Page 1

Eve Nnaji

Portfolio 2011-2013

” iin anyy other other th country t y the th oriigina gina i l ones are are usefu usefu f l tto con conside side id r as example pl s off poe poetry t y iin archi hitect t ture. tect ure The ure. They ar aree no nott sttrict rict i tllyy speak peakking i g arch hitec it ture t b t hav but h eb been absor absor b bed b d into i t the th dis di cipl ipline i tto such ine had degree gree tha th t the the ffactt that that h t they th y are gar gardens gardens d alm l ostt pass passed passed d me b byyy. hey off h ffer ff er a vie view i w off the h wor world ld tthat h iis rrelatively hat elat l ivel i ly easy easy to to see see and and th that hat can hat can b bee ag agreed reed d on as poeti p poetic. oetiic. Th Thee garde ggardens arde d ns visua vvisualise i lise isua l and li d enr enrich i h the ich h idea id d tha that h t al all ll life lliffe and and d all all things thing h s are hi are part part of of a greater greater whole whol h le le and and that th hat existing hat exist exist i ing i harmoniously h harm onio i usly l wit within i hin h this hi h wor hi world ld iiss a goall to stri strive ive ffor.M or.M ture, ne tture, near, ar,, far, f , lar llarge ge and ge and d ssmall, mall ll,, in ll i such such a powerful powerful powe f l wayy that th tha h t the th he world world ld does d appear app ppear harm h harmonious. onio i us. us The The d dest destabilizing tabil billizin b lizin i i g off rel relationships latio ti nshi h ps hi ps tthrough h gh hrou gh tthe he p h placement l mentt off thin lace thi things h gs gs iin n relati re relation llati tion tto o each each ho other.Th th ther h .Th The diff The d ffere fferent erentt types typ types off gardens gard gard dens use diff d fferen fferent erent devices d device i s to t achieve ach hieve i nott the th h saa fforms orms near near and and ffa farr sh share hare form fformal all q qualities uali lities li ti and ties d are pla p placed llaced d nextt to t each h other. oth ther. th er One O coul could ld sa sayy th they eyy show show h you you the th grai ggrain raiin off sand sand iin the th wor world.Th ld The The K Kare-sansui are-sans are sansuii ggardens arde d ns creat ccreate reatte th thee same same view view i off a con connect connected nectted dw world orld ld thr th through ough gh mak making king i g the th worl world ld ap appear ppear pear in i a ggrain grain i off sand. sand. and d O h poetry poetr oetryy further ffurthe h r attention attent attent tention i produce ion prod prod duce further f her furt h dept d depths. p hs. h Re-e hs Re R Re-encountering encou ncounter ntering i g the h “poe ““poem” poem” poe m” eeven ven if it it remain re remains main i s iin the h sam samee p po positi position siti i ion on h has as tthe he p h potential otential oten tial i l to off offe ffer er ne new w vi views iews and d new experiences. experien expe p rien i ces. ces Th Thee fi film fil lm lm direct di director rector rect or Andrei Andre d iT Ta Tarkovskij rkov k skij kijj use used d th the hee d de devices vice i s off the h Jap JJapanese panese gga garden gardens rden d s iin h e — an an extrem ex extreme t trem e versio ve version rsio i n off Sha Sh Shakkei. kk i. Th kkei There ere is i a sen sense se of of ha harmony h rmon rmonyy when wh hen panning panniing tthe panni he sscenery h cenery cene ry but butt in in the the context contex contex t t off the th fil film film lm this thiis ggarden arde d n seem seem created creatted creat do out utt o off a desperate d eratte sense desp sense off disharmony. disha disha i h rmon rmony. y Where Where h in i Japan J n the Japa the gardens garden garden d s reveal reveall the th nature natture off the th he world, world ld, in i Tarkovskis T kovs Tar k kii ussions abo ussions u about ut tthe he poeti p poetic oeticc authorship authorship author ship app appear ear agai again n an and d ag again ain as the the key key to to poetry po poetry. etry. Withou Wi Without thoutt the the concio co concious ncious us autho aauthor, uthor, r they they ask, ask how can there there be be me meaning? meanin aning? g? If If poetry poetry is cons consider considered idered ed not not to to convey convey a precise preci precise se meaning meaning meani ng but but to to create create a place place from from where where certain certain things things can can b bee mee partt in i how h it is is a ruin ruin. i . It als also l o ha h hass a process ess off b becoming ecomi a ru ruin i that th t play plays l s so some partt iin h how ow iitt is i a rruin. i Wha Wh What h t th the he ru ruin i u used sed d tto b bee is i nev never ffully ully ll forgotten f gott for tten en some ffain faint i t traces ttraces off its it qualities quallitie iti s as a building build ild lding i remain remai regardless regar egardles dl s off how h fragmented f gmen fra gmented t d the th h remains remai are. Ru R Rui u result is that rresult that the ofte ofteen often n carica ca caricature ricature rica ture like like view view of of history, hi histor story, stor y where where cus customs toms and clo clothes thes obs obscure cure the fac factt that that they they were lik likee you, you is is brushe br brushed ushed ushe d as aside ide for a person pe personal rsonal rson al communication ccommu ommunica ommu nication nica tion wit with h people people tha thatt ne never ver exis existed. ted The The phy physica physical sicall presen sica pr presence esence esen ce of of th thee ru ruin, in whet whether her ten or thous tthousan housan hous an n alse lse when compared to abandoned buildings. Although I have never visited Japan or even experienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in architecture. They are not s them to achieve what could well be impossible for architecture. What makes them useful as examples of poetry in the context of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visu visua ed a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in architecture. They are not strictly speaking architecture but have been absorbed into the discipline to such a degree that the fa ve what could well be impossible for architecture. What makes them useful as examples of poetry in the context of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visualise and enrich in this world is a goal to strive for.My understanding of the Japanese rock and stroll gardens is that they are designed to be a foreground to meditation. Many of the devices used work with the relationships between man, nature, near, far, large and small, in su through the placement of things in relation to each other.The different types of gardens use different devices to achieve not the same effect but the same view of the world.In Shakkei gardens it is achieved through the bringing into the garden of elements well s and are placed next to each