different types of bone loss will help develop a treatment plan with long-term success.

RESOURCES Mulligan TW, Aller MS, Williams CA. Atlas of Canine and Feline Dental Radiography. Yardly, PA: Veterinary Learning Systems, 1998. Deforge DH, Colmery BH. An Atlas of Veterinary Dental Radiology. Ames: Iowa State University Press, 2000. DuPont G, DeBowes L. Atlas of Dental Radiography in Dogs and Cats. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Co., 2008.

Address for correspondence: Jennifer Rawlinson Section Chief and Lecturer Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

392


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 393

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Oral pathology: diagnosis and treatment Jennifer Rawlinson DVM, Dipl AVDC, Ithaca, NY

single rooted tooth due to the risk of furcation exposure. A furcation can become fully exposed in some teeth with as little as 20% bone loss. If a furcation is completely exposed, it is recommended that the tooth be extracted, as owners will be unable to administer proper homecare to prevent the inevitable progression of PD.

Without a doubt, dental disease is the most common disease found in all dogs. A whopping 85% of dogs older than 5 years in age have some form of dental disease. Periodontal disease is the most common form of canine oral pathology. ALL breeds are affected though older dogs and small breeds are more severely affected due to crowding of teeth within the oral cavity. Additional lesions that are commonly found on oral exam include gingival hyperplasia, endodontic disease, oral masses (neoplastic and odontogenic), and traumatic injury. In addition, some diseases have a breed predilection. A knowledgeable clinician with good oral examination skills will be able to identify most of these lesions in the exam room and be able to formulate a diagnostic work-up and tentative treatment plan for the patient.

GINGIVAL ENLARGEMENT Gingival enlargement (GE) is the benign overgrowth of gingival tissue. In the past, this disease entity has also been called gingival hyperplasia, but this diagnosis can only be made after histopathology has been performed on excised tissue. GE can be either localized or generalized. It can be found in dogs of any breed or age, but it is rare in the cat. Cats with suspected GE should be evaluated closely for tooth resorption and gingivostomatitis. There are many causes of GE. It is well-recognized that there is a genetic and familial component to the disease. Dog breeds that have a predilection for developing GE are Great Danes, Boxers, Collies, Springer Spaniels, Doberman Pinchers, and Dalmatians. Additional causes include regional inflammation, drug administration, and endocrine disease/change. Drugs that have been shown to result in GE in dogs and cats are calcium-channel blockers, cyclosporine, and anticonvulsants. GE will usually resolve after reduction of the gingiva if the instigating medication is withdrawn. Sex-hormone changes either due to disease, supplementation, and/or pregnancy can result in GE. If the cause of GE cannot be readily identified, a full systemic work-up is indicated. Finally, some cases of GE are truly idiopathic, but this should be a diagnosis of exclusion. To treat GE it will be necessary to quantify the amount of overgrown tissue. Gingiva can be measured with a periodontal probe. Overgrown gingiva creates a pseudo-periodontal pocket which will be predisposed to plaque, calculus, and debris accumulation. PD can result from the collection of material in a pseudopocket, so it is advised to remove excess gingiva >3mm in height. Remember the normal gingival sulcus depth is 1-3 mm, so in reality, as soon as the gingiva overgrows this height, it should be removed. Enlarged tissue can sometimes be partially mineralized which can make excision challenging. Treatment for GE involves the

PERIODONTAL DISEASE Periodontal disease (PD) is inflammation and infection of the periodontium caused by an abnormal accumulation of periodontopathic organisms in the gingival sulcus. PD is staged by evaluating the periodontium for gingivitis, inflammation, and infection of the gingiva, and periodontitis, inflammation and infection of the gingiva, alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and cementum. Stage 1 PD is characterized solely by gingivitis. Clinical features of mild to moderate gingivitis are a light to moderate red blush to the gingiva and gingival edema without bleeding upon probing. Gingiva with severe gingivitis is bright red, edematous, sometimes ulcerative, and bleeds spontaneously or upon probing. Mild to moderate gingivitis can usually be resolved with good home care and routine dental cleaning. Severe gingivitis is usually associated with pathology that is more aggressive and will need either medical or surgical therapy to resolve. Stage 2-4 PD is determined by the amount of attachment loss caused by periodontitis, and it is determined radiographically. A clinical guesstimation regarding the severity of PD can be made by examining the region of the crown-root junction. The more severe the gingivitis, gingival recession, furcation involvement, root exposure, and bone loss the higher the stage of PD. The placement and structure of the affected tooth significantly influences the treatment plan and prognosis. It takes less attachment loss to “fatally flaw” a multi-rooted tooth than a

393


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 394

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

use of gingival marking forceps to create a bleeding point line to guide excision. The smooth tip of the marking forceps is slid into the region of overgrowth parallel to the tooth and advanced to the most apical portion of pseudopocket. The forceps are closed and the sharp beak on the end of the contralateral forceps tip penetrates the gingiva creating a bleeding point. This procedure is repeated every 3-5 mm until a clear cutting line is visible. Once the line has been created, a scalpel, high speed bur, or electrocautery tip can be used to excise the excess tissue. The tip of the cutting instrument should be angled roughly 30-45 degrees off the vertical axis of the tooth recreating the natural slope of the free gingival margin. A columnar or football shaped 12-fluted gold finishing bur is then used to smooth and recreate the natural gingival contours of the region.

tion of the root canal with an inert material, and restoration of the tooth. Root canal treatment spares the animal the experience of oral surgery and retains the function of the damaged tooth, but 5-10% of root canals are prone to failure due to small accessory canals off the main root canal. Therefore, the tooth needs to be radiographically monitored annually, and there is a chance the tooth may need to be addressed in the future. Root canals also require the involvement of a specialist and depending on the specialist may take more time and money that extraction. Extraction of a large tooth usually involves oral surgery that can cause discomfort for the patient; this discomfort should be managed with analgesics. If pain and regional infection are controlled, extraction sites will heal fast and the owner no longer needs to worry about the tooth. Though the dog will lose the function of the tooth, most dogs maintain normal oral function.

ENDODONTIC DISEASE MALOCCLUSIONS Endodontic disease is any disease located within the pulp of the tooth. Diseased pulp can result from concussive trauma, tooth fracture, malformation, anachoresis, neoplasia, and periodontal disease. Unhealthy pulp in a tooth with normal anatomical conformation is sometimes detected by discoloration of the tooth termed intrinsic staining. Color can range from pink to green/brown to gray depending on the state of degradation of the pulp. The discoloration is the result of past swelling of the pulp and deposition of blood components in the dentinal tubules. Inflammation of the pulp is termed pulpitis. Past events resulting in pulpitis may or may not have caused complete necrosis of the pulp. There are many teeth with intrinsic staining that continue to age normally. In other teeth, the increase in pressure within the root canal resulting from the swollen pulp causes irreversible pulpal damage and tooth death. These teeth can develop apical infections and abscesses. Vital intrinsically stained teeth with no evidence of apical disease should be radiographically monitored for signs of pathologic change; radiographs are recommended annually. Vital intrinsically stained teeth with signs of apical disease or non-vital teeth will need either extraction or root canal therapy to prevent regional infection and inflammation. Fractured teeth with pulp exposure need to be treated even if they are deciduous teeth. A fractured tooth can be treated via extraction, root canal therapy, or vital pulp therapy depending on the tooth injured, severity of the fracture, duration of fracture, and owner’s preference. Vital pulp therapy involves the extirpation of the most coronal 7-8 mm of pulp, application of a pulp medicant, and restoration of the fracture site. In a dog/cat <18 months of age, a fracture up to 1 week old can be treated by vital pulp therapy. In a dog/cat >18 months of age, a fracture can be treated by vital pulp therapy up to 72 hours post-fracture. If a pulp exposure exceeds these time limitations, then extraction or root canal therapy are the only viable options. If the fractured tooth is a good candidate for root canal therapy, then the pros and cons of root canal therapy vs. extraction need to be discussed with the owner. Root canal therapy involves the complete removal of the pulp, debridement of the root canal, obtura-

Evaluating a bite (some simple basics and exaggerated generalities): • The mandibular length is relatively constant while the maxillary length is more variable. • Class 0 occlusion (orthoclusion): normal positioning of teeth and jaws. • Class 1 occlusion (neutroclusion): teeth have normal mesiodistal relation but have faciolingual disturbances, the “cross-bites”. • Class 2 occlusion (distoclusion): mandibular teeth are distal in relationship to their maxillary counterparts, the “overbite”. • Class 3 occlusion (mesioclusion): mandibular teeth are mesial to their maxillary counterparts, the “underbite” and “level bite”. • Class 4 occlusion: special forms of “wry mouth” in which one quadrant is abnormally positioned either mesially or distally to its counterpart. Though some malocclusions are considered “normal” for a breed, all malocclusions can lead to soft tissue trauma, abnormal tooth wear, chewing abnormalities, discomfort, and increased susceptibility to periodontal disease. Therefore, any dog with a malocclusion should be examined closely for these secondary problems. No breed standard accepts a class 2 malocclusion because the mandibular canine teeth always cause some form secondary trauma to the rostral maxilla. Base narrow and instanding canine teeth can lead to similar trauma. Treatment options for malocclusions include extraction, vital pulp therapy, and orthodontic movement.

ADDITIONAL BREED SPECIFIC ENTITIES There are a couple additional pathologies that seem to occur in certain breeds though not exclusively. The Maltese is prone to canine gingivostomatitis. This is an overreaction of the immune system to the normal dental microfauna. Though there are varying degrees of gingivostomatitis, Mal-

394


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 395

73째 Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

tese seem prone to the severe form crippling their ability to eat, socialize, and thrive. Northern breeds (Siberian huskies, Malamutes, etc.) have a predilection for developing large, firm inflamed circular plaques on the hard and soft palate; these lesions are eosinophilic granulomas. These plaques can lead to some discomfort, but they usually resolve spontaneously after a few weeks. If necessary, glucocorticoids can be used successfully to treat the condition. Greyhounds in the United States are notorious for having severe periodontal disease disproportionate to their size. These cases usually require extensive periodontal therapy and/or extractions, so be prepared and allocate a minimum of 2-3 hours general anesthesia for each dog.

RESOURCES 1. 2. 3. 4.

Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Veterinary Dentistry Principles and Practice. Philadelphia: Lippencott and Raven, 1997. Niemiec BA. Small Animal Dental, Oral and Maxillofacial Disease: A Color Handbook. London: Manson Pub. Ltd, 2010. Verstraete FJ, Lomer MJ. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Dogs and Cats. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, 2012. Buelow ME, Marretta SM, Barger A, et al. Lingual lesions in the dog and cat: recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. J Vet Dent 2011; 28(3): 151-62

Address for correspondence: Jennifer Rawlinson Section Chief and Lecturer - Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

395


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 396

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

The systemic impact of periodontal disease Jennifer Rawlinson DVM, Dipl AVDC, Ithaca, NY

Oral disease is the most common physical examination finding in all age categories of the dog with periodontal disease (PD) the most commonly diagnosed oral disease.i,ii Periodontal disease is inflammation and infection of the periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone). The first sign of PD is gingivitis, seen clinically as hyperemia, edema, ulceration, and/or spontaneous bleeding of the gingiva. Gingivitis is the tissueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inflammatory response to periodontopathogenic bacteria in dental plaque accumulated on the tooth surface. As plaque continues to accumulate in the gingival sulcus, the early lesion (characterized by the presence of inflammatory mediators and the infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils) progresses to chronic infection (plasma cells predominant in the cellular population).iii Connective tissue and gingival epithelium are destroyed by the cellular inflammatory infiltrate and bacterial by-products (collagenase, hyaluronidase, protease, chondroitin sulfatase, endotoxin), which leads to increased tissue vulnerability and deeper infection. 1,3,iv Left untreated gingivitis can progress to periodontitis (infection of the nongingival components of the periodontium).v The transition from gingivitis to periodontitis is caused by changes in the pathogenic potential of dental plaque, inappropriate or inadequate host response to gingival infection, and various risk factors (e.g., systemic disease, stress, age, medicaments, lack of oral hygiene maintenance, poor diet, animal size).vi Periodontitis can progress slowly (with periods of quiescence) or rapidly but always results in some degree of regional destruction of the periodontium (i.e., attachment loss, ATL). Immunocompetent cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, TNFa) in addition to prostaglandin E2, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), and tissue inhibitors of MMP; the end result is destruction of collagen, connective tissue matrix, and bone.6 During both gingivitis and periodontitis regional blood-vessel porosity increases due to cytokine signaling and destruction of vessel endothelial cells.6 It seems logical that if porosity of periodontal vasculature increases due to tissue destruction while levels of bacterial by-products, inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and T-cell and B-cell populations increase due to active periodontal infection, these products will enter the systemic circulation of dogs. An association between poor human and canine oral health with increased risk of systemic disease has been pro-

posed. In humans, associations have been demonstrated between PD and increased circulating inflammatory mediators and acute-phase proteins, systemic endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, acute myocardial infarction, multiple pregnancy complications, and diabetes mellitus.vii,viii,ix,x,xi,xii,xiii Few canine studies have been performed in this field. Two cadaver studies showed that dogs with moderate to severe PD had increased microscopic changes in the myocardium, mitral valve, renal glomeruli and interstitium, and hepatic parenchyma compared to dogs with less severe PD.xiv,xv More recently, there have been four in vivo studies investigating the association of PD with chronic kidney disease, endocarditis, and changes in systemic health indices. One retrospective study drawing from a cohort of 167,706 dogs found that the hazard ratio for azotemic chronic kidney disease increased with the increasing severity of PD. Increasing severity of PD was also associated with serum creatinine >1.4mg/dl and blood urea nitrogen >36 mg/dl independent of the clinicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diagnosis of chronic kidney disease.xvi Two retrospective studies performed at two separate institutions reviewed the possible association between periodontal disease and endocarditis. The first study reviewed the records of 59,296 dogs with PD and compared them to an agematched group of 59,296 dogs with no PD. This study concluded that there was a significant link between the severity of periodontal disease and cardiovascular-related conditions, such as endocarditis and cardiomyopathy.xvii The second study reviewed the records of 76 dogs admitted to an Intensive Care Unit for endocarditis. No relationship was drawn from this study linking the presenting bacterial endocarditis with either previous dental or oral surgical procedures or oral infection.xviii The last study on in vivo dogs evaluated systemic health parameters (complete blood count, serum biochemical analysis, urinalysis, urine protein content, and C-reactive protein level) in healthy dogs undergoing treatment for periodontal disease and compared pre-procedure levels to 30-day post-procedure levels. This study found that the severity of PD was significantly correlated to decreasing platelets and the C-reactive protein level significantly decreased post-treatment. This is a good indication that inflammation within the oral cavity affects the systemic inflammatory state. Other findings in this study that were significant prior to applying Bonferroni corrections for family-wise error indicated that the severity of PD was associat-

396


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 397

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

ed with increasing globulin, microalbuminuria, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and glucose.xix In conclusion, even given the small number of studies investigating the association between PD and systemic health, the present literature including recent in vivo studies demonstrates associations between the severity of PD and systemic inflammation, renal and hepatic function, blood glucose, and cardiovascular disease. The findings are consistent with the more extensive research that has already been conducted in humans. Though no casual relationship has been proven by these studies, the significant association of PD to overall systemic health highlights the need for continued research.

bution to elevated C-reactive protein levels. Am Heart J 2004; 147: 1005-1009. ix Montebugnoli L, Servidio D, Miaton RA, et al. Periodontal health improves systemic inflammatory and haemostatic status in subjects with coronary heart disease. J Clin Periodontol 2005; 32: 188-192. x Linden GJ, McClean K, Young I, et al. Persistently raised C-reactive protein levels are associated with advanced periodontal disease. J Clin Periodontol 2008;35:741-747. xi Higashi Y, Goto C, Jitsuiki D, et al. Periodontal infection is associated with endothelial dysfunction in healthy subjects and hypertensive patients. Hypertension 2008; 51: 446-453. xii Felice P, Pelliccioni GA, Checchi L. Periodontal disease as a risk factor in pregnancy. Minerva Stomatol 2005;54: 255-264. xiii Mealey BL, Rethman MP. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus. Bidirectional relationship. Dent Today 2003; 22(4): 107-113. xiv DeBowes LJ, Mosier D, Logan E, et al. Association of Periodontal Disease and histologic lesions in multiple organs from 45 dogs. J Vet Dent 1996;13:57-60. xv Pavlica Z, Petelin M, Juntes P, et al. Periodontal disease burden and pathological changes in organs of dogs. J Vet Dent 2008;25:97-105. xvi Glickman LT, Glickman NW, Moore GE, et al. Association between chronic azotemic kidney disease and the severity of periodontal disease in dogs. Prev Vet Med 2011;99(2-4):193-200. xvii Glickman LT, Glickman NW, Moore GE, et al. Evaluation of the risk of endocarditis and other cardiovascular events on the basis of the severity of periodontal disease in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2009; 234(4):486-494. xviii Peddle GD, Drobatz KJ, Harvey CE, et al. Association of periodontal disease, oral procedures, and other clinical findings with bacterial endocarditis in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2009;234(1):100-107. xix Rawlinson JE, Goldstein RE, Reiter AM, et al. Association of periodontal disease with systemic health indices in dogs and the systemic response to treatment of periodontal disease. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2011;238(5):601-609.

REFERENCES i ii

iii

iv v vi vii

viii

Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Veterinary dentistry: principles and practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven Publishers, 1997; 685. Lund EM, Armstrong PJ, Kirk CA, et al. Health status and population characteristics of dogs and cats examined in private veterinary practices in the United States. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999; 214: 13361341. Carranza FA, Rapley JW, Haake SK. Gingival inflammation. In: Newman MG, Takei HH, Carranza FA, eds. Carranzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clinical periodontology. 9th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 2002;263-268. Kinane DF. Causation and pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Periodontol 2000 2001;25:8-20. Harvey CE. Management of periodontal disease: understanding the options. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2005; 31:819-836. Wolf HF, Rateitschak KH, Hassell TM. Color atlas of dental medicine: Periodontology. 3rd ed. New York: Thieme, 2005:39-66. Niedzielska I, Janic T, Cierpka S, et al. The effect of chronic periodontitis on the development of atherosclerosis: review of the literature. Med Sci Monit 2008; 14(8): 103-106. Deliargyris EN, Madianos PN, Kadoma W, et al. Periodontal disease in patients with acute myocardial infarction: prevalence and contri-

Address for correspondence: Jennifer Rawlinson Section Chief and Lecturer, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

397


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 398

73째 CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Practical therapies for periodontal disease Jennifer Rawlinson DVM, Dipl AVDC, Ithaca, NY

Periodontal disease (PD) is the most common physical exam diagnosis in all age categories for the dog, and the risk for developing significant PD increases with age and decreasing size of dog.i PD is inflammation and infection of the periodontium of the tooth, and it can lead to loss of the supporting structures of the teeth including alveolar bone and gingiva. PD results from a variety of contributing factors. These factors include the pathologic change in normal oral flora, degree of inflammatory reaction, sensitivity to periodontopathic microbes, genetic background, systemic health, inadequate routine oral care, and environmental influences (stress, nutrition, housing, etc.). If the underlying etiology is not considered prior to periodontal therapy, then the treatment chosen may be destined to failure as the forces that initiated the pathology will continue to cause loss of tissue. Therefore, the extent of home care and professional follow-up an owner is willing to provide has a big influence of the treatment chosen. There is no point to performing advanced periodontal treatments to save a tooth if the owner has no plans to perform home care and/or return for necessary recheck exams. In these cases, extraction of diseased teeth is preferred. Identification of attributing factors leading to PD, the severity of disease, the location of the lesion, and the tooth affected are important factors when considering therapeutic options. Intraoral radiographs are necessary to adequately stage and treat PD. Stages of PD are quantified by the relative difference in height between the cementoenamel junction and the alveolar ridge along the length of the root. Stage 1 shows normal bone height radiographically and is characterized purely by gingivitis. Stage 2 indicates 1-25% bone loss, and stage 3 is 25-50% bone loss. Stage 4 is bone loss >50%. Alveolar bone loss can occur in two ways, horizontal or vertical; the type of bone loss will be visible on radiographs. The type of bone loss is significant as only vertical bone loss can be repaired via bone augmentation. Stage 1 PD is reversible with routine home care +/- an anesthetized routine dental cleaning. Stage 2-3 PD involving a single rooted tooth can be managed with a dental cleaning, mechanical periodontal pocket management, +/- perioceutic placement, and if necessary, bone augmentation. Stage 2-4 PD resulting in severe furcation exposure in multi-rooted teeth usually warrants tooth extraction in companion animals. Remember, the best way to treat PD is through prevention!

COMPLETE DENTAL CLEANING A complete dental cleaning involves many steps that are invisible to the uneducated eye. Once the animal is anesthetized and stable, the procedure starts with taking intraoral radiographs and performing a detailed oral examination. The exam includes all steps previously discussed in the oral examination lecture with a closer look at the soft palate, tonsils, tongue, and buccal mucosa plus the use of a dental explorer and periodontal probe. The explorer is used to investigate supragingival dental lesions, and the probe is used to measure gingival sulcus depth, periodontal pockets, and gingival hyperplasia. With the probe, each tooth is also examined for furcation exposure and mobility. From the accumulated information a treatment plan is formulated. Hopefully, most teeth will need only a cleaning. Any tooth with a class 3 furcation exposure (probe passes completely under crown), grade 3 mobility (movement >1mm), or stage 4 PD needs to be extracted. All findings are recorded, and each tooth is triaged. All teeth in the mouth are cleaned in a very methodic manner. Developing a familiar routine is advised to avoid missing vital steps. The cleaning starts with debridement of dental calculus and foreign material with a scaler (hand or ultrasonic), flush, and/or calculus forceps. Following gross debridement, the ultrasonic scaler is used to completely clean each tooth surface to remove biofilm, plaque, and calculus. Teeth with no discernable calculus or plaque can be left for polishing only as it will remove the associated biofilm. An ultrasonic scaler with a perio tip attachment is also used to clean the gingival sulcus of each tooth and periodontal pockets <5-7 mm in depth; if the pocket is deeper than 5-7 mm, then the pocket should be opened for root planing (see below). The ultrasonic scaler should be used with a light touch for a duration in one spot or on one tooth for no longer than 10 seconds. There should be a visible dispersed spray at the tip of the instrument to provide cavitation for removal of biofilm, plaque, and calculus. In hard to reach areas, hand scalers, curettes, and FlexiStrips (thin, fine grit interproximal strips) are used. If plaque retentive areas are present, then the clinician may opt to decrease and smooth these regions with a very fine grit, thin diamond bur at low speed to perform odontoplasty, the removal of tooth structure. Once the teeth are debrided, an explorer is used to con-

398


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 399

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

firm the smooth surface of each tooth. If all surfaces are clean, then the teeth are polished at low speed with a disposable prophy angle with a rubber cup using fine grit polish. Light pressure is placed on the cup in the region of the sulcus to flare the edge of the cup into the sulcus allowing for subgingival polishing. All polish is thoroughly rinsed from the mouth and gingival sulci. If no periodontal pocketing or additional pathology is present, this concludes the complete dental cleaning.

Depending on the severity of disease, it may also be advantageous to prescribe a short course of an antibiotic.

SURGICAL PERIODONTAL THERAPY There are many forms of surgical periodontal treatment, and many of these procedures are highly technique sensitive requiring specialist skills and appropriate case selection. The surgical procedure that is most appropriate for a general practitioner to perform routinely is open root planing with or without bone augmentation. This procedure is performed on deep pockets (5-7 mm) created by vertical bone loss with no furcation exposure and little to no tooth mobility. Open root planing requires the creation of a gingival flap to completely visualize the periodontal defect. Prior to creating a flap, local and/or regional nerve blocks are performed. The flap used most commonly is the Modified Widman Flap that allows for complete elevation of associated gingiva and resection of diseased pocket epithelium.ii Once the flap is opened, the root is cleaned and debrided. If a vertical pocket is present that will allow for retention of a bone graft material, then this material is placed and the pocket sutured closed. Common materials used for this procedure are Consil (bioactive ceramic granules) or Osteo-Allograft Perio Mix (cancellous bone chips <1.25 mm). For the bone graft materials to work, the pocket MUST be completely debrided to root surface and fresh bone margin with no epithelium present. The graft is mixed with blood and gently packed into the defect until the material reaches the bone margin. The flap epithelium margins are cleaned, and the site sutured closed with 4-0 or 5-0 Monocryl in a simple interrupted manner. The animal is sent home with a 7 day course of antibiotics and 2-3 days of an analgesic. Surgical therapy requires routine home care and periodic rechecks for long-term success.

NONSURGICAL PERIODONTAL THERAPY Nonsurgical treatments are performed after the cleaning procedure. Pockets depths <5-7 mm are candidates for closed root planing. The goal of subgingival therapy is to completely debride periodontal pockets and provide a “bacterial free” environment to allow for healing of the periodontium. Closed root planing is the debridement of a periodontal pocket without the creation of a gingival flap to clean and smooth an exposed root surface. Closed root planning involves the use of either Universal or Gracey curettes. Universal curettes have two cutting surfaces whereas, Gracey curettes have only one; both instruments have a rounded toe and back so the instrument will not damage unintended tissue subgingivally. Most commonly, the ultrasonic scaler with a fine perio tip is used to provide initial debridement for pockets. Once the bulk of calculus has been removed, the curettes are used to debride the root and fashion it to a smooth surface. Once the root has been cleaned, the soft tissue side of the pocket will need to be addressed. The bacterial laden epithelial lining of the pocket can be removed either with the face of a curette or via a thin incision with a scalpel blade; this is called gingival curettage. To use the curette the face of the blade is turned to engage the pocket epithelium. A finger is used to gently press the gingival surface onto the blade, and the curette is stroked in a single coronal motion along the soft tissue. This may need to be repeated several times to remove diseased tissue. A number 1, 12B, or 15c scalpel blade can be used instead of the curette for soft tissue debridement, but its use should be conservative and limited to only the diseased epithelium. No sutures should be needed if this technique is performed properly. Once all infected material has been removed, the pocket is flushed with saline, 0.12% chlorhexidine, or 3% hydrogen peroxide. If the pocket is deep enough to retain a perioceutic, then material can be placed into the pocket for localized prolonged release of an antimicrobial agent.

REFERENCES i

ii

Lund EM, Armstrong PJ, Kirk CA, et al. Health status and population characteristics of dogs and cats examined at private veterinary practices in the United States. J AM Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:1336-41. Rateitschak KH, Wolf HF. Color Atlas of Dental Medicine: Periodontology 3rd ed. New York: Thieme, 2005.

Address for correspondence: Jennifer Rawlinson . Section Chief and Lecturer, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

399


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 400

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Open discussion Jennifer Rawlinson DVM, Dipl AVDC, Ithaca, NY

This session is completely devoted to the audience’s questions. The material provided below is strictly to stimulate conversation and to act as a reference for the practitioner. During the lecture series, regional blocks and extraction will be referred to commonly. The author felt it necessary to be able to provide a proceedings reference for this material if the practitioner was interested in investigating it further.

patient and suggestions for nerve block amounts in larger animals is suggested below. Nerve block dosing for a 3-kg cat with extractions in 4 quadrants: 3 kg (cat) * 2 mg/kg (max dose) = 6 mg (total dose) 6 mg (max dose) / 5 mg/ml (0.5% bupivacaine) = 1.2 mls (max ml dose) 1.2 mls (max ml dose) / 4 (# nerve blocks) = 0.3 mls/block

REGIONAL NERVE BLOCKS

Suggested dosing for cats and ranges (max 4 blocks): **Cats and dogs <3 kg = Cats and small dogs (3-5 kg) = Medium dogs (6-15 kg) = Large dogs (15- 25 kg) = Dogs >25kg =

Three regional nerve blocks are commonly used to provide analgesia during extractions in the mouth of dogs and cats. These nerve blocks are: the infraorbital, the middle mental, and the inferior alveolar. Supplies: 27 gauge ½” needle on a 1 cc TB syringe (cats and small dogs) 27 gauge 1 ½” needle on a luer lock 3 cc syringe (dogs) 1 bottle 0.5% bupivacaine with epinephrine (Marcaine) Bupivacaine is most commonly used by the author because of its extended duration of action which is 6 hours. Though most anesthesia textbooks report a duration to onset of 20 minutes, the author feels that clinical effects can be seen in as short as 10 minutes. If the nerve blocks are deposited in a region where known work needs to be completed prior to the remainder of a complete oral exam and intraoral radiographs, ample time will have passed prior to the first incision or other dental procedure. The maximum safe dose of bupivacaine is 2 mg/kg in the dog and cat. This maximum dose becomes significant in animals less than 5 kg as the practitioner becomes “dose restricted” rather than “anatomically restricted”. “Dose restricted” means that the site of injection could tolerate a larger amount of fluid in the region but due to the maximum dose restriction the practitioner can only deposit a smaller amount. “Anatomically restricted” means a large amount of analgesic could be used (e.g. as in big dogs) but the practitioner uses only a small portion of the maximum dose to avoid injury to the regional nerves. The two most common reasons in human dentistry for residual discomfort at the site of a nerve block are too much analgesic at one site and too rapid an injection. To avoid these injuries always consider the size of the patient, proportion of regional anatomy, and the speed of injection (go slow). Dosing for a critically small

dogs of different weight calculate out dosage** 0.25 ml per site 0.5 ml per site 0.75 ml per site 1.0 to 1.5 ml per site

Infraorbital Nerve Block The infraorbital nerve block is used to block all teeth located on the maxilla. Though there seems to be some question regarding analgesia of the last molar tooth the author feels that good coverage can be obtained if the block is placed at the caudal most extent of the infraorbital canal. The length of the canal can be determined by measuring from the rostral canal opening to the medial canthus of the eye. NEVER run a needle tip deeper than the medial canthus of the eye as structures within the orbit may be damaged. This becomes critical in brachycephalic breeds and cats as the infraorbital canal may only be 2-3mm in length! The lip is raised to palpate the mucosa in the region just dorsal to the distal root of the third premolar tooth on the maxilla. This is where the infraorbital canal opening is located in all dogs and cats. The non-dominant hand is used to palpate and mark the opening to the canal. The syringe with needle is held in the dominant hand with the index finger located slightly up the needle to provide support and guidance during placement. With the bevel up and the needle parallel to the dentition and maxillary bone, the needle is lightly placed through the mucosa and into the canal. If bone is encountered, exit and try again as internal redirection of the needle may cause harm to the neurovascular bundle. Once the needle is in place, aspirate and inject slowly while

400


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 401

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

notch of mandible in the region where the facial artery transverses the ventral mandible. Prep the site with alcohol. Direct the tip of the needle through the skin and onto the ventral portion of the mandible just caudal to the facial artery. Walk the needle medially until it falls off the mandibular bone then slide it up the medial aspect of the coronoid process until the needle tip can be palpated intraorally by the non-dominant index finger. Make sure to keep the needle tip engaged always on the bone of the coronoid process. The block will affect only the inferior alveolar nerve this way. Once the needle tip can be felt, the syringe is aspirated and the material is deposited creating a pillow of fluid under the mucosa intraorally. The region is massaged by the non-dominant index finger to distribute the bupivacaine and pressure is applied for 30 seconds.

pressing a finger on the canal opening to prevent flow of material out of the canal. Remove the needle and apply pressure to the site for 30 seconds to avoid hematoma formation.

Middle Mental Nerve Block The middle mental nerve block is used to provide analgesia to the canine and incisor teeth on the mandible in dogs greater that 10 kg in size. The author has found that in cats and dogs <10 kg the middle mental foramen is difficult to find and damage may result to the neurovascular bundle due to its small size compared to the needle. The only way to reliably achieve analgesia with this block is to deposit the contents of the block into the mandibular canal not just around the opening of the foramen. The middle mental foramen is located at the apex of the mandibular canine tooth just ventral to the mesial root of the second premolar. Displacing the buccal frenulum rostrally with the non-dominant hand, the needle is directed at a 45 degree angle to the bone and parallel with the dentition. The needle is slipped through the mucosa and into the foramen. Within a few millimeters there will be a caudally directed curve that will bring the needle into the mandibular canal. The needle does NOT have to be passed more than 1-2 mm into the canal. Once the needle is in place, firm pressure is placed over the aperture of the middle mental foramen with the non-dominant hand to prevent reflux of material. The syringe is aspirated and the contents slowly injected. No pillowing of analgesic should be felt in the region. The needle is removed and pressure applied for 30 seconds.

Surgical Extraction of the Canine and Carnassial Teeth The surgical extraction technique discussed can be applied to any tooth in any dog or cat mouth as long as respect for the change in regional anatomy is upheld. The following is an equipment list and an abbreviated step-bystep for extraction. Supplies: **Intraoral x-ray and film** High-speed dental drill with hand pieces and bur pack 1 pack dental elevators – 2mm to 8mm winged Wiggs One 1mm winged Wiggs dental elevator Small straight extraction forceps Root-tip extraction forceps Rounded periotome Periosteal elevator (14 Goldman-Fox) Various sizes small bone curettes #15 scalpel blade with handle Small rounded tip Metzenbaum scissors Fine-tip Mayo scissors Small needle holder Forceps – DeBakey and 1x2 thumb 4-0 Monocryl on a taper 5-0 Monocryl on a taper 3x3 gauze

Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block The inferior alveolar nerve block is used to provide analgesia to ALL mandibular teeth. In cats and small dogs it is the ONLY mandibular nerve block used. There are two ways of performing this block: intraoral and extraoral. The author’s extensive teaching experience has lead her to believe that the extraoral block is the easiest and safest block to perform as the practitioner knows exactly where the needle tip is at all times. Therefore, only the extraoral technique will be discussed. In addition, some concerns have been raised regarding tongue numbness after this procedure. If the block is appropriately placed, the lingual nerve should not be affected, as it is located dorsal to the mandibular foramen where the inferior alveolar nerve enters the mandible. (In humans, the distance between these two nerves is negligible; therefore, we experience tongue numbing.) The extraoral inferior alveolar nerve block is performed by sliding the index finger of the non-dominant hand directly caudal to the last molar tooth intraorally. The inferior alveolar foramen will be located halfway between the last molar tooth and the angular process of the mandible. It will be a low-profile structure so that in smaller animals the foramen may not be palpable, but the neurovascular bundle entering the canal will always be palpable. Place the tip of the intraoral index finger on the region of the inferior alveolar foramen and its associated neurovascular bundle. Using the dominant hand extraorally, palpate the vascular

Steps for Surgical Extraction NOTE: The mouth is a slippery place, and YOU WILL SLIP! If you plan to slip as we all do, no harm will come to the patient. Some rules for avoiding iatrogenic trauma associated with slipping are: always have your index finger located at the tip of your dental elevator, do not apply excessive advancement force with dental elevator, protect surrounding tissue with gauze or fingers, and always work coronally (into the mouth) when cutting or using the periosteal elevators. 1. Perform appropriate regional nerve block. 2. Determine tooth to be extracted and using scalpel incise along mesial and distal line-angles of tooth to create a trapezoidal mucogingival flap. This incision needs to be

401


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 402

73째 Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

3.

4.

5.

6. 7.

8. Once the tooth root is loose use extractions forceps to pull root from alveolar socket. 9. Debride the alveolar socket with a bone curette and shape/smooth remaining alveolar bone (alveoloplasty) with round diamond bur. Flush site copiously with sterile saline. Trim flap edge and freshen palatal/lingual gingiva. 10. Release mucogingival advancement flap by cutting through the periosteum only at the base of the surgical flap. 11. Using a simple-interrupted pattern, close flap by first suturing corners of flap in tension-free manner. Continue to close the occlusal surface of flap, and finish with the releasing incisions. Stitches should be 3mm apart with 5 throws to secure the knot. The first throw is a surgeons knot. Cut ends to 1-2mm length. The bites should be fullthickness and at least 2-3 mm in length either side of the incision to assure adequate purchase. 12. Flush site to remove all debris.

deep and through the periosteum so heavy pressure is applied to the blade. The releasing incisions on the mesial and distal aspect of the flap should extend a bit beyond the mucogingival junction (distance depends on size of animal but be conservative at first). Run the scalpel blade along the gingiva and into the gingival sulcus parallel to the tooth crown to create the most coronal aspect of your surgical flap. Using a periosteal elevator (or periotome is cats and small dogs) undermine the periosteum of the flap. It is easiest to start this at the mucogingival junction and work coronally. This allows for the best access to the correct plain of dissection under the periosteum. Completely elevate the flap. Using a #2 or 4 surgical round cutting carbide bur drill away alveolar bone to expose roughly 60-70% of the tooth root. Be sure to clearly identify the periodontal ligament on the mesial and distal aspects of the tooth root and deepen this cut into the periodontal ligament to allow for easier elevation. Section roots into individual components if the tooth being extracted is multi-rooted. Elevate and loosen each root separately using dental elevators. Remember TWIST and HOLD (at least 5 seconds).

Address for correspondence: Jennifer Rawlinson . Section Chief and Lecturer, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

402


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 403

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

"Vecchio e zoppo": l'analgesia nei pazienti geriatrici ortopedici” Vincenzo Rondelli Med Vet, Dr Ric, ECVAA Resident, Novara

I pazienti geriatrici veterinari soffrono spesso di patologie osteo-articolari, croniche e/o acute, per la cui diagnosi è fondamentale l’utilizzo di indagini strumentali, quali la radiologia tradizionale o la diagnostica per immagini avanzata; per la cura si ricorre a terapie specifiche o, in alcuni casi, ad interventi chirurgici. Risulta necessario il contenimento farmacologico per raggiungere una sedazione profonda, o l’anestesia generale, per poter ottenere posizionamenti ed immagini corrette, utili ad una migliore visualizzazione, ausilio di una più agevole diagnosi. Sia per la diagnostica per immagini, che nel ricorso ad un eventuale intervento chirurgico, è indispensabile fornire ai nostri pazienti farmaci per il controllo del dolore, sia acuto che cronico. La terapia farmacologica può prevedere inoltre la somministrazione di farmaci antiinfiammatori anche per lunghi periodi. Un problema dei nostri pazienti è spesso la concomitanza di altre patologie sistemiche che rende gli organismi più fragili di fronte agli effetti collaterali o alle reazioni avverse dei farmaci utilizzati per l’anestesia e la terapia. In pochi minuti proveremo a trattare le molecole impiegate per l’analgesia e la terapia del dolore, acuto e cronico, legato alle patologie osteo-articolari dei pazienti geriatrici veterinari.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12. 13.

BIBLIOGRAFIA

14. 1.

2.

3.

Pharmacology and therapeutics of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in the dog and cat: 1 General pharmacology P Lees, SA May… - Journal of Small Animal …, 1991 - Wiley Online Library Pharmacology and therapeutics of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the dog and cat: 2 Individual agents QA McKellar, SA May… - Journal of small animal …, 1991 - Wiley Online Library Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in species of veterinary interest P Lees, MF Lan-

doni, J Giraudel… - … pharmacology and …, 2004 - Wiley Online Library Cyclooxygenase selectivity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in canine blood HK Streppa, CJ Jones… - American journal of …, 2002 - Am Vet Med Assoc Renal syndromes associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs DM Clive… - New England journal of medicine, 1984 - Mass Medical Soc Clinical pharmacology of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in dogs B KuKanich, T Bidgood… - Veterinary Anaesthesia and …, 2012 - Wiley Online Library Comparison of injectable robenacoxib versus meloxicam for peri-operative use in cats: Results of a randomised clinical trial M Kamata, JN King, W Seewald, N Sakakibara… - The Veterinary …, 2012 - Elsevier Preferential accumulation of meloxicam in inflamed synovial joints of dogs L Johnston… - Veterinary Record, 2012 - veterinaryrecord. bmj.com Effects of carprofen, meloxicam and deracoxib on platelet function in dogs KB Mullins, JM Thomason… - Veterinary …, 2012 - Wiley Online Library Effectiveness of electroacupuncture analgesia compared with opioid administration in a dog model: a pilot study D Groppetti, AM Pecile… - British journal of …, 2011 - British Jrnl Anaesthesia Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs); The current position S Carmichael - The European Journal of Companion Animal Practice (…, 2011 The rational choice of therapeutic agents in elderly patients M Davies - Companion Animal, 2010 - Wiley Online Library Review of the applications of different analytical techniques for coxibs research M Starek - Talanta, 2011 - Elsevier Does administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug determine morphological changes in adrenal cortex: ultrastructural studies Wodzimierz Matysiak and Barbara Jodowska-Jdrych W Matysiak… - Protoplasma, 2010 – Springer

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Vincenzo Rondelli E-mail: vincenzo.rondelli@istitutoveterinarionovara.it

403


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 404

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Il neonato patologico: terapie Alessandro Rota Med Vet, Dr Ric, Almenno San Bartolomeo, (BG)

rispetto agli orfani sani o affetti da palatoschisi; i neonati patologici sono infatti deboli e con scarsi riflessi e reattività (non tossiscono), fattori che possono mascherare l’erroneo posizionamento della sonda.