other. One could say they show you the grain of sand in the world.The Kare-sansui gardens create the same view of a connected world through making the world appear in a grain of sand. Or rather a collection of rocks. Small thi ditation, a repetitive act. As should be the case with poetry further attention produce further depths. Re-encountering the “poem” even if it remains in the same position has the potential to offer new views and new experiences. The film director Andrei Tark house of the madman Domenico is partially filled with moss and water that through an opening in the wall blend into the vast landscape outside — an extreme version of Shakkei. There is a sense of harmony when panning the scenery but in the context of the dens reveal the nature of the world, in Tarkovskis film the landscape is how the creator wants the world to be but is not.Most architecture has many authors and is created through a process with many external pressures. Discussions about the poetic authorsh n there be meaning? If poetry is considered not to convey a precise meaning but to create a place from where certain things can be seen in ways they cannot be seen from where you initially stand many processes are capable of poetry. An example of this is the ocess of becoming a ruin that plays some part in how it is a ruin. What the ruin used to be is never fully forgotten some faint traces of its qualities as a building remain regardless of how fragmented the remains are. Ruins are full of memories you never had. Th h your very personal experiences of life. The result is that the often caricature like view of history, where customs and clothes obscure the fact that they were like you, is brushed aside for a personal communication with people that never existed. The physical p wer. Objects as seen in museums or maybe as found can tickle the nerve the ruin grabs and pulls. Abandoned objects are intimate but false when compared to abandoned buildings. Although I have never visited Japan or even experienced a pale reproduction o mples of poetry in architecture. They are not strictly speaking architecture but have been absorbed into the discipline to such a degree that the fact that they are gardens almost passed me by. That they are indeed gardens enables them to achieve what could we t of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visualise and enrich the idea that all life and all things are part of a greater whole and that existing harmoniously within this world ave never visited Japan or even experienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in architecture. They are not strictly speaking architecture but have been absorbed into such a degree that the fact that they are gardens almost passed me by. That they are indeed gardens enables them to achieve what could well be impossible for architecture. What makes them useful as examples of poetry in the context of this essay is that they o hat is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visualise and enrich the idea that all life and all things are part of a greater whole and that existing harmoniously within this world is a goal to strive for.My understanding of the Japa dens is that they are designed to be a foreground to meditation. Many of the devices used work with the relationships between man, nature, near, far, large and small, in such a powerful way that the world does appear harmonious. The destabilizing of relation placement of things in relation to each other.The different types of gardens use different devices to achieve not the same effect but the same view of the world.In Shakkei gardens it is achieved through the bringing into the garden of elements well beyond its re ng. The scales and forms near and far share formal qualities and are placed next to each other. One could say they show you the grain of sand in the world.The Kare-sansui gardens create the same view of a connected world through making the world appear i er a collection of rocks. Small things are endowed with the qualities and depth of the very large.The gardens are deigned for meditation, a repetitive act. As should be the case with poetry further attention produce further depths. Re-encountering the “poem” e same position has the potential to offer new views and new experiences. The film director Andrei Tarkovskij used the devices of the Japanese gardens in his films but created a different result. The house of the madman Domenico is partially filled with moss an opening in the wall blend into the vast landscape outside — an extreme version of Shakkei. There is a sense of harmony when panning the scenery but in the context of the film this garden seem created out of a desperate sense of disharmony. Where in Jap al the nature of the world, in Tarkovskis film the landscape is how the creator wants the world to be but is not.Most architecture has many authors and is created through a process with many external pressures. Discussions about the poetic authorship appear ey to poetry. Without the concious author, they ask, how can there be meaning? If poetry is considered not to convey a precise meaning but to create a place from where certain things can be seen in ways they cannot be seen from where you initially stand m f poetry. An example of this is the ruin, which has a past as a building. That past plays some part in how it is a ruin. It also has a process of becoming a ruin that plays some part in how it is a ruin. What the ruin used to be is never fully forgotten some faint tra building remain regardless of how fragmented the remains are. Ruins are full of memories you never had. They make your vague and often superficial ideas about life at the approximate time of use mix with your very personal experiences of life. The result is ure like view of history, where customs and clothes obscure the fact that they were like you, is brushed aside for a personal communication with people that never existed. The physical presence of the ruin, whether ten or thousand years old, is a cultual artefac ts as seen in museums or maybe as found can tickle the nerve the ruin grabs and pulls. Abandoned objects are intimate but false when compared to abandoned buildings. Although I have never visited Japan or even experienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in architecture. They are not strictly speaking architecture but have been absorbed into the discipline to such a degree that the fact that they are gardens almost passed me by. That they are i les them to achieve what could well be impossible for architecture. What makes them useful as examples of poetry in the context of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens vis ea that all life and all things are part of a greater whole and that existing harmoniously within this world is a goal to strive for.My understanding of the Japanese rock and stroll gardens is that they are designed to be a foreground to meditation. Many of the dev e relationships between man, nature, near, far, large and small, in such a powerful way that the world does appear harmonious. The destabilizing of relationships through the placement of things in relation to each other.The different types of gardens use differ t the same effect but the same view of the world.In Shakkei gardens it is achieved through the bringing into the garden of elements well beyond its reach through careful framing. The scales and forms near and far share formal qualities and are placed next to e y they show you the grain of sand in the world.The Kare-sansui gardens create the same view of a connected world through making the world appear in a grain of sand. Or rather a collection of rocks. Small things are endowed with the qualities and depth of t dens are deigned for meditation, a repetitive act. As should be the case with poetry further attention produce further depths. Re-encountering the “poem” even if it remains in the same position has the potential to offer new views and new experiences. The fil vskij used the devices of the Japanese gardens in his films but created a different result. The house of the madman Domenico is partially filled with moss and water that through an opening in the wall blend into the vast landscape outside — an extreme versio se of harmony when panning the scenery but in the context of the film this garden seem created out of a desperate sense of disharmony. Where in Japan the gardens reveal the nature of the world, in Tarkovskis film the landscape is how the creator wants the w st architecture has many authors and is created through a process with many external pressures. Discussions about the poetic authorship appear again and again as the key to poetry. Without the concious author, they ask, how can there be meaning? If poetry ot to convey a precise meaning but to create a place from where certain things can be seen in ways they cannot be seen from where you initially stand many processes are capable of poetry. An example of this is the ruin, which has a past as a building. That pa t is a ruin. It also has a process of becoming a ruin that plays some part in how it is a ruin. What the ruin used to be is never fully forgotten some faint traces of its qualities as a building remain regardless of how fragmented the remains are. Ruins are full of m They make your vague and often superficial ideas about life at the approximate time of use mix with your very personal experiences of life. The result is that the often caricature like view of history, where customs and clothes obscure the fact that they were like y e for a personal communication with people that never existed. The physical presence of the ruin, whether ten or thousand years old, is a cultual artefact of unusual power. Objects as seen in museums or maybe as found can tickle the nerve the ruin grabs and bjects are intimate but false when compared to abandoned buildings. Although I have never visited Japan or even experienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in a strictly speaking architecture but have been absorbed into the discipline to such a degree that the fact that they are gardens almost passed me by. That they are indeed gardens enables them to achieve what could well be impossible for architecture. What make mples of poetry in the context of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visualise and enrich the idea that all life and all things are part of a greater whole and that existing har orld is a goal to strive for.My understanding of the Japanese rock and stroll gardens is that they are designed to be a foreground to meditation. Many of the devices used work with the relationships between man, nature, near, far, large and small, in such a pow d does appear harmonious. The destabilizing of relationships through the placement of things in relation to each other.The different types of gardens use different devices to achieve not the same effect but the same view of the world.In Shakkei gardens it is ach bringing into the garden of elements well beyond its reach through careful framing. The scales and forms near and far share formal qualities and are placed next to each other. One could say they show you the grain of sand in the world.The Kare-sansui garden a connected world through making the world appear in a grain of sand. Or rather a collection of rocks. Small things are endowed with the qualities and depth of the very large.The gardens are deigned for meditation, a repetitive act. As should be the case with ion produce further depths. Re-encountering the “poem” even if it remains in the same position has the potential to offer new views and new experiences. The film director Andrei Tarkovskij used the devices of the Japanese gardens in his films but created a d ouse of the madman Domenico is partially filled with moss and water that through an opening in the wall blend into the vast landscape outside — an extreme version of Shakkei. There is a sense of harmony when panning the scenery but in the context of the created out of a desperate sense of disharmony. Where in Japan the gardens reveal the nature of the world, in Tarkovskis film the landscape is how the creator wants the world to be but is not.Most architecture has many authors and is created through a proces sures. Discussions about the poetic authorship appear again and again as the key to poetry. Without the concious author, they ask, how can there be meaning? If poetry is considered not to convey a precise meaning but to create a place from where certain thi they cannot be seen from where you initially stand many processes are capable of poetry. An example of this is the ruin, which has a past as a building. That past plays some part in how it is a ruin. It also has a process of becoming a ruin that plays some part i he ruin used to be is never fully forgotten some faint traces of its qualities as a building remain regardless of how fragmented the remains are. Ruins are full of memories you never had. They make your vague and often superficial ideas about life at the approxi your very personal experiences of life. The result is that the often caricature like view of history, where customs and clothes obscure the fact that they were like you, is brushed aside for a personal communication with people that never existed. The physical pr ther ten or thousand years old, is a cultual artefact of unusual power. Objects as seen in museums or maybe as found can tickle the nerve the ruin grabs and pulls. Abandoned objects are intimate but false when compared to abandoned buildings. Although I h or even experienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in architecture. They are not strictly speaking architecture but have been absorbed into the discipline to such a