PREMESSE La gestione terapeutica dei neonati è condizionata dalle loro peculiarità anatomiche e funzionali, in cui lo stato d’immaturità multisistemica influenza pesantemente la risposta alla terapia. Poiché il neonato patologico deve essere sottratto alla gestione materna, è necessario provvedere al controllo ambientale, fornendo idonee condizioni di temperatura, umidità e igiene, limitando i fattori di disturbo e provvedendo all’alimentazione artificiale e all’evocazione dei riflessi della minzione e della defecazione. La terapia neonatale prevede un trattamento eziologico (quando possibile), ma più frequentemente un trattamento sintomatico e di supporto. Il rapido scadimento delle condizioni generali dei neonati, indipendentemente dalla patologia, richiede infatti un pronto supporto terapeutico, in attesa di indicazioni più precise. Poiché l’ipotermia, l’ipoglicemia e la disidratazione, condizioni frequentemente riscontrate nei neonati, possono essere conseguenza o causa di patologie e mortalità, è necessaria una terapia di sostegno per la loro pronta correzione.

FLUIDOTERAPIA PARENTERALE Un più alto contenuto idrico e una maggior superficie corporea, l’immaturità della cute, un metabolismo più dinamico, una minor riserva adiposa, l’incapacità di gestione delle variazioni volemiche e le scarse capacità di conservazione dell’acqua e di concentrazione delle urine, sono alcuni dei principali aspetti che differenziano i neonati dagli adulti. Le richieste quotidiane di fluidi di mantenimento nei cuccioli e gattini, legate all’elevato turnover idrico, sono generalmente assicurate dall’alimentazione lattea. L’elevata esigenza idrica da una parte e le notevoli perdite di liquidi dall’altra, concorrono ad aumentare nel neonato il rischio di disidratazione e, dal momento che i meccanismi in grado di compensare la disidratazione sono inadeguati, possibile ipovolemia. Pertanto ogni situazione che comporti una ridotta assunzione e/o un’aumentata perdita di liquidi, aumenta il rischio di disidratazione. Lo stato di disidratazione non è facile da diagnosticare nel neonato, così come la valutazione della risposta alla terapia reidratante, anche perché il sovraccarico del circolo non è un’evenienza remota. Un metodo semplice per stabilire il grado di disidratazione e l’effetto della reidratazione è rappresentato dalla frequente misurazione del peso corporeo, anche se i metodi di laboratorio (valutazione dell’ematocrito, delle proteine sieriche totali, del PS urinario e della lattatemia) risultano più affidabili, ma più indaginosi. Nonostante il rene del neonato non sia perfettamente in grado di concentrare le urine, che appaiono quindi incolori nei neonati sani, nei soggetti disidratati molto spesso l’urina assume una colorazione gialla più o meno intensa. Anche questo dato può quindi essere osservato per definire la condizione di disidratazione nel neonato. In linea generale, i neonati che non si alimentano da oltre 24 ore, visto il rapido peggioramento delle condizioni generali, possono di fatto essere considerati affetti da disidratazione. Dal momento che nel neonato la disidratazione è spesso accompagnata da mancata o inadeguata assunzione alimen-

CORREZIONE DELL’IPOTERMIA L’ipotermia viene corretta mediante un graduale incremento della temperatura, 1° C in 40-60 minuti, attraverso diversi metodi che prevedono l’erogazione di calore. Sebbene l’assunzione di alimento caldo possa rappresentare un metodo di correzione termica, è bene ricordare che, in caso d’ipotermia con temperatura corporea <35°C, è bene sospendere l’assunzione di alimento per non incorrere nel rischio di polmonite ab ingestis, ileo paralitico ed enterocolite necrotizzante. L’arresto dell’assunzione alimentare, sia spontanea che imposta, porta rapidamente a ipoglicemia e disidratazione, condizioni che possono conseguire anche all’ipotermia, essere espressione o essere aggravate da numerosi stati patologici. In questi casi è necessario accertare la possibilità e l’opportunità dell’alimentazione spontanea (temperatura corporea >35°C, presenza di adeguati riflessi della suzione e deglutizione, assenza di palatoschisi) o dell’alimentazione con sonda oro-gastrica, prima di ricorrere alla fluidoterapia parenterale. È utile ricordare che l’applicazione della sonda oro-gastrica può essere più pericolosa nei neonati patologici

404


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 405

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

tare, la fluidoterapia deve contemplare non solo il ripristino della volemia, ma anche della glicemia e dell’equilibrio elettrolitico. Nel neonato la fluidoterapia deve essere eseguita per via parenterale, poiché la somministrazione orale di soluzioni elettrolitiche non è spesso in grado di correggere lo stato d’ipovolemia a causa della ridotta perfusione gastroenterica e capacità d’assorbimento. Date le caratteristiche della cute, del sottocute e la scarsità di masse muscolari del neonato, le vie di somministrazione più opportune sono l’endovenosa, l’intraperitoneale e l’intraossea, quest’ultima considerata come la via preferenziale dal momento che la spongiosa ossea del neonato garantisce un assorbimento e una distribuzione sovrapponibile alla somministrazione endovenosa. La somministrazione endovenosa può essere difficoltosa nel neonato non solo per le piccole dimensioni dei pazienti, ma anche per la caratteristica fragilità delle pareti venose. La somministrazione peritoneale, invece, pur essendo fattibile con una certa facilità, presenta l’inconveniente di un non prevedibile assorbimento e distribuzione dei fluidi. Dato il rischio non solo di disidratazione e ipovolemia, ma anche di sovraccarico circolatorio per l’immaturità multisistemica neonatale, è indispensabile, in corso di fluido terapia, un frequente monitoraggio (ogni 30 minuti) per valutarne gli effetti. Per quanto riguarda i tipi di fluidi da infondere per la correzione della disidratazione, è buona norma utilizzare soluzioni di cristalloidi, poiché l’impiego di colloidi può essere di difficile gestione nel paziente neonato e deve essere limitato ai pazienti con dimostrata riduzione delle proteine totali a valori <3.5 g/dl. Le soluzioni più spesso impiegate sono la soluzione di Ringer lattato o acetato. Esistono controversie sull’impiego del Ringer lattato motivate dalle incomplete conoscenze sulla fisiologia epatica neonatale e sulla capacità del fegato di utilizzare il lattato come fonte energetica alternativa in corso di ipoglicemia. Per quanto riguarda il volume di fluidi da infondere, esso dipende dalla conoscenza del fabbisogno idrico del paziente, associato alla valutazione del deficit idrico, calcolato moltiplicando il peso corporeo per la percentuale di disidratazione. È necessario

ricordare che il neonato disidratato e che non si alimenta, si trova anche in una condizione di ipoglicemia più o meno protratta. A tale proposito è quindi utile associare anche soluzioni di glucosio o destrosio per la correzione contemporanea della disidratazione e dell’ipoglicemia. Nei neonati con ipoglicemia di breve comparsa e non disidratati, può essere utile la somministrazione di miele applicato ripetutamente sulla lingua.

ANTIMICROBICI Il ricorso alla terapia antimicrobica nel neonato è molto dibattuto. Se la maggior vulnerabilità dei neonati agli agenti infettivi, soprattutto in presenza di un’insufficiente trasmissione dell’immunità passiva o di un ambiente particolarmente contaminato, può motivarne l’impiego “preventivo”, gli effetti collaterali poco conosciuti nel neonato e la possibile antibiotico-resistenza, devono far riflettere sulla effettiva necessità. Nei bambini l’impiego degli antibiotici è stato circoscritto solo ai casi di sepsi, d’infezioni gravi e debilitanti o alle gravi sindromi tossinfettive; nei neonati di cane e gatto è spesso difficile giungere a una diagnosi certa e definire il grado di compromissione delle condizioni generali, che peraltro si aggravano in tempi molto rapidi, richiedendo quindi una terapia sintomatica d’urgenza. Inoltre la terapia antibiotica viene spesso utilizzata nella gestione dei neonati patologici a causa della loro elevata sensibilità agli agenti infettivi e per l’impossibilità di conoscere il loro reale stato immunitario. Per la scelta degli antibiotici devono essere tenuti presenti lo spettro d’azione, gli effetti collaterali e la maneggevolezza in pazienti di piccole dimensioni con immaturità multisistemica. Di fatto gli antibiotici di maggior impiego nei neonati sono rappresentati dalle cefalosporine di terza generazione, per l’ampio spettro d’azione, per il ridottissimo effetto sulla flora intestinale e per la maneggevolezza di somministrazione. Il ricorso ad altri principi attivi deve essere limitato ai casi di provata necessità, a causa degli effetti indesiderati.

405


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 406

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

La gestione del cliente dell’ambulatorio veterinario Paolo Rota Sperti Pfizer, Business Consultant

ATTI NON PERVENUTI

406


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 407

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012 • SESSIONI AVANZATE

Istologia, immunoistochimica e c-Kit nel mastocitoma felino: quanto servono al clinico? Silvia Sabattini Med Vet, Dr Ric, Bologna

Marta Frizzon, Med Vet, Bologna - Giuliano Bettini, Med Vet, Bologna

rischio di recidiva locale.4 Aggregati linfoidi sono riscontrati anche in altre patologie del gatto quali complesso del granuloma eosinofilico e sarcomi iniezione-indotti e rivestono un importante ruolo nell’involuzione dell’istiocitoma cutaneo benigno del cane, è stato pertanto ipotizzato che la loro presenza possa essere l’espressione di una risposta immunologica verso il tumore.3 In uno studio condotto su 25 casi di mastocitoma cutaneo felino sono stati valutati classificazione istologica, indice mitotico, quantità di granuli citoplasmatici e infiltrato eosinofilico e linfocitario. Il fenotipo scarsamente differenziato e un elevato indice mitotico sono risultati significativamente correlati a un esito sfavorevole.3 Nel mastocitoma splenico, non sono stati ad oggi condotti studi per la valutazione di parametri istopatologici di prognosi. Nei mastocitomi intestinali la prognosi, indipendentemente dai caratteri istologici, risulta quasi sempre sfavorevole. Anche nella forma di MCT intestinale c.d. sclerosante, descritta da Halsey et al. (2010), nonostante il basso indice mitotico, la prognosi risultava infausta, con un tempo di sopravvivenza medio di 6.6 settimane.6

ISTOLOGIA Dalla maggior parte degli studi istologici emerge che le caratteristiche morfologiche solitamente associate a un comportamento biologico più aggressivo in oncologia, quali pleomorfismo, scarsa differenziazione cellulare e crescita di tipo infiltrativo, non sono costantemente correlate alla prognosi nel mastocitoma (MCT) felino. Il MCT cutaneo felino è attualmente classificato in tre diversi istotipi: il mastocitoma tipico (o mastocitico) ben differenziato, il mastocitoma mastocitico pleomorfo e il mastocitoma atipico (o scarsamente granulare). Nel mastocitoma pleomorfo, a caratteri di atipia talora estremamente marcati (cellule giganti, cellule multinucleate) non corrisponde necessariamente una prognosi sfavorevole.1 Secondo alcuni studi il MCT atipico sarebbe caratterizzato da un comportamento biologico invariabilmente benigno, con tendenza alla remissione spontanea,2 mentre da studi più recenti sembrano emergere risultati contrastanti.3 I tentativi fatti per correlare il grading istologico di Patnaik et al. (1984) con il comportamento del mastocitoma cutaneo felino non hanno avuto finora successo. In uno studio condotto su 14 casi di MCT cutaneo felino, 4 tumori (36%) furono definiti come ben differenziati, limitati al derma, con mitosi rare o assenti (grado I), 7 (50%) come localizzati nel derma e nel sottocute con moderato pleomorfismo cellulare e rare figure mitotiche (grado II) e 2 (14%) come poco differenziati, localizzati nel derma e nel sottocute, con elevato pleomorfismo cellulare e nucleare, presenza di cellule giganti e figure mitotiche variabili da rare a frequenti (grado III). Il grading istologico non risultò correlato con i tempi di sopravvivenza né di recidiva.4 Lo stesso sistema di grading fu utilizzato da Molander-McCrary et al. (1998) per classificare 32 casi di mastocitoma, di cui 4 con lesioni multiple. Nessun gatto morì a causa del mastocitoma in oltre un anno di follow-up e non fu evidenziata alcuna correlazione tra il grado istologico e il tasso di recidiva. Singoli criteri istopatologici quali il numero delle mitosi, l’infiltrazione del sottocute, il pleomorfismo nucleare e l’infiltrato eosinofilico risultarono anch’essi non predittivi del comportamento del tumore.5 Infiltrati linfocitari sono stati segnalati più frequentemente nei MCT pleomorfi e atipici, ma il loro significato prognostico è controverso. In uno studio fu riscontrata una correlazione tra la presenza di aggregati linfoidi e un minor

ISTOCHIMICA E IMMUNOISTOCHIMICA Marker di supporto alla diagnosi Le colorazioni speciali e l’esame immunoistochimico si rendono necessari soprattutto per la distinzione dei mastocitomi scarsamente differenziati da altri tumori a cellule rotonde. I granuli dei mastociti, se scarsi, possono essere dimostrati mediante reazione PAS o colorazioni istochimiche metacromatiche che sfruttano coloranti basici, come Blu di Toluidina, Giemsa e Alcian blu. Triptasi e chimasi sono proteasi neutre presenti nei granuli dei mastociti, che possono pertanto risultare utili come marker immunoistochimici di supporto alla diagnosi.7 I mastocitomi cutanei e splenici di gatto sono positivi alla triptasi e presentano generalmente una buona reazione per la cloroacetatoesterasi (CAE), indice di attività chimasica dei granuli. Il mastocitoma intestinale è invece in molti casi CAE-negativo. I linfomi sono caratterizzati dalla positività per CD3 (linfociti T) o CD79a (linfociti B). Il plasmocitoma può essere escluso in base alla negatività per CD45RA e CD79a. L’istiocitosi progressiva felina è caratterizzata dall’espressione

407


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 408

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

del CD18, CD1 e MHC II. I melanomi amelanotici dermici sono in genere positivi per Melan-A o S100.

nità di intervento terapeutico. Nel MCT di gatto è stata riscontrata la presenza di un elevato numero di mutazioni a carico del proto-oncogene c-Kit, concentrate soprattutto a livello di esoni 8 e 9 (quinto dominio simil-immunoglobulinico).13,14 La frequenza osservata è di molto superiore rispetto a quella riportata nel MCT del cane (59% vs. 9-33%), ma, al contrario di quest’ultimo, non è emersa una relazione statistica tra mutazioni e prognosi, anche per il fatto che noduli multipli dello stesso gatto presentano nel 71% dei casi mutazioni diverse. Il confronto con il pattern immunoistochimico ha messo in evidenza una debole associazione tra espressione aberrante citoplasmatica e presenza di mutazioni, potenzialmente attribuibile al limitato numero di casi. L’espressione citoplasmatica di Kit emerge comunque come fattore prognostico negativo e associato più frequentemente a una presentazione disseminata della malattia.14

Marker prognostici Ki67 è una proteina nucleare espressa durante tutte le fasi attive del ciclo cellulare (G1, S, G2 e M), ma assente nelle cellule quiescenti (G0). L’evidenziazione immunoistochimica di tale proteina mediante l’anticorpo MIB-1 permette di riconoscere i mastociti in effettiva proliferazione e, con opportune tecniche di analisi di immagine, di ottenere il Ki67-index (percentuale di cellule positive). La valutazione del Ki67-index nei mastocitomi di grado II del cane permette di differenziare le neoplasie più aggressive da quelle meno aggressive.8 Uno studio ha dimostrato il potenziale interesse della determinazione dell’indice di proliferazione nei mastocitomi cutanei felini. I gatti con Ki67-index < 5% presentavano infatti un tasso di sopravvivenza post-chirurgico dell’80% a due anni dall’intervento, contro una sopravvivenza del 20% nei gatti con Ki67-index > 5%.9 In uno studio condotto su 22 gatti, il Ki67-index è risultato significativamente più elevato nei mastocitomi pleomorfi ed è stata rilevata una correlazione con un esito sfavorevole.3 La telomerasi è un complesso ribonucleoproteico che previene l’accorciamento dei telomeri, determinando nel processo oncogenetico l’immortalità delle cellule tumorali. Un aumento dell’attività telomerasica, misurata indirettamente mediante la determinazione dell’immunoreattività per l’anticorpo hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), è stato dimostrato in diverse neoplasie del cane e del gatto. Nei precursori dei mastociti dell’uomo è stata rilevata un’induzione transitoria dell’attività telomerasica durante i processi di differenziazione.10 In uno studio effettuato su MCT cutanei di gatto, hTERT è risultata espressa in 15 di 22 casi (68%), suggerendo un possibile ruolo nella progressione tumorale. Né l’espressione, né la percentuale di cellule positive sono risultate tuttavia correlate alla prognosi.3

BIBLIOGRAFIA 1.

2.

3.

4. 5.

6.

7.

8.

c-Kit

9. 10.

Kit è un recettore di membrana di tipo III appartenente alla famiglia delle tirosinchinasi, codificato dal proto-oncogene ckit. Kit è normalmente espresso in vari tipi cellulari, tra cui mastociti, cellule germinali, linfociti intraepiteliali, melanociti, cellule interstiziali di Cajal, cellule di Purkinje e cellule staminali emopoietiche. Ad eccezione dei mastociti, Kit risulta essenzialmente assente nelle cellule emopoietiche mature. Diversi studi confermano il mantenimento della positività immunoistochimica per Kit nei mastocitomi cutanei e splenici di gatto, che ne permette l’utilizzo come marker diagnostico. Il mastocitoma intestinale presenta invece un’immunoreattività assai variabile, ma in genere scarsa, nei confronti di Kit.3,11,12 In seguito ai promettenti risultati ottenuti nel cane, l’interesse scientifico si è inoltre focalizzato sul significato patogenetico e prognostico del recettore Kit anche nel MCT felino. Una migliore comprensione del ruolo delle disregolazioni di Kit nel MCT del gatto potrebbe infatti fornire informazioni utili all’identificazione dei tumori a comportamento maligno e allo stesso tempo mettere in luce nuove opportu-

11.

12. 13.

14.

Johnson TO, Schulman FY, Lipscomb TP, et al. (2002), Histopathology and biologic behavior of pleomorphic cutaneous mast cell tumors in fifteen cats, Vet Pathol, 39: 452-457. Wilcock BP, Yager JA, Zink MC (1986): The morphology and behaviour of feline cutaneous mastocytomas. Veterinary pathology 23: 320-324. Sabattini S, Bettini G (2010), Prognostic value of histologic and immunohistochemical features in feline cutaneous mast cell tumors. Vet Pathol, 47(4): 643-653. Buerger RG, Scott DW (1987), Cutaneous mast cell neoplasia in cats: 14 cases (1975-1985), J Am Anim Hosp Assoc, 190: 1440-1444. Molander-McCrary H, Henry CJ, Potter K, et al. (1998), Cutaneous mast cell tumors in cats: 32 cases (1991-1994), J Am Anim Hosp Assoc, 34: 281-284. Halsey CHC, Powers BE, Kamstock DA (2010): Feline intestinal mast cell tumour: 50 cases (1997-2008). Veterinary and Comparative Oncology 8(1): 72-79. Kiupel M, Webster JD, Kaneene JB, et al. (2004), The use of KIT and trypase expression patterns as prognostic tools for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors, Vet Pathol, 41: 371-377. Maglennon GA, Murphy S, Adams V, et al. (2008), Association of Ki67 index with prognosis for intermediate-grade canine cutaneous mast cell tumours, Vet Comp Oncol. 6(4): 268-274. Abadie J (2006): Mastocitomi canini e felini. Summa animali da compagnia 10: 41-48. Chaves-Dias C, Hundley TR, Gilfillan AM, et al. (2001), Induction of telomerase activity during development of human mast cells from peripheral blood CD34+ cells: comparisons with tumor mast-cell lines, J Immunol, 166 (11): 6647-6656. Rodriguez-Cariño C, Fondevila D, Segales J, et al. (2009), Expression of KIT receptor in feline cutaneous mast cell tumors, Vet Pathol, 47(4): 643-653. Mallett CL, Northrup NC, Saba CF, et al. (2012), Immunohistochemical Characterization of Feline Mast Cell Tumors, Vet Pathol, in press. Isotani M, Yamada O, Lachowicz JL, et al. (2010), Mutations in the fifth immunoglobulin-like domain of KIT are common and potentially sensitive to imatinib mesylate in feline mast cell tumours, Br J Haematol, 148(1): 144-153. Sabattini S, Guadagni Frizzon M, Turba ME, et al. (2012), KIT receptor tyrosine kinase dysregulation in feline cutaneous mast cell tumour, Proceedings of the 2012 Congress of the European Society of Veterinary Oncology (ESVONC); p 77; 1-3, March 2012, Paris, France.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Silvia Sabattini Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche Veterinarie, Università di Bologna - Via Tolara di Sopra, 50 - 40064 Ozzano Dell’Emilia (BO) Tel. 051 2097970 - E-mail: silvia.sabattini@unibo.it

408


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:44

Pagina 409

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012 • SESSIONI AVANZATE

Mastociti in circolo: semplici spettatori o partecipanti attivi? Controversie, diagnosi e prognosi della mastocitosi/mastocitemia felina Silvia Sabattini Med Vet, Dr Ric, Bologna

Marta Frizzon, Med Vet, Bologna - Giuliano Bettini, Med Vet, Bologna

addominale. I tempi di sopravvivenza riportati in letteratura sono estremamente variabili. Occorre precisare che la presenza di interessamento multiorganico non implica necessariamente una prognosi sfavorevole. Nonostante raramente si osservi una remissione completa, la splenectomia, che rappresenta in questi casi il trattamento di elezione, può determinare un significativo miglioramento della sintomatologia e i pazienti riacquistano in genere una buona qualità di vita, con tempi di sopravvivenza mediani di 12-19 mesi.5,8,9-11 Con il termine mastocitemia (impropriamente definita anche “leucemia mastocitaria”) si intende il riscontro di mastociti circolanti nel sangue periferico. A differenza del cane, dove può insorgere in seguito a processi infiammatori, reazioni di ipersensibilità e altre condizioni patologiche, nel gatto il riscontro di mastocitemia è pressoché esclusivamente associato alla presenza di mastocitoma.7,12 In uno studio condotto su 40 gatti clinicamente sani e 40 gatti con malattie non associate al mastocitoma, in nessun caso è stata riscontrata mastocitemia.12 Nella tabella sono riportati i diversi casi di mastocitemia felina finora descritti in letteratura e si può osservare come questa condizione risulti più frequente in presenza mastocitomi viscerali (37/61; 60%) o sia viscerali che cutanei (14/ 61; 23%) e non sia costantemente associata al riscontro di interessamento midollare.6,13 Alcuni studi hanno indagato il significato prognostico della presenza di mastocitemia. Liska et al. (1979) non riportano una prognosi peggiore nei gatti con mastocitemia prima della splenectomia, mentre il riscontro di mastocitemia post-operatoria sembrerebbe rappresentare un fattore prognostico sfavorevole, in quando indice di ricomparsa della malattia. In uno studio recente condotto su 39 MCT felini a varia localizzazione, la percentuale dei decessi a causa del tumore è stata del 54% nei gatti con mastocitemia e del 24% in quelli senza mastocitemia.8 Nella rassegna dei casi riportati, la mastocitemia è stata rilevata mediante esame diretto dello striscio ematico o previo allestimento del buffy coat e i valori riferiti sono variabili dall’1 al 62% delle cellule in circolo. L’osservazione degli strisci da buffy coat rappresenta il miglior metodo di screening per valutare la presenza di mastocitemia, in quanto permette di rilevare il 30% di casi in più rispetto all’esame diretto dello striscio di sangue, mentre quest’ultimo rappresenta un metodo più accurato per la precisa quantificazione della mastocitemia.8

Nel gatto, oltre all’insorgenza di metastasi viscerali di mastocitomi (MCT) cutanei è riportata la possibilità della trasformazione neoplastica di precursori dei mastociti a livello di organi emopoietici, senza il costante coinvolgimento della cute. Questa seconda ipotesi patogenetica, primitivamente multiorganica, mostra caratteri simili al linfoma e alle leucemie e la malattia che ne deriva prende il nome di mastocitosi sistemica.1 La maturazione dei progenitori emopoietici in mastociti differenziati è mediata dall’interazione tra SCF (fattore di crescita dei mastociti) e il proprio recettore Kit. Secondo un’ipotesi basata su ricerche svolte nell’uomo, esiste la possibilità che i mastociti neoplastici producano in modo aberrante SCF, causando, mediante un meccanismo di stimolazione autocrina, una proliferazione incontrollata e il conseguente sviluppo di una mastocitosi sistemica.2 La definizione di mastocitosi sistemica nel gatto è tuttora incerta, ma nella maggior parte degli studi è intesa come una proliferazione di mastociti a livello di visceri addominali. Gli organi più frequentemente coinvolti sono milza, fegato e linfonodi. Nel 50% dei casi sono inoltre riportati l’interessamento midollare e la presenza di mastociti nel sangue periferico (mastocitemia).1,3 Con il termine di mastocitosi cutanea o mastocitoma cutaneo disseminato ci si riferisce invece alla presenza di numerosi (fino a qualche centinaio) mastocitomi cutanei distribuiti sull’intera superficie corporea.4 Molti autori ritengono che mastocitoma cutaneo e viscerale rappresentino due entità distinte, tuttavia in letteratura sono riportati diversi casi di MCT felino con concomitante interessamento cutaneo (in genere MCT disseminati) e viscerale.1,4-7 Riguardo alla coesistenza delle due forme e su quale debba essere ritenuta la localizzazione primitiva prevalente esistono ancora molte perplessità. In questi gatti viene solitamente diagnosticata prima (talvolta anni prima) la forma cutanea e il decesso o l’eutanasia avvengono in seguito alla diagnosi di MCT viscerale;1,4,7,8 di conseguenza in molti casi la milza è considerata un sito metastatico. È discutibile se il decorso lungamente indolente del MCT splenico e la maggiore probabilità di diagnosticare tempestivamente una lesione cutanea rispetto a una lesione viscerale abbiano un ruolo in questo. La mastocitosi sistemica è stata riscontrata principalmente nei gatti anziani, con un’età media di 10 anni (range, 3-16 anni). La sintomatologia è data da vomito, anoressia, perdita di peso e presenza di epato/splenomegalia alla palpazione

409


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 410

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

In uno studio è stata riscontrata nei gatti con mastocitemia un’associazione significativa con il calo dell’ematocrito (HCT, 27.8 nei gatti con mastocitemia e 35.7 nei gatti senza mastocitemia). In tutti i casi l’anemia era di tipo non rigenerativo.8 Questo può essere dovuto in parte al fatto che circa un terzo dei gatti con mastocitoma viscerale presenta anemia. L’anemia può essere causata da perdite croniche di sangue per ulcere gastroduodenali, infiammazione cronica, soppressione dell’eritropoiesi in seguito a mieloftisi, ipersplenismo ed eritrofagocitosi da parte di mastociti neoplastici.6,11

Altre anomalie ematologiche riportate in corso di mastocitosi sistemica/mastocitemia sono eosinofilia (reperto aspecifico, potenzialmente conseguente al rilascio di fattori chemiotattici da parte dei mastociti neoplastici) e macroglobulinemia.1,7,14 Quest’ultima sarebbe collegata a un ipotetico ruolo dei mastociti nella sintesi di immunoglobuline, ma l’esatto meccanismo non è ancora conosciuto.1 In conclusione, il mastocitoma felino ha un comportamento biologico generalmente poco aggressivo, ma nel complesso variabile e scarsamente prevedibile. Alla luce di questo ogni gatto con una diagnosi di MCT cutaneo dovreb-

TABELLA Skeldon et al., 2010

2/14 (staging incompleto)

Rassnick et al., 2008

2/7 (staging incompleto) 3/12

Litster e Sorenmo, 2006

1

6/6 (milza/ fegato)

3/3 (cutaneo solitario e milza/fegato)

2/2 (milza/fegato)

6/6

2/2 (milza/fegato)

Dank et al., 2002

5/6 (milza)

Allan et al., 2000

1 (milza/fegato)

Fearnley et al., 1993

1 (milza/fegato)

Brown e Chalmers, 1990 Buerger e Scott, 1987

12-23%

sangue buffy coat

48%

sangue no

1

buffy coat

no

1/12

buffy coat 1 (milza)

Madewell et al., 1983

28% 1 (cutaneo disseminato e milza/fegato)

Jeraj et al., 1983

5/7 (milza, fegato e altri organi addominali)

Guerre et al., 1979

1 (milza/fegato)

Confer et al., 1978

1

Weller, 1978

1

1 (milza/fegato) 0/2

410

no

sangue buffy coat

25%

sangue

4-11%

sangue

4%

sangue

2 (milza e altri organi addominali) 8

sangue sangue

1 (cutaneo solitario e milza/fegato)

Liska et al., 1979

Nielsen, 1969

sangue/ buffy coat

sangue

Holscher et al., 1986

0/8

5/12

buffy coat 1

Antognoni et al., 2003

sangue/ buffy coat buffy coat

1 (milza)

Isotani et al., 2006

Garner e Ligeman, 1970

1-62%

sangue

1

1-45%

6


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 411

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

be essere accuratamente stadiato e regolarmente monitorato al fine di escludere un coinvolgimento sistemico. L’esclusiva associazione tra mastocitemia e mastocitosi sistemica sottolinea l’importanza della valutazione del buffy coat nello staging e nel monitoraggio della risposta al trattamento in gatti con mastocitoma.

9.

10.

11.

BIBLIOGRAFIA 12. 1. 2.

3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8.

Garner FM, Lingeman CH (1970), Mast-cell neoplasms of the domestic cat, Pathol Vet, 7(6): 517-530. Dank G, Chien MB, London CA (2002), Activating mutations in the catalytic or juxtamembrane domain of c-Kit in splenic mast cell tumors of cats. Am J Vet Res 63: 1129-1133. Weller RE (1978), Systemic mastocytosis and mastocytemia in a cat, Mod Vet Pract, 59(1): 41-43. Lamm CG, Stern AW, Smith AJ et al (2009), Disseminated cutaneous mast cell tumors with epitheliotropism and systemic mastocytosis in a domestic cat, J Vet Diagn Invest, 21(5): 710-715. Confer AW, Langloss JM, Cashell IG (1978), Long-term survival of two cats with mastocytosis, J Am Vet Med Assoc, 172: 160-161. Madewell BR, Gunn C, Gribble DH (1983), Mast cell phagocytosis of red blood cells in a cat, Vet Pathol, 20: 638-640. Gulledge L, Boos D (1997), Cutaneous and visceral mast cell tumors in a cat, Fel Pract, 25(1): 13-15. Skeldon NC, Gerber KL, Wilson RJ et al. (2010), Mastocytaemia in cats: prevalence, detection and quantification methods, haematologi-

13. 14.

cal associations and potential implications in 30 cats with mast cell tumours, J Feline Med Surg, 12(12): 960-966. Guerre R, Millet P, Groulade P (1979), Systemic mastocytosis in a cat: remission after splenectomy, J Small Anim Pract, 20(12): 769772. Liska WD, MacEwen EG, Zaki FA et al. (1979), Feline systemic mastocytosis: a review and results of splenectomy in seven cases, J Am Anim Hosp Assoc, 15: 589-597. Allan R, Halsey TR, Thompson KG (2000), Splenic mast cell tumor and mastocytaemia in a cat: case study and literature review, N Z Vet J, 48(4): 117-121. Garrett LD, Craig CL, Szladovits B et al. (2007), Evaluation of buffy coat smears for circulating mast cells in healthy cats and ill cats without mast cell tumor-related disease, J Am Vet Med Assoc, 231(11): 1685-1687. Fearnley A, Edmunds G, Sutton R, et al. (1993), Systemic mastocytosis with mastocytaemia in a cat, Aust Vet Pract, 4:194-197. Center SA, Randolph JF, Erb, HN et al. (1986), Eosinophilia in the cat: a retrospective study of 312 cases (1975 to 1986), J Am Vet Med Assoc, 26: 349-358.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Silvia Sabattini Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche Veterinarie, Università di Bologna - Via Tolara di Sopra, 50 40064 Ozzano Dell’Emilia (BO) Tel. 051 2097970 E-mail: silvia.sabattini@unibo.it

411


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 412

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012 • SESSIONI AVANZATE

Patologie neuromuscolari: metodologia ed interpretazione delle biopsie muscolari Claudia Salvadori Med Vet, Dr Ric, Pisa

La biopsia muscolare rappresenta un campione diagnostico fondamentale per la caratterizzazione delle malattie neuromuscolari che può essere facilmente prelevata con una procedura minimamente invasiva.1 La biopsia dovrebbe essere eseguita precocemente nel decorso della malattia per evitare di raggiungere stadi avanzati caratterizzati da esteso danno muscolare con perdita di fibre e grave fibrosi, stadi in cui, la possibilità di successo di eventuali trattamenti terapeutici, è notevolmente ridotta. La scelta del muscolo per l’esecuzione della biopsia è importante per una corretta diagnosi. Nel caso delle miopatie focali il prelievo deve riguardare i muscoli interessati dal processo patologico in atto, mentre nel caso di miopatie generalizzate, l’elettromiografia rappresenta un ottimo strumento per selezionare i muscoli da sottoporre a prelievo (evitando di effettuare la biopsia nei punti di infissione degli aghi dell’elettromiografo).2 Generalmente si consiglia di prelevare muscoli per i quali in letteratura siano disponibili i normali riferimenti morfometrici (composizione miofibrale e diametro medio delle fibre) e tra questi i siti migliori sono per gli arti pelvici, il muscolo bicipite femorale, il vasto laterale, il capo laterale del gastrocnemio e il tibiale craniale mentre per gli arti toracici sono il capo lungo e il capo mediale del muscolo tricipite brachiale e il muscolo flessore superficiale delle dita.3 La metodica chirurgica con incisione della cute, sottocute e fascia muscolare è preferibile al prelievo con punch transcutaneo perché permette di ottenere un corretto orientamento del campione.2,3 La biopsia deve essere infatti rappresentata da un campione cilindrico lungo circa 1,5 cm, largo e spesso 1 cm in cui le fibre siano orientate longitudinalmente secondo la lunghezza del cilindro.3 L’orientamento delle miofibre nel campione è fondamentale in quanto permette un corretto posizionamento del campione nella fase di congelamento e l’ottenimento di sezioni trasversali, ottimali per la valutazione istomorfologica della biopsia. La biopsia dovrebbe essere effettuata a livello del ventre muscolare evitando le zone di inserzione tendinea e le aponeurosi dove le caratteristiche istologiche possono essere alterate.2 Il cilindro di muscolo ottenuto deve essere avvolto in una garza inumidita di soluzione fisiologica e posto in una provetta di vetro con tappo in gomma per evitare la disidratazione.3 I campioni non devono essere immersi in soluzione fisiologica, né devono essere congelati. Il campione deve essere inviato al laboratorio accompagnato da una mattonella refrigerante, entro le

24-36 ore dal prelievo.4 All’arrivo in laboratorio il campione viene congelato per immersione in isopentano preraffreddato in azoto liquido e conservato a – 80°C.3 Tramite criostato vengono eseguite sezioni seriali dallo spessore di 8-9 μm che sono colorate con metodi istologici e istochimici quali ematossilina-eosina e tricromica di Gomori (entrambe utili per la valutazione della forma e delle dimensioni delle miofibre, per la valutazione della trama connettivale endomisiale e perimisiale e per l’evidenziazione di cellule infiammatorie), PAS (per l’evidenziazione di accumuli di polisaccaridi intramiofibrali), Oil Red O (per l’evidenziazione dei lipidi intramiofibrali) e metodi istoenzimatici specifici per il tessuto muscolare quali l’ATPasi con preincubazione acida e alcalina per la tipizzazione miofibrale, l’esterasi per la valutazione delle esterasi non specifiche (presenti nei lisosomi e nelle placche neuromuscolari) e le reazioni istoenzimatiche per la valutazione del pattern enzimatico ossidativo miofibrale quali SDH (succinicodeidrogenasi), NADH-TR (nicotinamide adenindinucleotide-tetrazolioreduttasi), e COX (citocromossidasi).4,5 L’importanza di poter disporre di campioni freschi congelati è legata proprio alla necessità di eseguire specifiche tecniche istoenzimatiche per la tipizzazione miofibrale e la localizzazione degli enzimi ossidativi. La fissazione in formalina e l’inclusione in paraffina, utilizzate di routine per la diagnostica istologica, hanno scarsa utilità nelle diagnostica muscolare.1 Le miopatie sono malattie neuromuscolari che interessano le fibre muscolari quindi la porzione terminale dell’unità motoria (con tale termine si intende il complesso formato dal motoneurone situato nelle corna ventrali del midollo spinale o nei nuclei motori dei nervi cranici, il suo lungo assone che raggiunge i muscoli periferici, la placca neuromuscolare tramite la quale lo stimolo nervoso è trasmesso al muscolo e le fibre muscolari innervate dall’assone stesso).6,7 Da un punto di vista patogenetico, si distinguono miopatie primarie e miopatie neurogene secondarie. Nelle miopatie primarie le miofibre sono la sede dell’alterazione patologica primitiva mentre nelle miopatie neurogene, le miofibre sono colpite secondariamente per coinvolgimento primario del nervo periferico. Il trofismo muscolare è infatti strettamente dipendente dall’innervazione, per cui in casi di denervazione, il muscolo va incontro ad atrofia neurogena. Quest’ultima è caratterizzata da polimetrismo miofibrale, con fibre atrofiche che assumono una forma angolare a causa della pressio-

412


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 413

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

ne causata dalle fibre circostanti normalmente innervate e da fibre ipertrofiche (fibre che vanno incontro ad ipertrofia compensatoria per sopperire alle fibre che hanno perso la loro stimolazione motoria).6,2,5 Le fibre atrofiche possono essere sparse nei vari fascicoli o riunite in piccoli e grandi gruppi (interi fascicoli muscolari) di atrofia a seconda del numero degli assoni coinvolti nella degenerazione e della progressione della denervazione.2,5 L’atrofia muscolare neurogena cronica è caratterizzata da residui sarcoplasmatici (“nuclear bags”) compatibili con stadi terminali di atrofia miofibrale nei quali residuano solo porzioni minime di sarcoplasma con accumulo dei nuclei (si parla in questo caso di “pseudomoltiplicazione dei nuclei” in quanto i nuclei sembrano in numero superiore alle miofibre, ma tale fenomeno è imputabile esclusivamente all’atrofia miofibrale e non va confusa con infiltrati infiammatori).2 Nelle atrofie neurogene croniche si possono osservare anche necrosi con miofagocitosi multifocale, fibrosi a distribuzione perimisiale e raggruppamenti miofibrali. Quest’ultimi rappresentano l’esito della reinnervazione. Infatti l’assone innervante determina il tipo biochimico della miofibra (I, IIA ecc.) e in condizioni normali le diverse fibre sono disposte a formare un mosaico in cui i vari tipi istochimici sono regolarmente distribuiti.1 Quando un assone degenera, quello ad esso adiacente va ad innervare le miofibre rimaste denervate e queste assumono tutte lo stesso tipo biochimico, per cui si creano gruppi di fibre identiche sotto il profilo metabolico (Fig. 2).6,2 Nelle miopatie neurogene è importante anche la valutazione dei fascetti nervosi intramuscolari. A questo riguardo le colorazioni più utili sono la tricromica di Gomori e la PAS che evidenziano meglio la mielina degli assoni. I fascetti neuromuscolari sono utili per il riconoscimento dell’eventuale coinvolgimento della componente distale degli assoni periferici (neuropatia distale): si possono osservare perdita di fibre mieliniche, degenerazione assonale e fibrosi endonevriale.5 Le miopatie primarie sono caratterizzate generalmente dalla presenza di polimetrismo miofibrale con fibre atrofiche di forma rotondeggiante e fibre ipertrofiche. Si possono inoltre osservare aumento della percentuale di miofibre con nuclei centrali nel sarcoplasma (superiore al 2%, non considerando le miofibre sottofasciali), necrosi, miofagocitosi e rigenerazione miofibrale, vacuoli sarcoplasmatici, accumuli intramiofibrali di glicogeno, lipidi o di mitocondri anomali.2,4,6 Generalmente le miopatie primarie sono associate a fibrosi endomisiale, ma nelle forme croniche la fibrosi diventa generalizzata, coinvolgendo anche la trama perimisiale.4 Nell’ambito delle miopatie primarie si distinguono due gruppi di miopatie: infiammatorie e non infiammatorie, in base alla presenza o meno di cellule infiammatorie (vedi tabella). Miopatie infiammatorie. Caratterizzate dalla presenza di infiltrati infiammatori nel muscolo, possono essere focali, coinvolgendo un gruppo limitato di muscoli (come la miosite dei muscoli masticatori e la miosite dei muscoli extraoculari), oppure generalizzate come le miositi infettive, la polimiosite immunomediata, la polimiosite dei cani di razza Vizsla e la dermatomiosite.8,9 Nel cane sono state identificate anche miopatie infiammatorie con predominanza di macrofagi simili a quelle descritte nell’uomo.8