Fall 201

en experienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in architec ipline to such a degree that the fact that they are gardens almost passed me by. That they are indeed gardens enables them to achieve what could well be i context of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visualise and enric oniously within this world is a goal to strive for.My understanding of the Japanese rock and stroll gardens is that they are designed to be a foreground to re, near, far, large and small, in such a powerful way that the world does appear harmonious. The destabilizing of relationships through the placement of chieve not the same effect but the same view of the world.In Shakkei gardens it is achieved through the bringing into the garden of elements well beyond al qualities and are placed next to each other. One could say they show you the grain of sand in the world.The Kare-sansui gardens create the same view o r a collection of rocks. Small things are endowed with the qualities and depth of the very large.The gardens are deigned for meditation, a repetitive act. As ountering the “poem” even if it remains in the same position has the potential to offer new views and new experiences. The film director Andrei Tarkovsk The house of the madman Domenico is partially filled with moss and water that through an opening in the wall blend into the vast landscape outside — ery but in the context of the film this garden seem created out of a desperate sense of disharmony. Where in Japan the gardens reveal the nature of the w ot.Most architecture has many authors and is created through a process with many external pressures. Discussions about the poetic authorship appear ag ere be meaning? If poetry is considered not to convey a precise meaning but to create a place from where certain things can be seen in ways they cannot ple of this is the ruin, which has a past as a building. That past plays some part in how it is a ruin. It also has a process of becoming a ruin that plays some races of its qualities as a building remain regardless of how fragmented the remains are. Ruins are full of memories you never had. They make your vague ery personal experiences of life. The result is that the often caricature like view of history, where customs and clothes obscure the fact that they were like y e physical presence of the ruin, whether ten or thousand years old, is a cultual artefact of unusual power. Objects as seen in museums or maybe as foun


The Playful House

PROJECT1

Built to accompany the needs of a single woman, the house has a detached garage, exterior gathering space, 1 bed, 1 bath, a study, kitchen, and living room. The orientation is dictated by wind, sun, and site surroundings while the design is driven by the word ‘playful.’ The house is tilted so that the larger facade faces the south and the roof is designed to promote maximum wind circulation. Coming through the front gate, the garage flows onto the roof of the second floor and drives up to the main roof which curves and leads down to the exterior space cut out of the hill. This flowing nature of the house is carried through the interior and the exterior with level changes, secret enclosures, and playful curves.


3 1 1. Exagerrated dimensions confuse the sense of scale 2. Change of levels promote an active experience 3. Shape juxtapositions break the rules of perfection

Concepts

2

1

2

3


Spring 2012

even experienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in archit iscipline to such a degree that the fact that they are gardens almost passed me by. That they are indeed gardens enables them to achieve what could well b he context of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visualise and enr rmoniously within this world is a goal to strive for.My understanding of the Japanese rock and stroll gardens is that they are designed to be a foreground t ature, near, far, large and small, in such a powerful way that the world does appear harmonious. The destabilizing of relationships through the placement o achieve not the same effect but the same view of the world.In Shakkei gardens it is achieved through the bringing into the garden of elements well beyo mal qualities and are placed next to each other. One could say they show you the grain of sand in the world.The Kare-sansui gardens create the same vie her a collection of rocks. Small things are endowed with the qualities and depth of the very large.The gardens are deigned for meditation, a repetitive act. ncountering the “poem” even if it remains in the same position has the potential to offer new views and new experiences. The film director Andrei Tarko lt. The house of the madman Domenico is partially filled with moss and water that through an opening in the wall blend into the vast landscape outside cenery but in the context of the film this garden seem created out of a desperate sense of disharmony. Where in Japan the gardens reveal the nature of the s not.Most architecture has many authors and is created through a process with many external pressures. Discussions about the poetic authorship appear there be meaning? If poetry is considered not to convey a precise meaning but to create a place from where certain things can be seen in ways they cann ample of this is the ruin, which has a past as a building. That past plays some part in how it is a ruin. It also has a process of becoming a ruin that plays so t traces of its qualities as a building remain regardless of how fragmented the remains are. Ruins are full of memories you never had. They make your vag r very personal experiences of life. The result is that the often caricature like view of history, where customs and clothes obscure the fact that they were lik . The physical presence of the ruin, whether ten or thousand years old, is a cultual artefact of unusual power. Objects as seen in museums or maybe as fo


1 bedroom be edr room

Flower Shop

PROJECT2

3 stories st tor ries s

1 bathroom ba athr room study tud dy tc chen n kitchen dining nin ng living vin ng oof f ga ard den roof garden garage ara age e shop hop p


Fall 201

rienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in architecture. Th such a degree that the fact that they are gardens almost passed me by. That they are indeed gardens enables them to achieve what could well be impossib of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visualise and enrich the ide within this world is a goal to strive for.My understanding of the Japanese rock and stroll gardens is that they are designed to be a foreground to meditati , far, large and small, in such a powerful way that the world does appear harmonious. The destabilizing of relationships through the placement of things i ot the same effect but the same view of the world.In Shakkei gardens it is achieved through the bringing into the garden of elements well beyond its reac ies and are placed next to each other. One could say they show you the grain of sand in the world.The Kare-sansui gardens create the same view of a conn ction of rocks. Small things are endowed with the qualities and depth of the very large.The gardens are deigned for meditation, a repetitive act. As should g the “poem” even if it remains in the same position has the potential to offer new views and new experiences. The film director Andrei Tarkovskij used t se of the madman Domenico is partially filled with moss and water that through an opening in the wall blend into the vast landscape outside — an extre in the context of the film this garden seem created out of a desperate sense of disharmony. Where in Japan the gardens reveal the nature of the world, in architecture has many authors and is created through a process with many external pressures. Discussions about the poetic authorship appear again and eaning? If poetry is considered not to convey a precise meaning but to create a place from where certain things can be seen in ways they cannot be seen f is is the ruin, which has a past as a building. That past plays some part in how it is a ruin. It also has a process of becoming a ruin that plays some part in its qualities as a building remain regardless of how fragmented the remains are. Ruins are full of memories you never had. They make your vague and ofte onal experiences of life. The result is that the often caricature like view of history, where customs and clothes obscure the fact that they were like you, is br ical presence of the ruin, whether ten or thousand years old, is a cultual artefact of unusual power. Objects as seen in museums or maybe as found can tic