Miosite dei muscoli masticatori. È la forma di miosite più comune nel cane. È una forma di miosite focale che colpisce i muscoli della masticazione innervati dalla branca mandibolare del nervo trigemino quali il muscolo temporale, massetere, pterigoideo laterale e mediale, tensore del timpano e tensore del velo palatino che originano dal mesoderma della prima coppia di archi branchiali.10 I muscoli masticatori contengono un sottotipo di fibre di tipo I diverso dagli altri muscoli e un tipo miofibrale detto IIM non presente nei muscoli scheletrici.10,11 La miosite dei muscoli masticatori è una miosite immunomediata caratterizzata dalla produzione di autoanticorpi contro le fibre di tipo IIM e in particolare contro una proteina di 150kDa appartenente alla famiglia delle proteine tipo C di legame alla miosina (myosin binding protein-C family), la masticatory myosin binding protein-C (mMyBP-C).12 La biopsia muscolare mostra la presenza di infiltrati infiammatori multifocali prevalentemente a localizzazione periva scolare, e in minor misura anche perimisiale ed endomisiale, composti da numerosi macrofagi, cellule dendritiche, linfociti T (prevalentemente di tipo CD4+), e a differenza della polimiosite, anche da linfociti B.13 Si osserva anche un minor numero di granulociti eosinofili sia nei foci di infiammazione che a livello endomisiale e perimisiale.13,14 Vista la distribuzione multifocale degli infiltrati infiammatori questi possono anche non essere visibili nella biopsia muscolare. Tutte le miofibre comunque, sia quelle in prossimità degli infiltrati infiammatori che quelle lontane da questi, esprimono sulla loro superficie le molecole di MHC classe I e II.15 Gli infiltrati infiammatori sono associati alla presenza di necrosi miofibrale con miofagocitosi, atrofia miofibrale e rigenerazione, emorragie e marcata fibrosi.11,14 Con il progredire dell’infiammazione il tessuto muscolare può essere infatti interamente sostituito da tessuto fibroso con completa atrofia muscolare e perdita della funzionalità muscolare.11 Miosite dei muscoli extraoculari. Miopatia infiammatoria focale del cane che interessa selettivamente i muscoli extraoculari, anche a carattere monolaterale, senza coinvolgimento dei muscoli masticatori e dei muscoli appendicolari.16,17,18 Istologicamente in tutti i muscoli extraoculari, ad eccezione del muscolo retrattore del bulbo, si osservano infiltrati infiammatori multifocali costituiti prevalentemente da linfociti e macrofagi e da un minor numero di plasmacellule, neutrofili ed eosinofili associati a mionecrosi, atrofia miofibrale e marcata fibrosi soprattutto nei casi cronici.16,17 Miositi infettive. Nel cane e nel gatto rivestono notevole importanza le infezioni da Neospora caninum e Toxoplasma gondii. Nelle biopsie si osserva generalmente marcato polimetrismo miofibrale con fibre atrofiche rotondeggianti e fibre ipertrofiche, necrosi miofibrale e mineralizzazione, miofagocitosi e infiltrati infiammatori costituiti prevalentemente da numerose cellule dendritiche e linfociti e un minor numero di macrofagi e granulociti eosinofili associati alla presenza di tachizoiti liberi o all’interno delle miofibre.13,18 Le miositi protozoarie si differenziano dalla polimiosite per la prevalenza di cellule dendritiche e per la presenza di un maggior numero di eosinofili.13 Miositi parassitarie nel cane

413


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 414

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

sono segnalate anche in corso di infestazione da Leishmania infantum, Trichinella spiralis, Sarcocystis spp., e da microfilarie di Dirofilaria immitis. Nel cane si può avere miosite anche in corso di infezione da Leptospira australis, Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae e da Ehrlichia canis e nel gatto anche per infezione da virus della immunodeficienza felina (FIV).19

tarie, caratterizzate da progressiva degenerazione miofibrale, necrosi, miofagocitosi e rigenerazione miofibrale senza coinvolgimento selettivo dei diversi tipi miofibrali e in assenza di alterazioni ultrastrutturali patognomoniche degli organelli sarcoplasmatici, associate a progressiva fibrosi e aumento del tessuto adiposo. Con il termine di distrofie muscolari si intendono le miopatie causate da assenza o anomala configurazione delle proteine del sarcolemma, del sarcomero, del sarcoplasma, del nucleo, della lamina basale e delle proteine coinvolte nelle vie di glicosilazione.19 Nel cane e nel gatto sono segnalate distrofie muscolari per deficienza di distrofina, di sarcoglicani, di α2-laminina e α-distroglicano.1,21 Tramite l’indagine istologica sul campione muscolare si può avere il sospetto di distrofia muscolare che deve essere accertato attraverso l’analisi dell’espressione delle varie proteine muscolari tramite immunoistochimica e immunoblotting. Queste analisi sono fondamentali per indirizzare verso specifici test genetici. Come nell’uomo, anche nel cane e nel gatto la forma più comune di distrofia è per deficienza di distrofina. La distrofina è una proteina citoscheletrica situata a ridosso della membrana sarcolemmale che ha un ruolo fondamentale nel mantenimento strutturale dell’integrità delle fibre muscolari durante la contrazione muscolare, connettendo i filamenti di actina del citoscheletro al sarcolemma. Le lesioni istologiche sono caratterizzate da marcato polimetrismo miofibrale con numerose fibre atrofiche rotondeggianti e fibre ipertrofiche che spesso presentano incisure sarcoplasmatiche anche multiple (myofiber splitting). Si osservano numerose fibre con nuclei centrali nel sarcoplasma, fibre ialine e fibre ipercontratte. Caratteristici sono i focolai multifocali di mionecrosi e fagocitosi spesso con calcificazione associati a focolai multifocali di rigenerazione miofibrale e fibrosi endomisiale e perimisiale.22,23

Polimiosite. Con il termine di polimiosite si intende una patologia immunomediata in assenza di una eziologia infettiva e non associata a patologie sistemiche del tessuto connettivo.11 Istologicamente la polimiosite è caratterizzata dalla presenza di infiltrati infiammatori a localizzazione prevalentemente endomisiale e, in minor misura anche perimisiale e perivascolare con distribuzione multifocale coalescente, e dalla fagocitosi di fibre non necrotiche da parte di macrofagi. Gli infiltrati infiammatori sono formati prevalentemente da cellule dendritiche, macrofagi e linfociti T (prevalentemente di tipo CD8+).13 Gli infiltrati infiammatori sono associati ad atrofia miofibrale, necrosi miofibrale, numerose fibre rigeneranti e fibrosi prevalentemente a distribuzione endomisiale.14,18 Tutte le miofibre in corso di polimiosite, sia in prossimità degli infiltrati infiammatori e sia in assenza di questi, esprimono a livello del sarcolemma il complesso maggiore di istocomopatibilità di classe I (MHC I) e ciò rappresenta un test diagnostico importante soprattutto in assenza di infiltrati infiammatori.1,15 Poliomiosite dei cani di razza Vizsla. Rappresenta una forma di miosite razza specifica caratterizzata da polimetrismo miofibrale e infiltrati infiammatori con distribuzione endomisiale composti da linfociti T (prevalenza di CD4+) e un minor numero di macrofagi e linfociti B. Le lesioni muscolari sono associate anche a lesioni infiammatorie cardiache, cutanee e gastrointestinali.9

Miopatie endocrine. Nella miopatia da iperadrenocorticismo spontaneo le lesioni sono caratterizzate da polimetrismo miofibrale con presenza di fibre atrofiche angolari e rotondeggianti, fibre ipertrofiche con incisure sarcoplasmatiche e alterazione dell’orientamento delle miofibrille, aumento delle miofibre con nuclei centrali, necrosi miofibrale e miofagocitosi. L’atrofia miofibrale interessa prevalentemente le fibre di tipo II. Diffusamente, le miofibre in ematossilina-eosina presentano accumuli di glicogeno e numerosi vacuoli ORO positivi indicando quindi anche un aumento dei depositi lipidici intramiofibrali. Numerose fibre presentano anche accumuli patologici di mitocondri in posizione subsarcolemmale.24,25 Tipiche dell’iperadrenocorticismo sono anche le fibre lobulate con indentature sarcoplalemmali positive con le reazioni enzimatiche ossidative. Il selettivo coinvolgimento delle fibre di tipo II nell’atrofia è tipica anche della frequente miopatia da steroidi conseguente a trattamenti di lunga durata con glucocorticoidi (soprattutto quando vengono utilizzati corticosteroidi fluorinati come il triamcinolone, il betametasone e il desametasone).11 Il selettivo coinvolgimento delle miofibre di tipo II è infatti causato da un’inibizione dell’attività dell’enzima fosforilasi con inibizione dell’utilizzazione del glicogeno intramiofibrale e blocco della via gliocolitica (le fibre di tipo I sono meno sensibili al blocco della via glicolitica in quanto

Dermatomiosite. Rappresenta una patologia infiammatoria della cute e della muscolatura scheletrica che colpisce il Pastore Scozzese e i suoi incroci, lo Shetland Sheepdog e raramente altre razze. Si osservano infiltrati infiammatori multifocali perivascolari composti da linfociti, plasmacellule, macrofagi, neutrofili ed eosinofili, i quali possono anche coinvolgere i fascetti nervosi intramuscolari, associati a necrosi e rigenerazione miofibrale con atrofia miofibrale perifascicolare.11,18 Le lesioni cutanee e muscolari sono secondarie al danno vascolare caratterizzato da una vasculite necrotizzante delle arteriole e delle venule con necrosi fibrinoide della parete, infiltrazione di granulociti neutrofili, picnosi e carioressi delle cellule endoteliali.20 Miopatie primarie non infiammatorie. Questo termine raggruppa tutte le miopatie primarie metaboliche, degenerative e distrofiche (vedi Tabella) spesso di difficile interpretazione, che richiedono generalmente, ulteriori test diagnostici per la diagnosi definitiva eziologica. Si riconoscono distrofie muscolari, miopatie endocrine, miopatie mitocondriali e da alterazioni del metabolismo lipidico e miopatie congenite. Distrofie muscolari. Le distrofie muscolari sono un gruppo di miopatie degenerative non infiammatorie, eredi-

414


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 415

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

basano il loro metabolismo energetico sull’ossidazione degli acidi grassi).11,25 La miopatia da ipotiroidismo è caratterizzata da fibre atrofiche rotondeggianti e angolari prevalentemente di tipo II e fibre ipertrofiche di tipo I, talvolta con predominanza delle fibre di tipo I.26 Nelle miofibre si osserva anche accumulo di glicogeno e la presenza di corpi nemalinici prevalentemente nelle miofibre di tipo I.27,28 Frequentemente si osserva anche necrosi multifocale con miofagocitosi.27 Gli aspetti miopatici possono essere associati anche ad alterazioni di origine neurogena. L’ipotiroidismo determina una diminuzione dei recettori β-adrenergici sulle cellule muscolari con diminuita glicogenolisi, accumulo di glicogeno e ridotta attività dell’enzima adenilciclasi.26,28 La ridotta attività di questo enzima determina una riduzione della adenosina 3’,5’-monofosfato che a sua volta determina una ridotta attivazione della fosforilasi e quindi una riduzione della glicogenolisi con selettivo coinvolgimento del metabolismo energetico delle miofibre di tipo II.26

TABELLA - Principali miopatie del cane e del gatto MIOPATIE NON INFIAMMATORIE Miopatie endocrine Miopatia da ipotiroidismo Miopatia da iperadrecorticismo (Cushing) Miopatia da steroidi Miopatie metaboliche Patologie del metabolismo del glicogeno (glicogenosi) Glicogenosi tipo II – Lapland dogs Glicogenosi tipo III – Pastore Tedesco e Akita Glicogenosi tipo IV – Norvegese delle Foreste Glicogenosi tipo VII – Cocker e Springer Spaniel Patologie del metabolismo lipidico Deficienza di carnitina

Miopatie mitocondriali o da alterazione del metabolismo lipidico. Sono miopatie ancora scarsamente caratterizzate negli animali caratterizzate da accumulo di lipidi intramiofibrali (ORO positivi), e/o da alterazione della distribuzione dei mitocondri nel sarcoplasma (riconoscibile con le reazioni enzimatiche ossidative), e da alterazioni ultrastrutturali dei mitocondri stessi (visibili con indagini di microscopia elettronica).5,19 Alterazioni della β-ossidazione e della catena respiratoria mitocondriale portano ad un deficit energetico miofibrale con conseguente miopatia. A questo riguardo la biopsia muscolare deve essere associata a particolari analisi biochimiche quali dosaggio di lattato e piruvato, dosaggio degli acidi organici urinari e il dosaggio della carnitina nel muscolo, nelle urine e nel plasma. La biopsia muscolare inoltre può indirizzare verso specifici test enzimatici da effettuare su culture di mioblasti e verso specifici test genetici.1

Patologie mitocondriali Deficienza di citocromo c ossidasi – Bobtail Deficienza di piruvato deidrogenasi – Clumber e Sussex Spaniels Miopatia mitocondriale del Jack Russel Terrier Distrofie muscolari Deficienza di distrofina – gatto (distrofia muscolare ipertrofica); cane (Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Rottweiler, Kurzhaar, Alaskan Malamute, Irish Terrier, Pastore Belga Groenendal, Samoiedo, Schnauzer nano, Brittany Spaniel, Rat Terrier, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Fox Terrier a pelo ruvido, Bobtail, Spitz giapponese, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Weimaraner, Springer Spaniel)

Miopatie congenite. Rappresentano un eterogeneo gruppo di miopatie non distrofiche che vengono denominate in base alla caratteristica patologica predominante osservata nel muscolo (es. miopatia con accumulo di corpi nemalinici, miopatia con accumulo miofibrillare di desmina, miopatia centronucleare del Labrador Retriever ecc.), generalmente a livello ultrastrutturale. La razza dell’animale rappresenta un importante criterio diagnostico, ma la biopsia risulta fondamentale per riconoscere tali peculiari lesioni e indirizzare verso specifici test genetici.1

Deficienza di α2 laminina – cane (incrocio BrittanySpringer Spaniel); gatto (Main Coon; comune Europeo) Deficienza di sarcoglicano – cane (Chihuahua: assenza di α-, β-, γ-SG, Cocker Spaniel: assenza di γ-SG e riduzione di α-, β-SG; Boston Terrier: assenza di β- e γ-SG e riduzione di α-SG; assenza di α-, β-, γ-SG); gatto (deficienza parziale di β-SG) Deficienza di α-distroglicano – gatto (Sphinx e Devon Rex)

CONCLUSIONI

Alterazioni elettrolitiche Le patologie muscolari rappresentano un gruppo numeroso ed eterogeneo di patologie neuromuscolari con diagnosi complessa. La biopsia muscolare rappresenta un elemento chiave nell’iter diagnostico e nella valutazione prognostica, che però non può prescindere da una proficua collaborazione tra il neurologo clinico e il neuropatologo e dall’applicazione di ulteriori test sierologici, biochimici e genetici.

Alterazioni acquisite del metabolismo del sodio, potassio e fosforo Somministrazione di diuretici Ipokaliemia congenita del Burmese Paralisi periodica iperkaliemica – cane

415


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 416

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Rickettsie Virus Funghi

Sindromi miotoniche Miotonia congenita – cane (Chow Chow, Schnauzer nano, Staffordshire Terrier, Pastore Australiano; Cocker Spaniel; Alano); gatto Distrofia miotonica – cane (Rhodesian Ridgeback, Boxer)

Miositi idiopatiche o autoimmuni Polimiosite Miosite dei muscoli masticatori Miosite dei muscoli extraoculari Miosite dei muscoli laringei Dermatomiosite Polimiosite del Viszla Miosite con prevalenza di macrofagi Miofascite macrofagica Miosite a corpi inclusi (inclusion body miositis- lyke)

Sindromi con ipertonicità Sindrome da ipertonicità – cane (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel; Scottish Terrier “Scottie cramps”; Springer Spaniel; Wheaton Terrier) Miochimia – cane (Jack Russel Terrier); gatto

Miositi associate con patologie del tessuto connettivo Lupus eritematoso sistemico

Miopatie da sforzo Exertional myopathy – Greyhounds

Miositi paraneoplastiche Miopatie razza-specifiche ereditarie Miositi indotte da farmaci (tossicità diretta o reazioni di ipersensibilità idiosincrasica) D-penicillamina Cimetidina Trimetoprim-sulfadiazina Tapazolo

Miopatia centronucleare del Labrador Retriever Miopatia “central core-like”- cane (Alano) Miopatia a corpi nemalinici - cane (Border Collie); gatto Miopatia distale – cane (Rottweiler) Miopatia del Bovaro delle Fiandre Miopatia da accumulo di desmina – cane Miopatia con inclusioni cristalline tubulina-positive gatto

MIOPATIE IDIOPATICHE Miopatia fibrotica – cane (Pastore Tedesco, Rottweiler, Dobermann); gatto; cavallo Contratture muscolari – cane, gatto Miosite ossificante (fibrodisplasia ossificante progressiva) - cane; gatto “Limber tail”- Pointer, Labrador Retriever Miopatia necrotizzante - cane

MIOPATIE INFIAMMATORIE Miositi infettive Parassiti e protozoi Batteri

Bibliografia 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Shelton GD, (2010), Routine and specialized laboratory testing for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases in dogs and cats, Vet Clin Pathol, 39: 278295. Dickinson PJ, LeCouter RA, (2002), Muscle and nerve biopsy, Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract, 32: 63-102. Braund KG, (1994), Clinical syndromes in veterinary neurology, 2nd ed, Mosby, St. Louis, Missouri. Salvadori C, Cantile C, Arispici M, (2006), Metodologia ed interpretazione delle biopsie di muscolo e nervo, Veterinaria, 20: 7-16. Dubowitz V, Sewry C, (2007) Muscle biopsy, 3rd ed, Saunders Elsevier, Philadelphia, pp. 23-57. De Girolami U, Anthony DC, Frosch MP (1999), Peripheral nerve and skeletal muscle. In: Robbins. Pathologic basis of disease. Ed by RS Cotran, V Kumar, T Collins. WB Saunders Co, Philadelphia, pp 1269-1291. Glass EN, Kent M, (2002), The clinical examination for neuromuscular disease, Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract, 32:1-29. Shelton GD, (2007),From dog to man: the broad spectrum of inflammatory myopathies, Neuromuscul Disord, 17: 663-670. Haley AC, Platt SR, Kent M, et al., (2011) Breed-specific polymyositis in Hungarian Viszla dogs. J Vet Intern Med, 25: 393-397. Orvis JS, Cardinet GH (1981), Canine muscle fiber tyes and susceptibility of masticatory muscles to myositis, Muscle Nerve, 4: 354-359. Podell M, (2002), Inflammatory Myopathies. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract, 32:147-167. Wu X, Li Z, Brooks R, Komives EA, et al., (2007) Autoantibodies in canine masticatory muscle myositis recognize a novel myosin binding protein-C family member. J Immunol 179: 4939-4944. Pumarola M, Moore PF, Shelton GD, (2004), Canine inflammatory myopathy: analysis of cellular infiltrates, Muscle Nerve 29: 782-789. Salvadori C, Peters IR, Day MJ et al., (2005), Muscle regeneration, inflammation and connective tissue expansion in canine inflammatory myopathy, Muscle Nerve, 31:192-198. Paciello O, Shelton GD, Papparella S, (2007), Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in canine masticatory muscle myositis, Neuromuscul Disord, 17: 313-320.

416


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 417

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

16. 17. 18.

19. 20. 21.

22.

23. 24.

Allgoewer I, Blair M, Basher T et al., (2000), Extraocular muscle myositis and restrictive strabismus in 10 dogs, Vet Ophthalm, 3: 21-26. Carpenter JL, Schmidt GM, Moore FM, et al., (1989), Canine bilateral extraocular polymyositis, Vet Pathol, 26: 510-512. Evans J, Levesque D, Shelton GD, (2004), Canine inflammtory myopathies: a clinicopathological review of 200 cases, J Vet Intern Med, 18: 679-691. Mandara T, Cantile C, Baroni M, et al., (2011) Neuropatologia e neuroimaging, Poletto Editore, Milano, pp.322-344. Lewis RM, (1994) Immune-mediated muscle disease, Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract, 24: 703-710. Salvadori C, Vattemi G, Lombardo R, et al., (2009) Muscular dystrophy with reduced β-sarcoglycan in a cat. J Comp Pathol, 140: 278-282. Shelton GD, Engvall E, (2002), Muscular dystrophies and other inherited myopathies, Vet Clin North America Small Anim Pract 32:103124. Shelton GD, Engvall E, (2005), Canine and feline models of human inherited muscle diseases, Neuromuscul Disord, 15: 127-138. Braund KG, Dillon AR, Mikeal RL, et al., (1980), Subclinical myopathy associated with hyperadrenocorticism in the dog, Vet Pathol, 17:134-148, 1980.

25.

26. 27.

28.

Greene CE, Lorenz MD, Munnell JF, et al., (1979), Myopathy associated with hyperadrenocorticism in the dog, J Am Vet Med Assoc, 174:1310-1315. Braund KG, Dillon AR, August JR et al., (1981), Hypothyroid myopathy in two dogs. Vet Pathol,18: 589-598. Delauche AJ, Cuddon PA, Podell M, et al., (1998), Nemaline rods in canine myopathies: 4 case reports and literature review, J Vet Intern Med, 12:424-430. Platt SR, (2002) Neuromuscular complications in endocrine and metabolic disorders, Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Practice 32:125146.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Claudia Salvadori Dipartimento di Patologia Animale, Profilassi e Igiene degli Alimenti Università di Pisa Viale delle Piagge, 2- 56124 Pisa Tel. 0502216983 - Fax 0502216941 E-mail: claudia.salvadori@vet.unipi.it

417


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 418

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Il laboratorio in corso di urolitiasi: come, quando e perché Paola Scarpa Med Vet, Dr Ric, SCMPA, Milano

Piera Anna Martino, DBSc, Dr Ric, Milano

Il ruolo del laboratorio è fondamentale nella diagnostica e nel monitoraggio dell’urolitiasi, indipendentemente dal fatto che venga intrapreso un percorso medico (dissoluzione) o chirurgico. Al centro del nostro iter, vi è una necessità inderogabile: la prevenzione della recidiva. Questa implica un’accurata valutazione del paziente che passa attraverso il corretto utilizzo della diagnostica di laboratorio.

zione urinaria e predisposizione all’urolitiasi1. La presenza di uroliti o nefroliti di fosfato di calcio o di struvite è stata associata ad acidosi del tubulo distale. Questa è caratterizzata da diminuzione della secrezione di ioni idorgeno dal tubulo distale, urine alcaline, ipercalciuria, iperfosfaturia, ipocaliemia ed ipocitraturia. Cistinuria e calcoli di cistina possono essere associati a sindrome di Fanconi. Oltre alla valutazione “diagnostica” sarà necessario seguire un attento monitoraggio terapeutico per evidenziare l’efficacia del protocollo instaurato e l’insorgenza degli eventuali effetti collaterali dei farmaci somministrati: un accurato monitoraggio della proteinuria sarà consigliabile nei pazienti cistinurici sottoposti a trattamento con tiopronina2, così come un trattamento protratto con diuretici tiazidici, predisponendo all’ipopotassiemia, necessiterà del costante monitoraggio del quadro elettrolitico.

È sempre necessario effettuare uno screening di laboratorio in un paziente affetto da urolitiasi? Il paziente affetto da urolitiasi richiede una accurata valutazione ematologica, ematochimica ed urinaria. È necessario tener ben presente, infatti, che l’urolitiasi potrebbe non essere primaria, bensì secondaria ad altra patologia. La presenza di uroliti da ossalato di calcio è sicuramente concomitante ad ipercalciuria. È però necessario accertarsi che si tratti di una ipercalciuria normocalcemica secondaria all’eccessivo assorbimento intestinale di calcio (ipercalciuria da eccessivo assorbimento) o al ridotto assorbimento tubulare renale (ipercalciuria da perdita renale). È indispensabile escludere la presenza di una ipercalciuria ipercalcemica, causata da un’aumentata filtrazione glomerulare del calcio mobilizzato (che supera i normali meccanismi di riassorbimento tubulare) e che si presenta nelle patologie che determinano ipercalcemia: neoplasie, iperparatiroidismo primario, ipertiroidismo, sarcoidosi, malattie granulomatose. L’urolitiasi da ossalato di calcio è anche stata messa in relazione con l’iperadrenocorticismo: i glucocorticoidi infatti, sono in grado di determinare la mobilizzazione ossea di calcio e la riduzione del suo riassorbimento tubulare. Un paziente affetto da urolitiasi da urati ha necessità di una valutazione accurata della funzionalità epatica qualora non sia di razza Dalmata. La presenza di disfunzioni epatiche, shunt portosistemici o altre anomalie vascolari predispone a questa forma di urolitiasi. Il deficit di conversione a livello epatico dell’acido urico in allantoina e dell’ammonio in urea (iperuricemia ed iperammoniemia) porterà alla maggiore escrezione urinaria di acido urico ed ammonio (iperuricosuria ed iperammoniuria) con conseguente sovrasatura-

Il riscontro di cristalluria è fondamentale ai fini diagnostici? La cristalluria è un reperto di estrema importanza in corso di urolitiasi, sebbene debba essere considerato con estrema cautela ai fini diagnostici. Sebbene la composizione chimica dei cristalli e dell’urolita sia spesso la medesima, non è assolutamente possibile escludere un’evenienza contraria. Ricordiamo che infiammazioni o infezioni del tratto urinario possono creare condizioni idonee alla precipitazione di cristalli, anche in assenza di urolitiasi. Il riscontro o il mancato riscontro di cristalluria è di notevole importanza nella prevenzione della recidiva o nella dissoluzione del calcolo. Infatti, Il mancato riscontro può indicare una sottosaturazione dell’ambiente urinario e quindi l’efficacia del protocollo adottato. Non si deve dimenticare che la cristalluria può essere un artefatto. La possibilità di precipitazione di cristalli in vitro, aumenta dilazionando l’analisi delle urine nel tempo e soprattutto refrigerando il campione. La refrigerazione preserva molte delle caratteristiche chimico-fisiche dell’urina ed inibisce l’overgrowth batterico, ma è assolutamente nemica della corretta interpretazione della cristalluria. Alcuni studi dimostrano la precipitazione di cristalli di ossalato di calcio e di struvite in un numero non trascurabile di campioni di urina

418


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 419

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

refrigerata di gatto e di cane. Viene perciò consigliata la conservazione a temperatura ambiente, anche qualora l’analisi non possa essere effettuata in tempi brevi dopo la raccolta. Di questo sarà necessario tenere di conto qualora si spediscano i campioni di urine presso laboratori esterni3. La cristalluria non è sempre di facile interpretazione. Qualora vengano identificate forme atipiche, che non possano essere identificate attraverso la morfologia conosciuta, le caratteristiche di birifrangenza alla luce polarizzata e la compatibiltà con il pH urinario, è utile sapere che in medicina umana da tempo vengono applicate tecniche di spettroscopia ad infrarossi anche sui sedimenti urinari opportunamente filtrati e essicati. Questo metodo ha consentito il riconoscimento di cristalli dalle forme non usuali così come delle cristallurie da farmaco4.

La spedizione dell’urolita non costituisce un problema: è sufficiente spedirlo “a secco” in provetta o contenitore. È assolutamente necessario evitare le interferenze che potrebbero essere costituite dalla sua sospensione in formalina o altri mezzi di conservazione o trasporto.

È sempre necessario richiedere l’urinocoltura? L’esame batteriologico deve essere sempre utilizzato per accertare la presenza o l’assenza di un’infezione del tratto urinario. L’esame chimico delle urine (nitriti) e l’esame del sedimento urinario non sono infatti dotati di sensibilità sufficiente (58,5%) ad escludere la presenza di una batteriuria significativa. L’esame batteriologico deve essere proposto non solo nella fase iniziale del protocollo ma anche durante il monitoraggio (sia che si tratti di dissoluzione o di prevenzione). È consigliabile ottenere l’urina per la coltura batterica prima o al momento della rimozione chirurgica del calcolo e/o prima che la terapia antibiotica sia iniziata. Le infezioni batteriche potrebbero infatti portare a variazioni di pH tali da consentire la precipitazione di cristalli diversi e quindi favorire l’aggregazione di uroliti a composizione mista. I campioni di urina devono essere raccolti in modo da eliminare virtualmente la possibilità di contaminazione da parte di leucociti e/o batteri del tratto urinario inferiore (uretra, vagina, prepuzio). Le urine devono essere analizzate entro 15-30 minuti dal prelievo, in caso contrario devono essere immediatamente refrigerate a 4°C, questo perché batteri enterici Gram-negativi (come E. coli) sono capaci di duplicare il loro numero ogni 30 minuti in campioni di urina lasciati a temperatura ambiente. È consigliabile veicolare al laboratorio 5 ml di urina in un contenitore sterile refrigerato (es: provetta di vetro). Il campione può essere lasciato nella siringa utilizzata per il prelievo qualora non sia necessaria la spedizione, in modo da avere la minima manipolazione possibile. Se il campione viene inviato ad un laboratorio per le analisi, va indicato sul campione l’identificazione del paziente, il metodo di raccolta e il momento e ogni eventuale agente antimicrobico somministrato al paziente. I terreni colturali più utilizzati sono l’Agar-sangue, terreno di base, e l’Agar MacConkey, terreno selettivo per i Gram-negativi7. La semina avviene per spatolamento, ovvero ponendo 100-200 μL di urina al centro del terreno e distribuendoli su tutta la superficie con una spatola. Dopo l’incubazione, in base alla crescita batterica si calcola il numero di batteri per ml contenuto nel campione e se il numero è significativo si allestisce l’antibiogramma. Le colture di campioni ottenuti tramite cateterizzazione sono indicative di UTI se il numero di batteri è superiore a 103 UFC/ml, mentre quelle di campioni raccolti tramite minzione spontanea se i valori sono superiori a 104 UFC/ml. In caso di cistocentesi prepubica qualsiasi crescita batterica viene considerata significativa di infezione. Per questo è da rimarcare la necessità di comunicare al laboratorio il metodo di raccolta dell’urina.

Come analizzare l’urolita? La prevenzione della recidiva passa attraverso una corretta analisi dell’urolita. Questa deve assolutamente abbandonare la valutazione macroscopica, in quanto uroliti di composizione diversa possono essere assai simili tra loro. È necessario inviare al laboratorio la maggior parte degli uroliti recuperati, soprattutto se le dimensioni sono diverse tra loro. Infatti è possibile che gli uroliti più grossi contengano un core che gli uroliti più piccoli non presentano. Inoltre, se prelevati da aree diverse, potrebbero avere una composizione diversa (es: una infezione vescicale potrebbe creare le condizioni idonee alla precipitazione di cristalli di struvite su un nefrolita di altra composizione). È necessario procedere all’analisi dei calcoli anche nel caso di urolitiasi recidivanti, anche qualora i calcoli degli episodi precedenti siano già stati analizzati: non è possibile escludere che lo stesso individuo, in stadi diversi della propria vita, possa presentare condizioni di sovrasaturazione urinaria differenti5. Tra i metodi di analisi più diffusi ricordiamo: analisi chimica, cristallografia, spettroscopia ad infrarossi e diffrazione a raggi X. Queste metodiche non hanno performances equivalenti. In particolare l’analisi chimica, prevedendo la polverizzazione dell’urolita, impedisce di fatto l’identificazione dei diversi strati qualora si trattasse di un urolita a composizione mista. Inoltre studi multicentrici, effettuati in medicina umana, ne hanno evidenziato i limiti. Sono state, infatti, calcolate le diverse percentuali di errore che si verificano nella determinazione della composizione degli uroliti, mediante analisi chimica, spettroscopia e diffrazione. L’analisi chimica, sicuramente più economica ed accessibile, risulta essere la meno accurata. Attraverso questo metodo la possibilità di errore è del 10.5% nel caso di struvite, del 14.4% per l’ossalato di calcio, del 16.9% per l’urato di ammonio, del 19% per l’acido urico, per salire al 20.6% in caso di apatite, al 30.4% in caso di brushite ed al 71.6% in caso di xantina6. Tali percentuali di errore si riducono drasticamente qualora si utilizzino le altre due metodiche. La spettroscopia a raggi X viene applicata dalla maggior parte dei centri di referenza per l’analisi degli uroliti e pertanto è facilmente accessibile anche al libero professionista.

419


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 420

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Indifferentemente dal metodo di raccolta, la crescita di più di 3 specie batteriche viene considerata come evidenza di contaminazione8.

Questa procedura è assolutamente indicata in presenza di urocolture negative. È stata dimostrata una maggiore sensibilità della coltura su parete vescicale rispetto alla semplice urocoltura. Infatti, è stato possibile coltivare batteri a partire da macerati di parete laddove urocolture perioperatorie erano risultate sterili. Inoltre, sono stati riportati casi in cui batteri vitali sono stati isolati dagli uroliti in presenza di colture urinarie e di parete vescicale negative. Allo stato attuale quindi, ai fini di accertare la presenza/assenza di una infezione delle vie urinarie in corso di urolitiasi, risulta consigliabile inviare al laboratorio urina, parete vescicale ed urolita, in quanto l’infezione potrà essere esclusa solo quando tutti e tre i substrati analizzati saranno risultati sterili9.

È possibile ed utile effettuare l’esame microbiologico sugli uroliti? I batteri contenuti nell’urolita non sono sempre uguali a quelli presenti nelle urine. I batteri che si trovano negli uroliti rappresentano probabilmente la popolazione che era presente al momento della formazione dell’urolita e quindi possono fungere da agenti responsabili di UTI ricorrenti. I batteri possono rimanere vitali all’interno dell’urolita per lungo tempo. Nel caso non vengano rimossi tutti gli uroliti, la conoscenza del tipo di batteri contenuti nell’urolita e la loro sensibilità agli antibiotici può avere un importante valore terapeutico. Se i calcoli sono indotti da un’infezione, i batteri che sono associati con la loro formazione possono essere coltivati anche dalle urine. Lo scopo della tecnica di coltura dei calcoli è quella di eliminare più batteri superficiali possibili prima di rompere il calcolo e prelevare il materiale contenuto all’interno. Una volta rimosso, il calcolo viene messo in un contenitore contenente 50 ml di soluzione salina sterile e agitato vigorosamente. Il calcolo viene poi rimosso dal contenitore, sciacquato con soluzione salina sterile per evitare il trasporto di batteri da un lavaggio all’altro e quindi trasferito in un secondo contenitore con soluzione salina sterile. La procedura si ripete per 4 volte. Dopo aver rotto il calcolo con forbici sterili, una piccola quantità di materiale cristallino viene rimossa dall’interno del calcolo, messa in un mortaio sterile e pestata con 1 ml di soluzione salina sterile. Infine, si striscia su Agar-sangue e su Agar MacConkey un decimo di questo preparato e 0.1 ml di soluzione proveniente dal quarto lavaggio e si lascia incubare. La processazione è la stessa utilizzata per i campioni di urina.

BIBLIOGRAFIA 1.

2.

3. 4.

5.

6.

7. 8.

È possibile ed utile effettuare l’esame microbiologico su campioni di parete vescicale?

9.

La parete della mucosa vescicale, ottenuta mediante escissione chirurgica o biopsia endoscopica, può essere utilizzata ai fini di una coltura batterica. La biopsia può essere posta in una provetta contenente soluzione fisiologica sterile e conservata mediante refrigerazione per 4-6 ore. Può essere quindi seminata in un brodo colturale e dopo incubazione per 18 ore, il brodo positivo è seminato sui terreni sopra citati.

Bartges JW, Osborne CA et al: Canine urate urolithiasis. Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. Vet Clin North Am. Small Anim Pract (1999) 29:161-191. Lindell A, Denneberg T et al: Membranous glomerulonephritis induced by 2- mercaptopropionylglycine (2-MPG). Clin Nephrol (1990), 34:108-115. Lulich JP and Osborne CA: Changing paradigms in the diagnosis of urolithiasis. Vet Clin North Am. Small An Pract (2009), 39:79-91. Verdesca S, Fogazzi GB et al: Crystalluria: Prevalence, different types of crystals and the role of infrared spectroscopy. Clin Chem Lab Med (2011), 49:515-520. Koehler LA, Osborne CA et al: Canine uroliths: frequent asked questions and their answers. Vet Clin North Am. Small An Pract. (2009), 39:161-181. Hesse A, Kruse R, Geilenkeuser WJ et al: Quality control in urinary stone analysis: results of 44 ring trials (1980-2001). Clin Chem Lab Med (2005), 43:298-303. Poli G, Cocilovo A, Dall’Ara P, Martino PA, Ponti W: Microbiologia e Immunologia Veterinaria. (2005) UTET Scienze Mediche. Ling GV: Bacterial infections of the urinary tract. In: Ettinger S.J., Feldman E.C.: “Textbook of Veterinary Internal medicine. Diseases of the Dog and Cat”, V Ed. (1999) W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, U.S.A., 1678. Gatoria IS, Saini NS et al: Comparison of three techniques for the diagnosis of urinary tract infections in dogs with urolithiasis. JSAP (2006), 47:727-732.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Paola Scarpa Dipartimento di Scienze Veterinarie e Sanità Pubblica Università degli Studi di Milano

420


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 421

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Feeding cats with different nutritional needs: a dilemma in the multicat household Margie Scherk DVM, Dipl ABVP (feline practice) catsINK, Vancouver, BC, Canada

meal is approximately 10 pieces of an average maintenance dry food, even eating 10 extra pieces/day results in a 10% (1 lb) weight gain/year. We also contribute to obesity by our need for interaction with our cats. Cats (in general) interact with us frequently and (as mentioned) at a low intensity/casually. We, on the other hand, generally, want fewer, more intense/focused periods of interaction with them. We also feel rejected or like a bad provider if our cats don’t eat their food eagerly and seek second helpings. Eating is not a social activity for cats. And, because their meals are so small, we misunderstand and want them to eat more. We try more and more diets until we have “evidence “that they enjoy their food. And so we train them to ask for food and they train us to respond to their boredom or other unmet needs by feeding them. Opportunities to express hunting behaviour are a basic need for a cat. If a cat doesn’t have the opportunity to hunt, toys meeting appropriate criteria are small (prey-sized), make high-pitched squeaks or cheeps and move in a rapid, unpredictable fashion. The Indoor Pet Initiative offers an informative piece on choosing the correct toy for an individual cat: http://indoorpet.osu.edu/cats/basicneeds/preypref/index.cfm. Allowing them to hunt for their food (bowl) or using a feeding toy are mentally stimulating. Examples of toys of this sort include: • Pipolino (http://www.pipolino.ca/eng/pipolino.html) • Multivet Slim Cat (http://www.petsafe.net/Products/ Feeders/SlimCat.aspx) • Cat Activity Fun Board (http://www.traininglines.co.uk/ cat-activity-fun-board-3397-0.html) • Go!Cat!Go! Play-N-Treat balls • FUNkitty Egg-Cersizer: (http://www.premier.com)

MULTIPLE CATS, MULTIPLE NEEDS The goal within a multicat household is to: 1) achieve a feeding strategy that puts no one at risk nutritionally having the base/common ground diet available to everyone, as well as to 2) meet any additional individual nutritional needs of each member of the group as closely as possible twice a day behind closed doors. This requires analysis of the clowder’s nutritional needs as well as their personalities and physical abilities. In order to determine what doesn’t put anyone at risk, we need to think about what disease condition is most responsive to or, the reverse, most damaged by feeding the wrong diet. In other words, which cat is most fragile, from a nutritional point of view? Cats are obligate carnivores. This concept is central to understanding the nutritional needs of cats and planning dietary therapies for health disorders, especially when dealing with multiple cats with differing health considerations. We need to review basic nutritional needs of this species before we can decide what modifications can be made.

FOOD, FEEDING AND NUTRITION IN A FELINE CONTEXT We may not be what we eat, but what we eat certainly shapes our biology and how we live! Being obligate carnivores has affected everything about cats from their hunting behaviour to their solitary eating of many small meals a day to the size of their stomach and their lack of salivary amylase to their social structure. Cats naturally hunt for their food, yet the drive to hunt is independent from the need to eat. Hence, feeding more food doesn’t stop them from killing birds or mice, it merely makes them gain weight. On average, a cat needs 10-15 attempts before they are successful at killing prey; thus the drive to “eye, stalk, pounce and kill” is permanently turned-on else a cat would starve. Given that the average mouse provides about 30-35 kcal or energy, and a cat needs 50 kcal/kg ideal weight/day, the 5 kg cat needs 250 kcal or 8 mouse sized portions/day. These meals are spread out throughout the day, not all at one time. Feeding twice a day or leaving a bowl that is never empty are both not “natural” ways for cats to eat. Given that a 30 kcal

Cats diverged from dogs approximately 30 million years ago, evolving metabolically into obligate carnivores with unique strategies for the utilization of protein and amino acids, fats and vitamins. This concept must be at the centre of trying to understand the nutritional needs of cats and planning dietary therapies for health disorders. Domestic cats have not evolved from the wild cat model. (They display a much narrower diversity of phenotype than dogs.) They are anatomically and physiologically adapted to eating 10-20 small meals, (a reflection of their hunting behaviour), throughout the day and night. This allows them to hunt and

421


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 422

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

eat when their prey are active. Small rodents make up the majority of their diet, with rabbits, birds, insects, frogs and reptiles making up a smaller proportion. The average mouse, (30 kcal), is about 8% of an average feral (i.e. active, unaltered) cat’s requirements. Repeated hunting thoughout a 24hour period is needed to meet this need; this has evolved into the normal grazing feeding behaviour of domestic cats. Cats eat their prey head-first. This is a tactile response to the sensation from the direction of the hair. Cats are very sensitive to the feel of a food (physical form), its odour and taste. When offering novel foods, this should be kept in mind. Most cats prefer foods that are solid and moist, like flesh. They prefer their food at fresh-killed body temperature rather than room temperature or out of the refrigerator or hot. They dislike foods that are powdery, sticky or greasy. A critical difference in cats is that, while other species are able to rest their metabolic pathways from the efforts of glucose (energy) synthesis when they have been fed, cats must continue gluconeogenesis in both the fed and fasted states. When cats are anorectic, they catabolize body proteins. Protein supplementation during fasting will slow hepatic lipid accumulation. Urea cycle enzymes in the liver of cats are always „turned on“. This does not, however, imply that cats cannot use carbohydrates as they are capable over the longterm to adapt to lower protein diets. Adult cats have a much higher requirement for protein than dogs or humans. Expressed as a percentage of diet, adult cats need 29% vs. the adult canine requirement of 12% or the human need for 8%. Flavour preferences include those that are similar to those of prey, namely fat, meat extracts, protein hydrolysates („digest“), and certain amino acids that are abundant in muscle (alanine, proline, lysine, and histidine). Cats cannot taste sweet; they lack the second gene required to do so. Generally, cats avoid eating plant materials, even expressing the ingesta from entrails before eating them. Variations on these basic preferences occur and are a result of early experience. Under stressful situations, cats will refuse a novel food; under other circumstances, the same cat may be very adventuresome and chose a new diet over their familiar food. A new diet is more likely to be accepted if it is offered at home rather than in the clinic setting. Numerous studies have been performed all showing that spaying and neutering/castration decrease energy expenditure by 7-33%. It is, therefore, very important to counsel clients to change from a growth to an adult formulation and to restrict the caloric intake after surgical altering. In general, a rule of thumb for unaltered cats is that they need 60-80 kcal/kg/day and after altering, they need about 40-50 kcal/kg ideal body weight/day.

good enough to use for clinic calculations for how much a patient should be getting on a daily basis in clinic and as a starting point for the patient when they are discharged. The client should be advised of the actual amount of food to feed when sent home with a bag of dry food or a flat of canned food. Make sure that you are using the same measurement as what one person thinks of as a „cup“ may not be an 8 oz/250 ml measuring cup. Once feeding any therapeutic diet, it is very important to check and see how the individual patient is responding to the diet by reevaluating them, just as we would recheck a patient on any other medical therapy. Checking body weight and condition cannot be done over the phone. For cats outside of the 4-5kg (9-11lb) range in their ideal condition, the 50 kcal/ kg/day isn’t accurate enough. Caloric requirements for maintenance are closer to: 70 (BW in kg)0.75 (raised to the 0.75 power). If the idea of using this equation is overwhelming, you are not alone. Here is an easy way to perform this calculation (thanks to Dr. Dale Rubenstein): You can borrow your kids’ graphing calculator or, as an example for an 18 lb/8.1 kg cat: 8.1 X 8.1 X 8.1 = BW cubed = 534.4 Hit square root button twice on calculator => 23 then => 4.8 X 70 = 336. Compare this to the excess estimate we would get from using 50 kcal X 8.1 kg = 405 kcal!

BRIEF NUTRITION REVIEW There are six classes of nutrients: water, protein, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Of these six, three can be used as sources of energy: protein, fat and carbohydrates.

WATER Water is the most important nutrient for all species. It provides the biochemical milieu required for all metabolic reactions needed for life. Without water, we will die within a few days. Our bodies cannot tolerate an acute loss of 20% of water, yet we can lose 50% of our protein reserves and/or nearly all of our glycogen and fat reserves and survive. Water is obtained from ingestion of liquids, metabolism of food as well as the Kreb’s (TCA) cycle. Oxidization of food results in approximately 10-13g H2O/100 kcal of metabolizable energy (ME) produced. Water is lost from the body through urine and feces (75%) as well as via evaporation, respiration, mucous membranes and skin (insensible losses). The more frequently a cat eats, the more water he drinks (Kirschvink).

QUANTITY TO FEED ENERGY: CARBOHYDRATES, PROTEIN AND FATS

50 kcal/kg/day is a “ball park” calculation and refers to ideal body weight. If a cat is overweight, calculate their caloric requirement for maintenance at their ideal weight. (For weight loss, feed them 60-70% of this maintenance requirement. More about this later.) This rule of thumb is

Calories refer to energy available from a nutrient. The three macronutrients that provide energy are protein, fat and

422


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 423

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

carbohydrates. The cat is most efficient at gleaning energy from protein and least effective, from carbohydrates. The difference in efficiency is not huge and cats readily use carbohydrates despite the fact that they have no dietary requirement for them. Carbohydrates are a good energy source and have been shown to be necessary for lactating queens. They actually lack salivary amylase and have only a fraction of intestinal and pancreatic amylase production when compared to dogs (10% and 5%, respectively). Additionally, they lack glucokinase an enzyme required to absorb glucose and convert it into glycogen or fatty acids for storage. Cats also derive less energy per gram of carbohydrate than humans or dogs do because of a shorter colon and vestigial cecum. When considering any discussion about energy, it helps to understand the terms gross energy (GE), digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME). Gross energy is the energy produced by food when it is burned in a calorimeter (i.e., the total energy released by oxidation to CO2 and water). Digestible energy is the energy that is digested and absorbed (i.e., GE-fecal energy losses). Metabolizable energy is the energy that is actually utilized by the body (i.e., DE – urine losses). These values vary with species for any given food. A diet needs to be balanced relative to its energy content so that when a cat consumes enough energy, enough protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals are also obtained. If this isn’t the case, the result may be an energylimited diet: one which is very energy dense so the cat stops eating before the other nutrient needs have been met. Conversely, if the diet is bulk-limiting, a cat will feel sated before the energy and other nutrient requirements have been met. This is of clinical significance when considering the role that dry formulations play in the way we feed cats. We really don’t know yet what impact long-term carbohydrate intake plays in predisposing cats to obesity and diabetes mellitus, but it appears as if it is simply a matter of excessive caloric intake => obesity which results in diabetes in susceptible individuals. So, actually measuring food fed is important…and that means that we need to tell our clients how much to feed (how much of a cup, how much or a can) of a specific diet. When cats are anorectic, they catabolize body proteins. As already noted, protein supplementation during fasting will slow hepatic lipid accumulation. Urea cycle enzymes in the liver of cats are always „turned on“. The rate of the urea cycle is slowed down when ornithine levels decline and resumes when arginine levels (the dietary source for ornithine) are replenished. In extreme cases of feeding arginine deficient foods or human casein-based liquid enteral products, hyperammonemia may develop with severe, and potentially lethal, neurological signs. Proteins from different sources vary widely in their biologic value/availability. Egg protein/albumin is considered 100% available. Proteins from animal sources generally have a higher biologic value than proteins from plant sources, however, even animal source proteins may be less biologically available if they are improperly processed or

stored during food manufacturing. Grain proteins are limited in their amounts of methionine, lysine, leucine and tryptophane resulting in biologic values of 67 for soybean and 45 for corn. However, by hydrolyzing the soy protein, its bioavailability becomes almost equivalent to that of albumin. Gelatin (animal collagen) has a biologic value of zero. Other factors affecting the value of protein in a product include digestibility, amino acid balance, the energy density and palatability of a diet and the health, physiological demands and environment of the cat eating the diet. Adult cats have a much higher requirement for protein than dogs or humans, needing approximately 4.5-5 g good quality protein/kg ideal weight/day. Expressed as a percentage of diet, adult cats need 29% vs. the adult canine requirement of 12% or the human need for 8%. Cats have the ability to digest and utilize high levels of dietary fat. High fat, low carbohydrate diets are more suitable for cats with chronic diarrhea than are high fiber diets. The paleolithic diet of the cat, rodents and small birds, is high in protein and fat and low in carbohydrate, so it is not surprising that cats are adapted to this type of balance.

FEEDING FOR LIFE-STAGE OR USING THERAPEUTIC DIETS AS PART OF DISEASE MANAGEMENT In order to apply this brief overview of very basic nutrition and feline feeding facts to a multicat home with mutliple nutritional needs, let’s use the following example of a household consisting of the following seven individuals: 1. an elderly cat with International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) Stage 3 renal insufficiency 2. a thin, arthritic cat 3. a 4 month old healthy kitten 4. a 2 year old healthy cat 5. a 7 year old obese cat (BCS 8/9) 6. an adult cat with “IBD” who vomits and gets diarrhea readily, and 7. a 10 year old cat with diabetes. 8. a 7 year old chronically constipated cat 9. a 9 year old cat with CaOx history 10. a 2 year old cat with struvite crystalluria 11. a 14 year old hyperthyroid cat What dietary strategy can accommodate what appears to be completely disparate nutritional needs?

FEEDING CATS WITH RENAL DISEASE We would like to feed first cat, an elderly individual with Stage 3 renal disease, a protein-restricted diet suitable for renal insufficiency. Do all cats with renal disease have the same etiologic cause for their decline in renal function? Are they all at the same stage? Do they have identical nutritional requirements? Could this cat, perhaps, benefit from being fed a protein enhanced diet, a recuperative diet, a growth diet, a senior diet or a maintenance diet?

423


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 424

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Protein: calorie malnutrition occurs when a cat is getting enough calories but not enough of them come from protein. As a result, there may or may not be weight loss, but there will be muscle wasting as well as a deterioration in the hair coat quality. Because protein is component in antibodies, immune function may be compromised; anemia may be exacerbated due to the lack of building blocks for hemoglobin; albumin levels may decrease and tissue healing will be affected. Protein is a preferred flavour, so if a cat is already inappetant, restricting protein may result in inadequate intake of all nutrients, and the protein intake may fall below that required for normal function. As an obligate carnivore, if a cat doesn’t get enough dietary protein to meet metabolic requirements, he must draw on endogenous (stored) protein sources to meet those needs. Over months cats can down regulate their protein needs and switch to use other pathways, but in the short and intermediate term, muscle will be catabolized. The resulting muscle wasting and decreased mass reduces the serum level of creatinine (Cr) measured. This makes it difficult to know how much of that decrease in Cr in a cat fed a restricted protein diet is from improvement in renal function and how much is because there is less functional muscle producing Cr. It is also worthwhile to remember that BUN and Cr aren’t actual measures of kidney health: they are markers of the ability of the kidney to excrete these metabolic end-products, (as is also the case with amylase). Cr is the best of these three markers being exclusively excreted by kidneys. Despite numerous experimental studies and clinical trials having been performed, questions about feeding protein to the cat with renal disease still remain. These include the following five: 1. What is optimal amount of protein for cat with renal disease? 2. When should protein restriction be implemented? 3. Does the type of protein make a difference?

4. How much restriction is necessary? 5. Will a cat in > stage II benefit if phosphorus is restricted by other means? One of the most recent clinical trials (Ross, et al), a study that was extremely well designed and carried out, states that the: “renal diet evaluated in this study was superior to an adult maintenance diet in minimizing uremic episodes and renal related deaths in cats with spontaneous stage 2 or 3 chronic kidney disease.” but goes on to acknowledge that: “These findings emphasize the value of considering individual dietary components in the overall assessment of the benefits of dietary therapy. Individually or in combination, similar dietary modifications in the present study may have minimized the number of uremic crises and mortality rate.” A note about restricted and high protein diets: these diets do not have too little or too much protein, their protein levels fall within the nutritional guidelines, merely at the low or at the high end of the range. The protein restricted therapeutic diets are not all the same; there are some marked differences in their composition, not just in protein sources and quantities, but also in the calorie source, in their phosphorus, potassium, and sodium content. Tables 1 and 2 list and compare dry diets and canned restricted protein diets. Dietary protein is not, in and unto itself, toxic to kidneys. Because of inherent progression of chronic renal insufficiency, IRIS staging focuses on factors which, when managed, are known to slow progression. These are: 1. azotemia, 2. proteinuria, 3. hyperphosphatemia, 4. hypertension, and 5. metabolic acidosis. Restricting phosphorus may be helpful in slowing the progression of renal disease in cats. An international group of nephrologists suggested that targets for serum phosphorus should be:

Iris stage

Creatinine

Target serum phospharus

Method: adjust based on individual response

II

1.6-2.8 mg/dl (141.44 - 247.52 μmol/L)

2.5-4.5 mg/dl (0.81-1.45 mmol/l)

Dietary restriction or normal diet + intestinal phosphate binder

III

2.9-4.9 mg/dl (256.36 - 433.16 μmol/L

2.5-5 mg/dl (0.81-1.61 mmol/l)

Dietary restriction ± intestinal phosphate binder

IV

≥ 5 mg/dl (> 442 μmol/L)

2.5-6 mg/dl (0.81-1.94 mmol/l)

Dietary restriction ± intestinal phosphate binder

Elliott J, Brown S, Cowgill L, et al: Phosphatemia Roundtable 2006.

424


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 425

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Every time we send home a therapeutic diet, we are performing a feeding trial with one subject in it (n=1). We have to get the cat back into the clinic and see how he/she is doing on that food. How is his weight? Increased? Decreased? How is his coat? Does he eat with enjoyment or vigour? What are his stools like (moist logs or dry pellets, cow patties or coloured water)? How energetic is he since he has been on this diet? Has there been a change in his PCV and proteins? In this case, have the BUN and Cr, the phosphorus and calcium or usg changed? Is he proteinuric and potentially protein deficient? What about his blood pressure? Have these parameters increased or decreased? If his weight has decreased, is it because he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eating enough of the food we are giving him or is it because we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t giving him enough of it? OR (and only once we have asked the previous questions can we consider this) is it because his illness has progressed or another illness has arisen. Figure 1 shows an algorithm for weight loss. What are the nutritional requirements for the second cat who is thin and arthritic? Options we might consider include a kitten diet, a mobility/joint diet, a recuperative diet, or a senior diet. Assuming that the physical examination and diagnostics do not reveal a cause for her weight loss, it is reasonable to try a variety of diets including all of above in case she has become bored with her food.

Azotemia, metabolic acidosis and, to some degree, hyperphosphatemia are affected by hydration, thus optimizing hydration through the use of canned diets, adding water to food, encouraging drinking by use of flavoured liquids or a fountain along with the use of daily subcutaneous fluids are beneficial to the well-being of the patient. Similarly, for well-being, the patient should enjoy the diet offered, regardless of what illness he/she has. It is always more important that they eat, rather than what they eat. And the amount consumed must be monitored. This requires calculating the caloric requirements for each individual. 50 kcal/kg/day is a reasonable goal. The client should be advised how much food this is equivalent to so that if the cat does not eat that amount, they notify the veterinarian. It also prevents confusion regarding weight loss associated with progressing disease vs. that associated with inadequate nutrient intake. Returning to the cat in question, we do not know from the description (Stage 3 chronic kidney disease) whether the cat is proteinuric or protein replete, nor what the phosphorus or potassium levels are. A protein -estricted diet (which one?) may be appropriate, but one of the other aforementioned diet types (protein enhanced, recuperative, growth, senior or maintenance) might be the correct diet for this individual cat. Just because someone has a specific illness does not automatically mean that the diet designed for that condition is the best diet for that individual.

Figure 1 - Algorithm for weight loss.

425


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 426

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

tein, cats lost more fat and less lean mass compared with cats fed a diet with 35% of calories from protein, despite similar total weight loss and rate of weight loss. There are a number of approaches to feline weight loss: 1. High protein protects (minimizes loss of) lean mass, stimulates cellular energy metabolism and protein turnover, and may enhance satiety. 2. High moisture can reduce caloric density, which promotes short-term weight loss: It takes a few weeks to a few months for cats to adapt to the lower-caloric density (as fed) in canned foods versus dry foods; however, this only works for some cats. 3. High fiber can reduce caloric density and induce satiety. Some cats will self-restrict calorie intake when fed a dry, high-fiber, low-calorie diet. 4. Low fat will reduce caloric density. High-fat diets are a risk factor for inducing obesity and are generally not considered optimum for a weight loss diet. That said, some cats will lose weight on a high-protein, high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet if the calories are restricted appropriately. Ultimately, it is the calories ingested versus expended that is required for loss of weight. In fact, it doesn’t matter which

FEEDING GROWING CATS AND ELDERLY CATS Young cats have growth requirements, which include an increased proportion of animal based protein and more calcium and phosphorus. The 4-month old kitten (#3) and the 2year old healthy adult (#4) would ideally be fed a kitten diet and a maintenance diet respectively. Elderly cats over 12 years of age have been shown to have an increased need for protein, relative to adult cats. They also need more calories from fat than during their adult stage. In part this is because of a decreased ability to digest and absorb fat and protein.

FEEDING OBESE CATS For the fifth cat, #5, the 7-year old obese kitty with body condition score (BCS) 8/9 (or 4.5/5) the therapeutic strategies may include a high fiber diet, a high protein, low carbohydrate balanced diet, or a low fat diet. Exceeding a cat’s protein needs beyond maintenance requirements helps induce satiety. In a study by Laflamme et al, when cats were fed a diet with 45% of calories from pro-

Table 1 - Comparison of moist “restricted protein” diets.

426


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 427

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Remember to include the calories in the treats and supplements, people food and pill pockets that the kitty is being given when you figure out the quantity of food to recommend. The thermic effect of food (TEF) is a term that refers to the energy cost of digesting and absorbing food. TEF is higher when meals are small and frequent, so feeding multiple small meals is preferable to feeding one or two large meals. One way to incorporate this into the diet—and give the cat a little challenge (and exercise)—is to divide the day’s food into six or seven small portions, placing it on saucers throughout the home as if the cat were on a “treasure hunt”. This feeding strategy makes the cat less likely to gorge and entices him or her to look for more, all of which has a higher TEF cost. As with the protein-restricted diets, the composition of therapeutic diets designed for weight loss are very different from each other. Tables 3 and 4 show comparisons. Please note that dry Purina PVD DM is NOT designed for weight loss. In fact, it is the most calorically dense diet in our cupboards. It is a wonderful diet for convalescence as well as for growth, and, of course, for a thin diabetic cat. Canned DM or Hill’s dry or canned m/d may be appropriate options.

approach we choose, (making this cat very flexible) as long as the caloric intake is reduced, the diet is balanced, the cat isn’t feeling deprived and pestering the client and the diet is balanced. Given the benefits of achieving lean body mass by feeding a high protein diet, a goal of at least 40% protein, dry basis, in a low-fat diet (6% to 10% fat) is a healthy approach to take. In order to calculate the quantity of dry and/or canned food to recommend feeding for weight loss, use the following calculation: 1. Determine or approximate the cat’s ideal body weight in kg 2. Calculate the number of calories needed to maintain that ideal weight (wt in kg X 50 kcal/kg/day) 3. Multiply this number by 60-70% to get the amount of calories to feed for weight loss. Example: Fluffy weighs 18.6 lb (8.4 kg) with a BCS of 9/9 and is currently being fed 375 kcal/day. The goal is 12 lb (5.4 kg) for a BCS of 5-6/9. 5.4 kg X 50 kcal = 271 kcal/day Feed 60-70% X 271 kcal = 163-190 kcal/day. Weight loss of 6.6 lb (3 kg) will take at least 12 months. She will require 4.5-5 g good quality protein/kg ideal weight/day, i.e., 4.5-5 X 5.4 kg = 24-27 g protein/day.

Table 2 - Comparison of dry “restricted protein” diets.

427


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 428

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Our dietary choices for cat #6, the adult with the sensitive gastrointestinal tract and a diagnosis of “IBD” are either a limited antigen or a “hypoallergenic” diet.

Neither carbohydrates nor dry extruded diets are cause of diabetes or obesity. Exchanging dietary carbohydrate for protein appears to be useful for weight loss treatment and management of non-insulin dependent diabetes in cats. In a prospective, randomized, double blinded 10-week study (Hall et al), 12 cats (7/12 obese) of whom six were newly diagnosed and six were poorly controlled diabetics evaluated standard maintenance diet vs. lower carbohydrate, higher protein (LCHP) diets. The cats ate dry or canned based on their preference. All were treated with glargine and assessed at weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 with fructosamine, BG curve and clinical signs. One cat from each diet group

FEEDING CATS WITH DIABETES The last cat of the household is the 10-year old diabetic. Feeding strategies include a high protein, low carbohydrate diet or a high fiber diet. However, a diabetic cat can be controlled with insulin as long as the diet fed is consistent from day to day.

Table 3 - Comparison of moist “weight loss” diets.

Table 4 - Comparison of dry “weight loss” diets.

428


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 429

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

achieved remission by week 10. All cats improved clinically, increased weight and achieved good glycemic control. Those fed the LCHP had a significantly greater decrease in fructosamine. The conclusion, based on this small study was that using insulin, “frequent monitoring is key to achieving glycemic control in diabetic cats; potential benefits of dietary modification require further evaluation”. The author summarizes all of the preceding studies and approaches: high fiber & low fat, high insoluble fiber vs. low fiber, LCHP canned, low carbohydrate diet vs. low carbohydrate diet plus acarbose, low carbohydrate & low fiber diet vs. moderate carbohydrate & high fiber diet. None of these approaches appears to make a meaningful difference in the small numbers of cats in each study.

dration, feeding of this diet alleviated obstipation in cats with megacolon allowing them to discontinue medication, avoid surgery or euthanasia. Another approach is to reduce fiber and to make the diet very readily digestible. Fiber in Common Foods and Pet Foods Soluble Fiber

FEEDING THE CONSTIPATED CAT Constipation is, first and foremost, treated by rehydrating cells. As long as cellular dehydration is present, the need will exist to resorb water from renal and gastrointestinal systems. Thus, systemic hydration must be addressed. This may be achieved through parenteral fluid therapy, including regular subcutaneous fluids in the home, feeding canned foods, adding water or broth to the food, feeding meat broths, or the use of running water fountains in the home. Addition of fiber to the diet should be avoided until the patient is adequately hydrated. Use of enemas, promotility agents and laxatives prior to addressing this underlying problem is ineffective at best and has the potential for exacerbating the problem. Once that has been accomplished (or simultaneously to rehydration), once can focus on assisting the passage of the feces by mechanical or pharmacologic means. Dietary fiber acts as a bulk-forming laxative. The benefits of insoluble (poorly fermentable) fiber, such as from wheat bran and cereal grains, are to improve or normalize colonic motility by distending the colonic lumen, they increase colonic water content, they dilute luminal toxins (such as bile acids, ammonia and ingested toxins) and they increase the rate of passage of ingested materials thereby reducing the exposure of the colonocyte to toxins, while increasing the frequency of defecation. Soluble (highly fermentable) fibers (oat bran, pectin, beet pulp, vegetable gums, psyllium) are readily digested by bacteria and provide large quantities of short chain fatty acids, which are beneficial in many ways for colonic health, but they are not suitable as laxatives, because they have little ability to increase fecal bulk or dilute luminal toxins. In nature, most fibers are not strictly insoluble or soluble, but can be considered to have a greater or lesser percentage of soluble fiber. Pectin and guar gum are 100% soluble fiber. Suggested doses are: psyllium (MetamucilTM, 1-4 tsp mixed with food PO q12-24h), canned pumpkin (1-4 tbsp mixed with food PO q24h), coarse wheat bran (1-2 tbsp mixed with food PO q24h). Recently a dry diet enhanced with psyllium (Royal Canin Fiber response) has been marketed for constipation. In two trials, one in Europe, the other in Canada, along with rehy-

Psyllium

79%

Corn gluten meal

51%

Oat bran

50%

Beet pulp

50%

Bran flake cereal

33%

Barley

29%

Whole wheat bread

20%

All-Bran cereal

14%

Brewer’s grains

11%

Wheat bran

11%

Wheat middling

11%

100% bran cereal

11%

Corn

0%

Cooked white rice

0%

Adapted from Manual of Veterinary Dietetics: Table 5-16

FEEDING CATS WITH LOWER URINARY TRACT DISEASE Ensuring that urine is in a neutral pH and stays dilute enough so that mineral components don’t come out of solution will help reduce the chance of either CaOx or struvite crystals from forming. For all cats in the household: Make sure that water, the most important nutrient, is readily accessible. Have lots of water stations around the home. They should be in places other than the “kitchen” as well, so that cats don’t have to compete and because cats like to eat and drink in different places. The physics behind how cats drink is fascinating. This was recently publicized and is quite fascinating. http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-11reveals-subtle-dynamics-underpinning-cats.html The first of the two goals previously mentioned for feeding a multicat household is to achieve a feeding strategy that puts no one at risk nutritionally having the base/common ground diet available to everyone. Of these seven cats, the one at greatest risk if fed the wrong diet is the cat with “IBD”. If the cat with renal disease were in IRIS stage 4, he may well be the most delicate, but just getting adequate calories into a uremic cat becomes the main concern at that point

429


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 430

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

and placing a feeding tube would allow us to deliver an appropriate diet. We would also have to think about a different strategy for restricting access to other diets if he were feeling well enough to be roaming the house. If he is hyperphosphatemic as well as being in stage 3, using intestinal phosphate binders is a viable and necessary alternative to using a restricted protein diet as the baseline, everyone eats, diet. (He can still get the restricted protein diet twice a day.) The second goal is to meet the individual nutritional needs of each member of the household as closely as possible twice a day “behind closed doors”. Certainly the “IBD”-safe diet can be left out during the day for all cats to eat. Twice daily all cats other than the cat with gastrointestinal disease, can be placed in separate rooms to be supplemented with their different or additional needs. This requires analysis of the clowder’s needs as well as their personalities and physical abilities. The elderly cat who is less able to jump can be prevented from eating the food of an agile youngster if the growth diet is placed high up. An overweight cat can be prevented from getting to any food other than that designed for weight loss (the base diet) by putting a latch on a door, building a creep feeder or using a “keyed” cat flap (such as one that responds to the cat’s pre-existing microchip: www.sureflap.ca) so only the thinner cats can get through the narrower space. Figuring out creative strategies to use based on the strengths and weaknesses of the individuals is an intriguing challenge and needs to take the cats’ physical, personality and nutritional profiles into consideration. Reducing stress in the multicat household must always be a focus. Cats are social but with strict social rules and restrictions to keep distance in order to avoid confrontation. Environmental enrichment is extremely important: two useful resources are: http://indoorpet.osu.edu/cats/basicneeds/index.cfm and http://fabcats.org/behaviour/cat_friendly_home/info.html.

Fooshee, SK: The cat as a medical species. In August, JR (ed): Consultations in Feline Internal Medicine. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co., 1991, pp 3-11. Kirk, CA, Debraekeleer, J, Armstrong, PJ. Normal Cats. In Hand, MS, Thatcher, CD, Remillard, RL et al (ed): Small Animal Clinical Nutrition (4th ed). Topeka, Mark Morris Institute, 2000, pp 291-347. Zoran DL. The carnivore connection to nutrition in cats. JAVMA 2002; 221(11):1559-67. Laflamme, DP: Nutritional Management and Nutrition-related Disease in Feline Populations. In August, JR (ed): Consultations in Feline Internal Medicine 2. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co., 1994, pp 653-662. Pibot P, Biourge V, Elliott D (ed): Encyclopedia of Feline Clinical Nutrition. France, 2008. Kirschvink N, Lhoest E, Leeman J, et al. Effects of Feeding Frequency on Water Intake in Cats Conference Proceedings: ACVIM Forum 2005 (Abstract) Adams LG, Polzin DJ, Osborne CA, et al. Effects of dietary protein and calorie restriction in clinically normal cats and in cats with surgically induced chronic renal failure. AJVR 1993;54:1653. Finco DR et al. Protein and calorie effects on induced renal failure in cats AJVR 1998;59:575. Elliot J, Rawlings JM, Markwell PJ, et al. Survival of cats with naturally occurring chronic renal failure: effect of dietary management. JSAP 2000;41:235-242. Ross SJ, Osborne CA, Kirk CA, et al. Clinical evaluation of dietary modification for treatment of spontaneous chronic kidney disease in cats JAVMA 2006;229(6):949-957. Backlund B, Zoran DL, Nabity MB, et al. Effects of dietary protein content on renal parameters in normal cats. J Feline Med Surg. (2011) 13, 698-704 Finco DR, Brown SA, Crowell WA, et al. Effects of dietary phosphorus and protein in dogs with chronic renal failure. AJVR 1992;53:2264. DiBartola SP, Buffington CA, Chew DJ, et al. Development of chronic renal disease in cats fed a commercial cat food. JAVMA 1993; 202:744. Lulich JP, Osborne CA, O’Brien TD, Polzin DJ. Feline renal failure: questions, answers, questions. Comp Cont Ed Pract Vet 1992;14:127152. Brown SA. Oxidative stress and chronic kidney disease. Vet Clin North Am SA 2008;38(1):157-66. Elliott DA. Nutritional management of chronic renal disease in dogs and cats. Vet Clin North Am SA 2006;36(6):1377-84. Plantinga EA, Everts H, Kastelein AMC, et al. Retrospective study of the survival of cats with acquired chronic renal insufficiency offered different commercial diets. Vet Rec. 2005;157(7):185-7. Hughes KL, Slater MR, Geller S, et al. Diet and lifestyle variables as risk factors for chronic renal failure in pet cats. Prev Vet Med. 2002; 55(1):1-15. Burkholder WJ. Dietary considerations for dogs and cats with renal disease. JAVMA 2000;216(11):1730-4. Laflamme, DP: Nutritional Management and Nutrition-related Disease in Feline Populations. In August, JR (ed): Consultations in Feline Internal Medicine 2. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co., 1994, pp 653-662. Finco DR, Brown SA, Brown CA, et al. Protein and calorie effects on progression of induced chronic renal failure in cats. Am J Vet Res 59[5]: 575-82 1998. Ross SJ, Osborne CA, Kirk CA, et al. Clinical evaluation of dietary modification for treatment of spontaneous chronic kidney disease in cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc. September 2006; 229(6):949-57. Cupp CJ, Jean-Philippe C, Kerr WW, et al. Effect of Nutritional Interventions on Longevity of Senior Cats. Intern J Appl Res Vet Med; 2006: 4(1): 34-50. Laflamme DP, Hannah SS. Increased Dietary Protein Promotes Fat Loss and Reduces Loss of Lean Body Mass During Weight Loss in Cats. Intern J Appl Res Vet Med; 2005: 3 (2): 62-86. Hall TD. Effects of diet on glucose control in cats with diabetes mellitus treated with twice daily insulin glargine. J Feline Med Surg.11(2): 2009.

Key points 1) Don’t assume that a diet designed for a particular clinical condition is necessarily the best diet for every cat with that condition. 2) The quantities to be fed listed in product guidelines are a starting point. Each cat is different. 3) Monitor the clinical response of the individual patient to the dietary prescription.

REFERENCES Biourge, V: Feline Nutrition Update. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Congress, 2001. Buffington, CAT: Nutritional Requirements and Feeding Recommendations. In Sherding, RG (ed): The Cat, Diseases and Clinical Management (2nd ed). Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co., 1994, pp 133151. Buffington, CAT: Nutritional Diseases and Nutritional Therapy. In Sherding, RG (ed): The Cat, Diseases and Clinical Management (2nd ed). Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co., 1994, pp 161-190.

430


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 431

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

In! Getting calories in: feeding the inappetant or anorectic cat Margie Scherk DVM, Dipl ABVP (feline practice) catsINK, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Inappetence and anorexia are common problems in feline patients. Inadequate nutrient intake is, at best, detrimental and interferes with healing. At worst, it is life-threatening. Cats have only a limited ability to conserve body protein; this can result in negative nitrogen balance, protein: calorie malnutrition and deterioration of protective mechanisms impacting immunity, red cell hemoglobin content, muscle mass as well as the ability to repair tissues. Additionally, cats have limited storage of many other nutrients as well as a restricted ability to down-regulate numerous metabolic processes. Their design is best suited to eating multiple small meals per day, high in protein, and moderate in fat. Inappetence and anorexia should be dealt with promptly and adequately. Meeting the patient’s nutritional needs is not a substitute for localizing the cause for this inappetence. It is, however, necessary and allows time to identify the cause. Providing nutrients may be the most challenging part of any therapeutic regimen, and recovery or attaining the best possible QOL in cats may depend on our ability to ensure optimal nutrition. The first question that must be answered is: why has this cat stopped eating? Is it because of a loss in appetite or some other reason? Nausea may be of neurologic origin (e.g., vestibular disease or irritation of the chemoreceptor trigger zone or the vomiting center by inflammation, neoplasia or chemicals including metabolites or drugs). It may be a result of dehydration or may originate with GI inflammation for any reason (e.g., ileus, colitis, upper intestinal or gastric disease). However, decreased food intake may be due to other factors, such as dysphagia, pain (e.g., oral, dental, GI, multisystemic, etc.), dislike of the diet (e.g., boredom, altered palatability, spoilage), aversion, fear (e.g., environmental changes including those in the social demographics). Nutritional support should be considered for the severely malnourished cat (20% weight loss, body condition score 12/9) or moderately malnourished (a 10% weight loss, BCS 3-4/9) who also have catabolic disease. Some cats will benefit from early intervention even at normal weight and condition if they suffer from advanced renal disease, hepatopathy, protein losing GI or glomerular disease, pancreatitis or bile duct obstruction. Inappetent cats, and those not ingesting adequate protein, shift into a catabolic state. They are at risk for hepatic lipidosis, especially if ill and possibly at a greater risk if previ-

ously obese. Lipidosis is a disease of dysfunctional lipoprotein metabolism; it is important to calculate the daily caloric and protein requirements as part of the therapeutic plan. [Calories: 50 kcal/kg ideal BW/day; 4.5 g protein/kg ideal BW/day]. The diet needs to be balanced for energy (protein, fat, +/- carbohydrates), vitamins and minerals. It needs to be palatable taking the following four factors into account: texture, aroma, taste, and consistency. Bowls should be wide and flat to avoid interfering with whiskers. The environment should be non-threatening, so a hospital setting is especially off-putting. Feline facial pheromone may be beneficial to reduce stress. Rehydration and correction of electrolyte imbalances are important but oft overlooked goals in the correction of inappetence and anorexia. Anti-emetics have a place if the cat is vomiting. In gastric-origin nausea, agents such as H2 antagonists, gastroprotectants, proton pump inhibitors or prostaglandin E agonists may be beneficial depending on the cause of the gastric upset. Appetite stimulants including cyproheptadine (1 mg/cat PO BID), mirtazapine (2-3 mg/cat PO q72h) may help jumpstart a cat’s appetite, but keep track of total calories consumed. If a cat is eating but not enough, supportive feeding (assisted syringe feeding or tube feeding) must be considered. A cat eating small amounts of baby food will not meet his caloric needs until he eats 2-3 jars/day. Meat baby food is not balanced, but is sufficient for several weeks. There are several diets specifically designed for the assisted feeding of cats (Royal Canin Recovery, Hill’s a/d, Eukanuba Maximum Calorie), liquid balanced enteral diets for cats (Clinicare, Rebound) Additionally, we can make a slurry from any canned food; blend with a liquid feline diet rather than water to minimize loss of calories. There are several options for assisted feeding each with advantages and disadvantages. In general, the author starts with syringe assisted feeding until the cat is stable enough to allow the brief anaesthetic required for the placement of an esophageal tube. With concurrent liver disease, give three doses of Vitamin K1 (1.0 mg/kg q12h SC) prior to tube placement, biopsies or any other procedure that might result in bleeding. Placement of esophageal tubes is discussed elsewhere. The instrumentation for this procedure is very basic requiring only the following: 14-16 Fr red rubber feeding tube/urinary catheter, Carmalt or other long curved for-

431


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 432

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

ceps, a scalpel blade, suture and bandaging materials and a multiple use injection port (prn adaptor). Calculating how much to feed requires that you know the patient’s current weight as well as their healthy weight and the caloric densities (kcal/ml) of the diet you are intending to use (see Table 1). Use 50 kcal/kg as a rough guide to determine calories needed. Start by feeding 1/3-1/2 of the calories needed for the current, inappetant weight. On day two, feed 2/3-3/4 of this number and on day three, feed the full calories needed for the current weight. For weight gain, gradually increase to the calories needed for the cat’s healthy weight.

a gastrostomy tube, its bulb must be straightened out the bulb/balloon by inserting a straight probe through the tube while concurrently pulling the tube out. Suturing is not required for any of the skin openings. Cleanse minimal serous discharge that may occur for 2-3 days. Feeding frequency: the number of feedings per day, (and hence intervals), is determined based on the volume of food tolerated per feeding. Start with 6 ml and increase by 6 ml increments to about 36-48 for most cats. In the uncommon case of the patient who cannot tolerate even 6 ml boluses despite antiemetic therapy (see Pancreatitis notes in these Proceedings), trickle feeding may be instituted. Trickle feeding is a technique in which liquefied food is syringed into an empty fluid bag and administered gravitationally or by pump assistance via an intravenous line attached to the large bore feeding tube or by use of a large syringe filled with food and syringe pump. Renew food and delivery tubing and syringe at 12-hour intervals to avoid bacterial contamination. A promotility agent may be warranted as well. A good client reference is the Animal Medical Center of Canberra’s website: www.animalmedicalcentre.com.au => Pet Health => Articles => Cats => Tube feeding.

Example: 3.4 kg sick cat BCS 3/9, healthy weight 4.0 kg BCS 5/9 3.4 kg X 50 kcal/kg/day = 170 kcal by day 3 170 kcal = 81 ml Eukanuba Maximum Calorie OR 131 ml of Hill’s a/d or Royal Canin Recovery or PVD CV mixed with equal volumes Clinicare or Rebound. Day 1 feed 30-40 ml of Max Cal or 44-65 ml of the other diets Day 2 feed 54-61 ml of Max Cal or 87-98 ml of the other diets Day 3 feed 81 ml Max Cal or 131 ml of the other diets.

The success of assisted feeding is measured objectively by weight gain. Subjective measures will include improved coat quality, increased energy, muscle recovery and innumerable other effects that the client will appreciate. An improved quality of life is the goal whether recovery form the underlying problem is possible or not.