Indie Film School

PROJECT3

The school is located in the redesigned Culpepper Plaza. Green roofs provide large gathering spaces for the students in substitution of a floor plan without an atrium. The green roofs incorporate the theme of the plaza throughout the school. Indoor outdoor spaces are integrated into the school to let light into the building and provide a dynamic setting in a gridded floor plan. The school is organized in a way that it transitions from public to private with a gallery, restaurants, and a theater on the left and spaces specific for school practice on the right. The lobby is placed in the center and acts as a directional zone. The front of the school is lively with people eating outside and pedestrians departing from the transportation hub. The back of the school is the complete opposite to let pedestrians know that it is a private access area. A steel frame runs through the central flank of the school. The frame is in units composed of a 2-3 system. The units in 2 allow for expansion, creating social spaces, while the units in 3 allow for elongation, creating work spaces that can be added or


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

sound stage - 60x60ft

audio room - 18x10 ft PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIO

classrooms [4] - 40x40ft critique space [2] - 30x16ft

AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

pvc stage [2] - 30x60ft

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

video room - 30x16ft

audio control - 14x12ft

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

video control - 28x14ft

K EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

office [10] - 10x20ft

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODES

work space [48] - 6x6ft

film editing - 40x20ft P

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

store - 20x20

T

shop - 40x80

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


Film School

Indie


Spring 2013

or even experienced a pale reproduction of a “Zen style garden” in any other country the original ones are useful to consider as examples of poetry in ar e discipline to such a degree that the fact that they are gardens almost passed me by. That they are indeed gardens enables them to achieve what could wel n the context of this essay is that they offer a view of the world that is relatively easy to see and that can be agreed on as poetic. The gardens visualise and harmoniously within this world is a goal to strive for.My understanding of the Japanese rock and stroll gardens is that they are designed to be a foregroun , nature, near, far, large and small, in such a powerful way that the world does appear harmonious. The destabilizing of relationships through the placeme es to achieve not the same effect but the same view of the world.In Shakkei gardens it is achieved through the bringing into the garden of elements well be formal qualities and are placed next to each other. One could say they show you the grain of sand in the world.The Kare-sansui gardens create the same v rather a collection of rocks. Small things are endowed with the qualities and depth of the very large.The gardens are deigned for meditation, a repetitive a e-encountering the “poem” even if it remains in the same position has the potential to offer new views and new experiences. The film director Andrei Tar esult. The house of the madman Domenico is partially filled with moss and water that through an opening in the wall blend into the vast landscape outsid e scenery but in the context of the film this garden seem created out of a desperate sense of disharmony. Where in Japan the gardens reveal the nature of t t is not.Most architecture has many authors and is created through a process with many external pressures. Discussions about the poetic authorship appe can there be meaning? If poetry is considered not to convey a precise meaning but to create a place from where certain things can be seen in ways they ca example of this is the ruin, which has a past as a building. That past plays some part in how it is a ruin. It also has a process of becoming a ruin that plays aint traces of its qualities as a building remain regardless of how fragmented the remains are. Ruins are full of memories you never had. They make your v our very personal experiences of life. The result is that the often caricature like view of history, where customs and clothes obscure the fact that they were ted. The physical presence of the ruin, whether ten or thousand years old, is a cultual artefact of unusual power. Objects as seen in museums or maybe as


Portfolio  

A collection of my works from Freshman year to Sophomore year of my ongoing Texas A&M Architecture career

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