Once stable, gradually increase to meet caloric requirements for 4 kg healthy weight. 4 kg X 50 kcal/kg/day = 200 kcal (95 ml Max Cal vs.154 ml of the other diets). With surgically placed tubes there is a delay in how quickly one can start to use them; with an esophageal tube only a 2-3 hour delay is required to ensure full recovery from anaesthesia whereas gastrostomy and jejunostomy tubes require a longer wait of 10-12 hours. Cats can eat with any of these tubes in place. It is recommended to avoid offering food for a week to reduce the likelihood of them developing aversion to the food offered. Once a cat is eating well with tube in place the question becomes when one can remove the tube. Weigh the cat and, as long as he/she is eating well, avoid using the tube (for nutrients) for a week then reweigh the kitty. If the weight is stable (or increased), then it is safe to remove the tube. Because of stoma formation (except nasoesophageal tubes), removal does not require anaesthesia. Remove the suture (pursestring or stay sutures) and pull the tube out. In the case of

TABLE 1 - Caloric densities of convalescent diets, for calculating feeding volumes ReboundTM: 1 kcal/ml ClinicareTM: 1 kcal/ml Royal Canin/MediCal RecoveryTM: 1.23 kcal/ml Hill’s a/dTM: 1.3 kcal/ml Eukanuba Maximum CalorieTM: 2.1 kcal/ml Purina PVD CVTM: 1.3 kcal/ml if blended with 170 ml (1 CV can) ReboundTM/ClinicareTM Blended with H2O => 0.7 kcal/ml

References/Suggested reading available upon request

432


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 433

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Out! Managing feline constipation: relieving a hard problem Margie Scherk DVM, Dipl ABVP (feline practice) catsINK, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Constipation is defined as the infrequent or difficult evacuation of stool. It is a common problem in cats that may be acute or chronic and does not inherently imply a loss of colonic function. Often the underlying cause is dehydration and is readily managed by supportive hydration, by oral, nutritional or parenteral means. When a cat has intractable constipation that is unresponsive to therapy or cure, this is referred to as obstipation. Obstipation implies permanent loss of function. When obstipation results in dilatation of the colon or hypertrophy of the colon, then the condition is described as megacolon. Constipation is more prevalent than we may recognize. Clients may perceive firm pellets as being “normal” and report them as such when queried by the veterinary team. If their cat defecates in the garden or if the litter pan is not cleaned on a daily basis, they may be unaware that their cat has excessively dry stool. Cats are presented because of a client’s observation of reduced, absent or painful, elimination of hard stool. Cats may pass stool outside the box as well as in it, may posture and attempt to defecate for prolonged periods or may return to the box to try repeatedly to pass stool, unsuccessfully. There may be mucus or blood passed associated with irritative effects of impacted stool, and even, intermittently, diarrhea. Vomiting is frequently associated with straining. Inappetence, weight loss, lethargy and dehydration become features of this condition if unresolved. Dilated megacolon is preceded by repeated episodes of recurrent constipation and obstipation. In the cat with hypertrophic megacolon, there may be a known history of trauma resulting in pelvic fracture. Constipation is a sign of cellular water deficit. When cells are dehydrated and the water intake (from drinking and eating) of the cat is maximized, the kidneys have reclaimed as much water as they are capable of, then colonic contents are the last source of water to try to maintain hydration. Determining the actual character of a cat’s feces is helpful in assessing their overall condition. Asking the client if there has been a change in stool character may not elicit the information; if a cat has had hard stool for months, even if the client is aware that the stool is pelleted, the question will not produce this information. Asking the client to tell you if the stool is hard pieces, moist logs, semi-formed (cow patties) or coloured water will elicit the desired information.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND DIAGNOSIS Constipation, obstipation and megacolon may be seen in cats of any age, breed and gender, however middle aged (mean 5.8 years), male (70%) DSH (46%) cats appear to be at risk for megacolon. Cats with dysautonomia (rare) have signs referable to other autonomic defects, such as urinary incontinence, regurgitation, mydriasis, prolapse of the nictating membrane and bradycardia. Digital rectal examination under sedation or anaesthesia should be performed in all cats to rule-out pelvic fracture, malunion, rectal diverticulum, perineal hernia, anorectal stricture, foreign body, neoplasia or polyps. A neurological examination should be performed to detect any neurological causes of constipation, including pelvic nerve trauma, spinal cord injury, or sacral spinal cord deformities of Manx cats. Serum biochemistries and a complete blood count are generally normal; they should be performed in order to detect cats with electrolyte abnormalities (hypokalemia, hypercalcemia, dehydration). A serum T4 should be checked in obstipated kittens suspected of being hypothyroid. Abdominal radiography should be performed to characterize the mass and verify that it is, indeed, colonic impaction rather than neoplasia. They will also help to identify predisposing factors such as pelvic fracture, extra-luminal mass, foreign body, and spinal cord abnormalities. Barium enemas, or colonoscopy and ultrasound may be additional tools required to help define the problem. CSF evaluation is indicated in cats with neurological involvement.

THERAPY There are five components of medical management of the cat with recurrent constipation, obstipation or megacolon: 1. achieve and maintain optimal hydration; 2. remove impacted feces; 3. dietary fiber; 4. laxative therapy; 5. colonic prokinetic agents. 1) As long as cellular dehydration is present, the need will exist to resorb water from renal and gastrointestinal

433


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 434

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

systems. Systemic hydration may be attained through parenteral fluid therapy, including regular subcutaneous fluids in the home, feeding canned foods, adding water or broth to the food, feeding meat broths, or the use of running water fountains in the home. Addition of fiber to the diet should be avoided until the patient is adequately hydrated.

Recently a psyllium-enriched dry extruded diet (Royal Canin Fiber Response) has been studied in France and in Canada. It was shown to be beneficial in the treatment of cats with recurrent constipation attributed to dilated or hypertrophic megacolon. While some of the 54 cats required fluid therapy and enemas initially, oral laxatives and other medications were discontinued.

2) Removal of impacted feces helps to reduce the toxic and inflammatory stress on the bowel wall. Pediatric rectal suppositories may be used to help with mild constipation. They include dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (e.g.,DSS, ColaceTM), glycerin or bisacodyl (e.g.,DulcolaxTM). Enema solutions that may be used include warm tap water, DSS (5-10 ml/cat), mineral oil (5-10 ml/cat) or lactulose (5-10 ml/cat). They should be administered slowly through a well-lubricated 10-12 Fr. rubber catheter. Mineral oil and DSS should not be given together as DSS promotes mucosal absorption of the mineral oil. Sodium phosphate containing enemas (e.g., FleetTM) are contraindicated because they predispose to life-threatening electrolyte imbalances (hypernatremia, hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia) in cats. Hexachlorophene-containing soaps should be avoided because of potential neurotoxicity. Enemas given too rapidly may cause vomiting, pose a risk for colonic perforation and may be passed too rapidly for the fecal mass to be softened by them. Manual extraction may be required in recalcitrant cases. Infusion of water into the colon, manual massage and reduction of the mass by abdominal palpation and gentle use of fingers to break down the fecal mass may be helpful. Caution must be used to reduce the risk of perforation. Anytime a cat is anaesthetized for manipulations of the colon, a cuffed endotracheal tube should be in place, in case the cat vomits.

4) Laxatives may be categorized as emollient, lubricant, hyperosmotic and stimulant, based on method of action. Emollient laxatives are anionic detergents that increase the miscibility of water and lipid in ingesta, enhancing lipid absorption and impairing water absorption. DSS (ColaceTM, 50 mg PO q24h) and dioctyl calcium sulfosuccinate (SurfaxTM, 50 mg PO q12-24h) have been used in cats. Lubricant laxatives impede water absorption as well as enabling easier passage of stool. Mineral oil (10-25 ml PO q24h) or petrolatum (hairball remedies, 1-5 ml PO q24h) are best suited to mild cases of constipation. Additionally, mineral oil is better administered by enema rather than orally, because of the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Chronic use may interfere with absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. Hyperosmotic laxatives stimulate colonic fluid secretion and propulsive motility. While there are three types (poorly absorbed polysaccharides [lactulose, lactose], magnesium salts [magnesium citrate, magnesium sulfate, magnesium hydroxide] and polyethylene glycols [GoLYTELYTM, ColyteTM]), lactulose (0.5 ml/kg PO q8-12h, prn) is the safest and most consistently effective agent in this group. Kristalose consists of lactulose crystals for reconstitution that cats may accept sprinkled on their food or suspended in water. Mg salts are contraindicated in cats with renal insufficiency. Miralax, polyethylene glycol (PG3350) may be used in cats at a dose of 1/8 - 1/4 tsp twice daily in food; polyethylene glycols are contraindicated in functional or mechanical bowel obstruction. The stimulant laxatives enhance propulsive motility by a variety of actions. One example, which has been used in cats, is bisacodyl (DulcolaxTM, 5 mg PO q24h), which acts by stimulating nitric oxide-mediated epithelial call secretion and myenteric neuronal depolarization.

3) Dietary fiber acts as a bulk-forming laxative. The benefits of insoluble (poorly fermentable) fiber, (e.g., wheat bran, cereal grains), are to improve or normalize colonic motility by distending the colonic lumen, increase colonic water content, dilute luminal toxins (such as bile acids, ammonia and ingested toxins) and increase the rate of passage of ingested materials thereby reducing the exposure of the colonocyte to toxins, while increasing the frequency of defecation. Suggested doses are: psyllium (MetamucilTM, 1-4 tsp mixed with food PO q12-24h), canned pumpkin (1-4 tbsp mixed with food PO q24h), coarse wheat bran (1-2 tbsp mixed with food PO q24h). Soluble (highly fermentable) fibers (e.g., oat bran, pectin, beet pulp, vegetable gums) are readily digested by bacteria and provide large quantities of short chain fatty acids, which are beneficial in many ways for colonic health, but they are not suitable as laxatives, because they have little ability to increase fecal bulk or dilute luminal toxins. They gel intestinal contents. In nature, most fibers are not strictly insoluble or soluble, but can be considered to have a greater or lesser percentage of soluble fiber. Pectin and guar gum are 100% soluble fiber, psyllium is 79% soluble and 21% insoluble fiber.

5) Colonic prokinetic agents stimulate motility from the esophagus aborally. Older motility agents have been unsuccessful, either because of significant side-effects (bethanechol) or the inability to enhance motility in the distal gastrointestinal tract (metaclopromide, domperidone). Cisapride (PropulsidTM, PrepulsidTM) is a benzamide prokinetic drug and helps in mild to moderate constipation. Cats with longstanding obstipation or megacolon are not likely to be helped much by cisapride. Published dose recommendations are 2.5 mg PO q8-12h; this author routinely uses 5 mg/cat PO q8-12h without noted side effects. Newer promotility drugs have not yet received wide use in veterinary medicine. Dr. Washabau stated: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cats treated with prucalopride at a dose of 0.64 mg/kg experience increased defecation within the first hour of administra-

434


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 435

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

tion. Fecal consistency is not altered at this dose. The therapeutically effective dose for tegaserod in cats is 0.1-0.3 mg/kg PO BID.” Cats with chronic obstipation or megacolon are candidates for colectomy. Chronic fecal impaction results in mucosal ulceration and inflammation and risk of perforation. Surgery should be done before bowel wall and patient health are compromised and debilitated. At the time of

resection, small intestinal biopsies are advised, as concurrent, underlying disease (e.g. lymphoma, FIP) may be identified. Post-operatively, diarrhea may be present for 46 weeks. As anal tone isn’t compromised, house soiling shouldn’t occur. The prognosis for recovery is good.

References/Suggested reading available upon request

435


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 436

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Bronchopulmonary disease in cats and acute respiratory distress Margie Scherk DVM, Dipl ABVP (feline practice) catsINK, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Feline bronchial disease goes under a multitude of names reflecting the considerable heterogeneity in anatomic locations as well as etiologies that may be involved. Chronic bronchitis presents as a chronic cough (> 2 month duration) that is easily illicited by tracheal palpation. Morphologic changes that occur in the tracheobronchial epithelium and wall result in airway inflammation: mucosal edema and thickening, epithelial metaplasia and cellular infiltratation with increased production of mucus. Tracheobronchial irritation is a result of and results in mucus secretion, accumulation, and bronchoconstriction. Over time, this causes airway narrowing, increased airway resistance, decreased air-flow, air exchange, hypoxemia, exercise intolerance, dyspnea with an increased respiratory rate. Cor pulmonale or pulmonary hypertension can potentially develop. When the irritation is occurring mainly in the small airways that are less than 2 mm in diameter, along with coughing, expiratory wheeze may be present. As the smaller airways become obstructed, air becomes trapped within the alveoli resulting in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with an abdominal thrust component to the respiratory pattern and, over time, resulting in a caudal displacement (or flattening) of the diaphragm. This patient may present in dyspnea with cyanosis rather than being brought in with a history of nocturnal wheezing or coughing. Clients may bring their cat in because of post-tussive retching or gagging misinterpreted as vomiting. It is the irreversibility of early changes at any stage along with the inherent progression that makes conclusive diagnosis and ongoing treatment so important.

this pathophysiologic response can be triggered by viral respiratory tract infections or inhaled irritants such as dust, aerosols, second-hand smoke, incense, hoods on litter boxes trapping dust, forced air heating/cooling, open fireplace use, use of sprays (pesticides, carpet cleaners, perfumes, deodorizers, oil misters).

SIGNALMENT Classically it is the young adult cat who is affected with a preponderance of the Siamese breed being represented; however, any age or breed may develop bronchopulmonary disease.

HISTORY Signs range from chronic coughing, retching or expiratory wheezing, (especially at night), to severe respiratory distress and cyanosis. It is important to note that cats can adapt to their disease state. Thus, any further compromise may be critical. This explains why some clients are not aware that their cat has been ill when they present for a “first” acute attack. Vomiting may be misinterpreted by clients when they witness retching after severe coughing, or may be secondary to aerophagia (from respiratory distress or pain) or gastrointestinal disease.

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION ETIOLOGY: WHEN IS IT ASTHMA? In most instances, the patient will be afebrile, bright and alert. Normal breath sounds may be present in mild cases; an expiratory wheeze may be ausculted over the lungs as the cat is trying to force air out of the smaller airways. This may be so marked that there is obvious abdominal thrust visible. Palpation of the trachea often results in a cough. As this loosens the mucoid secretions in the airways, post-tussive auscultation may detect some crackles. Note: if no breath sounds are heard at all in a patient, this reflects severe bronchoconstriction; this cat is probably cyanotic.

Despite the fact that we may call bronchopulmonary disorders “allergic bronchitis”, not all cases are due to an immunologically mediated response to aeroallergens. When we have evidence to show that the clinical signs are associated with an increase in pulmonary mast cells, histamine release, IgE production and an increase in eosinophils and macrophages in secretions supports a diagnosis of “asthma”. (In fact, the condition in cats is similar enough to that of humans that cats are a model for this disease.) In cats,

436


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 437

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

made and, if there is indication of cardiovascular disease, followed up with an echocardiogram or, if there is an arrythmia, an ECG.

DIFFERENTIALS As a general “rule-of thumb”, changes in inspiration reflect an upper, larger airway problem, whereas, those of expiration reflect smaller, lower airway disease. Because of increased tracheal sensitivity in most cats, one may also need to consider upper airway obstructions due to laryngeal paralysis or masses, nasopharyngeal polyps, severe rhinitis or nasal obstruction. Anything that causes inflammation due to pressure or the presence of fluid as a result of some other disease process should be considered. A more complete discussion of differentials to consider in the cat presenting with acute (or acute on chronic) lower respiratory signs is found in a subsequent section of these notes.

BLOODWORK Hematological and biochemical changes may be non-specific. Stress or bacterial infection may cause a neutrophilia. A peripheral eosinophilia may support the diagnosis of bronchitis, however may be from another cause (parasitic, hypersensitivity): the lack of such a finding does not rule out airway inflammation. Hyperproteinemia may be present. Heartworm antigen tests are indicated in endemic regions.

DIAGNOSIS

FECAL EXAMINATIONS

If a patient is cyanotic or in severe respiratory distress, regardless of underlying etiology or pathology, immediate oxygen supplementation and rest are indicated. Radiographs and other diagnostics must wait. A small dose of a narcotic, such as oxymorphone, may help the cat to relax and thereby aerate his/her lungs more effectively. An oxygen cage, nasal oxygen or oxygen hood may be used. It is important not to use diuretics unless sure that the patient has cardiogenic pulmonary edema, as diuretics inspisate secretions and make them harder to clear from the airways. Serum NTpro-BNP has been recommended for the detection of subclinical cardiac disease. A recent study concluded that it failed to detect subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Maine Coon cats. (Singh) It may however be useful in determining whether a cat’s dyspnea is due to pulmonary vs. cardiac pathology, if moderate to severe cardiac pathology is present. Standard radiography, required for a bigger picture, will help make that distinction. In two retrospective reviews of cats with lower airway disease, cough was the most common presenting complaint, but not all cats show this sign. Other clinical signs are usually expiratory in timing. Thoracic auscultation is often unrewarding. (Adamama-Moraitou, Foster)

The eggs of Paragonimus or Capillaria may be seen in fecal examination: the former agent may be isolated using a sedimentation technique, while the latter may be seen with routine fecal examination. Aelurostrongylus larvae are detectable using a Baermann flotation technique.

AIRWAY SAMPLING Two methods are commonly used to harvest airway secretions for cytologic and microbiologic evaluation analysis for differentiation and diagnosis of the various causes of coughing and/or wheezing in the cat. Tracheal wash is readily available to all practitioners and samples the contents of the larger airways. Using a sterile endotracheal tube is less stressful than the traditional trans-tracheal technique. Prior to insertion of the endotracheal tube, desensitize the glottis well using lidocaine to decrease the risk of contamination by enabling an easy passage. Cuff the endotracheal tube. Pass a 3-5 Fr. red rubber feeding tube through an opening made in the end of its packaging, through the endotracheal tube until slight resistance is met. Flush 6 ml aliquots of nonbacteriostatic physiologic sterile saline and aspirate the wash back into a sterile collection syringe. Repeat this procedure until 6-12 cc of saline have flushed the airways. Submit some of the collected sample on air dried slides, in an EDTA tube as well as in a sterile red top tube for culture, should the fluid cytology show significant organisms. The presence of Simonsiella bacteria or squamous cells indicates oropharyngeal contamination. (DeHeer) Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is performed by wedging a bronchoscope in subsegmental bronchi. The advantages of BAL are that the normal values have been established for total cell counts and differentials to which a patient’s values can be compared; one can perform quantitated cultures and compare them to the known norms; one can select which airways one wishes to visualize and sample from if there were specific areas of concern on the radiographs. (Andreasen, Mills, Norris) Macrophages may represent up to 70% of the cells in healthy cats. The majority of the cells in BAL samples from

RADIOGRAPHY Once the patient is stable enough, thoracic radiographs are indicated. Ideally, three views should be taken: right and left lateral and ventrodorsal (VD). Characteristic findings include a bronchial pattern; consolidation of right middle or caudal left lung lobes may occur from bronchial obstruction with mucus and debris with subsequent resorption of residual alveolar air or varying degrees of air trapping. If unresolved, eventually air trapping results in chronic over inflation of the lungs with diaphragmatic flattening. Sometimes alveolar or interstitial changes may be seen. Occasionally, cats with broncho-pulmonary disease show no radiographic changes. The degree of radiographic changes may not accurately reflect the severity of clinical signs. (AdamamaMoraitou) Radiographic assessment of the heart should be

437


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 438

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

cats with asthma are either neutrophils, eosinophils or macrophages. The numbers and proportions vary in sick cats; this may represent a continuum of condition. The presence of alveolar macrophages is proof of sampling from lower airways. If intracellular bacteria are seen and a gram stain supports the presence of bacteria, then a culture and sensitivity should be run. Cultures are often negative in cats with small airway disease; cats with pneumonia have a variety of organisms (especially Mycoplasma spp). (Foster)

suspicion and putting multiple pieces of the puzzle together. When heartworm preventatives are used in cats within 30 days of exposure to heartworm-infected mosquitoes, larval forms do not reach the pulmonary vasculature. Whether indoors or indoors and out, cats residing in heartworm endemic regions or travelling through these areas should have for heartworm associated respiratory disease as a differential for small airway disease.

DIFFERENTIALS FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS

HEARTWORM ASSOCIATED RESPIRATORY DISEASE

Causes of acute (or acute on chronic) respiratory signs do not always involve immunological causes or even small airway pathology. Other considerations for dyspnea, tachypnea, cough, lethargy should be kept in mind. Pleural effusions from any cause, (e.g., left sided congestive heart failure, lymphatic disease resulting in chylothorax, sepsis with pyothorax, etc.), cause irritation, inflammation and this cluster of clinical signs. Additionally, acute respiratory distress may be associated with thyroid storm, perhaps due to mechanical (cardiac) and hormonal responses as well as extreme anxiety experienced by the patient. Pyothorax, long believed to be caused primarily by bite wound induced infection, may have other origins. A recent paper evaluating 27 cases concluded that parapenumonic spread of infection after colonization and invasion of lung tissue by oropharyngeal flora appears to be the most frequent cause of feline anaerobic polymicrobial pyothorax. (Barrs). A paper from Australia reviewed 21 cases of lower respiratory tract infections (pneumonia) and found that cats may present acutely or with chronic clinical signs. Infectious agents identified were Mycoplasma spp (62%, 13/21), Pasteurella spp (14%, 3/21) as well as Bordetella bronchiseptica, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas sp., Mycobacterium thermoresistible, Cryptococcus neoformans, Toxoplasma gondii, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Eucoleus aerophilus. Previously it had been thought that the common pathogens were P. multocida, E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, B. bronchiseptica and Strep. canis. Because of the wide diversity of etiologic organisms, the authors suggest that empirical therapy in coughing cats cannot be recommended and that BAL or tracheal wash cytology and microbiology should be performed in all cases. If, as is most frequently the case, specimen transport and culture methods for mycoplasmal detection are sub optimal or not available, empirical therapy with two weeks of doxycycline at 5 mg/kg twice daily orally should be considered.(Foster) Pyothorax and pneumonia may present with fever, a sign not likely in asthma. An unusual case of a cat with dermatologic nodules and infrequent coughing is reported. (Little) The cat had a disseminated protozoal infection that involved pulmonary parenchyma. Toxoplasmosis may present as strictly pulmonic signs as well. (Brownlee) Fungal disease may present in a similar fashion. Heartworm disease in cats causes respiratory signs in cats: Heartworm Associated Respiratory Dis-

Dirofilaria immitis infection in cats causes a completely different disease than in dogs. In cats, heartworm larvae arrive in the heart by 75-90 days after initial infection. These tiny L5 forms travel to the distal pulmonary arteries where most larvae die around 90-120 days post infection (p.i.). Their presence may incite a marked inflammatory response, resulting in an eosinophilic endarteritis with intimal fibrosis and in thickening of the arterial walls. The smallest vessels may become occluded from the thickened walls (occlusal hypertrophy). Cats with acute disease may present for cough, dyspnea, collapse or death similar to an acute asthmatic attack. With less severe response and over time, cough, dyspnea, lethargy, anorexia, vomiting and weight loss may be the clinical concerns. Other cats live comfortably for several years even with significant pulmonary pathology. As this occurs before establishment of adult heartworm infestation, (and in most cats worms do not achieve adulthood), the clinical signs associated with this pathologic response may occur as early as 90 days p.i. Diagnostically, this is significant because tests relying on the presence of adult worms will be negative in cats. A positive antigen test requires the presence of at least three adult female worms. A positive antibody test measures the catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response to larvae or adults, which have been present for 2-3 months. The antibody test is further compromised because even some cats with adult worms may remain antibody negative. Radiographic changes are not specific for Heartworm Associated Respiratory Disease (H.A.R.D.) and are bronchointerstitial in character. The inflammatory pattern in the lung parenchyma is peribronchial but may be severe enough to be a diffuse alveolar pattern. Pulmonary arterial patterns may be normal although if the periarterial inflammation is severe, the right and/or caudal pulmonary arteries may appear enlarged. These signs could just as well reflect asthma, or other small airway or vascular disease. Some cats show pulmonary artery enlargement. Heartworms may present in the pulmonary artery on echocardiographic evaluation, however that will not be the case in over 50% of infected cats as well as all cats who have successfully terminated infection (abbreviated infection) before the worms reach adulthood. Yet these cats will suffer from inflammationinduced changes. BAL or tracheal washings may be eosinophilic in nature just as with lungworm and with true allergies. Thus, the diagnostic challenge requires an index of

438


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 439

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

ease (H.A.R.D.). Fungal diseases and selected infectious agents have regional distribution, consequently, the client should be asked whether they (or a previous owner) have ever lived elsewhere or travelled with their cat. Another cause of acute respiratory signs not often considered in cats is gastric dilatation-volvulus associated with diaphragmatic hernia which is most commonly traumatic but may also be congenital in origin. (Formaggini) Thyroid storm is an uncommon manifestation of severe hyperthyroidism. Clinical signs are associated with thyrotoxic heart disease, secondary to increased cardiac output due to increased metabolic demand. They may present in acute respiratory distress due pleural effusion or edema with open mouth breathing. Additional clinical signs may include neurologic dysfunction, hypertension, dehydration and hypovolemia, gastrointestinal signs, fever, and hypokalemic myopathy, predominately characterized by extreme weakness and neck ventroflexion. This medical emergency requires oxygen and attention to minimizing stress. As soon as feasible, beta-adrenergic antagonists should be administered: a rapid onset, short acting B-blocker like esmolol (BreviblocTM) may be used initially in the emergency setting while monitoring the patient for improvement or deterioration. Thereafter the deleterious peripheral effects of excess thyroid hormones can be addressed. (Tolbert) These unusual “zebras” should be kept in mind, but by far the most common cause of acute, chronic or acute exacerbations of chronic cough, dyspnea, tachypnea +/- wheeze in cats is immunologic small airway disease: asthma.

prednisolone) are used initially at doses of 0.5-2.0 mg/kg PO divided twice a day. As improvement is noted and clinical signs resolve, the dose may be tapered over a three to four week period to 0.5-1.0 mg/kg PO q24h. It is important to maintain corticosteroid therapy to try to avoid irreversible fibrotic changes ultimately resulting in COPD. Long-acting depot injections of corticosteroids may be helpful initially in the “hard-to-medicate-cat”, but may result in the patient becoming refractory to corticosteroid use. Additionally, the development of diabetes and adrenocortical suppression are more common with this form of corticosteroid use. Bronchodilators are used in the treatment of feline bronchopulmonary disease to dilate airways, increase muco-ciliary clearance, increase diaphragmatic contractility, decrease pulmonary artery pressure, and stabilize mast cells. (Kirschvink) There are two classes of drugs used: beta-agonists (terbutaline, albuterol) and the methylxanthines (theophylline). In emergency situations terbutaline may be given at home or in clinic at 0.01mg/kg IV, SC. Epinephrine (0.1 ml SC, 1:1000) is indicated in severe bronchoconstriction/ “status asthmaticus”. As epinephrine will have cardiac effects as well, it should be used with caution. For chronic use, oral terbutaline or theophylline should be used. Beta-agonists are excellent bronchodilators. To avoid cardiovascular side effects associated with non-selective betaagonists use beta2-agonists. Terbutaline pharmacokinetics show that the cat is more sensitive to this agent than the human; start with low doses (0.625 mg PO q12h) and assess response prior to increasing the dose to maximum 1.25 mg PO q12h. Tachycardia and hypotension are the main side effects, easily overlooked by a client. Avoid concurrent use of beta-adrenergic antagonists (atenolol, propranolol)! Theophylline is a weaker bronchodilator that is believed to act by adenosine receptor antagonism, stimulation of catecholamine release or inhibition of intracellular calcium release. However, it also enhances mucociliary clearance and decreases respiratory muscle fatigue. It may act synergistically with beta-agonists. Because of a narrow therapeutic safety range, the sustained release agents are preferred. Slo-BID (Rhone-Poulenc) or a generic sustained release product are given at 25-50mg q24h in the evening. Halving the tablets is allowable, but crushing or otherwise altering the original form will significantly alter absorption kinetics. Long-term bronchopulmonary conditions in cats are best treated using a combination of corticosteroids and a bronchodilator. Recently aerosol inhalers (for both steroids and bronchodilators) have been recommended and used with success clinically in small animal medicine. Fluticasone is an inhaled steroid, which comes in 3 dose strengths (44, 110, 220 mcg/dose). Beta2-adrenergic agonists come in a selection of albuterol, salmeterol or terbutaline. These may be delivered with the use of an Aerokat (www.aerokat.com) held over the cat’s muzzle for 30 seconds. Drug delivery remains a significant question, both getting effective drug concentrations into the affected airways as well as avoiding excess drug/the potential of overdosing these small animals.

THERAPY FOR ASTHMA The goals of treatment are to minimize clinical signs, to maintain a normal lifestyle, and to establish and maintain near normal pulmonary function. Therefore, treatment must be aimed at eliminating underlying disease, controlling airway inflammation and environmental control (triggers) while counselling clients in becoming expert in observing their cat and learning to adjust medication as indicated as well as in understanding that the disease is long-term. The cornerstones of therapy are corticosteroids to reduce inflammation and edema, ensuring good hydration to enhance the clearance of secretions and a bronchodilator to reduce airway resistance caused by bronchospasm. Aerosol therapy or room humidification is beneficial in moistening secretions in order to aid the mucociliary elevator. Chest coupage may also be helpful to loosen secretions. The use of anti-tussives, is, however, contraindicated as the coughing itself is not detrimental and antitussive agents thicken secretions making it more difficult to clear the mucus. Corticosteroids are excellent at suppressing airway inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. (Lee) They reduce production of many leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and platelet-activating factor by inhibiting the synthesis of phospholipase -A2. They block the release of mediators from inflammatory cells (e.g. macrophages and eosinophils), reduce microvascular leakage and decrease the influx of inflammatory cells. Short acting agents (of prednisone or

439


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 440

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

• Leukotrienes, which are potent mediators of airway inflammation, may be involved in feline airway disease but the potential efficacy and/or toxicity of 5-lipoxygenase blockers or leukotriene receptor blockers (zafirlukast) in cats is still unknown. • An interesting approach that is currently being investigated is the use of an endothelin receptor antagonist for treatment in asthma. Endothelin-1 is a key mediator of asthma via pro-inflammatory, bronchoconstrictive, profibrotic and vasoconstrictive effects. Bosentan is a commercially available dual endothelin receptor antagonist that has been shown to be clinically efficacious in many species and experimentally effective in cats.

Tips on aerosol use: • Acclimate kitty to device over several days, letting him/ her investigate it. • Reward fearless approaches to device and start placing it near kitty’s face. (Praise, food, catnip, stroking?) • Practice with the mask over the cats face without anything in the chamber • Pre-load the chamber with a puff of albuterol (in addition to the dose required) • Make sure the mask is over the muzzle for 4-6 breaths • Administer bronchodilator (albuterol) first, to allow better delivery of corticosteroid Two recent studies have looked at the effects of inhaled drugs in cats with asthma. In the first, Reinero, et al (Am J Vet Res. July 2005) showed that the effects of several drugs (including steroids) on airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in cats with experimentally-induced asthma (Bermuda grass allergen model) “…orally administered corticosteroids did not have a significant effect on measured variables of systemic immunity, aside from a reduction in content of BGA-specific IgE.” Subsequently, the same group looked at the systemic effects of inhaled glucocorticoids because oral glucocorticoids may be contraindicated in some feline patients, e.g., cardiac disease, endocrine disease and some recrudescent infections. In a prospective, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled study on the effects of inhaled flunisolide on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA) and immune system of six healthy cats, (J Vet Intern Med. 2006) they showed that although the inhaled glucocorticoid [flunisolide] “can lead to measurable effects on the HPAA in healthy cats, clinical signs of adrenocortical suppression were absent, and systemic effects on the adaptive immune system were minimal”. The use of atropine is contraindicated despite its potent bronchodilator activity as it will cause inspisation of secretions and encourage mucus plugging of airways. Antibiotic use should be restricted to use based on culture and sensitivity results as many normal cats have commensal populations of bacteria, while only a few bronchitic cats have pathogenic bacteria present. If they are used, selection should be made of a bacteriocidal agent with good tissue and secretion penetration, minimal toxicity and gram negative spectrum. In experimentally induced allergic airway disease other drugs that have been evaluated include: • Cyproheptadine (1-2mg/cat PO q12h) blocks the serotonin released by immune-sensitized smooth airway muscle. • Cyclosporine (10 mg/kg PO q12h) inhibits T lymphocyte activation and may attenuate bronchoconstriction and ongoing airway inflammation.

REFERENCES/SUGGESTED READING Adamama-Moraitou KK, Patsikas MN, Koutinas AF. Feline lower airway disease: a retrospective study of 22 naturally occurring cases from Greece. J Feline Med Surg. August 2004;6(4):227-33. Andreasen CB, Bronchoalveolar lavage. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. January 2003;33(1):69-88. Barrs VR, Allan GS, Patricia Martin; Beatty JA, et al. Feline pyothorax: a retrospective study of 27 cases in Australia. J Feline Med Surg. August 2005;7(4):211-22. Brownlee L, Sellon RK. Diagnosis of naturally occurring toxoplasmosis by bronchoalveolar lavage in a cat. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2001 MayJun;37(3):251-5. DeHeer HL McManus P. Frequency and severity of tracheal wash hemosiderosis and association with underlying disease in 96 cats: 20022003. Vet Clin Pathol. March 2005;34(1):17-22. Formaggini L, Schmidt K, De Lorenzi D. Gastric dilatation-volvulus associated with diaphragmatic hernia in three cats: clinical presentation, surgical treatment and presumptive aetiology. J Feline Med Surg. April 2008;10(2):198-201. Foster SF, Martin P, Allan GS, et al. Lower respiratory tract infections in cats: 21 cases (1995-2000). J Feline Med Surg. June 2004;6(3): 167-80. Foster SF, Allan GS, Martin P, et al. Twenty-five cases of feline bronchial disease (1995-2000). J Feline Med Surg. June 2004;6(3):181-8. Kirschvink N, Leemans J,Delvaux F, et al. Bronchodilators in bronchoscopy-induced airflow limitation in allergen-sensitized cats. J Vet Intern Med. 2005 Mar-Apr;19(2):161-7. Lee LY, Widdicombe JG. Modulation of airway sensitivity to inhaled irritants: role of inflammatory mediators. Environ Health Perspect. August 2001;109 Suppl 4(0):585-9. Little L, Shokek A, Dubey JP, et al. Toxoplasma gondii-like organisms in skin aspirates from a cat with disseminated protozoal infection. Vet Clin Pathol. June 2005;34(2):156-60. Mills PC, Litster A. Using urea dilution to standardise cellular and non-cellular components of pleural and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids in the cat. J Feline Med Surg. April 2006;8(2):105-10. Norris CR, Griffey SM, Samii VF, et al, Thoracic radiography, bronchoalveolar lavage cytopathology, and pulmonary parenchymal histopathology: a comparison of diagnostic results in 11 cats. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2002 Jul-Aug;38(4):337-45. Singh MK, Cocchiaro MF, Kittleson MD. NT-proBNP measurement fails to reliably identify subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Maine Coon cats. J Fel Med Surg, 12 (12) 2010, 942-947. Tolbert MK, Ward CR. Feline Thyroid Storms: Rapid recognition of potential cases to improve patient survival.

440


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 441

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Snotting and snuffling: the cat with chronic upper respiratory disease Margie Scherk DVM, Dipl ABVP (feline practice) catsINK, Vancouver, BC, Canada

The chronic feline snuffler is a frustrating patient to treat: the longer the course, the more severe the consequences to affected tissues are and the more debilitating it is to the patient. A logical diagnostic plan to differentiate probable etiologies and to rule-out non-viral causes results in appropriate therapeutic choices. Even with a viral etiology, therapies to reduce the pathological consequences of the infection may modulate and help control the clinical signs.

suggesting an allergic or contact irritant component. Assess facial symmetry both face on and from above the head. Palpate the face to look for swelling, invagination or discomfort. Thoroughly evaluate teeth and alveolar bone for evidence of periodontal disease, abscessation or inflammation. Look at and palpate the hard and soft palate, where feasible, looking for oronasal fistula, mass lesions or ulceration. If a cat retches or yawns, the tonsils may be visualized. By opening the mouth, neurologic competency is assessed: jaw tone (motor V), position, movements and symmetry of the tongue (XII), gag reflex (IX, X). Evaluate nasal passage patency using a small mirror (compact or dental) or a glass slide that has been kept in the freezer. Wisps of cotton are also helpful. Palpate the trachea to see if this elicts a cough. It is helpful to auscult the trachea as well as three locations (dorsal cranial and caudal and craniaoventral) bilaterally to define the primary location of the lesion. Occasionally auscultation of the frontal sinuses may be revealing. For this, a small pediatric bell is used. For pulmonary auscultation, use two heads, the standard bell and a plexiglass scope (e.g., UltrascopeTM) as they provide different sensitivities and frequencies. A thorough physical examination should be performed. Fundic examination should be performed to look for Cryptococcus and other signs of systemic disease. Enlargement of regional lymph nodes or generalized node enlargement should be assessed.

HISTORY & PRESENTATION Chronic, recurrent rhinosinusitis occurs in cats of any age. Cats are presented because of sneezing, nasal discharge, and noisy breathing with or without inappetence. Sneezing occurs because of stimulation of irritant receptors in the nasal and sinus subepithelium. Knowing the timing, onset, duration and frequency of sneezing can be helpful. With chronicity, inflammatory changes this response may be abolished resulting in accumulation of discharge. Nasal discharge may be serous, mucoid, purulent, or sanguinous. It is helpful to know whether the discharge has changed, whether it changes throughout the day or season, and especially whether it is unilateral or bilateral. Respiratory patterns and sounds may be abnormal. Clients may comment on the cat sounding hoarse or even silent when meowing or that his/her purr is different. In general, sounds heard on inspiration are associated with larger airways whereas expiratory sounds are associated with smaller, lower airways. Snorting occurs with accumulation of discharges in the nasal passages or with secretions coughed into the oropharynx (e.g., from pneumonia). A snoring, stertorous sound is associated with proximal upper respiratory occlusion, such as with a polyp or foreign body obstruction or functional inflammatory obstruction. Stridor is an inspiratory wheeze that reflects changes in the larynx. An expiratory wheeze, crackles and rales reflect small airway involvement. A complete lack of bronchovesicular sounds occurs when there is pulmonary consolidation or inflammation. If the breathing is “worse at night” this could reflect bronchitis or merely the time that the client is at home to observe the cat. Sounds that are worse after exercise or at rest may reflect the severity of the respiratory interference or the movement of secretions. Some cats have seasonal flare-ups

ETIOLOGIES AND PATHOGENESIS Chronic rhinitis may be a sequel to, or separate from, acute rhinitis. It may represent an ineffective immune response to persistent viral infection. Feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) may be the common denominator initiating turbinate resorption, with subsequent secondary bacterial infections and unchecked inflammation exacerbating the problem. This is especially bad in anatomically predisposed individuals (conformation, anomalies). Irreversible destruction of the turbinates may result in viral or inflammatory mediator-induced cytolysis. Reactivation of herpesvirus from infected trigeminal ganglion may result in recurrent destruction. It is not possible to determine the course/cause in a given individual.

441


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 442

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Caliciviruses infection results in a carrier state with continuous shedding for variable periods of time. FHV-1, like other herpesviruses, results in a state of latency and approximately 80% of infected cats are permanent carriers. Latency accounts for recurrence of clinical signs during periods of physiological or psychological stress. Primary bacterial agents include Bordetella bronchiseptica, commonly found as a commensal without causing morbidity. Mycoplasma spp. may be cultured from some individuals, but their true incidence remains unknown due to the difficulty of isolating these fastidious organisms. Chlamydophyliosis is not common, and infection is limited to varying degrees conjunctivitis. L-forms may also be involves but require specific targeted culture techniques for verification. In one study (Johnson JAVMA 2005) aerobic bacteria were cultured from biopsy samples from twice as many clinically affected cats (4/10) than controls (2/7) while anaerobic infection occurred in only the affected cats (2/10). Flush samples were collected from the same cats with aerobes in 5/7 controls, and 9/10 affected cats; anaerobes in 3/10 and Mycoplasma spp. in 2/10 affected cats. Interestingly, FHV-1 was not cultured from any of the cats, but viral DNA was detected in 4/7 control and 3/10 affected cats by PCR implying that the virus was not viable. Bartonella henselae is commonly detected by serology (antibody titres), yet its true role in the chronically infected cat is not as relevant as its serologic exposure. One study (Chomel J Clin Microbiol 1995) showed that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Serological screening for Bartonella antibodies may not be useful for the identification of bacteremic cats (positive predictive value = 46.4%), but the lack of antibodies to B. henselae was highly predictive of the absence of bacteremia (negative predictive value = 89.7%).â&#x20AC;? The fact that cats on antibiotics often improve clinically, would support the role of bacteria; the fact that signs recur, despite therapy, implies that bacteria are only part of the cause of the illness. When antimicrobial therapy of 7-10 day duration fails to result in resolution of disease, then a thorough diagnostic work-up should be recommended. The main fungal organisms causing chronic upper respiratory disease, are Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans and gattii. These classically cause severe inflammation resulting in facial deformity and skin ulceration along with unilateral (> bilateral) nasal discharge. Aspergillosis sp. and Penicillium spp. have also been isolated. Trauma, congenital and conformational aspects, polyps, periodontal disease and foreign bodies all predispose to chronic infection. Any factors contributing to alterations in the structure or function of the upper airways, be they primary inflammation (lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis) or that secondary to the noxious effects of infection, will compromise normal function and predispose to chronic damage if the cat is unable to resolve the underlying factors. Chondritis and osteomyelitis are often sequellae to infection/inflammation. There is some suggestion that chronic rhinitis/sinusitis may predispose to nasal lymphoma in cats. Neoplasia further alters function and form, allowing secondary changes, which may be more worrisome to the client than the underlying cancer. If there are concurrent stressors

(sub-optimal nutrition, social distress, environmental factors) or outright immunocompromise/suppression (e.g., retroviruses), the likelihood of infectious agent involvement and the inability to clear these is increased. Most feline nasal tumours are malignant. They tend to be locally invasive (frontal and paranasal sinuses) without metastasizing distantly. Similar to other types of cancer in cats, the older cat is over-represented. Clinical signs will vary depending on the location of the tumour. Nasal tumours result in sneezing and unilateral nasal discharge; nasopharyngeal masses present with stertorous respiration. Further signs include variable facial deformity, epistaxis and epiphora.

DIAGNOSTICS When rhinitis or rhinosinusitis is a recurrent or chronic problem, a logical and thorough diagnostic plan should be followed. Start with a minimum database of a CBC, serum biochemistry, retroviral serology, urinalysis and blood pressure determination, if not already done in the earlier examination. If rhinoscopy is considered or if epistaxis has been part of the process, a coagulation panel should be performed. Any medications affecting hemostasis (e.g., aspirin, alpha antagonists) should be temporarily discontinued. If regionally appropriate, perform Aspergillus and Cryptococcus serologic titres. If lymph nodes are enlarged, cytologic specimens should be collected to use for staging in case neoplasia is diagnosed by histopathology. Skull radiography or CT/MRI to image dentition, nasal passages and sinuses as well as bone health will require general anaesthesia. Conventional radiography underestimates the extent of disease. Probe all periodontal pockets, retract the soft palate to look for polyps and palpate the soft palate. Three standard radiographic views should be exposed using high detail films and screens. 1) Open mouth ventrodorsal view assesses the nasal cavity and bullae. Symmetry is essential for evaluation of changes. 2) A lateral view allows evaluation of the frontal sinuses; if a change is suspected, it may be followed by an oblique lateral view to focus on the sinus in question. 3) A skyline view of the frontal sinuses is valuable and is performed with the cat in dorsal recumbency, pulling the mandible out of the way. Following imaging, samples should be harvested. Michiels et al evaluated the records of 40 cats who had undergone rhinoscopy for chronic nasal disease to compare relative diagnostic yield. Specimens in 17 cases were collected by brush cytology (higher yield than flush cytology). Concurrent biopsies were collected for histopathologic evaluation. Only 25% of the cases showed agreement. The conclusion was that cytology (even brush cytology) does not appear to be a reliable means for the detection of chronic inflammation and evaluation of chronic rhinitis in cats. The small size of cats makes scoping challenging: a flexible endoscope may be retroflexed around the soft palate if retraction of the soft palate using a dental mirror was unrevealing. To evaluate the more rostral portions of the nasal passage, a rigid 1.9 mm arthroscope with a 30 degree viewing angle may be used if a small flexible scope is unavail-

442


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 443

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

able. Irrigation with sterile saline is essential for optimal visualization. Mucus exudation, a polyp or mass, foreign body or “webbing” (nasopharyngeal stenosis) may be seen. If unilateral disease is present, evaluation of the unaffected side first is recommended. Normal turbinate mucosa should be pale pink and smooth. Hyperemia, irregular turbinate surfaces and moderate amounts of discharge suggest pathology. Fungal plaques may be seen and biopsied. While adenocarcinoma or sarcoma appear as a discrete mass, lymphoma may present as a mass or as a diffuse infiltrate. Even if the mucosa looks normal, biopsies should be taken in a cat with chronic disease, as gross appearance may be misleading. The entire cavity (rostral and caudal) should be examined before biopsying to avoid bleeding which interferes with visualization. Sedation may be desirable upon recovery and overnight hospitalization prevents excessive movement allowing hemostasis to occur. Concurrently, samples should be collected for culture. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures may be set up but results must be interpreted with caution because there are large numbers of normal flora in the nasal cavity. One can improve diagnostic yield by obtaining cultures from deep within the nasal cavity avoiding superficial contamination. Calicivirus identification requires virus isolation (VI). VI may also be attempted for FHV-1, however exposure to FHV-1, Chlamydophyla and Mycoplasma may be determined using PCR. Maggs (2005) assessed the relative sensitivity of PCR assays for the detection of FHV-1 DNA in clinical samples and commercial vaccines. It concluded that none of the assays was able to distinguish between wild-type virus and vaccine virus. Additionally, test sensitivity (detection limits and rates) varies greatly between the tests used. Before recovering the patient from anaesthesia, flush gently and thoroughly to remove and aspirate the discharge to help the patient during and after recovery. The endotracheal tube must be well cuffed and the oropharynx should be packed with a known number of swabs to prevent fluid aspiration.

phyla and L-forms. Azithromycin (5-10 mg/kg PO q24h for 5 days, then q72h long term) is popular because of its long duration of action. Pulse or intermittent therapy (e.g., one week/month) predisposes to the development of antibiotic resistance and cannot be recommended. Administration of antibiotic ophthalmic drops may be included because they can be used as direct topical therapy to the nasal passage. Should Cryptococcus sp. or Aspergillus sp. be cultured, specific antifungal protocols should be followed (discussed elsewhere). If an allergic component is suspected because of seasonal recurrence, antihistamines may be considered. Chlorpheniramine maleate 1-2 mg/cat PO q12h may be used. Less sedative antihistamines (e.g., AllegraTM, ClaritinTM), selectively inhibit peripheral H1 receptors. For FHV-1 infection, administration of the intranasal herpes and calicivirus vaccine two to three times a year may be beneficial in stimulating local immunity. L-lysine helps to reduce the frequency of herpesviral recrudescence by competing with arginine needed for viral replication. The dose is 250 (kittens) – 500 (adults) mg PO q12h long term. Interferon alpha at 30 units PO q24h may also help modulate FHV1 infection. Similarly, ophthalmic administration of alpha interferon in saline has been recommended for cats with herpes virus keratitis or conjunctivitis. Acyclovir is an anti-herpes drug used in humans but is potentially toxic in cats. Famcyclovir (name-brand or generic) is preferable: 15mg/kg PO BID (62.5 mg) X 2 weeks, assess response and decide whether or not to continue. Polyps and foreign bodies should be removed. Nasophyaryngeal stenosis/”webbing” requires surgical resection via a transpalatine approach. Like polyps, webs may reoccur. Dental disease should be treated, repairing fistulae if present. Surgical drainage and flushing may be warranted for some patients with chronic sinusitis. After openings are drilled into the frontal sinus, histopathologic samples and bacterial samples may be collected. Trypsin-containing solutions may help break up heavy mucus. Sinus ablation has also been described in which the frontal sinus is opened by bone flap, the mucoperiosteal lining is removed, necrotic nasal turbinates are removed, the opening between the sinus and nasal passages is obliterated with a piece of temporal muscle fascia and the frontal sinus is packed with a piece of ventral abdominal fat.

THERAPEUTICS: SPECIFIC Practitioners frequently choose antibiotics to treat the cat with upper respiratory disease. But do we know what organism is involved? If multiple organisms are grown on culture, the significance of the growth is questionable. Should a single bacterial species grow on culture that is NOT a normal commensal, sensitivity results may be used. Therapy should be continued for 6-8 weeks without changing the antibiotic if there is an initial positive response to the antibiotic, so the antibiotic should be safe for long-term use. Antibiotics should be chosen that reach the site of infection at effective therapeutic concentrations. Antibiotics that penetrate cartilage and bone are of value making amoxicillin- clavulanic acid, clindamycin and chloramphenicol reasonable choices. Clindamycin, doxycyline and chloramphenicol are effective against Mycoplasma spp.; metronidazole and doxycycline modulate the immune response thereby reducing inflammation somewhat. Doxycycline is effective against Chlamydo-

THERAPEUTICS: NON-SPECIFIC Maintaining hydration is essential for tissue perfusion, but also to make secretions less viscous and to improve cell function (e.g., their ability to clear mucus via the muco-ciliary apparatus). Thus, humidifying the air around patients with chronic airway narrowing is beneficial be it by steaming the bathroom or instilling saline into the nostrils to stimulate sneezing and clearance of the nasal passages. Oral and nasal decongestants doses are listed (Table 1). Anti-inflammatories play a role. By reducing airway swelling, breathing improves and less secretion is produced making the patient more comfortable. Glucocorticoids may help by retarding leukocyte function and migration, block

443


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 444

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

phospholipase A, decreased release of lytic enzymes, suppress delayed hypersensitivity reactions. This makes them candidates for use in lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis, the most common form of chronic rhinitis. Because the condition itself is not life-threatening, glucocorticoids should be used intermittently rather than continuously long-term. The author uses prednisolone daily for a week, and reduces to q48h over the next week. The concern with the use of glucocorticoids is the possibility that they might result in recrudescence of the virus or virus shedding. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories are alternate options; they should be given with food and dosed based on lean body weight. Piroxicam (0.3 mg/kg PO q48h) or meloxicam (0.05 mg/kg SID) may help. Leukotriene blockers may also be considered to reduce inflammatory cell infiltration. SingulairTM: 0.25mg-0.5mg/kg q24h (= 1/8th of a 10 mg tab); AccolateTM: 0.5mg-1mg/kg q12-24h It is critical to pay attention to nutrition in quality, balance and quantity. In addition to the frequently used antihistamine, anti-serotonin drug cyproheptadine (1 mg PO q12h), mirtazapine at 3-4 mg/cat PO q72h is a newly recognized appetite stimulant for cats.

TABLE 1 - Feline Upper Respiratory drugs and doses Antihistamines Amitriptyline (Elavil): 5-10 mg/cat q 12-24 hours Chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton): 1-2 mg/cat q 12-24 hours Clemastine (Tavist): 0.68 mg/cat or 0.05 mg/kg q 12 hours Cyproheptadine (Periactin): 1 mg/cat q 12 hours Diphenhydramine (Benadryl): 2-4 mg/cat q 8-12 hours Hydroxyzine (Atarax): 5-10 mg/cat or 2.2 mg/kg q 8-12 hours Trimeprazine (Temaril): 0.5-1 mg/kg q 8-12 hours Cetirizine (Zyrtec): 5 mg/cat q 12 hours Fexofenadine (Allegra): 10 mg/cat q 12 hours Claritin: 0.5 mg/kg/day Decongestants Diphenhydramine HCl 2-4mg/kg PO q8h Dimenhydrinate 4mg/cat PO q8h Pseudoephedrine 1 mg/kg PO q8h Nasal decongestant drops: Pediatric otrivin=0.05% xylometazoline (1 drop into each nostril SID for three days only to avoid rebound congestion). “Little Noses” Saline Spray/Drops non medicated “Little Noses” Decongestant Nose Drops with phenylephrine hydrochloride Afrin (oxymetazoline)

PROGNOSIS It is important that clients understand that a cat with chronic rhinitis/rhinosinusitis will never be cured. With ongoing management, the patient’s quality of life can be improved with a reduction in sneezing and nasal discharge.

Note: With any topical, medicated decongestant, you may get rebound effect due to secondary Beta adrenergic stimulation after three days. Not dangerous, just more congested.

444


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 445

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Diagnostic imaging of the lymphatic system Gabriela S. Seiler Dr Vet Med, Dipl ECVDI, Dipl ACVR, Cert Clin Res, Carolina State, USA

The lymphatic system is involved in most disease processes, and imaging of the lymphatic system can provide important information about type and severity of the patient’s disease. The lymphatic system can be divided into a vascular and a cellular component. The vascular system includes lymph capillaries, lymph vessels and collecting ducts. The vascular lymphatic system has mainly transport function in addition to the venous part of the vascular system. They remove interstitial fluid from tissues, absorb and transport fatty acids and fats as chyle from the digestive system, they transport white blood cells between the lymph nodes and bones, and carry antigen-presenting cells to the lymph nodes where an immune response is stimulated. The lymphatic capillaries are transparent and the lymph they carry is clear everywhere except in the intestinal villi, where the absorbed and transported emulsified fat or chyle makes the lymph appear milky. These intestinal lymphatic capillaries are known as lacteals. Interstitial fluid enters the lymph capillaries and flows slowly towards the heart via lymphatic ducts. Fluid is transported via peristalsis of the lymph vessels or passive compression from surrounding tissues such as musculature. The thoracic duct collects the lymph fluid from almost the entire body and connects to the general circulation via jugular vein or cranial vena cava. The thoracic duct is the continuation of the cisterna chyli after it courses through the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm. The cisterna chyli is the only portion of the normal vascular lymphatic system that can be seen on diagnostic imaging studies without the use of contrast media. The cisterna chyli is normally seen on cross-sectional imaging such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and should not be confused with pathological conditions. It is displayed as one or multiple tubular structure running alongside the aorta. The cisterna chyli may enhance after contrast medium administration. To investigate the anatomy of the lymph vessels and possible abnormalities, a lymphangiogram has to be performed in most cases. The most common indications are lymphedema, or chylothorax. Lymphangiography is performed by injecting iodinated contrast medium into a lymph node, or a lymph vessel. With the wide availability of ultrasound, ultrasound-guided lymph node injections are most commonly performed. Both the

popliteal and mesenteric lymph nodes are usually accessible for injections; if possible, the popliteal lymph node is preferred in our practice as no injection into a body cavity is needed. The hair over the lymph node is clipped and the skin is aseptically prepared. A 25 gauge needle is then inserted under ultrasound guidance into the center of the lymph node, followed by very slow injection of iodinated contrast medium through an extension set at a dose of 0.5 ml/kg in dogs, at a total dose of 1.5ml in cats. Immediately following injection radiographs or if available, CT images of the limb, abdomen and thorax are acquired to evaluate transportation of the lymph fluid. If the distal extremity is to be examined, a lymph vessel has to be directly cannulated for good delineation of the lymphatics. Feeding a fatty meal before the study enlarges the lymph vessels. Then, 0.5 – 1.5 ml of a dilute vegetable dye such as patent blue (2-3%) or Evans Blue (2-3%) is injected interdigitally, subcutaneously or intradermally. The dorsal metatarsal or metacarpal region is then surgically exposed and a blue stained lymphatic vessel is isolated. Lastly, the lymphatic vessel is cannulated with a 25 to 27 gauge needle and 2 to 20 ml of iodinated contrast medium are infused by hand or through an infusion pump and radiographs or CT images are obtained. CT is the preferred imaging method for lymphangiography, since it has higher contrast resolution and cross-sectional imaging avoids obscuring smaller lymph vessels by the ribcage or other superimposed structures. Lymphoscintigraphy is an alternative, noninvasive and safe method. However, it requires availability of a gamma camera and is therefore not commonly used. Lymphoscintigraphy involves subcutaneous injection of the radioactive substance, technetium-99m, coupled to sulphur colloid or albumin. The radioactive particles are then imaged as they pass through the lymphatic system, and draining lymph nodes can be visualized. The disadvantage of this method is that the spatial resolution is poor. The cellular component of the lymphatic system consists of lymph nodes, and aggregations of lymph tissue in other organs such as the gastrointestinal tract, thymus, and the spleen. Lymph nodes are located in peri-articular fat stores, the mediastinum and mesentery, and adjacent to many larger blood vessels. Each lymph node consists of a capsule containing elastic and smooth muscle fibers, and an internal

445


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 446

73째 Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

framework consisting of septa and trabeculae. Microscopically, each node is made up of a central medulla, which contains cords of lymphocytes and small sinuses, and an outer cortex containing lymphatic nodules or follicles. There are no lymph vessels in the brain and spinal cord or within skeletal muscles; however, mucous membranes and the skin are richly supplied with lymph vessels. The spleen, thymus, and bone marrow also contain lymphoid tissue, although the latter primarily forms erythrocytes and leukocytes rather than lymphocytes. Afferent lymph vessels enter the lymph node at the capsule (afferent = arriving). Efferent (= leaving) lymph vessels leave the node at the hilus. The hilus is also the entrance for the venous and arterial blood supply of the lymph node. The lymph nodes are primarily involved in immune responses. When infectious agents appear in the drainage area of a lymph node, they stimulate hyperplasia of the lymph node with an increase in numbers of macrophages and reticulocytes. The lymph node enlargement leads to stretching of the capsule which can be painful. Lymph nodes also act as filters for other cells such as tumor cells. Tumor cells carried in the lymph may become trapped in the lymph nodes where they are phagocytosed and destroyed or initiate a metastatic lesion. If metastatic tumor cells are not filtered out by the lymph nodes, they enter the circulation and lead to hematogeneous metastatic spread. All diagnostic imaging modalities can be used to investigate the lymph nodes to some degree. Radiography is the least sensitive method to detect lymph node enlargement, or lymphomegaly. On radiographs, normal and only mildly enlarged lymph nodes are not typically seen, only if they are surrounded by a fair amount of fat as for example the popliteal lymph node. Advanced lymphomegaly will lead to a mass effect with displacement of adjacent structures, for example ventral displacement of the descending colon and rectum in the case of sublumbar lymphomegaly. Ultrasound is the most commonly used imaging method to assess lymph nodes. Normal lymph nodes should be spindle-shaped, slender and have an echogenicity very similar to

the surrounding fat. The capsule should be smooth and hyperechoic. Occasionally, a hyperechoic hilus can be seen. Most lymph nodes are only a few millimeters wide, reliable reference values are not available. When comparing lymph node size, the width is more reliable than the length, as it is often difficult to have the entire length of a lymph node in the same image plane resulting in measurement errors. More important than the measurements however is the sonographic appearance of the lymph node, typically abnormal lymph nodes become more hypoechoic compared to the surrounding fat and become rounded rather than elongated. Doppler examination of the lymph nodes or contrast enhanced ultrasound can be performed to evaluate the blood flow and vascular architecture of the lymph node. Tumor infiltrates for example may lead to compression of blood vessels, or increased vascular supply which can be visualized with contrast enhanced ultrasound. Normal abdominal lymph nodes have a resistive index (RI) <0.65 and a pulsatility index (PI) of <1.45 whereas metastatic lymph nodes often have an elevated RI and PI. Head and neck lymph nodes as well as intrathoracic lymph nodes are more commonly investigated with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as the skull as well as the ribcage and air-filled lungs limit accessibility for ultrasound imaging. Normal lymph nodes on CT and MR are smooth in outline, have uniform density or signal intensity, and typically enhance strongly and uniformly after contrast medium administration. Normal thoracic lymph nodes, if visible at all, typically are less than 5mm in thickness whereas head and neck lymph nodes should be less than 10mm in thickness. In most cases, fine needle aspiration will be necessary to determine if a lymph node is normal or abnormal, and if it is reactive or neoplastic. Fine needle aspiration under ultrasound guidance should only be performed by ultrasonographers experienced in this technique. Lymph nodes, even if enlarged, are still relatively small structures that are mobile in the surrounding fat and closely associated with large vessels.

446


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 447

73째 CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Imaging of disorders of the lymphatic system in dogs Gabriela S. Seiler Dr Vet Med, Dipl ECVDI, Dipl ACVR, Cert Clin Res, Carolina State, USA

The spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, bone marrow and lymphoid tissue are all components of the lymphatic system and all are interconnected to help defend the body from infection and filter unwanted elements in the bloodstream. Since lymphatic tissue is essentially present in the entire body, diseases of the lymphatic system can affect multiple different organ systems. Enlargement of lymph nodes, described as lymphomegaly or lymphadenopathy is the most common manifestation of disease of the lymphatic system. Lymphomegaly can be a manifestation of lymphosarcoma but it can also result from other causes such as infections or foreign substances (lymphadenitis). The lymph nodes become enlarged as they go into overdrive to produces white blood cells to fight infection. Vaccinations and inflammations can also result in lymph node enlargement. Differentiation of a neoplastic from a reactive lymph node is usually not possible using imaging methods alone. As a rule of thumb though, the larger and rounder the lymph node becomes with loss of its normal ovoid or elongated shape the more likely it is neoplastic rather than just reactive. Ultrasonographically, very hypoechoic enlarged lymph nodes are also more likely neoplastic than lymph nodes that retain their normal echogenicity, however there is overlap in the described changes between neoplastic and reactive lymph nodes and tissue sampling such as fine needle aspiration or biopsy (tru-cut or excisional) is usually needed for a definitive diagnosis. Doppler ultrasound characteristics such as resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) as well as detection of abnormal subcapsular or displaced intranodal blood vessels using contrast enhanced ultrasound may aid in the diagnosis of neoplastic versus reactive lymph nodes. Juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis is a rare immune-mediated skin disease in young dogs aged between 2 and 9 months. This condition leads to enlarged lymph nodes, fever and dermatitis. In these young dogs, differentiation between normal and abnormal lymph nodes for example on ultrasound imaging can be difficult, since juvenile animals have larger lymph nodes than adult dogs in general. Heterogeneous lymph nodes with cavitations are an indication though that the lymph nodes are not normal. The diagnosis is made cytologically, where pyogranulomatous inflammation is determined. Lymphangitis is a rare condition in dogs and results from

infections, trauma and foreign bodies and involves an inflammation of the lymph vessels. Lymphangiectasia: is a blockage that is caused by dilation of the lymph vessels, this most commonly occurs in the intestinal tract and will be described in more detail under diagnostic imaging of intestinal disorders. Lymphedema: is a painful and dysfunctional disease that is common in certain breeds such as Poodles, Great Danes and Retrievers, and Draft horses. Lymph collects in soft tissue in the limbs leading to severe swelling and edema. Surgery, trauma, tumors, infection and radiation therapy can sometimes contribute to obstruction or destruction of lymph vessels and lead to lymphedema. Chylothorax: involves the accumulation of chyle (comprising of lymph and emulsified fats) in the thoracic cavity. This can be caused by obstruction or rupture of the thoracic duct. Less commonly, an abnormal thoracic duct will cause this condition. Lymphangiography either using radiography or computed tomography may be needed to diagnose these conditions, and the procedure is described in detail in the pleural effusion section. The following text will focus in more detail on canine lymphosarcoma, one of the most common disorders of the canine lymphatic system and of canine cancers.

THE MANY FACES OF LYMPHOSARCOMA Lymphosarcoma is classified based on the affected body region into: 1. Multicentric lymphosarcoma 2. Gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma 3. Mediastinal lymphosarcoma 4. Cutaneous lymphosarcoma 5. Extranodal and central nervous system (CNS) lymphosarcoma Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in diagnosing and staging the disease which is important for treatment choices. Typically, thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound are performed; in cases of suspected CNS lymphosarcoma cross-sectional imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) become important imaging tools.

447


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 448

73째 Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Thoracic radiographs are an essential part of staging most types of lymphosarcoma, and may be used to suspect mediastinal lymphosarcoma in dyspneic patients. The primary finding is enlargement of the thoracic lymph nodes including the sternal, mediastinal and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Radiographic signs of thoracic lymphomegaly include widening and increased soft tissue opacity of the cranial mediastinum with mediastinal lymphomegaly, an ovoid retrosternal soft tissue opacity if the sternal lymph node is enlarged, and perihilar soft tissue opacity if the tracheobronchial lymph nodes are affected. The tracheobronchial lymph nodes are grouped around the tracheal bifurcation, enlargement leads to dorsal deviation of the trachea cranial to the bifurcation and ventral displacement of the principal bronchi. The thymus may be enlarged and infiltrated in cases with mediastinal lymphosarcoma. The thymus is located immediately cranial to the heart and slightly on the left side. Enlargement will lead to a cranial mediastinal mass that abuts the cranial aspect of the cardiac silhouette and leads to widening of the cranial mediastinum on the ventrodorsal projection, extending slightly to the left cranial aspect of the heart. Lymphosarcoma can affect the pulmonary parenchyma as well. The typical radiographic appearance is a dense interstitial pulmonary pattern with a structured or reticular appearance. The findings may be subtle, and in some cases are recognized only retrospectively if the pulmonary parenchyma decreases in opacity after the start of a chemotherapy regimen. Abdominal radiographs can be used to determine presence of hepato-splenomegaly and in some instances severely enlarged lymph nodes can be recognized. The modality of choice however for staging and diagnosing lymphosarcoma in the abdomen is ultrasound imaging. The main finding in canine lymphosarcoma is more or less generalized lymph node enlargement. Lymph nodes typically become very hypoechoic and rounded or lobulated, often with a rim of reactive and very hyperechoic mesentery around them. Jejunal lymph nodes are often less severely affected than for example the medial iliac or hepatic lymph nodes. Lymph nodes such as aortic, splenic or gastric that are not routinely seen on abdominal ultrasound imaging may suddenly be

conspicuous. The spleen, if affected, is enlarged and has a characteristic appearance with multiple punctate hypoechoic nodules throughout the parenchyma. In juvenile animals though this same appearance is seen as well and caused by lymphoid hyperplasia, and should not be confused with lymphosarcoma. Liver infiltrates on the other hand have very non-specific appearance ranging from a normal echotexture to hyper- or hypoechoic liver parenchyma. Usually the liver is enlarged though in presence of lymphosarcoma. Other organs are less commonly affected, such as the kidney, pancreas and gastrointestinal tract. Although the ultrasonographic appearance of abdominal lymphosarcoma can be quite typical, fine needle aspiration and cytology are needed for a definitive diagnosis. Extranodal lymphosarcoma can affect the skin, liver, mammary glands, eyes or orbits, bones and mouth. These forms of lymphosarcoma are rare, and diagnostic imaging has limited use for cutaneous and ocular lymphosarcoma. Lymphosarcoma affecting the bone can be suspected radiographically if multiple bones are osteopenic with symmetric lytic lesions predominantly affecting the metaphyses. Direct neoplastic infiltration of bone marrow with infarction and necrosis and subsequent removal of bone by osteoclasts may cause the lytic lesions. The metaphyseal regions are particularly vulnerable because of their higher metabolic turnover and sluggish blood flow through associated venous sinusoids. This type of lymphosarcoma mostly affects juvenile dogs. Central nervous system lymphosarcoma is considered to be the result of metastatic disease of multicentric lymphosarcoma. It is the third most common secondary brain tumor in dogs, and is overall responsible for about 4% of all canine intracranial tumors. Both the brain and spinal cord may be affected, and have variety of appearances. Most commonly, intracranial lymphosarcoma is T2-hyperintense and contrast enhancing with evidence of perilesional edema. Meningeal enhancement in the region of the lesion is commonly seen. The MR findings of intracranial lymphosarcoma can be similar to meningioma or histiocytic sarcoma. The diagnosis is supported by identification of lymphoblasts in the cerebrospinal fluid.

448


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 449

73째 CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Lymphoma or IBD? diagnostic imaging of small intestinal disease Gabriela S. Seiler Dr Vet Med, Dipl ECVDI, Dipl ACVR, Cert Clin Res, Carolina State, USA

Clinical signs associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as inappetence, vomiting and diarrhea are common indications for diagnostic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. In any patient with gastrointestinal (GI) signs, with the exception of acute diarrhea, survey radiographs are recommended to rule out presence of radiopaque foreign bodies, and to determine if there is an abnormal gas pattern anywhere along the GI-tract. Radiographic contrast studies using barium sulfate or iodinated contrast media are not commonly used anymore and not very sensitive or specific for inflammatory or neoplastic diseases affecting the gastrointestinal wall. Ultrasound is nowadays the diagnostic imaging method of choice to further evaluate the gastrointestinal tract, as it allows examination of the GI contents, the wall thickness and structure, the GI motility, and evaluation of any associated disorders, for example pancreatitis or cholangiohepatitis. In people, computed tomography (CT) is also commonly used to evaluate the intestinal tract; this is not widely used or accepted in veterinary medicine today. Focal small intestinal masses are usually neoplastic in origin, with the exception of relatively uncommon fungal infections, foreign body granulomas, abscesses, hypertrophy and hematomas. Typically, in neoplastic masses the wall layering is disrupted, whereas for example focal smooth muscle hypertrophy described in the cat leads to focal wall thickening but preserved wall layers. Tissue sampling either by full thickness biopsy, or ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration or biopsy (if the mass is large enough) is required for a definitive diagnosis. The most challenging gastrointestinal diseases are the ones that tend to lead to diffuse infiltration of the small intestinal wall. Ultrasound is very valuable to detect and characterize lesion localization and degree of infiltration of the small intestinal wall.

sound, and abnormal ultrasound findings are not specific for a certain type of disease, therefore intestinal biopsy, with full-thickness biopsy being the gold standard, is required to determine the exact type of inflammatory disease. Ultrasonographic changes are usually diffuse although focal or segmental changes are possible as mentioned above. Mild to moderate transmural thickening but also normal overall wall thickness is commonly observed. In most instances the wall layers are preserved but the relative thickness of the individual layers may be abnormal. Wall layers may become indistinct with severe cellular infiltration, edema, ulcers or hemorrhage. Hypertrophy of the muscularis layer seen as a thick hypoechoic peripheral rim is common in chronic small intestinal disorders, particularly in cats with lymphoplasmacytic or eosinophilic infiltrates. In cats more than in dogs, the finding of a thickened muscularis layer has also been associated with lymphoma and mast cell tumor. Thickening and hyperechogenicity of the mucosa is mostly associated with lymphoplasmacytic enteritis and lymphangiectasia. The lacteal dilations seen with lymphangiectasia result in striations that are perpendicular to the long axis of the bowel loop, the intestinal walls are thickened and may be corrugated, and there usually is abdominal effusion present. Hyperechoic speckles or diffuse hyperechogenicity may be seen with lymphoplasmacytic enteritis; however hyperechoic speckles in the intestinal mucosa are sometimes seen in normal or asymptomatic animals as well. Hyperechoic lines in the mucosa that are parallel to the long axis of the bowel loop have been shown to represent fibrosis histopathologically; however the clinical significance of this finding is doubtful.

NEOPLASTIC DISEASE INFLAMMATORY DISEASE

Neoplasia is more commonly focal than inflammatory disease which is usually diffuse, but there is some overlap. Loss of wall layers is the best predictor of presence of neoplastic disease. When loss of layering is noticed, it is 50 times more likely to be a neoplastic lesion. Additionally, wall thickness of a neoplastic lesion was shown to be statistically greater than in inflammatory disease. Inflammatory disease is typically associated with no or only mild lym-

Inflammatory intestinal diseases are common both in dogs and cats. The most common type is lymphoplasmacytic enteritis; other types include eosinophilic enteritis, granulomatous enteritis, protein-losing enteropathy with lymphangiectasia, food allergies, and chronic infections. These diseases do not always lead to changes detectable on ultra-

449


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 450

73째 Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

TABLE 1 Inflammatory disease

Neoplastic disease

Distribution

72% diffuse 28% focal

2% diffuse 98% focal

Wall layering

88% normal or reduced 11% absent

1% normal or reduced 99% absent

Wall thickness

0.2-2.9 cm

0.5-7.9 cm

Lymph node size

0.6-2.6 cm

0.3-9.0 cm

phadenopathy whereas neoplasia is more commonly focal, and if associated lymph nodes are enlarged they tend to be larger than with inflammatory disease only. In table 1, ultrasonographic findings of inflammatory and neoplastic small intestinal disease in dogs are summarized (Penninck et al., Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2003) Intestinal lymphoma is seen in both cats and dogs. It is most commonly evident as a focal circumferential transmural hypoechoic mass with loss of wall layering. Partial obstruction of the lumen may occur, but usually obstruction is not complete. Although fortunately not common, perforation of intestinal lymphoma with subsequent septic abdomen can occur. In cats lymphoma tends to be diffuse affecting all or large segments of the intestine. The neoplastic infiltrate can affect all wall layers without causing visible loss of wall layering. Thickening of the muscularis layer has been reported in both intestinal lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease in cats. A recent publication determined a significant association between muscularis layer thickening and T-cell lymphoma in cats, but did not show a significant difference in occurrence of lymph node enlargement when comparing cats with lymphoma and cats with IBD. All the above mentioned imaging characteristics of diffuse intestinal lymphoma in cats make it almost impossible to differentiate lymphoma from IBD based on ultrasound imaging alone. To further complicate matters, cats with disease limited to the mucosa and lamina propria determined histopathologically had no ultrasonographic abnormalities. If a clinical or ultrasonographic suspicion of diffuse intestinal lymphoma exists, fine needle aspirates with cytology of the associated lymph nodes may provide a relatively non-invasive answer if lymphoma is diagnosed with certainty. If the lymph nodes are reactive or the aspirates are non-diagnostic, intestinal biopsies are required for a definitive diagnosis. Due to the variable involvement of the different wall layers full-thickness intestinal biopsies are superior to endoscopic biopsies. Intestinal adenocarcinomas also occur in both dogs and cats. They typically present as a transmural solitary mass with sonographically complete loss of wall layering, diffuse

disease is very rare. Intestinal obstruction is more common with carcinoma than with lymphoma, and carcinoma is often asymmetric whereas lymphoma tends to be concentric. Otherwise the sonographic appearance of focal lymphoma or adenocarcinoma is very similar. Advanced disease can lead to metastatic spread throughout the mesentery, seen as multifocal small hypoechoic nodules in the mesentery and often free fluid. Intestinal mast cell tumors are less common than lymphoma but can have a similar appearance particularly in cats. In a recent publication, mast cell tumors were most commonly found to have focal, hypoechoic wall thickening that was non-circumferential and eccentric, or circumferential, asymmetric and eccentric. Loss of wall layering was not present in 40% of cats who had thickened muscularis layer instead. Metastatic disease was found in the abdominal lymph nodes in 50% of cats, whereas liver and spleen was not commonly observed. Interestingly, in 29% of cats, concurrent small cell lymphoma was present. Intestinal smooth muscle tumors such as leiomyomas or leiomyosarcomas are more common in dogs than in cats. Leiomyosarcomas are often very large, irregular masses that can grow beyond the intestinal serosa. Perforation is common in gastric leiomyosarcomas. Leiomyomas on the other hand tend to be smaller focal intramural hypoechoic nodules or masses with loss of wall layering. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of the small intestinal wall is usually only rewarding if a focal intestinal mass is present. If the mass is large enough, tru-cut biopsies may be performed however they are often not necessary as a diagnosis can be made on cytology. Care has to be taken not to penetrate the intestinal lumen with the needle, sedation is usually required. If the regional lymph nodes (jejunal, colonic, pancreaticoduodenal or gastric) are large enough, typically a thickness of 5mm or more, fine needle aspirates can be performed under ultrasound guidance which may help reaching a conclusion about the small intestinal disease. Since lymph nodes are small, mobile and always closely associated with the vasculature sedation is required for these procedures.

450


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 451

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Advances in diagnostic imaging of splenic disorders Gabriela S. Seiler Dr Vet Med, Dipl ECVDI, Dipl ACVR, Cert Clin Res, Carolina State, USA

neoplasia more likely, as the likelihood of several hematomas forming in the spleen at the same time is lower. The best predictor for malignancy, is the presence of other neoplastic lesions within the abdomen. Splenic hemangiosarcomas tend to metastasize to the liver. Hemangiosarcoma metastases in the liver present as hypoechoic nodule, this appearance however is also non-specific and the differentiation between benign nodular hyperplasia and metastatic neoplasia is often impossible using conventional ultrasound. Other sites of metastasis include the peritoneal space and omentum. If multiple hypoechoic nodules are seen along the peritoneal surface and in the mesenteric fat, a neoplastic lesion should be suspected. Similarly, hypoechoic or cavitated lesions in the kidneys in association with a bleeding splenic mass can be assumed to be metastatic in origin. Contrast enhanced ultrasound presents an opportunity to gain more specific information in dogs with hemoabdomen and splenic masses. Ultrasound contrast agents are microscopic gas-filled spheres (microbubbles) that are injected into the blood stream through a peripheral vein. The microbubbles remain intravascular, and since they are gas filled they produce a very strong backscatter echo and markedly increase the visibility of even small blood vessels. The use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound to determine if a splenic mass is benign or malignant is still controversial and not clearly determined. The perfusion parameters and imaging appearance of splenic hemangiosarcoma were not different from splenic hematomas in some studies, whereas others postulate that the presence of very tortuous peripheral blood vessels during contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging is consistent with hemangiosarcoma. As mentioned above, both types of masses tend to have a perfused portion (tumor tissue in hemangiosarcomas and lymphoid hyperplasia in hematomas) and large non-perfused areas (hematoma), therefore a clearly different appearance when imaging the vasculature is not expected when using contrast enhanced ultrasound. Where contrast-enhanced ultrasound has proven to be very useful is in the characterization of liver nodules. The hepatic blood volume consists of 80% portal venous blood and 20% arterial blood. Benign liver nodules such as nodular regeneration have a structure very similar to normal liver tissue, with both arterial and portal venous blood flow. Metastatic nodules as with hemangiosarcoma on the other

Splenic changes detected with diagnostic imaging are common, and many of them are poorly characterized. The primary imaging methods of choice to work up splenic disease are still radiography and diagnostic ultrasound, however with the more common occurrence of cross-sectional imaging methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), splenic lesions are often detected during general abdominal and spinal imaging. Some advances in ultrasound have been made with the use of contrast media. In the following imaging findings of splenic disorders and their further workup will be described.

SPLENIC MASS AND HEMOABDOMEN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; IS IT HEMANGIOSARCOMA? Hemoabdomen is a common presentation in the small animal emergency service. Exploratory surgery without prior imaging is a valid option in a patient with established hemoabdomen. However, owners and clinicians often seek additional information prior to surgery to determine the source of bleeding and to estimate prognosis. A percentage of dogs present with other sources of hemorrhage such as bleeding hepatic masses or even retroperitoneal hemorrhagic masses that have entered the peritoneal space (retroperitoneal hemangiosarcoma or invasive adrenal tumors). In these cases abdominal ultrasound is very helpful to determine that a mass is not surgically resectable and exploratory surgery can be avoided. Ruptured splenic masses, either hemangiosarcomas or hematomas however are most often the cause of hemoabdomen in older dogs. The ultrasonographic appearance of splenic hematomas does not differ from the appearance of hemangiosarcomas. Both splenic hemangiosarcomas and splenic hematomas usually present as large, complex and cavitated masses that often distort the shape of the spleen and expand the splenic capsule. Detection of blood flow within the mass using Doppler ultrasound does not increase the likelihood of a neoplastic lesion, since splenic hematomas most commonly originate from a focus of lymphoid hyperplasia that starts to bleed, and this focal hyperplastic tissue is incorporated in the hematoma and is well perfused. Splenic hemangiosarcomas on the other hand consist of large areas of non-perfused hematomas. Detection of multiple cavitated masses makes

451


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 452

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

hand grow more rapidly and have a large amount of angiogenesis and neovascularization, therefore their main blood supply is arterial in origin. This results in a different enhancement pattern. Malignant liver nodules tend to have an initial “blush” of enhancement during the arterial phase, but remain hypoechoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma during peak liver enhancement when the portal venous system is saturated with contrast medium. Benign liver nodules typically enhance very similar to the surrounding liver during peak hepatic enhancement, leading to reduced visibility at peak enhancement. Contrast enhanced ultrasound has been shown to very accurately diagnose malignancy if nodules remained hypoechoic at peak liver enhancement. Not seeing any metastatic lesions using contrast enhanced ultrasound however does not completely rule out the presence of metastatic disease, as some metastatic liver nodules may still be very small and not detectable at the time of imaging.

entiate benign from malignant nodules. There are several studies published evaluating the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for the diagnostic workup of splenic nodules, but conflicting results have been reported, and a larger study with higher case numbers is still needed to determine the use of this method. There is little published information available on the CT and MR appearance of benign vs. malignant splenic nodules. One paper looking at splenic hemangiosarcomas describes the contrast enhancement of splenic nodules as a predictor for malignancy, and has determined that a HU measurement of less than 55 after contrast medium administration is most consistent with splenic hemangiosarcoma. However only a small number of dogs were evaluated in this study, and the results have to be validated in a larger study. The most commonly seen splenic nodules on MR imaging are hypointense on both T1 and T2 weighted imaging, these are usually considered benign and may be associated with iron storage in extramedullary hematopoiesis. However, publications confirming this observation are not currently available.

SPLENIC NODULES – BENIGN OR MALIGNANT? DIFFUSE SPLENIC DISEASE Splenic nodules are frequently identified when imaging the abdomen and the question subsequently arises whether they are benign or malignant. Unfortunately, the imaging findings of most splenic nodules are non-specific, and a diagnosis can only be reached cytologically or histopathologically. The exceptions are myelolipomas which can usually be recognized with a high degree of certainty. Myelolipomas occur both in dogs and in cats and present ultrasonographically as very hyperechoic nodules adjacent to the hilar splenic vessels. Some myelolipomas are present throughout the parenchyma and can reach quite a large size. Large myelolipomas may have an associated sound attenuation in the tissues deep to them, creating the appearance of distal shadowing. On CT imaging, myelolipomas can be recognized based on their low Hounsfield Units (HU) in a negative range, consistent with fat. On MR imaging, the bright signal intensity of myelolipomas in T1- and T2-weighted sequences with signal nulling in fat suppressed or STIR sequences is also quite typical for myelolipomas. The second cause of splenic nodules that is usually recognizable is lymphosarcoma. Nodules associated with lymphosarcoma are small and hypoechoic and extremely numerous throughout the spleen, giving it a “swiss cheese” appearance. However the same appearance is seen in very young animals with increased lymphoid hyperplasia and in puppies with suspected lymphoma fine needle aspiration will be necessary to differentiate the two causes. Ultrasonographically, most other splenic nodules are very non-specific in appearance. Benign lesions such as lymphoid hyperplasia and extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) can be associated with a large degree of internal hemorrhage and/or necrosis and become quite large, creating a cavitated mass-lesion that may bulge from the splenic capsule. On the other hand, neoplastic lesions may present as well-defined hypoechoic nodules. Therefore, currently fine needle aspirates or biopsy of splenic nodules is the only way to differ-

Diffuse infiltrative splenic disease is recognizable mostly due to splenic enlargement, rarely a change in echogenicity on ultrasound imaging. In unsedated cats where a large spleen is detected with any imaging modality, this finding should be investigated further as a high percentage of cats with splenomegaly are eventually diagnosed with diseases such as mast cell tumor, lymphosarcoma, or FIP. In dogs, splenomegaly is much more common, especially in certain breeds like German shepherd dogs or Greyhounds, and is more commonly benign as with lymphoid hyperplasia or congestion. An enlarged spleen with a normal echogenicity in a dog is therefore often not further investigated with invasive procedures, unless there is a suspicion of a diffuse neoplastic or infectious process. In some instances, fine needle aspiration of the spleen is warranted even if the spleen is normal in size and echotexture. Mast cell tumors have been reported to occur without any visible ultrasonographic changes in the spleen, and routing splenic aspirates are often performed during the staging process of higher grade mast cell tumors.

SPLENIC VASCULAR DISEASE – INFARCTION, TORSION, THROMBOSIS Due to its slow blood flow, the splenic vein is one of the more commonly affected abdominal veins in animals with hypercoagulable status. Splenic vein thrombi are readily seen in the lumen of the larger splenic veins, and may be mineralized as they mature. If complete obstruction is present, splenic infarction may result. Ultrasonographically, splenic infarcts appear as sharply delineated, often triangular or rectangular areas in the periphery of the spleen with a very hypoechoic parenchyma with a lacy pattern. Occasionally, splenic infarcts are in the center of the splenic

452


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 453

73째 Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

parenchyma and have a rounded shape, and may be confused with splenic masses or nodules of other origin. The very hypoechoic structure and lack of blood flow within the nodule with Doppler ultrasound allows the diagnosis of infarction. On CT and MR imaging, lack of perfusion after contrast medium administration is diagnostic for splenic infarction. Complete infarction of the spleen occurs with

splenic torsion. In these cases, the entire spleen becomes enlarged, malpositioned, and again very hypoechoic with a lacy pattern on ultrasound, or completely non-enhancing on other imaging modalities. Triangular areas of fat can be seen traveling into the splenic hilus along the twisted blood vessels, and an absence of blood flow within the spleen can be demonstrated using Doppler ultrasound.

453


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 454

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Diagnostic imaging workup of patients with pleural effusion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; imaging of the thoracic duct Gabriela S. Seiler Dr Vet Med, Dipl ECVDI, Dipl ACVR, Cert Clin Res, Carolina State, USA

Possible causes for pleural effusion are listed in table 1:

PHYSIOLOGY OF THE PLEURAL SPACE The normal pleural space contains a small amount of fluid that acts as a lubricant between the lungs and the thoracic wall. The main function of the pleural space is to create negative pressure which keeps the lung lobes attached to the chest wall and causes the lung lobes to expand as the chest wall expands during inspiration, with subsequent air flow into the lungs. There is a constant turnover of fluid within the pleural space. Hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressures of blood vessels within the parietal pleura, which is supplied by the systemic circulation, and blood vessels of the visceral pleura, which is supplied by the pulmonary circulation, influence the pleural fluid. Since the systemic hydrostatic pressure is higher than the pulmonary hydrostatic pressure, there is a constant net flow of fluid into the pleural space. This excess fluid is absorbed into the pulmonary circulation, but also into the lymphatics of the thoracic cavity. Removal of pleural fluid and particles by the lymphatic system is enhanced by the respiratory movements.

TABLE 1 Transudate

Exudate

Heart failure

Pyothorax

Lymphosarcoma

Pleural foreign body

Diaphragmatic hernia

Pneumonia

Pneumonia

Neoplasia (mesothelioma, carcinomatosis)

Hypoproteinemia

Chylothorax

Lung lobe torsion

FIP

Hemorrhage

Nocadiosis

Trauma

Fungal disease

coagulopathy

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING OF PATIENTS WITH PLEURAL EFFUSION CAUSES OF PLEURAL EFFUSION The first step in the diagnostic workup of a patient with pleural effusion is thoracocentesis with fluid analysis (cytology and culture), followed by diagnostic imaging. Radiographs are usually the first modality of choice in any patient with respiratory disease. Pleural space disease leads to decreased negative pressure with the result that the lung lobes retract from the thoracic wall. This is seen radiographically as soft tissue opacity between the chest wall and lung lobes, and in between the lung lobes along the pleural fissure lines. The margins of the lung lobes are slightly rounded. Marked rounding and distortion of the lung lobes is seen with chronic pleural effusions and associated fibrosing pleuritis. The soft tissue opacity of the pleural fluid silhouettes with other soft tissue structures in the thorax such as the mediastinum, cardiac silhouette and diaphragm. This creates a problem for the clinician interpreting the radiographs, as the main reason for the radiographic examination is to determine an underlying cause for the pleural effusion, for example cardiac, mediastinal and diaphragmatic disease. Thoracocentesis with removal of as much fluid as possible improves radiographic quality. Also, ventrodorsal radiographs

Both causes and consequences of pleural space disease can be deduced from this basic pleural space physiology. The highly regulated fluid balance is disrupted with local or systemic derangements. Increased capillary permeability due to local infection or neoplasia leads to exudate formation as with pyothorax or neoplastic effusions. Trauma or clotting disorders for example with rodenticide toxicity lead to hemorrhagic effusion. Systemic factors typically lead to transudate formation in the pleural space. Possible causes include low oncotic pressure due to hypoalbuminemia, increased systemic capillary pressure seen in right heart failure in dogs, or increased pulmonary capillary pressure as seen with left heart failure in cats. Systemic diseases leading to generalized vasculitis such as DIC, sepsis, SIRS often are associated with some degree of pleural effusion as well. Finally, diseases or dysfunction of the lymphatic system lead to decreased drainage of the pleural space and fluid accumulation. Possible causes include mediastinal masses with lymph flow obstruction, and obstruction or trauma to the thoracic duct.

454


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 455

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

are better than dorsoventral radiographs to evaluate the heart and mediastinal structures in presence of pleural fluid, as the fluid accumulates in the depressions along the spine rather than surrounding the heart. Finally, displacement of visible thoracic structures such as the trachea can be used to estimate heart size and possible presence of a mediastinal mass. In cats particularly, the trachea may be dorsally displaced without mediastinal lesions or cardiac enlargement. However caudal displacement of the tracheal bifurcation is only seen in presence of a mediastinal mass. A thin, curvilinear radiolucency corresponding to the pericardial fat also often helps in delineating the cardiac silhouette and determine if there is likely cardiomegaly or not. Positional radiographs (horizontal beam with the patient in dorsal, ventral or lateral recumbency) are helpful in shifting the fluid to different areas of the thorax and evaluating structures such as a the diaphragmatic crura. Care should be taken for all radiographic procedures not to cause stress to the patient. It is very important to evaluate the position and direction of the lung lobes and their bronchovascular structures, to rule out presence of lung lobe torsion. With lung lobe torsion, the bronchovascular structures may be deviated and the affected lung lobe is typically enlarged, resulting in a mediastinal shift to the contralateral side, consolidated and may contain a vesicular â&#x20AC;&#x153;foamyâ&#x20AC;? gas pattern. Ultrasound is an imaging modality that is not commonly used for thoracic imaging as the gas in the lungs prohibit examination of the deeper thoracic structures, but is well suited for investigating fluid filled spaces. If ultrasound of the thorax is anticipated, pleural fluid should only be removed to a degree that the patient is more comfortable. The main use of ultrasound in dogs and cats with pleural effusion is to detect cardiac and pericardial disease, mediastinal masses, and to evaluate if the diaphragm is intact or if abdominal organs have herniated into the thorax. Pulmonary causes of pleural effusion are not easily assessed with ultrasound, as a good overview of the thorax is not achieved and residual air in the lungs create artifacts that may obscure deeper lesions. In complex cases where a cause for the pleural effusion is not detected with radiography or ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) is often performed. CT has the advantage that there is no superimposition of different structures as with radiography, and both air-filled and soft tissue structures can be assessed. In presence of pleural effusion it is especially important to administer intravenous contrast medium to delineate perfused structures such as pleural masses from loculated fluid. CT provides an excellent overview over all thoracic structures and aids in potential surgical planning. Thoracic wall lesions such as rib tumors or osteomyelitis can

readily be identified, and the integrity of the adjacent ribs can be assessed. Pleural surface irregularities and pleural masses which are very difficult to identify radiographically can be detected and mediastinal masses are not only identified, but can also be evaluated for origin (lymph nodes, thymus, and heart base) and surgical resectability based on vascular invasion or vascular entrapment. The diagnosis of cranial vena cava thrombosis also requires the administration of contrast medium. The pulmonary parenchyma is difficult to evaluate in presence of a large volume pleural effusion, as it is collapsed and consolidated. Evacuation of the pleural effusion and/or repositioning of the patient may be necessary to better assess the pulmonary parenchyma. Pulmonary mass lesions, areas of consolidation and abscess formation can be detected on CT imaging. CT is often the imaging modality of choice to rule out lung lobe torsion. In addition to the malpositioning of the lung lobe and vesicular emphysema, the bronchus to each lung lobe can be followed and abrupt termination or torsion of a bronchus confirms the diagnosis of lung lobe torsion. Evaluation of the heart is only possible with the most modern, very fast multislice CT scanners as the cardiac motion otherwise causes too many artifacts. If a fistulous tract is present on the thoracic wall, iodinated contrast medium can be instilled into the fistula (fistulogram) followed by CT imaging, this often allows localization and identification of pleural foreign bodies if present. Finally, displacement of abdominal organs is readily identified using thoracic CT imaging. CT lymphangiography can be performed in dogs and cats with chylothorax. It provides information about the anatomy of the cisterna chyli and thoracic duct, which is helpful for surgical planning of a thoracic duct ligation. Many different anatomic variations with single or multiple vessels are commonly seen. It also allows to determine if the thoracic duct is ruptured, obstructed or if there is some anomaly present. For this procedure, iodinated contrast medium is injected into a lymph node under ultrasound guidance. The popliteal lymph node is the preferred injection site if it can be identified and accessed with ultrasound. Contrast medium is injected very slowly over a time period of about 5 minutes using a 25 gauge needle with extension set, at a dose of maximal 0.5ml/kg. In cats, a total dose of 1.5ml is sufficient. The injection is stopped if extravasation of contrast medium occurs. If the popliteal lymph node is not suitable for injection, a mesenteric lymph node can be used as well. The injection is followed by immediate imaging of the cranial abdomen and the entire thorax. The same procedure can be performed using radiographs instead of CT, however the anatomic resolution of CT imaging is superior and more branches of the thoracic duct can be identified.

455


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 456

73째 CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Challenging imaging cases of pleural effusion Gabriela S. Seiler Dr Vet Med, Dipl ECVDI, Dipl ACVR, Cert Clin Res, Carolina State, USA

Diagnostic imaging is an integral part of the workup of a patient with pleural effusion. Many different imaging modalities and methodologies such as radiography, ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), fistulography, and lymphangiography are available and potentially valuable. Each patient has to be individually assessed in order to select the right imaging modality and to use an appropriate imaging protocol for each modality to gain as much information as possible.

Several challenging cases of dogs and cats with pleural effusion will be presented, and for each case the decisionmaking process in selection of the imaging modality and protocols will be explained. The imaging findings with their possible conclusions will be discussed in detail. Radiographs are usually the starting point and are obtained in almost all cases of pleural effusion. In this selection of challenging cases special emphasis will also be placed on CT imaging and special procedures such as fistulograms and lymphangiograms.

456


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 457

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012 • SESSIONI AVANZATE

Diagnostic Imaging of the Liver Gabriela S. Seiler Dr Vet Med, Dipl ECVDI, Dipl ACVR, Cert Clin Res, Carolina State, USA

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association’s Liver Standardization Group categorized canine and feline hepatic disease into four main groups: parenchymal disease, neoplastic disease, biliary disorders, and vascular disorders An update on the sonographic, computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) Imaging, and nuclear medicine imaging examinations necessary to make diagnoses in each category is provided in this presentation.

We also have to keep in mind that many diseases may not disrupt the normal parenchymal architecture or echogenicity and are very difficult to detect ultrasonographically. Examples include round cell neoplasia, early metastatic neoplasia, inflammatory or toxic liver disease, early liver fibrosis, and vacuolar hepatopathy or storage diseases. Therefore, if there is a clinical suspicion of liver disease, tissue sampling is recommended even if the liver is ultrasonographically normal. Vacuolar changes in the liver associated with lipidosis and steroid hepatopathy usually cause hepatomegaly in conjunction with diffuse hyperechogenicity and rounded borders. Another feature that may occur is hyperattenuation of the ultrasound beam. This is seen as a gradual decrease in echogenicity in the far field of the image, which can be so severe that the liver in that region is not visible. Inflammatory disease can be associated with diffuse hypoechogenicity. If acute hepatitis or cholangiohepatitis is present, the liver may appear to have high contrast—a hypoechoic parenchyma with pronounced hyperechogenicity of the portal vein walls or periportal tissue. Anechoic cavitary structures in the liver can be attributable to necrosis, neoplasms, or cysts. Cystic structures generally have sharply defined borders, can be round or irregular in shape, and may even contain hyperechoic septa. Acoustic enhancement is typically identified in the far field, distal to the cyst. Causes include congenital cysts, posttraumatic cavitations, biliary pseudocysts, or parasitism. Unfortunately, biliary cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinomas may appear similar. Hepatic abcessation occurs rarely in small animals and may appear similar to a primary tumor, granuloma, or hematoma because of its highly variable sonographic features. Granulomatous causes of focal hepatic disease in dogs and cats include mycobacterial infections, migrating larvae, and schistosomiasis. Foreign material is another cause of granuloma formation in the liver. Sonographically, granulomas in dogs and cats may appear as multifocal hyperechoic and well-marginated parenchymal lesions. Liver lobe torsion occurs in the dog rarely but should be included in the differential diagnosis for acute abdomen or abdominal effusion. The torsion leads to congestion and necrosis of the affected lobe or lobes. Typically, the affected lobe appears hypoechoic, and color Doppler shows reduced or no blood flow within the lobe.

PARENCHYMAL DISEASE Hepatic parenchymal abnormalities of non-neoplastic origin include metabolic liver diseases such as vacuolar hepatopathy (steroid hepatopathy, hepatic lipidosis, and diabetes mellitus), inflammatory liver disease, acute or chronic, amyloidosis, fibrosis and cirrhosis, necrosis, abcessation, granulomas and storage diseases. Radiographically, liver enlargement of microhepatia can be determined, and occasionally nodular liver margins may be seen. Ultrasonography is the most commonly used imaging method to further characterize parenchymal liver disease. In order to narrow down possible differential diagnoses, the liver size and shape, presence of focal, multifocal or diffuse disease, and the echogenicity of the liver parenchyma are considered. Differential diagnoses for microhepatia are limited in number and consist of vascular anomalies, chronic liver disease and diaphragmatic hernia. Vascular liver disease is discussed below under vascular disorders. Diaphragmatic hernia is typically suspected based on history and other findings such as thoracic radiographs. Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a small liver, often with a hyperechoic parenchyma in presence of fibrosis. If multifocal nodular regeneration is present, the disease is classified as cirrhosis. Common additional findings include peritoneal effusion secondary to portal hypertension, and multiple acquired extrahepatic shunts connecting to the left renal vein. Most other diffuse liver diseases lead to an enlarged or normal sized liver. In that case, the echogenicity of the liver parenchyma is helpful to characterize the disease, although there is a large variability in most liver diseases and a combination of ultrasound findings, blood chemistry results and cytology or histopathology is needed to make a diagnosis.

457


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 458

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

duct and gallbladder dilation can be seen as early as 24 hours after obstruction, whereas intrahepatic bile duct dilation occurs after 3-7 days. The gallbladder is not necessarily dilated with extrahepatic bile duct obstruction. Choleliths are observed in both dogs and cats, and often are without clinical consequences. However, calculi can become lodged in the bile duct at the duodenal papilla and cause obstruction. Calculi are recognized ultrasonographically as round hyperechoic structures causing a distal shadow. Ascending infections leading to cholangitis are more common in cats than in dogs due to different anatomy of the duodenal papilla. Ultrasonographically, diffusely hypoechoic liver parenchyma, thickened gallbladder and bile duct walls, biliary sludge and dilation of the bile duct can be seen. Tissue sampling is very important, as the treatment differs for neutrophilic versus lymphocytic cholangiohepatitis and they cannot be differentiated based on imaging findings alone. Gallbladder aspirates are commonly performed if cholangitis is suspected in our clinic, with better chances of getting positive culture results than with liver aspirates alone. In dogs, biliary mucoceles are more and more common in small breed dogs such as shelties. They are caused by mucinous hyperplasia of the gallbladder mucosa, followed by inspissation of bile within the gallbladder lumen. The gallbladder wall becomes progressively thinner and necrotic, and may rupture. Secondary infections and bile duct obstructions can occur as well, but are not considered the underlying cause. Sonographically, gallbladder mucoceles have a very typical appearance with a hyperechoic â&#x20AC;&#x153;stellateâ&#x20AC;? pattern in the center and peripheral hypoechoic bile. Gallbladder contents are solid and are not seen to be swirling around within the gallbladder anymore. The cranial abdomen should carefully be evaluated for evidence of gallbladder rupture, such as regional peritoneal effusion and hyperechoic mesentery. Occasionally, free floating mucoceles can be found in the abdomen after gallbladder rupture. Mucoceles typically have to be surgically removed; emergency surgery has to be performed if rupture is suspected. Advanced imaging methods for the diagnosis of biliary tract diseases are not commonly used in dogs and cats. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is an established method to diagnose biliary disease in people. CT cholangiography is also possible, both methods have not been explored in dogs and cats but may become valid options in the future. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy can be used to quantify liver function, evaluate hepatic morphology, and assess biliary tract patency, cholestasis, and diagnosis cholecystitis. Limited availability of the equipment and radiopharmaceuticals is the main disadvantage of this method and it is rarely used in veterinary medicine.

NEOPLASTIC DISEASE Neoplastic disorders in dogs and cats are categorized as hepatocellular (nodular hyperplasia, adenoma, and HCC), cholangiocellular (biliary adenoma, biliary carcinoma, and mixed), hepatic carcinoids, primary vascular and mesenchymal (hemangiosarcoma and myelolipoma), hematopoietic (lymphoma and histiocytic sarcoma), and metastatic. Neoplasia can be focal, multifocal or diffuse in nature, and when compared with parenchymal liver diseases and the very common nodular hyperplasia, the appearance is very non-specific. Indications for a malignant process on ultrasound include rapid increase in size and number of liver nodules on repeat ultrasound examinations, a large number of liver nodules of varying sizes that are penetrating the liver capsule, hepatic lymphomegaly and evidence of neoplastic disease elsewhere. Target lesions are associated with malignancy with a positive predictive value of 74%, but can be seen with nodular hyperplasia or pyogranulomatous hepatitis for example. Overlap between those features in benign and malignant disease makes tissue sampling necessary in almost all cases. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound has proven helpful and very accurate in predicting malignant liver nodules, particularly in dogs with hemangiosarcoma. Contrast enhanced ultrasound allows assessment of perfusion patterns of liver nodules. Typically, malignant liver nodules have increased arterial blood supply but no portal venous system, they therefore remain hypoechoic at peak liver enhancement where the portal venous supply leads to diffuse enhancement of the liver parenchyma. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound requires specific ultrasound equipment and transducers, and is therefore not widely available. CT and MR imaging are not routinely used in veterinary medicine to assess the liver. In people, CT and MR imaging allow differentiation between benign and malignant liver masses with a high degree of accuracy, mostly using perfusion parameters. The method has yet to be validated in veterinary medicine. In an ongoing study at our institution, no morphologic differences between benign and malignant liver masses were found using contrast-enhanced CT, but some differences in arterial blood supply were evident, a finding which is currently further evaluated. Different tumor types and pathophysiology in people versus dogs may be a reason why it may be more difficult to classify liver masses in dogs.

BILIARY TRACT DISEASE Icterus is the most common reason to investigate the biliary system in dogs and cats. Diagnostic imaging is used to differentiate between intra- and extrahepatic causes of icterus. Bile duct obstruction can be caused by intraluminal material such as calculi, accumulated sludge or mucinous hyperplasia, strictures, intramural lesions (severe inflammation, biliary carcinoma) or extramural compression for example caused by pancreatitis, duodenal masses or enlarged regional lymph nodes. Obstruction is diagnosed based on dilatation of the bile duct, which normally should not exceed 3mm in dogs and 4mm in cats. Bile duct and gallbladder dilation depends on duration of the obstruction, bile

VASCULAR DISEASE Vascular diseases encountered in dogs and cats include hepatic venous congestion, portal hypertension, portosystemic shunts (PSSs), and other vascular malformations including segmental aplasia of the caudal vena cava, arteriovenous fistulas and portal vein hypoplasia.

458


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 459

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Hepatic venous congestion is often due to heart disease or pericardial effusion. Enlargement of the hepatic veins is observed and abnormal pendulous flow can be detected using Doppler ultrasound. The underlying cause has to be investigated, with echocardiography usually being the first step. Thrombi or masses in the caudal vena cava can be difficult to detect on echocardiography, and contrast enhanced CT imaging or venography may have to be performed. Portal hypertension is difficult to diagnose. Doppler interrogation is possible, but hampered by the deep position of the portal vein in the cranial abdomen and the suboptimal scan angle for measuring flow velocities. Normally, the portal vein flow should be directed towards the liver with velocity of around 20 cm/sec. Hepatofugal flow, or very low velocities (<10cm/sec) are consistent with portal hypertension. In these cases, peritoneal effusion is usually present and the region of the left renal vein should be carefully examined for presence of acquired extrahepatic shunts. Probably the most common indication for diagnostic imaging of the hepatic vasculature is a suspected portosystemic shunt. Several different imaging methods are available, all with advantages and disadvantages, and selection may depend on availability, experience of the person doing the diagnostic imaging, preference of the surgeon, and financial situation of the owner. In veterinary medicine, operative mesenteric portography, splenoportography, and cranial mesenteric angiography are the currently well-established gold standards for depicting the anatomic details of PSSs. The invasiveness of the procedure is the biggest disadvantage of this method, and if advanced imaging methods are available this is not commonly performed anymore. Ultrasonography is often the first step in diagnosing PSSs, since it is very non-invasive and can be performed in the non-sedated patient. It also provides information about related abdominal findings such as renomegaly, nephro- and urolithiasis, and unrelated abdominal findings that may complicate treatment. The sensitivities and specificities of sonography for the detection of extrahepatic PSSs have been reported to range from 80.5% and 66.7% up to 95% and 98%, respectively. The portal vein tributaries and caudal vena cava are investigated with and without Doppler ultrasound to identify a shunt vessel. Shunt vessels tend to be tortuous, and when investigated with color or spectral Doppler, show turbulent blood flow away from the portal vein. The size of the portal vein decreases rapidly cranial to the entrance of the shunt vessel into the caudal vena cava can be difficult to clearly demonstrate, as it may be very close to the diaphragm and lung artifacts obscure the area. Gastrointestinal gas is another factor that may prohibit accurate description of the origin and course of a shunt vessel, particularly in extrahepatic shunts originating from the left gastric vein. A portal vein/aortic ratio of 0.65 or less is predictive for the presence of an extrahepatic shunt, and a value of 0.8 or greater excludes it. If the ratio is 0.80 or greater, other types of disease, such as microvascular dysplasia, intrahepatic shunt, and portal hypertension attributable to chronic liver disease with secondary shunting, could still be present. Nuclear scintigraphy is a highly sensitive and minimally invasive method for the diagnosis of portosystemic shunts. A

radiopharmaceutical (pertechnetate) is injected either into the rectum, or under ultrasound guidance into the splenic parenchyma. The distribution of the radiopharmaceutical is followed dynamically using a gamma camera. In a normal patient, the radiopharmaceutical will travel from the injection site into the liver, and with a small time delay will then appear in the heart and systemic circulation. In presence of a portosystemic shunt the radiopharmaceutical will bypass the liver and appear first in the heart and enters the liver with a delay through the systemic circulation. While this method provides a quick “yes or no” answer, the anatomic resolution is low and the exact anatomy of a portosystemic shunt cannot be described, which may be important for surgical planning. Dual phase CT has become the gold standard in our institution to diagnoses vascular anomalies within the liver. It requires helical scanning in order to cover enough anatomy within a short period of time. With dual phase CT, contrast medium is injected rapidly as a bolus using a power injector, and the liver/abdomen is imaged while the contrast medium is in the arterial system (usually about 10 seconds after injection) and then in a second scan while the contrast medium is mostly in the portal venous system (usually about 30 seconds after the start of the arterial phase). This method allows depiction of all abdominal vessels in great detail and portosystemic shunts and other vascular malformations such as segmental aplasia of the caudal vena cava or arteriovenous fistulas can be described very accurately. The disadvantage of this method is the increased cost and need for sedation or general anesthesia. MRI can be used to image the hepatic vasculature as well, but is less commonly performed in veterinary medicine, likely also related to the high cost of this method.

FINE NEEDLE ASPIRATION AND BIOPSY OF THE LIVER As mentioned several times in the text above, tissue sampling is an integral part of the diagnostic workup of dogs and cats with liver disease. Adequate coagulation has to be determined prior to tissue sampling, particularly if biopsies are taken. Both procedures can be performed under ultrasound guidance. Sedation or general anesthesia is required for safe sampling. Fine needle aspirates are associated with less risk, but are also less accurate than tissue biopsies. In diffuse liver disease, multiple different sites should be sampled to have a representative diagnosis. Focal lesions can be targeted with ultrasound guidance. It is recommended to not only sample the center of a lesion but also the periphery, as the center may be necrotic and non-diagnostic. Liver biopsies can be performed under ultrasound guidance, but the small size of the tissue sample may also not represent the disease process in the entire liver, and laparoscopic or surgical biopsies are often preferred. Complications of ultrasound guided tissue sampling are rare. After any tissue sampling procedure, the patient should be monitored directly with ultrasound for the presence of free fluid. Small amounts of free fluid at the sampling site are not uncommon with tissue core biopsies but are less frequent with fine-needle aspirations. Small amounts of fluid are generally self-limiting when the patient’s coagulation status is normal.

459


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 460

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Liberalizzazioni. Vantaggi per le strutture gestite dal management Massimiliano Serreri Med Vet, Olbia (OT)

personalizzata un po’ più vicino alle sue esigenze. Dal monitoraggio di questo secondo invio si potranno precisare ancora un po’ meglio i gusti e le preferenze del cliente e così via, fino a raggiungere un livello considerevole di rispondenza alle necessità del lettore, anzi di quel preciso lettore. A questo punto potrebbero essere passati alcuni mesi: se una rivista concorrente proponesse un analogo servizio con un prezzo identico o anche un po’ più modesto il lettore sarebbe disposto a spendere altri tot mesi per ricreare tutto il processo d’apprendimento? Probabilmente no, e in questo modo l’azienda che produce la prima rivista si è guadagnata la fedeltà del suo consumatore. Sapendo tante cose di quest’ipotetico lettore inoltre la rivista potrebbe vendergli altri prodotti coerenti con gli interessi, o vendere spazi pubblicitari sapendo con esattezza chi sarà la persona cui giungeranno. In sostanza una volta acquisito un consumatore l’impresa one-to-one cercherà di soddisfare il maggior numero dei suoi bisogni, capitalizzando sempre di più le risorse di conoscenza e d’interazione consolidate nel tempo.

INTRODUZIONE Il marketing nella sua storia ha conosciuto diverse fasi, prima come semplice strumento di “spinta” della produzione industriale verso i consumatori e poi gradualmente come metodologia d’analisi ed ascolto del mercato. Le nuove tecnologie oggi consentono una sempre maggiore interazione con il consumatore, anche in tempo reale, un consumatore che nel frattempo si è fatto sempre più esigente, informato ed anche “infedele” alla marca. Il marketing one-to-one dunque rappresenta una nuova concezione della disciplina, che ne modifica il punto di partenza tradizionale: lo scopo dell’impresa infatti non è più quello di soddisfare un solo bisogno del più ampio numero di clienti possibile ma il maggior numero di bisogni di uno stesso cliente. Per fare questo l’impresa deve, in primo luogo, apprendere il maggior numero d’informazioni possibile sul suo cliente ma soprattutto deve essere in grado di ricordarle e di poterle usare di volta in volta per migliorare e personalizzare il servizio. È difficile pensare ad uno strumento che si presti meglio della Rete per acquisire tali dati sul consumatore, anche perché gli strumenti del web permettono un continuo monitoraggio delle attività del cliente. Diceva Oscar wild “ posso resistere a tutto tranne che alle tentazioni…..” per questo il Marketing del terzo millennio non po’ fare a meno delle emozioni. Il brand, quindi, si evolve e diventa Marketing emozionale. La parola marketing nel linguaggio comune ha assunto il significato di “ piazzare sul mercato” prodotti o servizi, con la finalità di trarre da questi il maggiore profitto possibile. Per raggiungere tale scopo, ovviamente, i prodotti da “piazzare” devono essere anche tali da realizzare tale scopo. Il marketing in breve è quel ramo dell’economia che si occupa dello studio descrittivo del mercato e dell’analisi dell’interazione del mercato e degli utilizzatori con l’impresa. Una buona operazione di marketing mira, dunque, non solo alla pubblicità ma anche a influenzare la scelta dell’anello finale della catena: il Cliente. Facciamo un esempio: un cliente si abbona ad una rivista virtuale, e inizia a riceverla regolarmente: se la rivista riesce a monitorare gli argomenti che interessano maggiormente l’utente con il secondo invio potrà fornirgli una versione

MARKETING EMOZIONALE Negli ultimi trent’anni, però, gli esperti del settore hanno sempre considerato al centro delle loro azioni il prodotto/servizio commercializzato dalle loro aziende, cercando e attuando politiche rivolte al condizionamento del mercato di riferimento, trascurando talvolta il fatto che i mercati, sono composti di persone. E le esigenze di queste, essendo anche conseguenza del cambiamento sociale e culturale, si sono evolute nel corso del tempo e oggi, trovandoci in una società più complessa, ci troviamo davanti anche ad un consumatore più complesso con bisogni e desideri più elaborati. Di conseguenza anche il marketing si trova “costretto” a seguire questi cambiamenti; oggi “ non è più il prodotto ad essere venduto”, dato che per ogni categoria merceologica esiste una scelta amplissima, quindi ciò su bisogna puntare, è il rapporto che il soggetto stabilisce col brand e con i valori e le emozioni che esso comunica. L’obbiettivo che oggi il marketing si pone è quello di indagare, non più solo sul comportamento del consumatore, ma sulla sua mente, sulla sua soggettività, sui suoi desideri, sulle sue emozioni e percezioni, in rapporto ad un prodotto

460


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:45

Pagina 461

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

• • • • •

o ad una comunicazione, al fine di capire meglio i suoi bisogni e quindi soddisfarli. Le nuove attuali e moderne strategie di marketing, quindi, non possono non prendere in considerazione il vero protagonista del processo commerciale, vale a dire il Cliente, se vogliamo essere efficaci e produrre risultati soddisfacenti; l’obbiettivo è quello di trasformare i biosgni in benefici, e i benefici in desideri. Ed ecco che nasce il marketing del terzo millennio: il marketing emozionale, o marketing dell’esperienza. Esso si basa su un concetto molto semplice ed intuitivo: coinvolgere ogni singolo cliente offrendogli un’esperienza memorabile e, cosa molto importante, superando le sue aspettative. Come fare? Anticipando i suoi desideri inconsci e soddisfacendoli. “Desidero quindi compro” questa è il meccanismo vincente. La componente emotiva dell’esperienza di acquisto sostituisce la logica del “ bisogno-acquisto-beneficio”, per lungo tempo motore fondante delle strategie di marketing aziendali. La teoria del marketing emozionale o esperienziale viene formulata dal professore della Columbia University Bern. H. Schmitt che lo descrive, appunto, come un’esperienza memorabile che il cliente deve sperimentare, e tale da superare le sue aspettative. Un’esperienza è memorabile quando è capace di arrivare in profondità nei sentimenti del cliente e di rimanervi a lungo, associata a sensazioni e ricordi piacevoli. L’esposizione prolungata e intensa a queste esperienze forma un legame profondo e personale tra il cliente e l’azienda, che in questo modo entra nelle posizioni più alte della short list del cliente. La short list è una graduatoria inconscia delle tre o quattro marche che vengono considerate come “ preferite”, “ acquistabili”. O “ migliori” dal cliente rispetto ad una determinata categoria di prodotti. I nomi ai primi posti sono quelli che per primi verranno in mente al cliente e influenzeranno le sue scelte al momento dell’acquisto. Mentre quelli che non sono presenti nella short list vengono percepiti come non accettabili e non verranno presi in considerazione. L’obbiettivo della strategia di marketing in questo caso,è quello di individuare che tipo di esperienza valorizzerà al meglio il prodotto. Secondo Schmitt esistono 5 tipi di esperienza, denominati SEMs o Strategic Esperential Modules:

Sense experience. Che coinvolge la percezione sensoriale; Feel experience. Che coinvolge senimenti ed emozioni; Think experience. Creative e cognitive; Act experience. Che coinvolge la fisicità; Relate experience. Risultanti dal porsi in relazione con un gruppo. Ovviamente, possono essere mixati per ottenere un’esperienza davvero “ memorabile”, a sua volta impostata secondo 4 direttrici: • Intrattenimento, attraverso il coinvolgimento dei 5 sensi; • Educativo, tramite partecipazione attiva; • Estetico immersione nell’evento senza modificarlo; • Di evasione, immersione nell’evento con coinvolgimento attivo. È bene specificare che nel marketing emozionale le esperienze sono soprattutto, anche se non esclusivamente, di tipo sensoriale; vengono cioè coinvolti i 5 sensi (olfatto, udito, vista, tatto, gusto) in diverse proporzioni a seconda dell’emozione che si vuole suscitare. Si fa pertanto ricorso a strategie legate alla psicologia ambientale, per esmepio la scelta di un dato colore per evcare un determinato stato d’animo, l’uso di un’illuminazione appropriata per creare una determinata atmosfera, la diffusione di suoni e musica all’interno di un locale e così via. Solo in pochi casi finora si è cercato di stimolare il gusto e l’olfatto, due sensi spesso sottovalutati anche se in grado di evocare emozioni molto più forti rispetto agli altri: questi stimoli, infatti, vengono processati direttamente dall’amigdala e vengono tramutati all’istante in sensazioni senza venire filtrati dal cervello. Questo processo porta ad un immediato aumento delle sensazioni positive e ad un giudizio molto migliore sul prodotto e sulla permanenza all’interno dei locali. Un efficace esempio di come si possono stimolare questi sensi viene dalla Jordan’s forniture, una catena statunitense di negozi di arredamento. Nella sezioni bambini viene diffuso un goloso profumo di chewing-gum e caramelle, mentre nella sezione Country si sente una piacevole fragranza di pino e sottobosco. Un altro senso molto importante per il coinvolgimento emotivo è l’udito: è infatti dimostrato che i locali all’interno dei quali viene diffusa musica hanno un tempo di permanenza maggiore al loro interno e anche in questo caso viene enfatizzata la percezione visiva dei prodotti.

461


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 462

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Come preparare il tuo paziente per sfide vincenti: obiettivi nutrizionali in corso di riabilitazione motoria e non solo Patrizia Sica Med Vet, Milano

La nutrizione, come la fisioterapia veterinaria, segue i medesimi principi applicati in quella umana e si pone gli stessi obiettivi: 1. riportare il paziente alle condizioni fisiche ottimali il prima possibile facilitandone la guarigione, accorciando i tempi di degenza, accelerando i processi di guarigione di tessuti lesionati, prevenendo le complicanze, o semplicemente 2. far raggiungere in un soggetto sano, più o meno impegnato agonisticamente, la massima potenzialità o l’ottimale espressione delle proprie attitudini. Come qualsiasi altra indicazione medica, anche quella alimentare è importante venga fornita dal veterinario, che può tenere conto di numerosi fattori: l’età dell’animale, le predisposizioni di razza, la sua struttura fisica, lo stato della muscolatura, la tipologie di attività svolta, le eventuali patologie, le metodiche mediche o chirurgiche adottate. Per ogni fase della vita e livello di attività, sportiva o meno, ci sono obiettivi nutrizionali da porsi. Un alimentazione ottimale è quindi importante durante tutta la vita per sostenere una mobilità sana, nel tempo.

bile (31,6%, 23,1% o 14,6% di proteine sulla sostanza secca) dallo svezzamento e per 18 settimane, hanno fatto osservare l’assenza di effetti di origine alimentare sul metabolismo del calcio o sullo sviluppo scheletrico. Le proteine, nei limiti dei livelli comuni, in un contesto di apporto energetico controllato, non contribuiscono, quindi, alle comparsa di disturbi scheletrici dello sviluppo.

SOGGETTO ADULTO Anche se un cane viene alimentato in maniera ottimale durante la fase di crescita, ci sono ancora un certo numero di fattori che possono inficiare la mobilità nell’età adulta. Un peso corporeo mantenuto negli standard può aiutare a ridurre la manifestazione o la progressione di una serie di condizioni che possono interferire con la mobilità: ridurre l’apporto calorico, limitando la percentuale di grassi, può portare ad un calo ponderale, che può essere ancor più favorito se associato ad una integrazione con L-carnitina e all’impiego di una miscela di carboidrati differenziati, in grado di promuovere una risposta glicemica modulata e la formazione delle riserve adipose di bilanciamento controllate. L’obesità è riconosciuta, infatti, come un fattore di rischio, ad esempio, per lo sviluppo e la progressione di OA nei cani. Inoltre, cani e gatti con problemi di mobilità tendono ad essere più sedentari, inducendo ad un aggravamento delle condizioni ponderali del soggetto. La riduzione del peso è stata associata a miglioramenti evidenti del grado di zoppia, con ripercussioni positive sul ricorso di farmaci analgesici in molti pazienti. Da non sottovalutare, inoltre, il ruolo positivo che può avere l’alimentazione sulla compliance dei proprietari, quando il cibo diventa fonte di integrazioni orale di condroprotettori, come la glucosamina e il condroitin solfato, in grado di modulare la struttura e la fisiologia articolare e quindi intervenendo come coadiuvanti nel trattamento delle artropatie.

SOGGETTO IN CRESCITA Se si permette ad un cucciolo di un cane di taglia grossa di esprimere tutto il suo potenziale genetico in modo non controllato, il rischio di sviluppo di problemi scheletrici come ad esempio la displasia dell’anca, l’osteocondrosi o la osteodistrofia ipertrofica - è alto. Cani alimentati ad libitum hanno maggiori probabilità di sviluppare una obesità iperplastica di tipo primario o difetti articolari conseguenti alla formazione di una spongiosa subcondrale e alla distruzione della cartilagine articolare, sollecitata delle aumentate forze meccaniche sulle articolazioni durante la fase di crescita ponderale. Nel primo anno di vita, in particolare durante le fasi di più rapido accrescimento, è dunque determinante gestire la velocità di crescita nei cuccioli di taglia grande, preferendo una dieta con una densità energetica moderata (14% di lipidi circa) e apporti attentamente bilanciati di calcio (0,8%) e di fosforo (0,67%), onde ridurre significativamente lo sviluppo di anomalie scheletriche, senza preoccuparsi esageratamente del tenore proteico. Infatti, studi controllati non hanno convalidato l’ipotesi di una correlazione tra elevato apporto proteico e anomalie scheletriche: diete isocaloriche, ma con contenuto proteico notevolmente varia-

SOGGETTO MATURO O ANZIANO Durante gli anni della maturità e oltre, l’alimentazione può giocare un ruolo ugualmente chiave sull’incidenza e sulla gravità di diverse problematiche muscoloscheletriche.

462


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 463

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Aspetti quali il mantenimento della massa muscolare ed il controllo del livello di infiammazione articolare possono, infatti, contribuire all’ottenimento di un confacente livello di mobilità. Il mantenimento di una buon tono e di una massa muscolare magra, compensando le naturali perdite o trasformazioni conseguenti ad un processo di invecchiamento, può essere ottenibile fornedo apporti proteici per via alimentare pari al 24% o maggiori. I processi infiammatori, invece, che possono colpire le articolazioni dei soggetti anziani, possono essere modulati ricordando che tutti i tipi di acidi grassi assunti per via alimentare influenzano significativamente i tipi di acidi grassi che costituiscono le membrane cellulari e quindi i tipi di mediatori rilasciati durante gli eventi infiammatori. Mediatori prodotti dall’acido eicosapentaenoico (omega-3) tendono ad essere meno infiammatori rispetto a quelli prodotti, invece, dall’acido arachidonico (omega-6) pro-infiammatori. Diminuendo il rapporto degli acidi grassi omega-6:omega-3 nell’intervallo da 5:1 a 10:1 si può modulare nutrizionalmente la gravità dei processi infiammatori che colpiscono le articolazioni di cani e gatti anziani.

cibo che deve essere consumata può eccedere la capacità di ingestione fisiologica dell’apparato digerente. Questo può portare ad una maggiore velocità del transito gastroenterico e una minore digestione dell’alimento, esacerbando ulteriormente il deficit energetico. Comuni fonti di grassi sono grasso di pollo, sego, lardo, olio di semi, olio di cartamo, olio di semi di soia, olio di girasole, olio di pesce e olio di lino. Attuali evidenze indicano, inoltre, che l’allenamento aerobico determina nel cane un maggiore fabbisogno proteico. Le proteine alimentari, anch’esse fonte energetica pregiata, possono essere di orgine animale o vegetale: quelle di origine animale e di elevata qualità, sono caratterizzate da digeribilità, equilibrio aminoacidico ed appetibilità migliori. Tuttavia, la qualità delle proteine di origine animale può variare in base ai metodi e alle condizioni di preparazione utilizzati durante la produzione. Le proteine animali comunemente incluse negli alimenti commerciali per cani sono rappresentati da pollo, farina di pollo, manzo, uova, farina di pesce, farina di carne, derivati della carne, derivati del pollo, agnello e farina di agnello. Comuni fonti di proteine vegetali, negli alimenti per cani, includono: farina di glutine di mais, farina di soia, idrolisati di soia e germi di grano. Gli alimenti per cani con minor valore sono frequentemente formulati con fonti proteiche di origine vegetale, e spesso utilizzano una combinazione di derivati della soia e farina di glutine di grano per compensare il basso livello di aminoacidi essenziali presenti nellle proteine vegetali (il glutine di grano è carente di lisina e triptofano; i prodotti della soia, di metionina). Non di minore importanza per i cani sportivi sono i carboidrati, per l’apporto energetico di rapido utilizzo che possono fornire: riso, frumento, sorgo, orzo, patate e avena forniscono carboidrati complessi in forma di amido, che diviene altamente disponibile solo quando cotto appropriatamente. Una quantità limitata di carboidrati può inoltre essere immagazzinata nell’organismo come glicogeno, mentre l’eccesso viene metabolizzato e trasformato in grasso come ulteriore fonte energetica di riserva.

SOGGETTO IN ATTIVITÀ (DA LAVORO O SPORTIVO) Parimenti, si possono massimizzare le performace di un soggetto che deve esprimere eccezionali capacità atletiche, ponendo una particolare attenzione all’alimentazione. I cani da lavoro necessitano, in generale, di un apporto energetico superiore alle esigenze di mantenimento di un normale cane adulto, ma queste devono essere modulate in base al tipo di attività e sforzo richiesto (ad esempio se nel breve o nel lungo tempo). In generale, sono due gli aspetti nutrizionali principali da considerare per i cani in attività: promuovere una prestazione ottimale e fornire calorie sufficienti a mantenere il peso corporeo e le condizioni fisiche originali. Occorre soddisfare, grazie ad una strategia nutrizionale appropriata, sia le esigenze muscolari immediate, sia i fabbisogni a lungo termine connessi con l’aumento della capacità aerobica, l’incrementata predisposizione ai traumi e l’aumento del volume ematico. Una componente fondamentale di questa strategia nutrizionale consiste nella completa copertura del fabbisogno di energia metabolica, utilizzando le appropriate fonti alimentari di grassi, proteine e carboidrati. I grassi alimentari rappresentano la forma più concentrata di energia, costituiscono una fonte di acidi grassi essenziali e consentono l’assorbimento delle vitamine liposolubili essenziali. La densità calorica dei grassi alimentari è più di due volte superiore a quella delle proteine e dei carboidrati. Quindi, un maggiore contenuto in grassi alimentari aumenta la densità energetica della dieta. I grassi, inoltre, contribuiscono anche a migliorare l’appetibilità e la consistenza degli alimenti. A tutto ciò si aggiunge la considerazione che la concentrazione energetica della dieta influenza la quantità di cibo che deve essere consumato per soddisfare i fabbisogni energetici. Se il valore energetico della dieta è troppo basso per sostenere l’aumento dell’attività fisica, la quantità di

CONCLUSIONI Il tentativo di migliorare la qualità della vita dei nostri pazienti può passare attraverso diverse vie. La mobilità è un aspetto importante. Benché la genetica, gli eventi imprevisti e le malattie possano influenzare la mobilità, attraverso l’alimentazione possiamo favorire la massima mobilità nei nostri animali. L’alimentazione, a lungo termine, con alimenti di qualità è associata ad una maggiore ampiezza del movimento. Dovremmo incoraggiare per i nostri clienti l’adozione di tutte le possibili opzioni preventive e terapeutiche, alimentari incluse, per migliorare la qualità della vita, godendo così della massima mobilità.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Patrizia Sica - E-mail: sica.p@pg.com

463


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 464

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Disuria: quando la diagnostica per immagini è essenziale Giliola Spattini DVM, PhD, Dipl ECVDI, Reggio Emilia

Abbiamo diverse metodiche di diagnostica per immagini a disposizione, il primo passo è decidere quale utilizzare per prima e come procedere. Come sempre la scelta dipende dalle condizioni del paziente: se il paziente presenta dolore intenso alla porzione caudale dell’addome, allora è consigliabile iniziare lo studio di diagnostica per immagini con una radiografia addominale, centrata a livello dell’addome caudale, che comprenda le regioni pelvica e perineale. Per essere completo lo studio deve comprendere una radiografia laterale con gli arti posteriori estesi caudalmente, una laterale con gli arti posteriori estesi cranialmente (soprattutto nel maschio per evitare la sovrapposizione dei femori con l’osso penieno), una VD, eventuali VD oblique (Figg. 1 e 2). Le strutture che devono essere valutate attentamente sono: 1) Colonna vertebrale a. Controllare che non siano presenti lesioni che potrebbero fare pensare ad alterazioni neurologiche delle basse vie urinarie.

INTRODUZIONE La disuria è un grave sintomo clinico che può essere la conseguenza di diverse patologie. La diagnostica per immagini è indispensabile per ottenere una diagnosi accurata e indirizzare alla giusta terapia.

DIAGNOSTICA PER IMMAGINI NEL PAZIENTE DISURICO In un paziente disurico la diagnostica per immagini deve rispondere alle seguenti domande: 1) È presente un’ostruzione meccanica dell’uretra o del collo vescicale? 2) È presente un processo infiltrativo che comprime le basse vie urinarie, se sì, è extrauretrale, coinvolge la parete dell’uretra o è endouretrale? 3) È presente un’alterazione spastica/neurologica delle basse vie urinarie?

Figura 1 - In questa radiografia è possibile valutare la vescica e la prostata, ma i femori si sovrappongono all’osso penieno, nascondendo eventuali calcoli intrappolati nell’incisura dell’osso penieno.

464

Figura 2 - Paziente diverso rispetto alla figura 1, si noti le strutture rotondeggianti radiopache bloccate a livello dell’osso penieno. Da questa proiezione non è possibile valutare adeguatamente prostata e vescica.


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 465

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

b. Nei maschi controllare che non ci siano reazioni osteo-aggressive a carico del corpo vertebrale di L57, tipica area metastatica dei carcinomi prostatici. 2) Linfonodi sottolombari o iliaci a. S’individuano appena ventralmente a L6-7. Normalmente non sono identificabili. Se aumentano di dimensioni e assumono la forma rotondeggiante, perdendo l’aspetto ovale facilmente sono neoplastici (Fig. 3). 3) Ossa iliache e sacrali, canale pelvico a. Importante valutare le ossa del bacino in cerca di aree litiche, fratture, restringimenti del canale pelvico, possibili calcoli in area uretrale (Fig. 4). b. Quest’area è molto difficile da indagare con una radiografia in bianco, soprattutto nelle VD dove il materiale fecale contenuto nel colon potrebbe nascondere l’area uretrale. In questi casi è spesso consigliabile ese-

guire anche delle proiezioni oblique del canale pelvico (Fig. 5). 4) Area perineale e margine caudale del paziente. a. Nel maschio l’uretra peniena è molto superficiale. Soprattutto appena prima dell’osso del pene possono fermarsi calcoli uretrali che tendono a raccogliersi in questa posizione a causa del restringimento dell’uretra all’interno della doccia peniena dell’osso del pene (Fig. 2). b. Fondamentale valutare sempre la forma del pene perché in alcuni casi la deformazione dell’osso penieno può essere la causa della disuria. 5) Addome caudale, con particolare attenzione alla vescica, alla prostata nel maschio e all’utero nella femmina sterilizzata, alla porzione caudale del colon discendente e al retto, allo spazio retroperitoneale. Come primo passo nei pazienti trattabili, o come secondo passo nei pazienti non collaborativi ma trattati con antidolorifici e/o sedativi, l’esame ecografico è un’importante procedura diagnostica che permette un’attenta valutazione della vescica e dell’area caudale dell’addome. Le aree di particolare interesse sono: 1) La vescica, si deve prestare attenzione alla presenza di: a. Uroliti, se piccoli potrebbero essere incanalati nell’uretra, soprattutto nel maschio. b. Segni ecografici riferibili a cistite acuta o cronica. c. Segni ecografici compatibili con una massa vescicale che, soprattutto se interessa l’area del trigono, può essere la principale causa di disuria. La presenza dilatazione ureterale si accompagna spesso alle forme neoplastiche, e solo raramente alle cistiti. Importante valutare se la massa interessa anche la porzione più craniale dell’uretra (Fig. 6). 2) Il colon e il retto: a. Processi patologici a carico del colon possono facilmente infiltrare vescica e uretra.

Figura 3 - Linfomegalia dei linfonodi iliaci o sottolombari.

Figura 4 - Questa paziente ha tre calcoli in vescica e due in uretra.

465


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 466

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Figura 5 - Stesso paziente della figura 4, controllo post-operatorio, nelle due ortogonali sembra che i calcoli siano stati adeguatamente rimossi ma nella proiezione obliqua è evidente che un calcolo di grosse dimensioni permane in uretra. Il paziente deve tornare in chirurgia!

Figura 6 - Immagine ecografica della vescica di un bovaro del Bernese di 5 anni affetto da carcinoma delle cellule transizionali. Il paziente era stato portato per stranguria ed ematuria. La massa creava ostruzione dell’uretere sinistro e invadeva parzialmente l’uretra.

b. Il retto è visualizzato utilizzando come finestra acustica la rosetta anale. Importante valutare sia processi infiltrativi sia flogistici ma anche eventuali ernie perineali. Se ci sono organi pelvici dislocati nel perineo è molto semplice diagnosticare un’ernia perineale, diversamente può essere una diagnosi difficile. Importante notare che nelle fasi iniziali di ernia perineale, si accumula del liquido anecogeno tra i piani fasciali, che è un segno caratteristico. Il sospetto di ernia perineale deve sempre essere confermato o smentito tramite esplorazione rettale. 3) L’uretra: a. Ecograficamente è possibile seguire la prima parte che origina dal collo vescicale. In genere è possibile visualizzare l’uretra prostatica: se la prostata è caudale si consiglia di spostare la prostata cranialmente facendo introdurre un dito di un operatore nel retto del pazien-

te. Nelle femmine è possibile seguire l’uretra fino al pube. Soprattutto nel maschio è possibile visualizzare la parte distale dell’uretra nell’area perineale, ed è inoltre possibile seguire l’uretra peniena (Fig. 7). 4) Utero e cervice a. Masse uterine o dell’area della cervice possono infiltrare o più spesso comprimere l’uretra. Quando le masse sono molto estese è difficile riconoscerne l’origine (Fig. 8). 5) Linfonodi iliaci e inguinali a. Oltre alle dimensioni e alla forma, ecograficamente si valuta la vascolarizzazione che idealmente deve rimanere prevalentemente ilare. Nelle forme neoplastiche la vascolarizzazione tende a essere prevalentemente periferica e non uniformemente distribuita.

466


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 467

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Figura 7 - Immagine ecografica di calcoli bloccati appena prossimalmente all’osso penieno (linea rettilinea iperecogena.

2. Sedare profondamente o anestetizzare il paziente. a. Questo è mandatario per azzerare spasmi uretrali che potrebbero creare problemi interpretativi. 3. Disinfettare bene i genitali e lubrificare la punta del catetere sterile con lubrificanti anestetici. 4. Alcuni autori consigliano di iniettare nel catetere 2 ml di lidocaina per ridurre il fastidio locale. 5. Maschio: a. Posizionare un catetere urinario il più largo possibile a livello della punta del pene, inserito a sufficienza per evitare che il mezzo di contrasto fuoriesca dai fori laterali del catetere, ma inserendolo il meno possibile in uretra. Se le dimensioni del paziente lo consentono sarebbe preferibile un catetere di Foley. b. Fermare il catetere urinario con un tiralingua in modo da impedire allo stesso di essere espulso a causa della pressione dell’iniezione del mezzo di contrasto. 6. Femmina: a. Posizionare un catetere di Foley nel vestibolo vaginale. Gonfiare il catetere e ancorarlo in vagina tramite un tiralingua. Questa procedura è chiamata Vagino-uretrogramma positivo. 7. Mezzo di contrasto a. Iodato, non ionico. Pazienti MASCHI: i. Gatto 5 ml ii. Cane piccola taglia 10 ml iii. Cane media taglia 20 ml iv. Cane grossa taglia 30 ml b. Iodato, non ionico. Pazienti FEMMINE: i. Gatto 15 ml ii. Cane piccola taglia 30 ml iii. Cane media taglia 45 ml iv. Cane grossa taglia 90 ml 8. Iniettare il mezzo di contrasto con una moderata pressione e scattare verso la metà dell’iniezione. Scattare il secondo radiogramma con la restante parte del mezzo di contrasto. Il mezzo di contrasto può essere diluito al 50% per diminuire l’effetto osmotico sulla vescica e per ridurre i costi.

Figura 8 - Fibroma uterino. L’aspetto caratteristico è quello di una massa eterogenea, spesso cistica, in genere diagnosticata quando raggiunge grosse dimensioni e causa compressione alle vie urinarie.

URETROGRAFIA ASCENDENTE CON MEZZO DI CONTRASTO POSITIVO Quando radiologia in bianco ed ecografia non bastano, l’uretrografia ascendente porta ulteriori informazioni anatomiche e funzionali. Tecnica: 1. Ottenere uno studio in bianco dell’addome caudale del paziente, con le proiezioni menzionate. a. Questo perché lo studio in bianco potrebbe già fornire una diagnosi rendendo superfluo l’esame contrastografico. b. Per valutare il grado di riempimento del colon che potrebbe ostacolare la lettura del radiogramma. c. Per controllare che la tecnica radiografica sia adeguata.

467


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 468

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

Se presenti spasmi uretrali che possono ostacolare il passaggio del mezzo di contrasto, può essere utile un’irrigazione intrauretrale di atracurio besilato diluito. Preparare una soluzione di 4 ml costituita da 3.8 ml di fisiologica e 0.2 ml di atracurio besilato (TRACHIUM, fiale da 50 mg in 5 ml). Mettere la soluzione in una siringa, connetterla al catetere urinario, irrigare l’uretra per circa 5 minuti, mantenendo una lieve pressione, soprattutto nelle ostruzioni quasi complete. L’atracurio besilato è un derivato del curaro che agisce rilasciando la muscolatura striata presente nel terzo distale dell’uretra. Il contatto prolungato è necessario per superare la barriera costituita dalla mucosa. Non viene assorbito per via sistemica. In questo modo si avrà un rilassamento uretrale che permetterà al mezzo di contrasto di distendere e visualizzare molto meglio il lume uretrale. Si rimanda alla letteratura o al seguente contatto giliolavet@yahoo.it per informazioni a riguardo.

Figura 9 - Uretrografia ascendente positiva in un paziente maschio affetto da calcolo uretrale e stenosi con parziale sfiancamento uretrale.

BIBLIOGRAFIA Galluzzi F, De Rensis Fabio, Spattini G: Trattamento con atracurio besilato endouretrale in 20 gatti maschi con tappi uretrali. Atti del 65° congresso SCIVAC. 2010. Wallack ST: The Handbook of Veterinary Contrast Radiography. Paperback. Pages: 131-134. 2003.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Giliola Spattini Clinica Veterinaria Castellarano (Re) E-mail: giliolavet@yahoo.it

Figura 10 - Vaginoutretrografia normale nella femmina. S’intravede il tiralingua che ancora il catetere di Foley al vestibolo vaginale.

468


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 469

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Mastocitoma multiplo: chirurgia o chemioterapia? Damiano Stefanello Med Vet, Dr Ric, Milano

A dispetto di una distribuzione ubiquitaria dei mastociti non neoplastici lo sviluppo di mastocitomi si osserva più frequentemente a livello cutaneo/sottocutaneo, mentre è meno frequente osservarlo a livello mucocutaneo ed extracutaneo o viscerale. La forma cutanea/sottocutanea è la più frequente rappresentando il 16-21% di tutti i tumori cutanei del cane; i noduli possono essere singoli (forma singola) o multipli (forma multipla). La forma multipla rappresenta il 9-21% dei casi di mastocitomi e a sua volta può essere distinta in forma multipla contemporanea (detta anche simultanea) e non.1-3 La forma multipla può essere, in alcuni casi seppur infrequentemente, anche a carico delle giunzioni mucocutanee e non avere quindi una esclusiva localizzazione cutanea. Per quanto attiene al segnalamento, la forma multipla colpisce più frequentemente soggetti in età adulta prevalentemente di sesso femminile sterilizzate.3,4 Relativamente alla razza è stata osservata un’elevata incidenza di razze come Staffordshire Terrier e Boxer anche se il dato deve essere considerato con cautela visto che la popolazione di riferimento non era disponibile.4 La distinzione tra la forma multipla contemporanea e quella non contemporanea necessita di un breve chiarimento. La foma cutanea multipla non contemporanea si caratterizza per l’insorgenza di nuovi mastocitomi a distanza di tempo da mesi a volte anni in modo ripetuto, mentre nella forma contemporanea si osserva una simultanea presenza di mastocitomi multipli che varia da un valore minimo di 2 e può arrivare anche a superare le 20 unità. Gli studi relativi al mastocitoma multiplo sono veramente limitati.1,3,4 La presentazione multipla del mastocitoma così come per altri tumori potrebbe far suggerire comunque una tendenza alla disseminazione metastatica del tumore stesso e quindi essere associata a prognosi infausta. In effetti la stadiazione della World Health Organization classifica i mastocitomi multipli come di III stadio clinico attribuendogli una prognosi meno favorevole rispetto al mastocitoma singolo5,6 a dispetto di una letteratura che seppur carente gli assegna un comportamento biologico tendezialmente benigno e con prognosi pressoché favorevole, soprattutto se in assenza di metastasi linfonodali e a distanza, per dimensioni inferiori a 3 centimetri e con rimozione chirurgica completa.3,4 La necessità di verificare se i mastocitomi multipli contemporanei sono una malattia metastatica o la presentazione

multipla di mastocitomi con differenti profili genetici è stata in passato parzialmente soddisfatta su un limitatissimo campione dimostrando talvoltà la presenza di una malattia clonale cutanea, quindi metastatica, piuttosto che nuovi mastocitomi multipli.7 Lo studio della clonalità offrirebbe informazioni importantissime ma purtroppo non è un esame che si può eseguire con facilità in ambito clinico. Secondo O’Connell et al 2011 è lecito pensare che si tratti di un’unica malattia metastatica quando si è in presenza di un mastocitoma localmente recidivante in cui si presentano altri nuovi mastocitomi.4 I mastocitomi multipli possono presentarsi simultaneamente anche con grado istologico differente (secondo la classificazione di Patnaik et al 1984) anche se il grado istologico più frequentemente riscontrato è stato il grado I, seguito dal grado II e infine dal grado III.4,8 Relativamente al grado istologico è importante specificare che un singolo mastocitoma in un cane con mastocitoma multiplo contemporaneo o non contemporaneo può, se di terzo grado, condizionare la prognosi del paziente; infatti la sola presentazione multipla non è da solo un fattore protettivo per garatire tempi di sopravvivenza lunghi. A proposito di fattori prognostici utili a categorizzare i pazienti e a stratificarli per categorie di rischio in funzione del tempo di sopravvivenza ci vengono in aiuto due studi.3,4 Nello studio di Mullins et al 2006 l’analisi univariata propone come fattori prognostici: - le dimensioni superiori a 3 centimetri (hanno una prognosi meno favorevole) - l’escissione chirurgica soprattutto se con margini liberi ha un forte valore protettivo - le terapie (chirurgia in associazione a chemioterapia) aumentano i tempi di sopravvivenza - la presenza di segni e sintomi (mastocitomi ulcerati, edema, vomito diarrea melena) sono associati a prognosi meno favorevole. Tuttavia in analisi multivariata solo la presenza di segni/sintomi si associa in modo statisticamente significativo a tempi di sopravvivenza ridotti. In un recente studio4 una corposa analisi statistica consente di osservare sia in analisi univariata che in analisi multivariata i seguenti fattori di rischio: - la localizzazione agli arti sembra avere un valore protettivo anche se in funzione della Hazard Ratio riportato il dato sembra instabile forse per la bassa numerosità del

469


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 470

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

campione pertanto questo fattore prognostico dovrebbe essere considerato poco nella pratica clinica - il grado istologico III ha una prognosi decisamente infausta - il trattamento con vinblastina + lomustina è stato associato fortemente con una prognosi meno favorevole ma questo risultato è fortemente inficiato dal fatto che i pazienti che il clinico ha incluso nel protocollo chemioterapico erano i pazienti sintomatici o quelli che avevano mastocitomi con comportamento clinico più agressivo; pertanto questo risultato non deve essere tradotto in “la chemioterapia peggiora la prognosi”. Infatti vedremo più avanti che pazienti con mastocitoma multiplo sottoposti chemioterapia, in particolare vinblastina + lomustina, hanno tempi di sopravvivenza statisticamente più lunghi. Sempre in questo studio altre variabili si sono rilevate avere un influenza sul tempo di sopravvivenza putroppo però solo in analisi univariata. Queste variabili sono: - le dimensioni superiori a tre centimetri sono state associate a prognosi meno favorevole. La significatività statistica osservata nell’analisi univariata non si ripete in analisi multivariata probabilmente perché la categorizzazione scelta (minore di 3 centimetri contro maggiore di 3 centimetri) non consente un’adeguata interpretazione statistica del dato. In questo caso un’analisi su scala continua avrebbe consentito di conoscere l’impatto prognostico della dimensione per ogni centimetro di aumento di dimensione. - indice mitotico (≥5-10 hpf) i tempi di sopravvivenza si contraggono - la recidiva locale (ripresentazione del mastocitoma entro i 2 centimetri da dove era insorto prima del trattamento chirurgico/chemioterapico/radioterapico) è un fattore prognostico fortemente negativo. - la presenza di metastasi al linfonodo regionale e le metastasi a distanza (milza e fegato) sono associate a prognosi sfavorevole. Il valore prognostico della recidiva locale, dei secondarismi al linfonodo regionale e a distanza sono del tutto sovrapponibili a quelli dei mastocitomi a presentazione singola. Relativamente alle scelte terapeutiche è stato osservato che i pazienti che ricevono un trattamento sia esso chirurgico, radioterapico o chemioterapico hanno comunque un aumento statisticamente significativo dei tempi di sopravvivenza rispetto ai cani che non ricevono alcun trattamento. Relativamente alla chemioterapia nel dettaglio il protocollo con maggiore influenza sui tempi di sopravvivenza si è rilevato essere quello combinato con vinblastina in associazione con lomustina mentre l’impiego degli inibitori tirosinchinasici seppur utilizzati in un limitato numero di cani ha dimostrato una tendenza statisticamente significativa all’aumento del tempo di sopravvivenza.4 Con diagnosi citologica di mastocitoma e presentazione clinica multipla contemporanea/simultanea è sempre consigliato eseguire una stadiazione clinica pretrattamento, che consenta di rilevare tutti i fattori prognostici clinici e patologici indispensabili alla formulazione della terapia e della prognosi. 2-4 Questi sono:

-

numero di mastocitomi multipli in quanto pur non condizionando la prognosi possono influenzare la scelta terapeutica (chemioterapia senza chirurgia). - presenza di segni e sintomi sistemici (ulcerazioni edemi, vomito e diarrea, melena) perché è oltre a essere una variabile clinica con impatto prognostico rendono più complicata la gestione clinica - evidenziare linfoadenomegalie che andrebbero sottoposte a campionamento (se i linfonodi non sono clinicamente aggredibili avvalersi ove possibile della diagnostica per immagini) - dimensioni del/dei mastocitomi: misurare il diametro di ogni singolo mastocitoma (mastocitomi superiori ai 3 centimetri hanno una prognosi meno favorevole) - eseguire una ricerca delle metastasi a distanza per escludere le metastasi viscerali che hanno una prognosi sfavorevole (soprattutto se ci troviamo di fronte a mastocitomi con recidiva locale e con metastasi linfonodale), indagando con prelievi citologici milza, fegato (indipendentemente dalla loro presentazione ultrasonografica) e di midollo osseo come recentemente suggerito.9-11 Alcuni fattori prognostici possono invece essere disponibili al clinico secondariamente ad una valutazione istopatologica. In questo caso le variabili istopatologiche con impatto prognostico che influenzano le scelte dei trattamenti postchirurgici e ovviamente la prognosi andrebbero esplicitatamente riportati nel referto istopatologico: - terzo grado istologico. Nei mastocitomi multipli in presenza di mastocitomi di terzo grado anche se in un singolo mastocitoma questo condiziona la prognosi dell’intero paziente.8,12 - indice mitotico (≥5-10 high for field).4,12 La tipologia dei margini di escissione (liberi da cellule neoplastiche, liberi ma esigui, infiltrati). sembra essere un fattore prognostico negativo per il tempo di sopravvivenza nello studio di Mullins et al 2006 mentre non lo sono sia in analisi univariata che in multivariata nello studio di O’Collins et al 2011.Si ricorda tuttavia che il rischio di recidiva è maggiore con margini infiltrati e che la recidiva locale è di per se un fattore prognistico negativo anche nei mastocitomi multipli. Le scelte terapeutiche per il mastocitoma multiplo dipendono dalla stadiazione clinica, dalla presenza di fattori prognostici negativi individuati sia nel corso della visita clinica, sia nella anamnesi, sia nella stadiazione e nella tipologia di presentazione clinica (contemporanei e non contemporanei). Opzione chirurgica. I cani con mastocitomi multipli che possono usufruire di questa opzione sono ovviamente i mastocitomi multipli non contemporanei, quelli in cui: sono state escluse la presenza di metastasi a distanza, non siano presenti contemporaneamente presenti più di 6 mastocitomi, non ci siano recidive locali con secondarismo cutaneo multiplo.2-4 Rispetto al numero di mastocitomi multipli contemporanei è ragionevole valutare comunque l’impatto della chirurgia sul paziente in funzione della sede e delle dimensioni dei singoli mastocitomi e sulla reale possibilità di non incorrere in una escissione marginale. L’opzione chirurgica con intento palliativo può tavolta essere considerata in pazienti con mastocitomi multipli inizialmente valutati

470


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 471

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

come non chirurgici, per aiutare a migliorare la qualità di vita del paziente (ad esempio: singolo mastocitoma ulcerato sanguinante con segni di Darrier positivi) in associazione a terapie complementari come la chemioterapia e la radioterapia. Va sottolineato che il trattamento chirurgico dei mastocitomi multipli ha comunque dei limiti: elimina solo i mastocitomi macroscopiamente individuabili e non ha alcun valore protettivo sulla formazione di nuovi mastocitomi. Queste informazioni vanno sempre chiaramente espresse al proprietario prima dell’inclusione nel piano terapeutico. Opzione chemioterapica. Rientrano in questa tipologia di pazienti i cani con metastasi a distanza, pazienti non chirurgici (dimensione dei mastocitomi, numero di mastocitomi), pazienti che dopo chirurgia e istologia hanno fattori istopatologici negativi (grado istologico, indice mitotico, qualità dei margini di escissione) e pazienti con metastasi al linfonodo regionale. I protocolli chemioterapici più riportati in letteratura sono: vinbalstina + prednisone, vinbalstina + ciclofosfamide + prednisone, vinblastina + prednisone + lomustina, lomustina da sola e clorambucile + cortisone.13-17 L’utilizzo della chemioterapia nel trattamento del mastocitoma multiplo si è rilevata efficace tuttavia non è disponibile una stratificazione in funzione dello stadio clinico o meglio non sono disponibili dati su mastocitomi multipli trattati solo ed esclusivamente con chemioterapia. Infatti sono spesso riportati studi in cui la chemioterapia è stata somministrata nel setting postoperatorio (margini infiltrati, terzo grado istologico elevato, indice mitotico elevato), tanto che il suo utilizzo come protocollo di salvataggio o in aiuto alla chirurgia, e quindi applicato ad una popolazione selezionata di pazienti, risulta nell’analisi statistica riportata nello studio di O’Collins 2011 come un fattore prognostico negativo. Come già accenato questo è un confondimento dovuto alle scelte del clinico. Tuttavia in questo studio il protocollo di chemioterapia con maggior influenza positiva sul tempo di sopravvivenza si è rilevato essere la combinazione di vinblastina e lomustina.4 Pur non disponendo di dati oggettivi la chemioterapia potrebbe rappresentare l’unico presidio antiblastico da utilizzare in mastocitomi multipli contemporanei (>6) anche in assenza di secondarismi loco-regionali e a distanza. In questa tipologia specifica di pazienti il protocolli chemioterapici tradizionali svolgono sicuramente un azione di contrasto che tuttavia deve confrontarsi con la sua incapacità di eradicare completamente la malattia oncologica e con la necessità di favorire una somministrazione prolungata nel tempo o nella necessità del ripetersi in cicli di chemioterapia nell’arco della vita. Infatti non esistono dati relativi al controllo della malattia e al tempo medio di sopravvivenza di cani con mastocitomi multipli contemporanei non chirurgici e di stadio III senza linfonodo positivo trattati con sola chemioterapia, anche se nell’esperienza dell’autore si evidenzia sempre più spesso un contenimento della malattia (cosidetta malattia stabile) e non una cura per mezzo di trattamenti chemioterapici con somministrazione prolungata. Nel caso di trattamenti cronici è importante valutare non solo la malattia cutanea per giudicare il risultato terapeutico ma monitorare anche l’assenza di secondarismi a distanza mediante ecogra-

fia addominale associata a citologie ecoguidate, citologie del midollo osseo, radiogramma diretti del torace e ove necessario tomografie computerizzate a raggi X e risonanza magnetica. Poca esperienza è al momento disponibile relativa al trattamento dei mastocitomi multipli con inibitori tirosinchinasici (masitinib e toceranib)4,18,19 anche se i risultati disponibili dimostrano un’ottima capacità di mantenere la malattia stabile, risultato tutt’altro che insoddisfacente in una malattia che può avere un andamento cronico e progressivo. Si rammenta inoltre che l’azione dei chemioterapici tradizionali, rispetto alle terapie bersaglio, sembrano non avere alcun ruolo preventivo sulla formazione di nuovi mastocitomi, attività invece potenzialmente possibile per gli inibitori delle tirosin chinasi, soprattutto nelle fasi inizialissime della trasformazione neoplastica dei mastociti. Infine limitatissimi risultati sono disponibili in letteratura circa l’influenza della radioterapia sul tempo di sopravvivenza dei cani con mastocitomi multipli contemporanei dove spesso l’applicazione è in associazione alla chemioterapia e come protocollo di salvataggio. Il suo ruolo terapeutico non è comunque da ascrivere solo a pazienti terminali e il suo utilizzo per mastocitomi multipli poco responsivi alla chemioterapia va tenuto in debita considerazione. Concludendo il mastocitoma multiplo ha generalemente una prognosi favorevole soprattutto in assenza di fattori prognostici negativi. La terapia chirurgia verificata la sua fattibilità sembra essere quella più impiegata e quella più dotata di potere terapeutico soprattutto in associazione alla chemioterapia. Nei casi in cui la chemioterapia sia l’unica opzione terapeutica disponibile bisogna valutare con attenzione la sua efficacia terapeutica, la sua durata e la possibile ricaduta sul paziente soprattutto per periodi di somministrazione prolungati di prodotti antiblastici sia di nuova e vecchia generazione.20

CITAZIONI BIBLIOGRAFICHE 1.

2.

3.

4.

5. 6.

7.

471

Kiupel M, Webster JD, Miller RA et al.,(2005), Impact of tumour depth, tumour location and multiple synchronous masses on the prognosis of canine cutaneous mast cell tumours. Vet Med A Physiol Pathol Clin Med, 52: 280–286. Murphy S, Sparkes AH, Blunden AS, et al., (2006), Effects of stage and number of tumours on prognosis of dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumours, Veterinary Record, 158: 287–291. Mullins MN, Dernell WS, Withrow SJ, et al., (2006), Evaluation of prognostic factors associated with outcome in dogs with multiple cutaneous mast cell tumors treated with surgery with and without adjuvant treatment: 54 cases (1998–2004), J Am Vet Med Assoc, 228:91–95 O’Connell K, Thomson M, (2011), Evaluation of prognostic indicators in dogs with multiple, simultaneously occurring cutaneous mast cell tumours: 63 cases, Vet Comp Oncol doi: 10.1111/j.14765829.2011.00301.x Owen LN, ed. (1980),TNM Classification of Tumours in Domestic Animals, 1st ed. Geneva, World Health Organization,14–15. Thamm DH, Vail DM, (2007), Mast cell tumors. In: Withrow SJ,MacEwen EG, eds. Small Animal Clinical Oncology, 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA, WB Saunders Co, 402–424. Zavodovskaya R, Chien MB, London CA, (2004), Use of kit internal tandem duplications to establish mast cell tumor clonality in 2 dogs, J Vet Intern Med,18:915-917.


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 472

73° Congresso Internazionale Multisala SCIVAC

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

Patnaik AK, Ehler WJ, MacEwen EG, (1984), Canine cutaneous mast cell tumor: Morphologic grading and survival time in 83 dogs, Vet Pathol, 21:469–474. Marconato L, Bettini G, Giacoboni C, et al., (2008), Clinicopathological features and outcome for dogs with mast cell tumors and bone marrow involvement, J Vet Intern Med, 22:1001–1007. Stefanello D, Valenti P, Faverzani S, et al., (2009), Ultrasound-guided cytology of spleen and liver: a prognostic tool in canine cutaneous mast cell tumor, J Vet Intern Med, 23:1051-1057. Book AP, Fidel J, Wills T, et al.,(2011), Correlation of ultrasound findings, liver and spleen cytology, and prognosis in the clinical staging of high metastatic risk canine mast cell tumors, Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 52:548-54. Kiupel M, Webster JD, Bailey KL et al.,(2011), Proposal of a 2-tier histologic grading system for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors to more accurately predict biological behaviour, Vet Pathol, 48:147-55. Thamm DH, Mauldin EA, Vail DM, (2006), Outcome and prognostic factors following adjuvant prednisone/vinblastine chemotherapy for high risk canine mast cell tumor: 61 cases, J Vet Med Sci, 68: 581–587. Cooper M, Tsai X, Bennett P, (2007), Combination CCNU and vinblastine chemotherapy for canine mast cell tumour:57 cases, Vet Comp Oncol, 7:196-206. Camps-PalauMA, LeibmanNF, ElmslieR, et al., (2007), Treatment of canine mast cell tumours with vinblastine, cyclophosphamide and prednisone: 35 cases (1997–2004), Vet Comp Oncol, 5:156–167. Rassnick KM, Moore AS, Williams LE, et al., (1999), Treatment of

17.

18.

19.

20.

canine mast cell tumors with CCNU (lomustine), J Vet Intern Med, 13:601-605. Taylor F, Gear R, Hoather T, Dobson J, (2009), Chlorambucil and prednisolone chemotherapy for dogs with inoperable mast cell tumours: 21 cases, J Small Anim Pract, 50:284-289. Hahn KA, Legendre AM, Shaw NG, et al., (2010), Evaluation of 12and 24-month survival rates after treatment with masitinib in dogs with nonresectable mast cell tumors, Am J Vet Res, 71:1354-1361. London CA, Malpas PB, Wood-Follis SL et al., (2009), Multi-center, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized study of oral toceranib phosphate (SU11654), a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for the treatment of dogs with recurrent (either local or distant) mast cell tumor following surgical excision, Clin Cancer Res, 15:3856-3865. Rassnick KM, Bailey DB, Russell DS, et al., (2010), A phase II study to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of alternating CCNU and highdose vinblastine and prednisone (CVP) for treatment of dogs with high-grade, metastatic or nonresectable mast cell tumours, Vet Comp Oncol, 8:138-152.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Damiano Stefanello - Ricercatore Dipartimento di Scienze Veterinarie e Sanità Pubblica (DIVET) Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Milano E-mail: damiano.stefanello@unimi.it

472


01_Atti_73_SCIVAC_ok:Atti_73_SCIVAC

29-05-2012

8:46

Pagina 473

73° CONGRESSO INTERNAZIONALE MULTISALA SCIVAC RIMINI, 8-10 GIUGNO 2012

Profilassi della Filariosi cardiopolmonare. Vecchi miti e nuove leggende. Cosa c’è di nuovo? Luigi Venco DMV, SCPA, Dipl EVPC, Pavia

Dal 1987 anno di introduzione sul mercato del primo lattone macrociclico la chemioprofilassi della Filariosi cardiopolmonare ha subito una svolta. Ad oggi, in considerazione dell’elevata pressione dell’ospite intermedio, della selezione (Culex pipiens) o nuova introduzione (Aedes albopictus) di diverse specie di zanzare e della vasta popolazione canina non ancora sottoposta a prevenzione, tuttavia la parassitosi si sta ancora diffondendo sia in termini di prevalenza sia in acquisizione di areali storicamente indenni. Il trattamento preventivo basato somministrazione di lattoni macrociclici ha valenza essenziale per il cane, reservoir del parassita, ma anche per il gatto, ospite suscettibile ma non ideale di D. immitis nel quale la diagnosi è difficoltosa e non esiste una valida terapia, ed in cui una riduzione in termini di preva-

lenza dell’infestazione nel reservoir si trasformerebbe in una evidente riduzione del rischio. La possibilità di utilizzare molecole, o loro associazioni, ad ampio spettro consente oggi al medico veterinario di perseguire molteplici scopi (oltre a quello profilattico nei confronti di D. immitis) nella battaglia verso parassiti e malattie da essi indotte pericolose per la salute ed il benessere animale.

Indirizzo per la corrispondenza: Luigi Venco Ospedale veterinario Città di Pavia Viale Cremona 179, 27100 Pavia E-mail: lui